Dictionary: ALL – ALLG

• ALL
adv. 1. 1994 sl. – very
adv. 2. 1997 US sl. – so
 
• ALL-A-BITS
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – in pieces or rags, broken
 
• ALLABLASTER
n. 1805 Eng. dial. – alabaster
 
• ALL ABOARD
adj. 1868 Amer. sl. – ready to take action
 
• ALLABORATE
vb. 1656 obs. – to labour vehemently
 
• ALL ABOUT
adj. 1. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – light-headed
adj. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – in a state of confusion
adj. 3. 1946 UK sl., chiefly Royal Navy usage – alert, efficient
adj. 4. 1999 US sl. – interested in
adv. 1848 Aust. – everywhere
 
• ALL-ABOUT-GIN
n. 1962 Aust. sl. – a domestic servant

• ALL ABOUT IT
adj. 2000 US students’ sl. – enthusiastic, keen
 
• ALL ABOUT LIKE SHIT IN A FIELD
phr. 1999 UK sl. – everywhere
 
• ALL ABOUT TROUT
phr. 1960s rhyming sl. – on the lookout for an advantageous opportunity
 
• ALL ABROAD
adj. 1770 colloq. rare – uncertain, at a loss, in great confusion; perplexed; baffled; bewildered; wide of the mark; wrong
adv. 1. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – in great confusion
adv. 2. 1901 Eng. dial. – lying scattered about
 
• ALLACK
vb. 1897 Eng. dial. – to idle away time; to loiter, to loaf, to play
 
• ALL-A-COCK
adj. 1. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – highly elated
adj. 2. L19 sl. – defeated, overthrown
 
• ALLACOMPAIN
n. M19 rhyming sl. – rain
 
• ALL AFLOAT
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – in disorder
n. 19C Brit. rhyming sl. – a coat
 
• ALLAGADOO
n. 1961 sl., orig. Irish English, often derogatory – a person who is attached to or associated with a rugby game or club, but does not play; esp. an administrative official or committee member
 
• ALLAGRUGOUS
adj. 1742  Sc. – discontented-looking, ill-natured, morose, disagreeable; grim, ghastly
 
• ALLAGUST
n. 1742 Sc. obs. – suspicion
 
• ALL-A-HUH
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – awry, askew, lopsided, aslant
 
• ALL A-HUNKY
adj. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – all right
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate
 
• ALLAKAY
n. 1818 Sc. – the bridegroom’s man; he who attends on the bridegroom, or is employed as his precursor, at a wedding
 
• ALL ALIVE
n. 1940s rhyming sl. – the number 5
 
• ALL ALIVE-O;  ALL ALIVO
adj. M19 sl. – alert, active
 
• ALL-A-LIVING-ALONE
phr. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – of a sick person: left in a helpless situation
 
• ALL ALONE
adj. 1951 US sl. – in horse racing: leading a race by several lengths
 
• ALL ALONE LIKE A COUNTRY DUNNY
adj. 1988 Aust. sl. – completely alone; by yourself; friendless
 
• ALL-AMERICAN CHUMP
n. 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage – a stupid person
 
• ALL-AMERICAN DRUG
n. 1998 US sl. – cocaine
 
• ALL AMORT
adj. 1. L16 arch. – dead; lifeless; spiritless; dejected
adj. 2. L18 sl. – shocked, surprised and thus rendered motionless
 
• ALL-A-MUGGLE
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – disorderly, untidy
 
• ALLAN
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a bit of land nearly surrounded by water; an island
 
• ALL-AND-ALL
n. 1. 1970 Amer. dial. – one’s best clothes
n. 2. 1970 Amer. dial. – one’s wife
n. 3. 1980s Black British sl. – (as ‘all and all’) everyone
 
• ALL AND EVERYONE
n. 1973 Trinidad & Tobago – every single person
 
• ALL AND ODD
n. 1556 obs. – all and each, one and all
 
• ALL AND SINGULAR
pron. 1472 now arch. – everyone
 
• ALL AND SUNDRIES
n. 1783 obs., chiefly Sc. – everybody of all classes, one and all
 
 ALL-ANERLY
adj. 1860 Sc. – only, sole
adv. 1818 Sc. – only, solely; quite alone
 
 ALL ANXIOUSED UP
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – impatient
 
 ALL ANYHOW
adv. Bk1903 – in a confused or disorderly manner
 
 ALL-A-ONE-HUH
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – awry, askew, lopsided, aslant
 
 ALL A PENNY
adj. 1978 Barbados sl. – inexpensive and plentiful
 
 ALL ARMS AND LEGS
n. 19C Brit. sl. – weak beer
 
 ALL AROUND
adj. 1938 Amer. dial. – near, close to
 
 ALL-AROUNDER
n. 1. 1892 colloq. obs. – a person of no fixed abode
n. 2. 1906 – a person with ability in many departments
 
 ALL AROUND MY HAT
phr. M19 sl. – all over, completely
 
 ALL AROUND THE PIG’S ARSE THERE IS PORK
phr. 1980s NZ sl. – a phrase of resignation, acceptance
 
 ALL ASSED UP
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – disorderly; in confusion
 
 ALL AT A BANG
phr. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – all at once
 
 ALL AT A SLAP
phr. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – all at once
 
 ALL AT HOME
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – quite sane
 
 ALL AT ONE SHOT
adv. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – immediately; shortly
 
 ALL A-TREAT
adj. 1900s sl. – excellent, wonderful
 
 ALL AT SEA
adj. 1. 1768 – confused, bewildered
adj. 2. 20C nautical sl. – intoxicated with alcohol
 
 ALLAUDABLE
adj. 1731 obs. – praiseworthy, commendable
 
 ALLAVOLIE
adj. Bk1898 Sc. – giddy, volatile
adv. Bk1898 Sc. – at random
 
 ALLAY
vb. 1918 US military sl. – to go, to hurry, to run
 
 ALL BALLED UP
adj. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; confused; muddled
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – disorderly; in confusion
 
 ALL BALLS AND BANG-ME-ARSE
n. 1940s sl. – nonsense
 
 ALL B AND B
phr. 1940s sl. – used of a well-built, sexy woman (All Bosom and Bottom)
 
 ALL BARENAKED
adj. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – naked
 
• ALL BEDENE
adv. c1200 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – all together; altogether, completely
 
• ALL BEER AND SKITTLES
n. 19C Brit. sl. – an easy life; pleasure, enjoyment
 
• ALL BEHIND
adj. 20C Brit. rhyming sl. – blind
 
• ALL BEHIND IN MELBOURNE 
adj. Bk1999 Western Aust. sl. – pert. to a large posterior; fat, heavy-buttocked
 
• ALL BEHIND LIKE A CAT’S ARSE
adj. 20C Brit. sl. – running late
 
• ALL BEHIND LIKE A DOG’S TAIL
adj. 20C Brit. sl. – running late
 
• ALL BEHIND LIKE BARNEY’S BULL
adj. 1. 1940s Aust. & NZ sl. – late, delayed
adj. 2. 1940s Aust. & NZ sl. – overweight
 
• ALL BEHIND LIKE THE COW’S TAIL
adj. 20C Irish sl. – late
 
• ALL BETS ARE OFF
phr. 1850s – the situation is entirely different than in the beginning
 
• ALL BETS OFF
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – dead
 
• ALL BETTY
phr. E19 sl. – finished, done for
 
• ALL BLOWED UP
adj. c1960 Amer. dial. – out of order or humour
 
• ALL BROKEN UP
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; confused; disconcerted
 
 ALL BROKE UP
adj. 1955 Amer. dial. – in poor health; injured
 
 ALL BUM
adj. M19 sl. – of a woman: wearing a noticeably large bustle (a stuffed pad that emphasized the rear of the dress)
 
 ALL BUZZED UP
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – drunk
 
 ALL BY EASE
adv. 1881 Eng. dial. – gently, quietly
 
 ALL BY ONE’S LONESOME
phr. 20C Amer. sl. – alone; solo
 
 ALL CALLY-O
adj. 1945 Amer. nautical sl. – all right
 
 ALL CHIEFS AND NO INDIANS 
phr. 1972 – all bosses and no workers; a situation at work where everyone wants to give orders and no one wishes to work
 
 ALL-CLEAR
n. 1936 Amer. sl. – denoting authorization to proceed with something; a signal that there is no further danger
 
 ALL COCK AND RIBS LIKE A MUSTERER’S DOG
adj. 1970s Aust. & NZ sl. – said of a very thin person
 
 ALL COMPLAIN
n. 20C Brit. rhyming sl. – rain
 
 ALL COP AND NO BLUE
adj. L19 sl. – said of a mean person or attitude
 
 ALL DAT
adj. 1991 Amer. rap music usage – first-rate, perfect
n. 2003 UK sl. – everything
 
 ALL DAY
adj. 1. 1976 US sl. – in bar dice games involving up to three rolls: taking all three rolls to make the player’s hand
adj. 2. 1983 US sl. – in craps: said of a bet that is in effect until the shooter rolls his point or a seven
n. 1. L19 sl. – the end of one’s life
n. 2. 1970s US criminals’ sl. – a life sentence
phr. 1. 1978 US jocular usage – yes indeed
phr. 2. 1983 US sl. – in craps: said of a bet that is in effect until the shooter rolls his point or a seven
 
 ALL DAY, ALL NIGHT, JUST LIKE NEW YORK
adj. 1930s African-American sl. – fashionable; sophisticated
 
 ALL DAY AND A NIGHT
n. 2000s US prison sl. – a life sentence without the opportunity of parole
 
 ALL DAY AND NIGHT
n. 1976 US sl. – a life prison sentence
 
 ALL DAYER
n. 20C Brit. sl. – a day-long drinking session
 
 ALL DAY FROM A QUARTER
n. 1992 US criminals’ sl. – a sentence of 25 years to life
 
 ALL DAYS
adv. c1000 obs. – always, forever
 
 ALL-DAY SUCKER
n. 1939 Aust. sl. – a large lollipop that takes a long time to consume
 
 ALL DICKEY;  ALL DICKY
adj. L18 sl. – all over, ruined, finished
 
 ALL DICKEY WITH;  ALL DICKY WITH
adj. L18 sl. – all over, ruined, finished
 
 ALL DOLLED UP LIKE A BARBER’S CAT
adj. M19 Can. sl. – dressed in the height of fashion
 
 ALL DOWN THE LINE
adv. 1976 UK sl. – in every way, completely; at every opportunity
 
 ALL EARS
adj. 1860s Amer. colloq. – very eager to hear; acutely attentive
 
 ALL EASE
adv. 1969 Amer. dial. – without difficulty, easily
 
 ALLECT
vb. 1528 obs. – to allure, to entice, to attract, to seduce
 
 ALLEE-COUCHEE
vb. 1888 Eng. dial. – to go to bed
 
 ALLEE-SAMEE
adv. 1856 US sl. – in the same way; nevertheless
prep. 1926 US sl. – like
 
 ALLEGATE
vb. 1892 Ireland – to argue, to dispute
 
 ALLEGATION
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a dispute, a quarrel
 
 ALLEGOGER
vb. 1863 Eng. dial. – to go out to a ship to sell provisions
 
 ALLEGRO
adj. Bk1994 sl. – lively
 
 ALLEKAY
n. 1818 Sc. – the bridegroom’s man; he who attends on the bridegroom, or is employed as his precursor, at a wedding
 
 ALLELUIA LASS
n. L19 sl. – a young Salvation Army woman
 
 ALLEMAND
vb. 1821 Sc. obs. – to conduct in a formal and courtly style
 
 ALL ENDS AND SIDES
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – unreliable, scatterbrained
adv. 1866 Eng. dial. – in excess, too great abundance
 
 ALLER
n. 1790 Eng. dial. – a boil, a carbuncle
 
 ALLERGIC
adj.1935 Amer. jocular usage – having a strong aversion to something or someone 
 
 ALLERICKSTIX
adv. 1890 Amer. dial. – all right, fine; satisfactorily
 
 ALLERISH
adj. 1825 Sc. obs. – chilly, rather cold
 
 ALLERNBATCH
n. 1746 Eng. dial. – a boil, a carbuncle; an old sore
 
 ALLERS 
adv. 1833 colloq. – always
 
 ALLEVATE
vb. 1. 1613 obs. rare – to raise up, to lift
vb. 2. 1613 obs. rare – to ease, comfort, alleviate, assuage
 
 ALLEVE
vb. a1546 obs. – to relieve, to alleviate
 
 ALLEVIATOR
n. c1846 sl. – a drink, esp. in a medicinal context
 
 ALLEVOLIE
adj. Bk1898 Sc. – giddy, volatile
adv. Bk1898 Sc. – at random
 
 ALLEY
adj. 1990s US college sl. – second-rate
n. 1. 1580 Eng. dial. – a pathway in a garden between flowerbeds, etc.
n. 2. 1713 Eng. dial. – the aisle of a church
n. 3. 1848 Amer. dial. – a playing marble, orig. of alabaster and subsequently of glass in imitation of alabaster, considered a favourite marble to be used as a shooter or taw
n. 4. 1892 Amer. dial. – any playing marble
n. 5. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a pathway down the middle of a large room, as in a factory between the rows of machines
n. 6. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – the line marking the goal in a game of football
n. 7. M19 sl. – the vagina
n. 8. L19 sl. – a go-between
n. 9. 1912 US sl. – in baseball: the undefended area between two outfielders, or between an outfielder and a foul line, into which a ball may be hit, usually for extra bases
n. 10. 1920s US criminals’ sl. – a place where illicit beer is brewed
n. 11. 1929 US sl. – in baseball: the middle of the strike zone conceived as an imaginary corridor extending directly from the pitcher’s mound across the middle of home plate to the catcher’s glove
n. 12. 1960s African-American sl. – a hospital corridor
n. 13. 1975 US sl. – on the railway: the track visible ahead of a train
n. 14. 1982 Aust. sl. – in horse racing: a stall in the starting barrier
n. 15. 1990s US criminals’ sl. – the open area outside a row of cells
n. 16. 1992 US sl. – a walkway between rows of prison cells
vb. 1918 US military sl. – to go, to hurry, to run
 
 ALLEY-ALLEY
n. 1896 Amer. dial. – a playing marble of real alabaster
 
 ALLEY APPLE
n. 1. 1927 Amer. dial. – a brick, rock, or stone, usually when used as a missile
n. 2. 1954 Amer. sl. – a piece of horse manure
 
 ALLEY BAT
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a promiscuous, careless, or slovenly woman; an immoral woman; a prostitute; sometimes used as a general term of abuse
 
• ALLEYBLASTER
n. 1805 Eng. dial. – alabaster
 
• ALLEY BOURBON
n. 1999 US sl. – strong, illegally manufactured whisky
 
• ALLEY CAT
n. 1. 1886 – a homeless cat
n. 2. 1911 – a person, usually a female, of rather easygoing, or loose sexual morals; a promiscuous person
n. 3. 1926 Amer. sl. – a prostitute, esp. one who prowls in the night
n. 4. 1945 US sl. – a young person who idles on a street corner
n. 5. 1966 Amer. dial. – an illegitimate child
n. 6. 1996 Guyana sl. – a person who survives on begged or stolen pickings
n. 7. 20C sl. – a womanizer
n. 8. 20C sl. – a night watchman
vb. 1937 sl. – to behave in a sexually promiscuous manner
 
• ALLEY-CLEANER
n. 1957 US sl. – a riot gun, usually a shotgun with a wide blast and thus used to disperse a mob
 
• ALLEY-COUCHEY
vb. 1888 Eng. dial. – to go to bed
 
• ALLEY CRAPS
n. 1977 US sl. – a spontaneous, loosely organized, private game of craps, rarely played in an alley
 
• ALLEY DOG
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a mongrel dog; a dog of mixed breed
 
• ALLEY JUICE
n. 1992 US sl. – denatured alcohol (ethyl alcohol) to which a poisonous substance has been added to make it unfit for consumption
 
• ALLEY LILY
n. 1924 US sl. – a brick, rock, or stone, usually when used as a missile
 
• ALLEY LINE
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – in marble play: the line toward which the players roll their marbles before beginning a game, to determine the order of shooting
 
• ALLEYMAN
n. 1915 army sl. – a German
 
• ALLEY-MOUTH
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a boundary or goal in the game of football
 
• ALLEY OOP
n. 1. Bk1994 sl.  – in basketball: a pass that is lobbed far through the air and tipped in by a player waiting near the basket 
n. 2. 1996 Can. sl. – in snowboarding: a 360-degree turn in the direction of the back of the board
 
• ALLEY RAT
n. 1. 1914 sl. – a particularly unpleasant, villainous, and impoverished person
n. 2. 1930s US sl. – a pimp, esp. one involved in cheating a prostitute’s clients
 
• ALLEY RIFLE
n. 1969 US sl. – a brick, rock, or stone, usually when used as a missile
 
• ALLEY-SCORING
n. 1997 US sl. – the recycling of food, furniture, or anything else left in the rubbish
 
• ALLEY TAW;  ALLEY TOR
n.  1955 Amer. dial. – in marble play: a shooter
 
• ALLEY UP
vb. 1. 1940s Aust. sl. – to pay one’s share
vb. 2. 2002 NZ sl. – to pay off a debt
 
• ALLEY-WAITER
n. 1896 Amer. dial. – an elevator
 
• ALLEY WAY
n. 1. 1910s US sl. – the throat, in the context of drinking
n. 2. 1950s US homosexual sl. – the anus
 
• ALLEY-WHIPPED
adj. 2000s US sl. – unpaid (or robbed of one’s pay) despite having done the work required
 
• ALLEY-WISE
adj. 1974 US sl. – sophisticated in the ways of the world
 
• ALLEZ
vb. 1918 US military sl. – to go, to hurry, to run
 
• ALLEZ OOP
n. 20C Brit. rhyming sl. – poop, excrement
int. 1931 UK sl. – as ‘allez-oop!’) used to accompany the action when lifting a child, or boosting someone over or onto something.
 
• ALL FACE
adj. L19 UK & US sl. – naked; nude
 
• ALL FART AND NO SHIT
adj. 1989 UK sl. – said of a person who makes empty promises; engaging in empty, boastful talk; all talk and no substance
 
• ALL FIRE AND TOW
adj. 1838 Amer. dial. – irascible, excitable, hot-tempered
 
• ALL-FIRED
adj. 1835 Amer. dial. – extreme, severe
adv. 1833 Amer. dial. – extremely, thoroughly
 
• ALL-FIREDLY
adv. 1. Bk1898 Amer. – enormously
adv. 2. M19 US sl. – particularly, excessively
 
• ALL FORLORN
n. 1. 20C British rhyming sl. for ‘horn’ – an erect penis
n. 2. 1960s rhyming sl. for ‘horn’ – a state of sexual excitement
 
• ALL FROTH AND NO BEER
adj. Bk1999 Aust. sl. – silly; superficial
 
• ALL FRUITS RIPE
phr. 1. 1980s W. Indies & Black British teen sl. – everything is fine
phr. 2. 1990s sl. – all woman are potential sex partners
 
• ALL FUSS AND FEATHERS
adj. c1960 Amer. dial. – of a woman: dressed in her good clothes
 
• ALL FUSSED ABOUT
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; perplexed; baffled
 
• ALL FUSSED UP
adj. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; confused; disconcerted
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – disorderly; in confusion
 
• ALL FUSSED UP ABOUT
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; perplexed; baffled
 
• ALL GAS AND GAITERS
adj. M19 sl. – satisfactory, as desired
n. 1923 sl. – nonsense, rubbish, pomposity, bombast
 
• ALL-GATES
adv. 1. 1884 Eng. dial. – in every way, by all means
adv. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – however, at all events, at any rate
 
• ALL GET-OUT
phr. 19C US – euphemism for ‘hell’ in ‘it’s as hot as all get-out’
 
• ALL GOES DOWN GUTTER LANE
phr. 18C obs. – he spends all his money on his stomach
 
• ALL GONE
adj. 1. 1929 Amer. sl. – drunk
adj. 2. 1950 Amer. dial. – fatigued, weak, somewhat ill, lifeless, without energy
 
• ALL GONE TO BOLLOCKS
phr. 20C Brit. sl. – said of something that’s gone wrong
 
• ALL GONG AND NO DINNER
phr. 1981 UK sl. – all talk but no action
 
• ALL GOOD
phr. 1990s African-American teen sl. – everything is fine
 
• ALL GRANDIED UP
adj. 1966 Amer. dial. – dressed sloppily
 
• ALL GUTS
n. 1. 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage – a person of great courage
n. 2. 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage – a fat person 
 


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Updated: September 5, 2022