Dictionary: AC – ACD

• ​​A.C.
n. 2000s US prison sl. – Aryan Circle, A White supremacist prison gang 

• AC
conj. a1000 obs. – but
n. 1990s African-American sl. – the Acura Legend, a popular automobile 

• A.C.A.B.
phr. 1940s sl. – All Coppers Are Bastards; a popular tattoo in the UK, esp. among Hell’s Angels and other outlaw groups

• ACACY
n. Bk1731 obs. rare – innocence, guilelessness; a being free from malice

• ACADEME
n. 1. 1588 poetic usage – a place where the arts and sciences are taught; an institution for the study of higher learning; an academy 
n. 2. 1861 chiefly US – a member of a university or college, now spec. a senior member, a member of a university or college’s teaching or research staff 

• ACADEMIAL
adj. 1755 rare – relating to an educational institution or environment; concerned with the pursuit of research, education, and scholarship; educational, intellectual

• ACADEMIAN
n. 1593 – a member of an academy; an academic or academician; a student in a university or college

• ACADEMIC
n. 1. 1581 – a member of a university or college, now spec. a senior member, a member of a university or college’s teaching or research staff. also. in weakened sense, a person interested in or excelling at pursuits involving reading, thinking, and study
n. 2. 1728 rare – a member of an academy for the cultivation and promotion of literature and arts and sciences

• ACADEMICAL
n. 1656 – a member of an academy; a student in a university or college

• ACADEMICAL CLERK
n. 1857 – at certain colleges of Oxford University: a junior member of a college who receives an emolument in return for undertaking duties (esp. singing) in chapel

• ACADEMICIAN
n. 1. 1665 rare – a collegian; a student in a college or university
n. 2. 1668 – a member of an academy for the cultivation and promotion of literature, of arts and sciences
n. 3. c1760 UK sl. – a harlot; a prostitute; an inmate of an ‘academy’
n. 4. E19 sl. – a prisoner
n. 5. Bk1921 sl. – a thief

• ACADEMICIZE
vb. 1846 rare – to engage in academic discourse, thought, or analysis

• ACADEMIC OVERKILL
n. Bk1969 US Air Force Academy cadets’ sl. – the act of trying to teach cadets faster than they can forget

• ACADEMIST
n. 1. 1649 – a member of an academy for the cultivation and promotion of literature, of arts and sciences
n. 2. 1651 obs. rare – a pupil or instructor in a school for riding, etc.

• ACADEMITE
n. 1829 – a member of any various academies; esp. a member of the Royal Naval Academy at Portsmouth

• ACADEMIZE
vb. 1. 1848 obs. rare – to form an academy
vb. 2. 1868 – to bring under the influence or control of an academy; also, to make academic

• ACADEMY
n. 1. 1650 sl. obs. – a brothel; a bawdy house
n. 2. E18 sl. – a casino
n. 3. 18C sl. – a lunatic asylum
n. 4. 18C Eng. sl. – a rendezvous for thieves, harlots, or gamesters; a thieves’ school or gang
n. 5. E19 sl. – a prison
n. 6. 19C sl. – a billiard room
n. 7. Bk1921 sl. – a gang of thieves

• ACADEMY AWARD
adj. 1. 1958 US sl. – excellent
adj. 2. 1966 Aust. sl. – histrionic
n. 1958 US sl. – recognition of excelling in a field

• ACADEMY AWARD WINNING
adj. 1987 Aust. sl. – histrionic

• ACADEMY BUZZ-NAPPER 
n. 1890 criminals’ sl. obs. – an apprentice in the art of picking pockets; some schools use a dummy with bells in every pocket for practice picking 

• ACADEMY HEADACHE
n. c1880 Eng. sl. – one due to visiting exhibitions

• ACADIAN
adj. 1746 – native to Nova Scotia
n. 1. 1705 – a native or inhabitant of Acadia, a former French colony on the Atlantic seaboard of North America, which included the present Maritime Provinces of Canada (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island), or of the Maritime Provinces; spec. a French-speaking descendant of French settlers in Acadia
n. 2. 1776 – a Louisianan descended from inhabitants of Acadia expelled in 1755
n. 3. 1790 – a native of Nova Scotia  

• ACAJOU
n. 1725 – the cashew nut  

• ACALE
adj. c1320 obs. – cold, frozen

• ACAMY
adj. 1845 Sc. – diminutive, undersized, infirm
n. 1865 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a diminutive thing; a weak or infirm person or animal; a weakling; also, a term of abuse

• ACANG
vb. c1225 obs. rare – ? to act foolishly, to lose self-control

• ACAPULCO
n. 1965 – a high grade of marijuana, typically brownish- or greenish-gold in colour, originally grown around Acapulco, Mexico

• ACAPULCO GOLD
n. 1965 – a high grade of marijuana, typically brownish- or greenish-gold in colour, originally grown around Acapulco, Mexico

• ACAPULCO RED
n. 1960s drugs sl. – marijuana 

• ACAROPHOBIA
n. Bk1991 – a fear of skin infestation by mites or ticks

• ACARYA 
n. 1792 – in India: a spiritual teacher or leader; an influential mentor

• ACAST
vb. c1220 rare – to cast down, to throw down, to cast away or off

• ACATALEPSY
n. 1605 – incomprehensibility

• ACATALEPTIC
adj. 1727 rare – incapable of being certainly comprehended or ascertained; incomprehensible, unknowable

• ACATALLACTIC
adj. 1865 – not concerned with or involving exchange, esp. of money
n. 1842 obs. rare – a matter unconnected with exchange, esp. of money

• ACATASTASIS
n. 1683 obs. rare – an unsettling or confusing of something

• ACATE
n. c1374 obs. – buying, purchasing, purchase

• ACATER
n. c1386 obs. – a purchaser of provisions; a purveyor; a provider or preparer of ‘cates’ or delicacies; a caterer

• ACATERY
n. a1377 obs. – provisions purchased; also, the room or place allotted to the keeping of all such provisions

• ACATES
n. 1465 obs. – things purchased; such provisions as were not made in the house, but had to be purchased fresh when wanted, as meat, fish, etc.; hence, all provisions except the home produce of the baker and brewer; dainties, delicacies

• ACATHOLIC
adj. 1823 – that is not Catholic
n. 1745 – a non-Catholic, esp. a non-Catholic inhabitant of a Catholic state

• ACATOUR
n. c1386 obs. – a purchaser or buyer of provisions; esp. the officer who purchased provisions for the royal household; a purveyor

• ACATRY
n. a1377 obs. – provisions purchased; also, the room or place allotted to the keeping of all such provisions

• ACAUSE
conj. 1819 – because

• ACCA
n. 1. 1824 Sc. – aqua vitae; whisky
n. 2. 1977 Aust. sl. – an academic person, esp. one who trades on the proliferation of current, if ephemeral, intellectual fads
n. 3. 1970s Aust. sl. – jargon-loaded academic writing
n. 4. 1980s Aust. sl. – acne spots
n. 5. Brit. sl. – a bet of at least four selections; an ‘accumulator’

• ACCABE!
int. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – expression of disgust

• ACCABLE
vb. 1602 obs. rare – to overwhelm, to crush

• ACCATRY
n. a1377 obs. – provisions purchased; also, the room or place allotted to the keeping of all such provisions

• ACCEDE
vb. 1. 1465 obs. – to come forward, approach, or arrive at a place or state
vb. 2. a1475 rare – to join with something or somebody else; to become part of or adapted to something; to give support

• ACCELERATE
adj. 1527 obs. rare – quickened, hastened
vb. 1854 obs. rare – to assign to an earlier date, to antedate

• ACCELERATEDLY
adv. 1753 rare – with ever increasing speed

• ACCELERATION
n. L19 tramps’ sl. – starvation 

• ACCELERATOR
n. 1. 1819 – an early form of bicycle, in which the rider sat on a bar between the two wheels, and propelled himself by pushing the ground with each foot alternately
n. 2. 1992 US criminals’ sl. – an arsonist 
n. 3. 1993 US sl. – an amphetamine tablet

• ACCELERATORY
adj. 1847 rare – quickening, adding to velocity

• ACCEND
vb. 1. c1425 obs. – to stir up, to excite, to incite, to stimulate
vb. 2. a1475 obs. – to kindle, to set light to, to set on fire

• ACCENDIBILITY
n. 1821 obs. – capacity of being kindled, set on fire or inflamed

• ACCENDIBLE
adj. 1630 obs. rare – capable of being kindled, or set on fire

• ACCENDING
adj. 1646 obs. – kindling

• ACCENSED
adj. 1. 1490 obs. – inflamed with emotion; stirred up, excited, incited, stimulated
adj. 2. 1613 obs. – kindled, set on fire, inflamed

• ACCENSION
n. 1646 obs. or arch. – the act of kindling, or the state of being kindled; ignition; heat

• ACCENSOR
n. Bk1883 – one who sets on fire or kindles; in the Roman Catholic Church, a minister or servant whose business it is to light and trim the candles and tapers

• ACCENTY
n. 1600 obs. rare – accent; a significant tone one sound in speech; a spoken word

• ACCEPT
adj. a1382 obs. – accepted; approved; considered or taken as acceptable

• ACCEPTANT
adj. 1846 – inclined or tending to accept; receptive; acquiescent
n. 1598 obs. – one who accepts, receives, or takes what is offered; the acceptor of a bill of exchange or a draft

• ACCEPTATION
n. 1. 1426 obs. – the act of taking, or receiving, what is offered, whether by way of favour, satisfaction, or duty; acceptance
n. 2. 1504 obs. – the state of being acceptable or accepted
n. 3. 1529 – favourable reception, approval; hence, assent, acquiescence, belief
n. 4. a1555 – the sense in which a word or sentence is understood; the accepted meaning or purport of something

• ACCEPTATION OF PERSONS
n. c1400 rare – favouritism on personal grounds; undue partiality

• ACCEPTATIVENESS
n. 1. 1870 obs. rare – tendency to give acceptance to statements; credulity
n. 2. 1882 obs. rare – a being accepted or well-receive

• ACCEPTILATE
vb. 1880 obs. rare – in Roman Law: to discharge a debt by an acquittance without payment

• ACCEPTION
n. 1. c1384 rare – the act of accepting; the receiving or taking of anything presented; acceptance, favourable reception
n. 2. c1384 obs. – partiality, favouritism
n. 3. 1535 rare – the sense in which a word or sentence is understood; the accepted meaning or purport of something

• ACCEPTIVE
adj. 1. c1475 rare – fit or suitable for acceptance; appropriate
adj. 2. 1598 obs. – having a tendency to accept; ready to accept; receptive

• ACCEPTIVITY
n. 1855 – the quality or condition of being acceptive; receptivity

• ACCEPTOR
n. 1. c1384 rare – a judge who is influenced by the personal acceptableness of individuals, one who shows partiality on personal grounds; a person who shows undue partiality or favouritism
n. 2. 1839 – in horse racing: a horse confirmed to start a race

• ACCEPTRESS
n. Bk1883 obs. – a female who accepts

• ACCERSE
vb. 1548 obs. rare – to summon

• ACCERSITED
adj. 1548 obs. rare – summoned, sent for

• ACCESS
n. 1. c1325 – a coming on of illness or disease, esp. of sudden illness
n. 2. c1374 obs. – an ague fit; ague, intermitting fever
n. 3. c1384 – a sudden fit of some emotion or feeling; an outburst; also, a burst of energy, etc.
n. 4. 1528 obs. – the act of going or coming to or into; coming into the presence of, or into contact with; approach, entrance
n. 5. 1587 obs. – a coming together of the members of Parliament; an assembly, a session
n. 6. 1587 obs. – a coming to work or business; an assembling or meeting of a body
n. 7. 1641 obs. – a coming to office, dignity, or sovereignty; arrival at the throne
n. 8. 1781 – an outburst; a sudden fit of anger or other passion

• ACCESSARINESS
n. 1654 obs. – an acceding to or aiding in a crime or misdeed; secondary involvement

• ACCESSION
n. 1. 1551 – something which is added or joined to another thing; an augmentation; also, a person who joins a group of others
n. 2. 1565 rare – the onset of fever or disease
n. 3. 1570 – a joining something to something else; addition; augmentation
n. 4. 1608 – the onset of a mental or emotional condition; a sudden outbreak or fit of some emotion or mental state
n. 5. 1608 – an entering into something or somewhere; coming into contact with something
n. 6. 1611 – the attainment or acquisition of an office or position of rank or power, esp. that of monarch
n. 7. 1642 obs. – the act of coming to or towards by forward motion; advance, arrival
n. 8. 1704 – the joining of a nation or state to an economic and political  union or organization
n. 9. 1763 – an addition to the collection of a library, museum, etc.; an acquisition

• ACCESSIONAL
adj. 1646 – of the nature of an increase or augmentation; additional; supplementary, accessory

• ACCESSION DAY
n. 1709 – an anniversary of the day on which a monarch ascended to the throne; also, a day on which a monarch ascends to the throne

• ACCESSIVE
adj. 1. 1583 – exceeding what is right, proportionate, or desirable; immoderate, inordinate, extravagant
adj. 2. 1609 obs. – capable of access; accessible
adj. 3. 1641 rare – pert. to access or approach; seeking to approach, pressing in, aggressive

• ACCESSIVELY
adv. 1611 obs. – in an accessive manner; pressingly, aggressively

• ACCESSOR
n. Bk1795 – one that joins another, an accomplice

• ACCESSORIAL
adj. 1726 – of the nature of an accessory or accompaniment; auxiliary, supplementary

• ACCESSORY
n. 1992 US sl. – a boyfriend or girlfriend

• ACCESSORY FACTOR
n. 1912 – a vitamin

• ACCESSORY FOOD FACTOR
n. 1919 – a vitamin

• ACCIBOUNCE
n. 2003 Trinidad and Tobago – a minor collision or accident

• ACCIDENCE
n. 1. 1393 rare – mishap, chance; fortuitous circumstance
n. 2. 1826 Sc. – a slip of memory; an accident

• ACCIDENCY
n. 1645 rare – a fortuitous circumstance or acquisition; a chance; a windfall

• ACCIDENT
adj. c1450 rare – that is accidental; contingent, incidental
n. 1. a1525 obs. – an occurrence, incident, event
n. 2. 1846 euphemism – an unintentional act of urinating or defecating 
n. 3. 1850 colloq. – a child whose conception was not planned; an illegitimate child; a bastard  
n. 4. 1932 sl. – an unplanned pregnancy
n. 5. 1964 US sl. – a murder that cannot be proved as such
n. 6. 20C Brit. sl. – an arrest

• ACCIDENTAL
adj. 1895 Eng. dial. – illegitimate  
n. 1935 US prison sl. – a prison inmate convicted for a social crime, such as hooliganism rather than violent or property crimes 

• ACCIDENTAL DADDY
n. 1985 sl. – a man who fathers a child by accident, usually after a casual sexual encounter

• ACCIDENTALITY
n. 1651 – a being accidental

• ACCIDENTALLY ON PURPOSE
adv. 1711 – deliberately; used of a supposed accident that deliberately discomforts a disliked target

• ACCIDENTARILY
adv. 1591 obs. – by way of accident; casually, incidentally

• ACCIDENTARY
adj. 1. c1555 obs. – having the nature of a logical accident; non-essential
adj. 2. 1581 obs. – fortuitous, casual

• ACCIDENT BLACK SPOT
n. 1936 – a section of a road noted for accidents

• ACCIDENTED
adj. 1. 1548 obs. – endowed with non-essential or incidental attributes
adj. 2. 1844 – of a landscape, its nature: characterized by irregularities, undulating
adj. 3. 1879 – characterized by accidents

• ACCIDENTIAL
adj. 1. 1558 rare – characterized by non-essential qualities
adj. 2. 1603 – occurring by accident or chance

• ACCIDENTIALITY
n. 1814 rare –  the quality of being accidental

• ACCIDENT LURK
n. 1842 UK sl. – those who beg on the basis of having suffered a bad accident

• ACCIDENTLY
adv. 1. 1506 obs. – non-essentially, incidentally, as a secondary effect
adv. 2. 1611 obs. – accidentally, casually, by chance

• ACCIDENT WAITING TO HAPPEN
n. 1920 – a person or thing likely to cause trouble or harm; a potentially disastrous situation, esp. resulting from carelessness or neglect

• ACCIDIE
n. c1230 obs. –  sloth, torpor

• ACCIDIOUS
adj. a1400 obs. – lazy, slothful

• ACCIDITY
n. 1731 obs. rare – slothfulness, lethargy

• ACCINATE
vb. 1652 obs. rare – to distinguish with a vocal accent or stress

• ACCINCT
adj. 1661 obs. rare – girded, prepared or equipped for action, ready

• ACCINGE
vb. 1657 obs. rare – to ‘gird up one’s loins’, to apply oneself, to prepare oneself for what is to come

• ACCIPIENT
adj. 1730 obs. rare – that receives; accepting, recipient
n. 1731 obs. – one who receives

• ACCIPITER
n. a1398 – originally, a bird of prey, esp. a hawk

• ACCIPITRAL
adj. 1842 – resembling that of a falcon or hawk, esp. in respect of sight or temperament; sharp-eyed, hawklike

• ACCIPITRARY
n. 1633 arch. & hist. – a person who keeps and trains hawks or falcons; a falconer, one who catches birds of prey

• ACCITE
vb. 1. c1475 obs. – to summon, to call
vb. 2. 1597 obs. – to arouse, to excite
vb. 3. a1631 obs. – to cite in writing, to quote

• ACCLAIM
n. 1546 Sc. obs. – a claim, esp. a legal claim
vb. 1. c1330 Sc. & Eng. dial. obs. – to lay claim to, to claim
vb. 2. 1620 obs. – to agree, to consent; to affirm an overwhelming decision

• ACCLAIMABLE
adj. 1735 Sc. obs. – capable of being claimed; liable to be claimed

• ACCLAIMER
n. 1802 – one who acclaims, praises, or applauds; an applauder

• ACCLAMATE
vb. 1624 obs. rare – to applaud, to shout applause, to acclaim

• ACCLAMATOR
n. 1651 obs. rare – one who joins in acclamation; an applauder

• ACCLAMATORY
adj. 1657 – expressing acclamation

• ACCLEARMENT
n. 1692 obs. rare – a clearing one’s name, exculpation

• ACCLIMATEMENT
n. 1823 obs. – the condition of being acclimatized; habitation or adaptation to climate or environment

• ACCLIMATION
n. 1801 chiefly US – the process or result of acclimating or of being acclimated to a new climate or environment 

• ACCLIMATOR
n. 1827 rare – a person who habituates something or someone to a new environment or climate

• ACCLIMATURE
n. 1823 rare – acclimatization

• ACCLIME
vb. 1834 obs. rare – to acclimatize, to habituate

• ACCLINE
vb. c1420 obs. rare – to incline, or slope towards

• ACCLIVE
adj. 1616 obs. rare – rising with a slope; sloping upward; ascending

• ACCLIVITOUS
adj. 1803 – rising with a slope; sloping upward; ascending

• ACCLIVITY
n. 1614 – an upward slope of a hill, etc. an ascending slope; also, steepness

• ACCLIVOUS
adj. 1731 – rising with a slope; sloping upwards; steep

• ACCLOY
vb. 1. c1330 obs. – to cause to become lame, esp. by maiming with a pointed instrument; to make a horse lame by inadvertently driving a nail into the foot when shoeing
vb. 2. c1374 – to fill to satiety
vb. 3. c1425 – to overfill, to overload, to burden, to oppress
vb. 4. c1430 – to block, to obstruct, to clog, to choke
vb. 5. 1470 rare – to pierce, to stab
vb. 6. 1519 – to overburden the stomach; to nauseate
vb. 7. 1530 – to disgust, to weary, to become offensive to

• ACCOIL
n. 1814 obs. rare – reception, welcome
vb. 1596 obs. – to gather together, to collect

• ACCOLENT
adj. 1731 obs. rare – dwelling near; neighbouring
n. Bk1795 – a borderer; one who dwells on or near the border of a country

• ACCOLL
vb. 1340 obs. – to throw the arms around the neck of; to embrace, to hug

• ACCOMBINATION
n. 1846 obs. rare – the act of combining together

• ACCOMMODABLE
adj. 1592 – capable of being accommodated; suitable

• ACCOMMODANT
adj. 1693 obs. rare – accommodating; self-accommodating; suiting oneself to circumstances

• ACCOMMODATE
adj. 1525 obs. – suited, adapted, fitted; hence, suitable, fitting, fit
vb. 1. 1624 obs. – to fit or equip a thing for use; to put in order; hence, to repair, to refit, to mend
vb. 2. 19C sl. – to work as a prostitute  
vb. 3. E19 UK sporting sl. – to go halves on a bet 
vb. 4. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally; to copulate; to serve another person sexually

• ACCOMMODATELY
adv. 1623 obs. – in a suitable of fitting manner

• ACCOMMODATENESS
n.1660 obs. – the quality of being suited; suitableness

• ACCOMMODATER
n. 1902 US rare – a temporary domestic help

• ACCOMMODATIN’ AS A HOG ON ICE
adj. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – extremely disagreeable or unobliging

• ACCOMMODATION
n. 1. 1595 rare – financial aid in an emergency; a loan
n. 2. 19C sl. – copulation

• ACCOMMODATION ARREST
n. 1961 US sl. – a pre-arranged consensual raid of an illegal gambling operation, designed to give the appearance of strict enforcement of laws

• ACCOMMODATION BEAUTY
n. E19 sl. – a prostitute

• ACCOMMODATION BOAT
n. 1793 Anglo-Indian obs. – a small boat used to transfer passengers between ship and shore

• ACCOMMODATION COLLAR
n. 20C Amer. police sl. – an arrest made to fulfil a quota, usually in response to pressure for strong police action against crime 

• ACCOMMODATION HOUSE
n. 1. 1787 – a lodging house for travellers
n. 2. 1823 sl. – a brothel
n. 3. L19 sl. – a ‘hotel’ where rooms can be hired for short times by lovers or prostitutes and their clients 

• ACCOMMODATION MAN
n. L19 UK criminals’ sl. – one who is paid to give false evidence 

• ACCOMMODATION STAGE
n. 1811 US – a stagecoach which stops at all the stages on its route

• ACCOMMODATION TRAIN
n. 1838 US – a train which stops at all the stations on its route

• ACCOMMODATOR
n. 1. 1912 US rare – a temporary domestic help
n. 2. 1940 criminals’ sl. obs. – one who bribes witnesses and prosecutors into bringing about a desired verdict, esp. a former police officer 

• ACCOMMODE
vb. 1567 rare – to accommodate

• ACCOMMODEMENT
n. 1620 obs. – an agreement, a settlement; also, resolution of a dispute

• ACCOMPACKMENT
n. c1650 obs. rare – ? a compact, an agreement

• ACCOMPANABLE
adj. 1548 obs. – sociable, companionable

• ACCOMPANIABLE
adj. 1580 obs. – sociable, companionable

• ACCOMPANY
vb. 1. 1490 rare – to associate, consort, or keep company with; to engage in sexual activity
vb. 3. 1534 obs. – to congregate, to gather, to assemble

• ACCOMPASS
vb. 1668 obs. rare – to bring about; to contrive

• ACCOMPLEMENT
n. c1525 obs. – anything that completes or perfects, that adds grace or ornament to body or mind
vb. 1601 obs. rare – to offer compliments

• ACCOMPLETE
adj. a1450 obs. rare – filled up; complete; carried out; fulfilled, accomplished

• ACCOMPLETIVE
adj. 1826 rare – having the property of fulfilling; tending to accomplish

• ACCOMPLICESHIP
n. 1795 rare – the state of being an accomplice; criminal assistance

• ACCOMPLICITY
n. 1792 – the state of being an accomplice; criminal assistance

• ACCOMPLIMENT
n. 1705 – an accomplishment
vb. 1601 obs. rare – to compliment

• ACCOMPLISH
vb. a1500 rare – to reach a certain age; to pass a period of time

• ACCOMPLISHMENT
n. 1. 1540 obs. – a perfecting or making whole; the state of being perfect or complete; perfection
n. 2. 1605 obs. – an ornament, an accoutrement

• ACCOMPTANT
n. 1. 1453 obs. – one who renders or is liable to render account; one accountable or responsible
n. 2. 1539 obs. – one who professionally makes up or takes charge of accounts; an officer in a public office who has charge of accounts
n. 3. 1646 obs. – one who counts or can count or reckon; a reckoner, a calculator
n. 4. 1655 obs. rare – a narrator

• ACCOMPTER
n. 1483 obs. – account, reckoning

• ACCONSENT
vb. 1560 obs. – rare to consent to anything proposed, to give consent

• ACCORD
adj. a1413 obs. – in accord or agreement; in harmony
vb. 1. a1000 obs. – to restore estranged parties to friendly relations; to reconcile people in conflict or disagreement
vb. 2. 1340 rare – to bring things that differ into agreement; to reconcile quarrels or differences; to resolve a matter
vb. 3. a1425 obs. – to agree to do something
vb. 4. c1450 obs. – to relate, narrate, or mention in a written account; to put or set down in writing or some other permanent form
vb. 5. 1485 rare – to compose, sing, or play in harmony

• ACCORDABLE
adj. 1. c1374 obs. – agreeing, harmonious, accordant; suitable, agreeable
adj. 2. 1651 rare – capable of being harmonized or reconciled; reconcilable or compatible with something

• ACCORDANCE
n. 1388 rare – agreement or accord between people; harmonious relations; also, a formal agreement

• ACCORDANCY
n. 1790 rare – a state of agreement; harmony, accordance

• ACCORDER
n. 1597 rare – a person who reconciles people or things; a mediator; also, a person who agrees with something

• ACCORDING TO COCKER
adv. 1785 Eng. colloq. – properly, correctly, as laid down by the rules  

• ACCORDING TO GUNTER
adv. L19 US sl. – properly, correctly, as laid down by the rules

• ACCORDING TO HOYLE
adv. 1904 sl. – properly, correctly, as laid down by the rules

• ACCORDING TO ONE’S OWN LIGHTS
phr. Bk2004 – in accordance with one’s conscience or inclinations

• ACCORDING TO ONE’S TELL
phr. 1871 Amer. dial. – in one’s opinion, to one’s way of thinking

• ACCORDION
n. 1. 1925 sl. – a train made up of Pullman cars
n. 2. 1960s US homosexual sl. – a penis that is substantially larger than expected when erect 

• ACCORDION ACT
n. 1989 US sl. – a collapsing under pressure

• ACCORDION WAR
n. 1982 US sl. – US tactics during the Korean war: accordion-like movements up and down Korea by land forces

• ACCORDMENT
n. c1330 obs. – agreement, reconciliation; reconcilement; harmony, accord

• ACCORPORATE
vb. 1612 obs. rare – to unite, to incorporate

• ACCOST
vb. 1. 1610 obs. – to border on, to adjoin
vb. 2. 1635 obs. rare – to approach, to draw near to
vb. 3. E20 US euphemism – of a prostitute: to solicit someone to an act of sexual immorality

• ACCOSTABLE
adj. 1622 obs. – ready to accost, courteous; capable of being approached; approachable, accessible; affable

• ACCOSTING
n. 1. 1791 Sc. obs. – courting, paying addresses
n. 2. 1871 – a publicly offering one’s services as a prostitute; soliciting

• ACCOST THE OSCAR MEYER
vb. 1980s sl. – to masturbate

• ACCOUCHE
vb. 1. 1819 obs. rare – of a woman: to give birth to a child
vb. 2. 1821 obs. – to confine a woman to bed for the delivery of a child
vb. 3. 1859 obs. rare – to deliver a child
vb. 4. 1867 obs. – to assist or deliver women in childbirth; to act as a midwife or accoucheur

• ACCOUCHEMENT
n. 1730 arch. – the confinement of a woman to bed for the birth of a child; delivery in child-bed

• ACCOUCHEUR
n. 1727 – properly, a man who assists women in childbirth, a man-midwife; until the adoption of ‘accoucheuse’ it was used of both sexes

• ACCOUCHEUSE
n. 1795 arch. – a woman who assists in childbirth, esp. one who is professionally trained; a midwife

• ACCOUNSEL
vb. c1420 obs. – to counsel, to advise

• ACCOUNT
vb. 1. 1303 obs. – to count, to count up, to enumerate
vb. 2. c1386 obs. – to recount, to relate
vb. 3. 1398 obs. – to calculate, to reckon, to compute
vb. 4. a1400 obs. – to take into account or consideration; to consider

• ACCOUNTABLE
adj. 1. 1589 obs. – able to be reckoned or computed
adj. 2. 1603-5 obs. – to be counted or reckoned on

• ACCOUNTANCY
n. 1860 rare – originally, a job or position as an accountant; later, a firm of accountants

• ACCOUNTANT
adj. 1494 obs. – giving or liable to give an account; accountable, responsible
n. 1. 1449 rare – one who renders or is liable to render account, esp. for conduct or the performance of duty, or for transactions or money held in trust; one accountable or responsible
n. 2. 1539 – one who professionally makes up or takes charge of accounts, esp. within the context of a business; a bookkeeper; an officer in a public office who has charge of accounts
n. 3. 1622 rare – one who counts or can count or reckon; a reckoner, a calculator; also, one who can count or reckon well (poorly, etc.)
n. 4. 1655 obs. rare – a person who presents a narrative account; a narrator

• ACCOUNTANTSHIP
n. 1640 rare – the practice of accounting

• ACCOUNT CASTER
n. 1580 obs. – a person who casts or reckons up accounts

• ACCOUNTER
n. 1. 1303 obs. – one who accounts, reckons, calculates, renders an account
n. 2. 1356 obs. – a person who presents a narrative or descriptive account; a narrator
n. 3. c1503 obs. – an account, a reckoning

• ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE
n. 1966 sl. – a pimp who caters to successful businessman and/or offers high-class prostitutes

• ACCOUNTING
adj. 1551 obs. – counting, reckoning

• ACCOUNTING DAY
n. 1549 – the Day of Reckoning

• ACCOUNTLESS
adj. 1. 1649 obs. rare – free from accountableness; irresponsible
adj. 2. 1650 obs. – beyond count or reckoning; countless; innumerable

• ACCOUNTMENT
n. 1857 rare – the work of accounting or reckoning for, responsibility

• ACCOUNTS
n. 1745 Sc. – news, details, information

• ACCOUPLE
vb. 1486 obs. – to join one thing to another, esp. in matrimony; to couple

• ACCOUPLEMENT
n. 1483 rare – the act of coupling one thing to another; union, pairing; marriage union

• ACCOUPLING
n. 1525 rare – the act of joining two things into a couple or pair; coupling; esp. union in marriage

• ACCOURAGE
vb. 1534 obs. – to encourage, to hearten

• ACCOURSE
n. 1598 obs. rare – a rushing up or out, a hastening forward; a forward course

• ACCOURT
vb. 1596 obs. rare – to court

• ACCOUTRE
vb. 1606 rare – to attire, to equip, to array

• ACCOUTRED
adj. 1596 – attired, dressed, equipped, arrayed; generally with the idea of being specially attired for some purpose

• ACCOUTREMENT
n. 1549 – apparel, outfit, equipment

• ACCOUTREMENTS
n. 1. 1586 – clothes, trappings, apparel, equipments; in the military, the equipments of a soldier other than arms and dress
n. 2. 19C sl. – the male genitals

• ACCOWARD
vb. 1481 obs. – to render cowardly; to intimidate, to cow, to make faint-hearted

• ACCOWARDIZE
vb. 1480 obs. – to render cowardly; to intimidate, to cow, to make faint-hearted

• ACCOY
vb. c1350 obs. – to still, to calm, to quiet, to appease; hence, to soothe or coax (the alarmed or shy), to tame, to silence, to daunt (the forward or bold)  

• ACCREASE
n. 1598 obs. – growing by addition; increase
vb. 1. a1382 obs. – to increase or grow by addition
vb. 2. 1401 obs. – to cause to grow; to increase

• ACCREDITATE
vb. 1654 – to accredit; to give credit to someone for something; to vouch for, to sanction or countenance

• ACCRESCE
vb. 1. 1634-46 rare – to accrue 
vb. 2. 1637 rare – to increase, to grow up
vb. 3. 1652 rare – to increase, to add to

• ACCRESCENCE
n. 1606 rare – a growing by accretion or addition

• ACCRESCENT
adj. 1713 – growing continuously, ever increasing

• ACCRIMINATE
vb. 1641 obs. rare – to accuse of a crime

• ACCRIMINATION
n. 1655 – accusation of crime  

• ACCROACH
vb. 1. c1325 – to draw to oneself; to catch, to attract, to acquire
vb. 2. 1423 – to encroach

• ACCROACHMENT
n. c1428 – usurpation; encroachment

• ACCRUE
vb. 1. 1586 obs. – to grow by addition, to increase, esp. in age or number
vb. 2. 1594 obs. – to gather up, to collect  
vb. 3. 1604 obs. – to grow, to grow up  

• ACCRUE CHOCOLATE
vb. 1929 UK Royal Navy usage – to behave towards officers in an obsequious, sycophantic manner 

• ACCRUST
vb. 1881 obs. – to become hardened or rigid

• ACCUB
n. 1623 obs. rare – the print of any creature’s foot

• ACCUBATION
n. 1. 1612 rare – the posture of reclining at table, practised by many ancient nations
n. 2. 1853 obs. rare – the confinement of a woman to bed for childbirth; accouchement

• ACCUMB
vb. 1813 obs. rare – to recline at meals, like the Greeks and later Romans

• ACCUMBENCY
n. 1658 rare – the reclining position at table

• ACCUMBENT
adj. 1727 – lying up to, or reclining at table
n. 1. 1630 obs. rare – a person at the table; a diner
n. 2. 1656 – one who reclines at table according to the ancient manner; hence, one who is at table without regard to posture

• ACCUMBER
vb. c1275 rare – to encumber; to overload; to oppress; to overwhelm; to crush

• ACCUMBERED
adj. c1300 obs. – overwhelmed, embarrassed, entangled, encumbered

• ACCUMBERING
n. 1340 obs. – the act of encumbering, overloading, or overwhelming; the fact of being overwhelmed or oppressed; distress, vexation

• ACCUMBING
n. 1646 obs. – a reclining at table when dining

• ACCUMBRANCE
n. c1330 obs. – the of encumbering, impeding, or overwhelming; molestation, injury; a burden or impediment

• ACCUMBROUS
adj. c1392 obs. – cumbrous, oppressive, troublesome

• ACCUMULATE
adj. 1533 rare – heaped up, accumulated; increased by accumulation

• ACCUMULATOR
n. 1. 1611 – a person who accumulates things, esp. wealth or possessions; an acquisitive person; a hoarder, a gatherer
n. 2. 1691 obs. – at Oxford University: a person who takes degrees by accumulation
n. 3. 1889 UK sl. – a type of bet where the amount won on one event becomes the stake for the next event; a bettor who operates in such a manner

• ACCUMULE
vb. 1490 obs. rare – to accumulate, to heap up  

• ACCUR
vb. c1555 obs. – to run to, to run together; to meet

• ACCURANCE
n. 1677 obs. rare – a taking care, care, solicitude

• ACCURATE
adj. 1581 obs. – executed with care; careful

• ACCURATELY
adv. 1549 obs. – carefully

• ACCURRE
vb. c1555 obs. – to run to, to run together; to meet

• ACCURRENT
adj. 1432-50 obs. rare – running or flowing into; affluent, tributary

• ACCURSE
vb. c1175 obs. or arch. – to pronounce or imprecate a curse upon; to devote to perdition, evil, or misery

• ACCURSED
n. 1340 – an accursed person; a detestable or hateful person

• ACCURTATION
n. 1583 obs. – shortening, curtailment, abbreviation

• ACCUSAL
n. 1594 – an accusation

• ACCUSANT
adj. 1604 rare – accusing  
n. a1425 rare – one who accuses, an accuser

• ACCUSATIVE
adj. a1400 obs. rare – pert. to accusation; accusatory

• ACCUSATOR
n. 1382 – an accuser; spec. a plaintiff, a prosecutor

• ACCUSATORIAL
adj. 1788 – characterized by accusation; accusing, reproachful

• ACCUSATORY
adj. a1400 – containing an accusation

• ACCUSATRIX
n. 1530 rare – a female accuser

• ACCUSE
n. a1439 rare – the act of accusing or charging with crime; charge, accusation
vb. 1. c1400 rare – to betray, to disclose; hence, to reveal, to display, to show or make known
vb. 2. 1901 Ireland – to admit, to allow; to suppose

• ACCUSEMENT
n. c1374 rare – the act of accusing or charging with an offense; an accusing; an accusation, a charge

• ACCUSERESS
n. Bk1867 obs. – she who accuses

• ACCUSER-GENERAL
n. 1770 – a chief prosecutor or accuser

• ACCUSIVE
adj. 1861 rare – accusatory

• ACCUSOR
n. 1340 obs. – an accuser

• ACCUSTOM
n. c1440 obs. – custom, habit, habituation
vb. 1422 obs. – to make a thing customary, habitual, usual, or familiar; to practise habitually

• ACCUSTOMABLE
adj. 1494 obs. – usually practising or practised; habitual, usual, customary, wonted

• ACCUSTOMABLY
adv. c1450 arch. rare – customarily, habitually, usually, ordinarily

• ACCUSTOMANCE
n. c1384 rare – customary use or practise; custom, habit; later, a making a person or thing accustomed to something; familiarization

• ACCUSTOMARILY
adv. 1577 rare – usually, customarily

• ACCUSTOMARY
adj. 1541 arch. – usual, customary

• ACCUSTOMATE
adj. 1494 obs. – accustomed, habituated, customary, usual, wonted

• ACCUSTOMATION
n. 1605 obs. rare – the act of making usual, habitual, or familiar; the habitual practice or use

• ACCUSTOMED
adj. 1690 obs. – frequented by customers

• ACCUSTOMER
n. 1538 obs. rare – ? a collector of customs

• ACCUSTOMING
n. a1475 obs. – the act of making oneself familiar with, using, practising, consorting; familiarization, habituation

• AC/DC
adj. 1. 1960 sl. – bisexual
adj. 2. 1930s sl. – pert. to a homosexual male who is ambivalent to the choice of male or female sex roles
n. 1. 1930s sl.  – a bisexual person  
n. 2. 2002 UK homosexual sl. – a couple 

• AC-DC BAR
n. M20 US sl. – a bar offering sexually oriented entertainment appealing to both male and female sexual interests


Back to INDEX A

Back to DICTIONARY