Dictionary: ACK – ACR

• ACK
int. Bk1921 sl. – No! refusal of a request
n. 1. 1941 Amer. dial., derogatory – an Italian
n. 2. 1968 US sl. – a pimple 
n. 3. 1980s Aust. sl. – acne spots 
n. 4. 1986 Brit. sl. – in computer programming: a message sent from one system or program to another, acknowledging receipt of a previous message
vb. 1. 1984 UK clerical usage, orig. Civil Service – to acknowledge a letter, etc.
vb. 2. 1986 UK sl. – in computer programming: to acknowledge receipt of a message

• ACK-ACK
n. 1. 1917 Amer. military sl. – antiaircraft gun, artillery, or fire 
n. 2. Bk1944 services’ sl. – a machine gun 
vb. 1947 US sl. – to shoot someone or something

• ACKADENT
n. 1882 Sc. – aqua vitae, whisky

• ACKADUR
vb. 1866 Sc. – to persevere, to endure, to endeavour 

• ACKAMARACKA
n. 1933 sl., orig. US – insincere or exaggerated talk intended to flatter or deceive; humbug or flattery; pretentious nonsense, bluff 

• ACKAMARACKER;  ACKAMARAKA
n. 1. 1920s sl. – tea
n. 2. 1930s sl. – a fraudulent tale, a tall story, nonsense

• ACKAMARACKUS
n. 1933 sl. rare, orig. US – insincere or exaggerated talk intended to flatter or deceive; humbug or flattery; a fraudulent tale; a tall story; nonsense 

• ACKAVITY
n. 1788 Sc. obs. – aqua vitae; whisky

• ACKBAND
n. 1929 Sc. – control

• ACK EMMA
n. 1. 1890 Brit. sl., orig. military usage – the morning 
n. 2. 1917 Amer. military aviation usage – an air mechanic

• ACKEMPUCKY
n. 1944 Amer. dial. – any food mixture of unknown ingredients

• ACKER
n. 1. c1440 obs. – ? flood, tide; bore; strong current in the sea
n. 2. 1808 Eng. dial. – a ripple, furrow, or disturbance of the surface of water
n. 3. 1910s sl., orig. military usage – money, whether change or notes sl.
n. 4. 1929 Sc. – a small quantity 
n. 5. 1984 Aust. sl. – an academic, esp. one who trades on the proliferation of current, if ephemeral, intellectual fads
n. 6. 1970s Aust. sl. – jargon-loaded academic writing
n. 7. 1980s Aust. sl. – acne spots
vb. 1. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to chatter
vb. 2. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to stammer, to stutter 
vb. 3. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to tremble with passion

• ACKER BILK
n. 1960s Brit. rhyming sl. – milk 

• ACKER FORTIS
n. M19 US sl. – very strong drink, usually alcoholic but sometimes coffee

• ACKERMARACKER
n. 1920s sl. – tea

• ACKERS
n. 1939 sl., orig. military usage – coins, notes, money; specifically, piastres 

• ACKETY-ACK
n. 1928 Amer. military sl. – antiaircraft gun, artillery, or fire 

• ACKEY
n. 1941 Amer. dial. derogatory – an Italian

• ACKIE FORTIS
n. M19 US sl. – very strong drink, usually alcoholic but sometimes coffee 

• ACKIE-PEEVIE
n. 1929 Sc. – whisky

• ACKLE
vb. 1961 Brit. sl. – to fit or function properly

• ACKMAN
n. 1823 UK criminals’ sl. – a river thief who specializes in robbing river traffic 

• ACKNICKELOUS;  ACKNICKULOUS
adj. 1988African-American & teen sl. – wonderful, marvellous 

• ACKNOW
vb. 1. 933 obs. – to come to know, to recognize; to understand
vb. 2. c1000 obs. – to admit or show one’s knowledge, to acknowledge, to confess

• ACKNOWLEDGE
n. 1. 1492 Sc. obs. rare – investigation, trial
n. 2. c1510 obs. – admitted or communicated knowledge, recognition, cognizance, awareness

• ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
n. 1600 obs. rare – recognition, knowledge

• ACKNOWLEDGE THE CORN
vb. 1. 1839 Amer. dial. – to admit to being drunk
vb. 2. 1846 sl. – to confess, to make an admission, as to an accusation, failure, etc.; to admit an error

• ACKNOWLEDGE THE MALT
vb. 1. 1865 Amer. dial. – to admit to being drunk
vb. 2. 1846 orig. US – to admit an error 

• ACKPIRATE
n. Bk1883 – a sailor’s term for a freshwater thief, or one who steals on navigable rivers

• ACKRUFF
n. 1900 criminals’ sl. obs. – a river thief who robs and kills victims 

• ACK RUFFIAN
n. 1900 criminals’ sl. obs. – a thief who operates along the river 

• ACKWA
n. 1824 Sc. – aqua vitae; whisky

• ACKWALLY
adv. 1877 Sc. – actually

• ACKWART
adj. 1786 Sc. – awkward

• ACK WILLIE;  ACK WILLY
adj. 1942 Aust. sl. – absent without leave

• ACKY
n. 1930s UK criminals’ sl. – aqua fortis, nitric acid when used to test for gold 

• ACLEAVE
vb. 1460 obs. rare – to cleave or split

• A-CLEEK
adv. c1781 Sc. – arm in arm

• ACLEFT
adj. c1425 obs. rare – cleft, split

• ACLITE;  ACLYTE
adv. 1923 Sc. – awry, turned to one side

• ACLOSE
vb. c1315 obs. rare –  to enclose, to confine, to shut up

• ACLUMSID
adj. 1388 obs. rare – made clumsy or unable to grasp; benumbed, paralysed

• ACME
n. 1. 1579 rare – the period of full growth, the flower or full-bloom of life; reproductive maturity
n. 2. 1682 – the point of extreme violence of a disease or illness; the crisis

• ACME WRINGER
n. 1988 Sc. rhyming sl. – the finger 

• ACNE
n. 1976 US sl. – a rough road surface

• ACNE-TYPE SURFACE BLEMISH
n. M20 US advertising usage – a pimple 

• A-COAST
adv. 1. 1579 obs. – at one side, by the side, by the coast
adv. 2. 1579 obs. – ashore

• ACOCK
adj. 1611 – elated, triumphant
adv. 1. 1826 – defiantly
adv. 2. 1843 – turned upward; cocked

• A-COCKBILL
adv. 19C colloq., nautical usage – free, dangling free 

• A-COCK-HORSE
adj. 1611 Eng. dial. – triumphant
adv. 1. M16 – astride
adv. 2. 1611 sl. – defiantly
adv. 3. M17 obs. – in an exalted position; in a place of triumph

• A-COCK-HYE
adv. 1598 obs. – ? high up, straight up high

• A-COCK-STRIDE
prep. 1840 obs. – astride; mounted upon

• ACOLASTIC
adj. 1. 1656 obs. – ‘that liveth under no correction, riotous’; prodigal, licentious
adj. 2. 1676 obs. – incorrigible, not better by chastisement
n. 1612 obs. – a prodigal or licentious person

• ACOLAUST
n. 1633 obs. – one that revels in sensual pleasures; a sensualist

• ACOLD
adj. c1314 rare – cooled, chilled, cold
vb. 1. c880 obs. – to become cold
vb. 2. c1230 obs. – to make cold, to cool

• ACOLEE
n. 1591 obs. – an accolade; the salutation marking the bestowal of knighthood, applied by a stroke on the shoulders with the flat of a sword and in earlier use also simply by an embrace or kiss

• ACOLOTHIST
n. 1726 arch. – an acolyte; a subordinate officer in the Romish church who trims the lamps, prepares the elements for the sacraments, etc.

• ACOLOUTHITE
n. 1599 obs. rare – an acolyte

• ACOLUTHIST
n. 1592 – an acolyte; an inferior officer in the church who attended the priests and deacons, and performed subordinate duties, as lighting and bearing candles, etc.

• ACOLYTE
n. 1. c1000 – an inferior officer in the church who attended the priests and deacons, and performed subordinate duties, as lighting and bearing candles, etc.
n. 2. 1623 – a devoted follower or admirer; a novice or neophyte
n. 3. 1829 – an attendant or junior assistant in any ceremony or operation;  a novice

• ACOLYTHIST
n. 1592 obs. – an acolyte; an inferior officer in the church who attended the priests and deacons, and performed subordinate duties, as lighting and bearing candles, etc.

• ACOME
vb. a1000 obs. – to come to, to attain, to reach

• A-COMPASS
adv. c1385 obs. – in a circle

• ACOMPTER
n. 1483 obs. – account, reckoning

• ACONIC;  ACONICKE
adj. 1623 obs. rare – poisonous

• ACONITE
n. 1597 poetic usage – deadly poison 

• À CONTRE-COEUR
adv. 1803 – against one’s will; reluctantly

• ACOOL
vb. a1000 obs. – to wax cold, to cool

• A COOLOO
phr. c1925 Royal Air Force usage – all; everything 

• ACOP
adv. 1610 obs. rare – on the top; on high

• ACORE
vb. c1200 obs. – to taste, to feel the smart of, to suffer pain

• ACORN
n. 1. 1859 sl. – a gallows  
n. 2. 1920 Amer. & Brit. sl. – the head
n. 3. 20C homosexual sl. – the head of the penis 
n. 4. 1984 US sl. – in a casino: a generous tipper

• ACORN CALF
n. 1929 Amer. dial. – a poor specimen, a runt, a weakling (refers to humans as well as cattle and other animals)

• ACORN-CRACKER
n. 1905 Amer. sl. – a countrified person; a rustic, a yokel; an uncouth rural person

• ACORN IN A BIRD’S NEST
n. 20C Brit. sl. – the male genitals

• ACORN PICKER
n. 1960s homosexual sl. – a fellator 

• ACORNS
n. 1975 Amer. – testicles

• ACORN SHELL
n. 1990s UK sl. – a condom

• ACOS
conj. 1900 Eng. dial. – because

• ACOSMY
n. 1704 obs. rare – a state of ill health accompanied by pallor of the skin

• ACOST
adv. 1. c1300 obs. – on or by the side; beside; aside; at one side
adv. 2. 1599 obs. – ashore

• ACOUNTER
n. 1. 1303 obs. – one who calculates or reckons
n. 2. c1330 obs. – an armed encounter; an attack
vb. c1330 obs. – to encounter, to meet as an adversary; also, to engage in combat with

• ACOUNTERING
n. a1400 obs. – combat, battle

• ACOUNTRE
n. c1314 obs. – an encounter

• ACOUP
vb. 1. 1297 obs. – to accuse
vb. 2. c1380 obs. – to strike, to shower blows

• ACOUPEMENT
n. a1300 obs. – accusation

• ACOUPING
n. c1350 obs. – a coming to blows; the act of striking with a weapon; the shock of spear on shield

• ACOURSE 
adv. 1. 1697 obs. rare – according to ordinary procedure or custom; as a matter of course
adv. 2. 1883 colloq. – of course, naturally

• ACOUSMATIC
adj. 1920 – thoughtless, unthinking

• ACOUSTICAL
adj. 1803 – of the nature of sound; involving sound

• ACOUSTIC PERFUME 
n. Bk2004 sl. – sound for covering up unwanted noise, such as music over loudspeakers in a noisy construction area

• ACOUSTICIAN
n. 1826 – one skilled in the science of sound; a student of acoustics

• ACOUSTICON
adj. c1660 obs. rare – relating to the sense of hearing
n. 1660 rare – a device used to assist hearing or amplify sound

• ACOUSTICOPHOBIA
n. Bk1991 – an abnormal fear of noise

• ACOVER
vb. 1. a1100 obs. – to recover, to get back, to regain; to regain health, to recover from illness; to  heal
vb. 2. a1225 obs. – to recover something; to get back, to regain

• ACOVERING
n. c1225 obs. – recovering; recovery 

• ACOY
adv. 1567 obs. rare – calmed, subdued, reserved; coy

• A.C. PLONK
n. 1941 Royal Air Force sl. – an aircraftman of the lowest rank 

• ACQUAINT
adj. 1297 arch. – acquainted; personally known; mutually known; having personal knowledge of
n. c1386 obs. – an acquaintance
vb. c1325 obs. – to introduce or present oneself to; to develop an acquaintanceship with a person; to get to know

• ACQUAINTABLE
adj. c1400 rare – easy to be acquainted with, affable, familiar 

• ACQUAINTANCE
n. 1. c1230 – orig. a person with whom one is acquainted closely; a friend or companion; later, a person one knows slightly or on a less intimate basis than friendship
n. 2. Bk1879 Eng. dial. – a sweetheart; a lover; a fiancée

• ACQUAINTANCED
adj. 1832 – acquainted, personally known to another person, or to each other

• ACQUAINTANCY
n. 1819 rare – the state or position of having acquaintance or personal knowledge

• ACQUAINTANT
n. 1611 rare – a person with whom one is acquainted; an acquaintance

• ACQUAINTATION
n. 1468 obs. rare – acquaintance

• ACQUAINTED
adj. 1. 1406 rare – known widely; well-known, familiar; easily recognizable
adj. 2. M19 UK criminals’ sl. – aware, knowing 
n. c1566 obs. – a person with whom one is acquainted; an acquaintance

• ACQUAINTEDNESS
n. 1661 rare – the state of being acquainted with someone or something; familiarity

• ACQUEST
n. 1. a1456 obs. – the act of acquiring
n. 2. 1622 – a thing acquired, an acquisition; a territory gained by military force

• ACQUIESCATE
vb. a1586 obs. rare – to acquiesce; to agree tacitly to; to concur in; to accept the conclusions or arrangements of others

• ACQUIESCE
vb. 1. 1613 – to agree, esp. tacitly; to concur in; to raise no objections to; to comply with, to concede
vb. 2. c1620 obs. –  to remain at rest, either physically or mentally; to rest satisfied in a place or state 
vb. 3. 1658-9 obs. – to bring to rest; to appease, to satisfy, or harmonize 
vb. 4. 1660 obs. – to remain in quiet subjection; to submit quietly; to remain submissive

• ACQUIESCE MAN
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a ‘yes-man’; a sycophant, a toady

• ACQUIESCEMENT
n. 1721 rare – acquiescence; resting satisfied; rest, quiet satisfaction; peaceful agreement or submission

• ACQUIESCENCE
n. 1612 rare – untroubled contentment; quiet satisfaction

• ACQUIESCENCY
n. 1646 rare – acquiescence; untroubled contentment; quiet satisfaction

• ACQUIESCENT
adj. 1616 – disposed to quietly agree or assent; ready to accept something without protest, or to do what someone else wants
n. 1810 – one who silently assents, submits, or who accepts something without protest

• ACQUIET
vb. 1. 1453-4 obs. – to acquit; to pay off a claim, debt, or liability; to make good an obligation
vb. 2. a1535 obs. – to set at rest, to quiet, to pacify. to calm, to soothe

• ACQUIETING
n. 1504 obs. – a bringing to rest, quieting, or pacification

• ACQUIRABILITY
n. 1802 rare – the quality of being acquirable; the capacity to acquire something

• ACQUIRE
n. 1592 obs. rare – acquirement or gain; abundance
vb. 1937 UK sl. – to steal something

• ACQUIRY
n. 1549 rare – the process of acquiring; acquirement, acquisition

• ACQUISITE
adj. 1528 obs. – acquired; gained, gotten, obtained for oneself

• ACQUISITED
adj. 1613 obs. rare – acquired

• ACQUISITITIOUS
adj. 1653 obs. – of the nature of an acquisition; gained by exertion; acquired, as opposed to ‘native’ or ‘innate’

• ACQUISITIVE
adj. 1629 obs. – that has been acquired
n. Bk1921 sl. – plunder, booty, pickings

• ACQUISITIVE COVE
n. Bk1904 sl. – a thief

• ACQUISITOR
n. 1668 – one who acquires

• ACQUIST
n. 1. 1613 rare – the act of acquiring; acquisition, gain
n. 2. 1635 obs. – a thing acquired; an acquisition
vb. 1592 obs. – to gain for oneself; to acquire

• ACQUISTED
adj. 1613 obs. – acquired

• ACQUISTER
n. 1613 obs. rare – a means of acquiring something; one who acquires

• ACQUIT
adj. 1393 arch. rare – acquitted, cleared, set free
n. 1475 obs. – the act of acquitting; discharge; acquittance, acquittal
vb. 1. c1300 obs. – to pay back a person in respect of an obligation due to or benefit or injury received from him or her; to pay in kind, to requite
vb. 2. 1340 rare – to relieve a person of an obligation; to release from a duty, prior undertaking, etc.
vb. 3. c1530 obs. – to discharge the claims or duties of an office, to perform, to fulfil, to accomplish, to finish
vb. 4. 1567 obs. – to pay for, to atone for an offense

• ACQUITMENT
n. 1431 rare – an acquitting; acquittal

• ACQUITTANCE
vb. 1448 obs. rare – to give an acquittance or discharge; to discharge

• ACRASIA
n. 1590 – intemperance, excess; irregular or disorderly behaviour

• ACRASIAL
adj. 1845 rare – ill-regulated, intemperate, uncontrolled

• ACRASY
n. 1596 rare – irregularity, disorder, intemperance, excess

• ACRATISM
n. 1804 obs. – in ancient Greece: a breakfast of bread dipped in wine

• ACRAZE
vb. 1549 obs. – to weaken, to impair, to enfeeble

• ACRAZED
adj. 1. 1521 obs. – weakened, enfeebled, diseased in body, affected with illness, indisposed; impaired
adj. 2. 1576 obs. – exasperated; mentally affected; crazed

• ACRE
n. 1. c975 obs. – a piece of tilled or arable land; a field
n. 2. 1701 obs. – an alleged term for a duel fought between English and Scottish borderers
n. 3. 1930s Aust. & US sl. – a prison sentence, cited variously as 1 month, 12 months or ‘plenty’
n. 4. 1938 Aust. sl., euphemism – the buttocks 
n. 5. 1990s sl. – the testicles

• ACREABLE
adj. 1742 rare – of an acre; per acre

• ACRE-FOOT
adj. 1908 Amer. dial. – big-footed
n. 1. 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage – a person with large feet
n. 2. 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage – a rustic 

• ACRE-LAND
n. a1400 obs. – ploughed or arable land

• ACREMAN
n. c1000 – a cultivator of the ground; a husbandman, or ploughman

• ACREME
n. 1675 obs. – a unit of land area equal to ten acres

• ACREOCRACY
n. Bk1921 sl. – the landed interest

• ACRE OF CORN
n. 1930s Aust. & US sl. – a prison sentence, cited variously as 1 month, 12 months or ‘plenty’

• ACREOPHAGIST
n. 19C – one who habitually abstains from eating meat; a vegetarian

• ACRES
n. 1. 1775 sl. – a coward
n. 2. 1830 – large quantities, a wide expanse

• ACRID
n. c1550 obs. rare – a locust

• ACRIDOPHAGI
n. Bk1795 – the people of Ethiopia who feed on locusts

• ACRIMONIOUS
adj. 1. 1612 rare – bitter and hot to the taste; bitterly pungent, irritating, corrosive; acrid
adj. 2. 1651 – bitter and irritating in disposition or manner; bitter-tempered

• ACRIMONIOUSLY
adv. 1753 – with bitterness or severity

• ACRIMONY
n. 1. 1542 rare – biting sharpness to the taste; pungency; acridity
n. 2. 1597 – sharp or irritating bitterness of temper or manner; ill feeling

• ACRIOUS
adj. 1675 rare – acrid

• ACRISY
n. 1. 1704 obs. rare – a state of disease such that the likelihood of the patient’s recovery can neither be affirmed nor denied
n. 2. 1721 obs. rare – the fact of no decision being made on a question

• ACRITICAL
adj. 1899 – not involving or applying critical judgement;  uncritical

• ACRITOCHROMACY
n. 1855 obs. – defective colour vision; colour blindness

• ACRITUDE
n. 1650 rare – bitterness, sharpness or pungency of taste; acridity

• ACRITY
n. 1619 rare – sharpness, keenness, shrewdness 

 • ACRO
n. 1967 Amer. aviation usage – acrobatic manoeuvres

• ACROAMA
n. 1. 1579 rare – oral teaching heard only by initiated disciples; esoteric doctrines
n. 2. 1603 rare – a rhetorical declamation, as opposed to an argument

• ACROAMARE
adj. 1657 obs. rare – pungently bitter

• ACROAMATIC
adj. 1632 rare – pert. to hearing; hence, privately communicated by oral teaching to chosen disciples only; esoteric, secret

• ACROAMATICAL
adj. 1580 obs. – pert. to hearing; hence, privately communicated by oral teaching to chosen disciples only; esoteric, secret

• ACROASIS
n. 1623 rare, chiefly Ancient Hist. usage – an oral discourse; a discourse listened to rather than read 

• ACROATIC
adj. 1655-50 – pert. to hearing; hence, privately communicated by oral teaching to chosen disciples only; esoteric, secret

• ACROBACY
n. 1867 – acrobatics; an acrobatic feat

• ACROBAT
n. 1. B1912 sl. – a drinking glass
n. 2. 1958 W. Indies sl. – a fool

• ACROBATICS
n. 1856 – dexterous operations in reasoning, accounting, etc.

• ACROBATISM
n. 1848 – the art or profession of the acrobat; the performance of gymnastic feats

• ACROBATS
n. 1924 Amer. gambling sl. – loaded or unfairly bevelled dice 

• ACROCOMIC
n. 1623 obs. rare – one having long hair 

• ACROLOGIC
adj. 1830 rare – pert. to initials

• ACROLOGICAL
adj. 1827 rare – relating to or based on initial letters or sounds

• ACROMANIA
n. Bk1991 – a violent form of mania; incurable insanity

• ACRONYCAL;  ACRONYCHAL
adj. 1594 – happening in the evening or at nightfall, as the acronychal rising or setting of a star

• ACRONYCH
adj. 1594 – happening in the evening or at nightfall, as the acronychal rising or setting of a star

• ACRONYMANIA
n. 1968 – a fervent or excessive enthusiasm for the use of acronyms or initialisms

• ACRONYMANIAC
n. 1968 – a person having an excessive enthusiasm for using acronyms

• ACRONYMIC
adj. 1948 – relating to or designated by an acronym

• ACRONYMIZE
vb. 1955 – to convert into an acronym; to call by an acronym

• ACRONYMOUS
adj. 1955 – relating to or designated by an acronym

• ACROOK
adv. a1387 – in a bend or curve; awry, crookedly

• ACROPHILE
n. Bk1991 – a lover of high mountains and heights

• ACROPHILIA
n. Bk1991 – a love of high mountains and of heights

• ACROPHOBE
n. 1894 – a person affected with acrophobia

• ACROPHOBIA
n. 1888 – irrational fear of heights

• ACROPHOBIC
adj. 1888 – affected with acrophobia

• ACROSCOPIC
adj. 1834 obs. rare, poetic usage – positioned so as to view something from a height 

• ACROSS
adv. 1. a1250 rare – in the form of a cross, crosswise; crossing each other, crossed
adv. 2. 1559 obs. – not straight or directly; obliquely; athwart, awry, amiss
prep. 1607 obs. – at odds with, at variance with
n. 1900s US sl. – Great Britain

• ACROSS COUNTRY
n. 1929 criminals’ sl. – one who is a fugitive from the law 

• ACROSSED
adj. 1548 obs. rare – crosswise, crossed

• ACROSS LOTS
phr. 1. E19 US sl. – via a short cut
phr. 2. M19 sl. – accelerated, using fig. ‘short cuts’
phr. 3. 1848 sl. – completely

• ACROSS THE BOARD
n. 1964 sl. – in horse racing: a bet that a horse will win, place (finish second), or show (finish third)

• ACROSS THE BRIDGE TO DARTMOUTH
adj. 1999 Can. sl. – mentally ill, institutionalized 

• ACROSS THE BUBBLE
adj. 1912 criminals’ sl. – into prison 

• ACROSS THE DITCH
n. 1998 NZ sl. – Australia 

• ACROSS THE PAVEMENT
adv. 1977 UK sl. – of a criminal activity: in a street situation 

• ACROSS THE RIVER
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – dead

• ACROSS THE TRACKS
n. 1943 US sl. – the socially inferior area of town

• ACROST
prep. 1759 – across
adv. 1775 – across

• ACROSTIC
adj. 1602 obs. rare – crossed, folded across; moving crosswise, erratic, zigzag
n. 1614 obs. – the beginning or end of a verse

• ACROTELEUTIC
n. 1719 obs. – a formula repeated at the end of a psalm; a doxology

• A-CRY
adv. 1593 obs. – in a cry, crying

• ACRYLIC
adj. 1990s US college sl. – superficial, hard, difficult to tolerate 


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