Dictionary: AWI – AZZ

 AWIDE
adv. 1610 obs. – wide, widely
 
 AWILD-EN
vb. c1225 obs. rare – to become wild or unruly
 
 A-WILL
adv. a1275 obs. exc. Sc. – at one’s will; of one’s own accord
 
 AWIN
vb. 1. c950 obs. – to labour
vb. 2. c1000 obs. – to overcome, to conquer; to win, to gain, to obtain
 
 A-WING
adv. 1827 – on the wing; fluttering
 
 A-WINK
adv. 1883 – winking
 
 A-WIPER
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – one who curries favour; a toady
 
 AWIS
adv. 1790 Sc. – certainly
 
 AWIT
vb. 1. c1200 obs. – to perceive, to know
vb. 2. 1250 obs. – to watch over, to command a troop
 
 AWK
adj. 1. c1440 obs. – directed the other way or in the wrong direction, back-handed, from the left hand
adj. 2. c1440 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – of persons or things: awkward, untoward, perverse
adj. 3. c1440 obs. – odd, strange
adj. 4. 1593 obs. – untoward to deal with, awkward to use, clumsy
n. 1. 1644 obs. – backhandedness, untowardness, awkwardness
n. 2. 1811 Eng. dial. – a stupid, clumsy person
 
 AWKA VEETY
n. 1829 Sc. – aqua vitae, whisky
 
 AWKLY
adj. c1400 obs. – untoward, perverse
adv. 1. c1440 obs. – in the wrong direction, backhanded or left-handed wise; hence, sinisterly, unluckily
adv. 2. c1440 obs. – perversely, untowardly
adv. 3. 1565 obs. – inauspiciously
adv. 4. 1603 obs. – in ungainly fashion, clumsily, awkwardly
 
 AWKNESS
n. 1587 obs. – wrongness, irrationality, perversity, untowardness, awkwardness, ineptitude
 
 AWKWARD
adj. 1. 1530 obs. – froward, untoward, perverse, in conduct
adj. 2. 1866 Eng. dial. – backward; back-handed
adj. 3. 1883 Eng. dial. – of persons or animals: perverse, obstinate, difficult to manage, bad-tempered
adj. 4. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – of the weather: uncertain
adj. 5. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – of things: perverse, unfavourable
adj. 6. L19 sl. – pregnant
 
 THE AWKWARD AGE
n. 1895 – the time of life when one is no longer a child and yet not properly grown up
 
 AWKWARD AS A CAT IN PATTENS
adj. Bk1903 Eng. dial. – very awkward, clumsy, making a great noise
 
 AWKWARD AS A CHOW ON A BIKE
adj. 1920s Aust. sl. – extremely clumsy, uncoordinated
 
 AWKWARD AS DICK’S HATBAND
adj. 1868 Eng. dial. – very awkward
 
 AWKWARDISH
adj. 1603 colloq. – rather awkward
 
 AWKWARDLY
adj. 1703 Eng. dial. – awkward, troublesome, clumsy
adv. c1540 obs. – wrongly, perversely
 
 AWKWARDNESS
n. 1674 obs. – untowardness, perversity; perverseness, obstinacy, impracticability
 
 AWKWARDS
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – perverseness, obstinacy, impracticability
 
 AWKWARD SQUAD
n. 1. 1796 Brit. – collectively, people who do not, or will not, conform; a notional grouping of people who are ‘difficult’; a set of people who tend to behave in an obstructive way or who express opposition or dissent
n. 2. B1890 Eng. sl. – army recruits drilling
n. 3. Bk1944 services’ sl. – where backward rookies receive elementary instruction

 AWKY
adj. 1655 obs. – untoward, difficult, awkward
 
 AWL
n. 17C sl. – the penis
 
 AWLATED
adj. 1297 obs. rare – disgusted
 
 AWL-BIRD
n. 1763 Eng. dial. – the green woodpecker, Gecinus viridis
 
 AWLENCH
vb. c1200 obs. – to make splendid, to adorn
 
 AWLY
adj. c1200 obs. – awful, dreadful, terrible
adv. c1225 obs. – awfully, terribly, dreadfully
 
 AWM
vb. 1. 1878 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to waste time, to be idle; to move about aimlessly, to loiter, to lounge; to stand gaping and staring; to do work in a slovenly manner
vb. 2. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – to set about a thing, to begin, to move, to attempt
 
 AWMAN
n. 1866 Sc. – a thrashing, a sound beating, chastisement
 
 AWN
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – a yawn
vb. 1. c1175 obs. – to put before a person’s eyes; to show, to manifest; to appear
vb. 2. 1950 Amer. dial. – to yawn
 
 AWNED
adj. 1747 Eng. dial. – fated, destined, ordained
 
 AWNING OVER THE TOY SHOP
n. 1990s Aust. sl. – a male beer belly
 
 AW NUTS!
int. Bk1934 college sl. – an exclamation of disgust
 
 A-WOBBLE
adv. 1881 – wobbling
 
 AWOL
adj. 1. 1920 sl., orig. US – absent without leave; missing
adj. 2. 1944 US military sl. – ‘after women or liquor’
n. 1. 1918 US sl. – a deserter
n. 2. 1942 US military sl. – ‘ a wolf on the loose’
 
 AWOL BAG
n. 1956 US sl. – in the Korea and Vietnam wars: an overnight bag
 
 A.W.O. LOOSE
n. 1920 US sl. – absence without leave
 
 AWOMEN CORNER
n. c1960 Amer. dial. – a humorous creation to match the ‘amen corner’ in the church; men and women, except courting couples, sat on opposite sides of the church
 
 AWONDER
vb. c1230 obs. – to astonish, surprise, marvel; to be astonished or amazed; to cause to wonder
 
 AWONDERED
adj. 1154 obs. – astonished, astounded, amazed
 
 A WORD
n. 1980s US homosexual sl. – AIDS
 
 AWORRY
vb. c885 obs. – to strangle; to worry
 
 AWORTH
vb. 1. c1000 obs. – to vanish, to perish; to escape notice
vb. 2. c1275 obs. – to become, to turn to
 
 AWORTHY
vb. c1275 obs. – to give honour or dignity to; to dignify, to adorn
 
 AWOUS
adj. c1675 obs. rare – awe-inspiring
 
 AWOW!
int. 1768 Sc. – an exclamation of sorrow; alas!
 
 AWPING
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – clumsy, awkward
 
 AWPISH
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – clumsy, awkward
 
 AWPS
n. 1. 1790 Eng. dial. – a stupid, clumsy, gawky person
n. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a wayward, mischievous child
 
 AW-PUCK
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – the will-o’-the-wisp
 
 AWRACK
adv. 1627 – wrecked, ruined
 
 AWRAP
vb. 1609 obs. rare – to wrap
 
 AWRATH
vb. a1250 obs. – to make angry, to enrage
 
 AWREAK
vb. 1. 1048 obs. – to avenge
vb. 2. c1275 obs. – to condemn, to blame, to find fault with
vb. 3. a1300 obs. – to sentence to punishment, to condemn a person
 
 AWREAKING
n. 1340 obs. – revenge
 
 A-WRECK
adv. 1878 – in a wrecked condition
 
 AWREIGHT
adj. c1275 obs. – wrenched away
 
 AWRIGHT!
int. 1960s sl. – that’s good! I feel great!
 
 AWRITE
vb. c885 obs. – to write
 
 AWRONG
adv. 1430 – wrongly, in a wrong way
 
 AWROTH
vb. a1250 obs. – to make angry, to enrage
 
 AWRY-EYED
adj. 1919 Amer. dial. – having bleary or wild-looking eyes, esp. as a result of drunkenness; drunk; enraged, angry
 
 AWSE
adj. 1989 Amer. sl. – awesome, wonderful, perfect
vb. Bk1886 Eng. dial. – to attempt
 
 AW SHUCKS
adj. 1932 colloq. – of a person’s manner, behaviour, etc.: genially self-deprecating, shy, or abashed; bashful
int. 1888 colloq. – a mild exclamation expressing surprise, exasperation, genial self-deprecation, or gratified embarrassment
 
 AWSOME
adj. 1. 1817 Sc. & Eng. dial. – awful, appalling, terrifying
adj. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – susceptible to fear, terrified
 
 AWSOMELY
adv. 1901 Sc. – very much
 
 AWVISH
adj. 1. 1819 Eng. dial. – silly, dull, stupid, clownish, mischievous
adj. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – reluctant, undecided
adv. 1790 Eng. dial. – slightly unwell, out of sorts
 
 AWVISHLY
adv. 1746 Eng. dial. – stupidly, queerly
 
 AWVISHNESS
n. 1867 Eng. dial. – disagreeable behaviour, perversity
 
 AX
n. 1. 1883 Amer. sl. – a finishing action, such as a dismissal from a position, defeat in a game, expulsion from school, rejection of a lover, etc.
n. 2. 1896 Amer. sl. – a straight razor or knife
n. 3. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a question
n. 4. 1915 Amer. sl. – the penis
n. 5. 1950 US sl. – any sharp-edged weapon
n. 6. 1955 US jazz sl. – a musical instrument, esp. an electric guitar; orig. used in jazz circles for any instrument, particularly a saxophone or trumpet, instruments on which ‘chops’ (musical figures) are played
n. 7. 1974 US sl. – in a gambling operation: the house’s cut of the bets
n. 8. 1991 US sl. – the lip of a wave
vb. 1. 1785 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to ask
vb. 2. 1922 sl. – to dismiss or discharge; to drop, to cancel, to reject
 
 AXABLE
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – of an age suitable for marriage
 
 AXE
n. 1. 1883 Amer. sl. – a finishing action, such as a dismissal from a position, defeat in a game, expulsion from school, rejection of a lover, etc.
n. 2. 1896 Amer. sl. – straight razor or knife
n. 3. 1915 Amer. sl. – the penis
n. 4. 1950 Amer. sl. – any sharp-edged weapon
n. 5. 1955 US jazz sl. – a musical instrument, esp. an electric guitar; orig. used in jazz circles for any instrument, particularly a saxophone or trumpet, instruments on which ‘chops’ (musical figures) are played
n. 6. 1974 US sl. – in a gambling operation: the house’s cut of the bets
n. 7. 1991 US sl. – the lip of a wave
vb. 1. 1922 sl. – to dismiss or discharge; to drop, to cancel, to reject
vb. 2.1923 Eng. sl. – to lessen expenditure
 
• THE AXE
n. 1923 – dismissal of an employee
 
• AXE GOD
n. 1999 Brit. sl. – a popular electric-guitar player who inspires hero-worship with his musical technique
 
• AXE HANDLE
n. 1947 US sl. – an imprecise unit of measurement, esp. when applied to the breadth of a man’s shoulders or woman’s buttocks
 
• AXE HANDLE PARTY
n. 20C US sl. – a riot or brawl
 
• AXE HERO
n. 1996 Brit. sl. – a popular electric-guitar player who inspires hero-worship with his musical technique
 
• AXE MAN
n. 1. 1828 – a warrior armed with a battle-axe
n. 2. L19 sl., orig. African-American – one who carries or wields a knife
n. 3. 1920s US prison sl. – a barber
n. 4. 1975 Trinidad and Tobago – a person who decides when a company will discharge an employee
n. 5. 1976 Brit. sl. – an electric guitarist; rarely, any musician
 
• AXE UP
vb. 1980s Aust. sl. – to share
 
• AXE-WOUND
n. 2003 Brit. sl. – the vagina
 
• AX-HANDLE
n. 1843 Amer. dial. – orig. among loggers: a unit of measurement, esp. of width
 
• AX-HANDLE PARTY
n. 1958 Amer. dial. – among loggers: a brawl
 
• AX-HANDLES
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – diarrhoea
 
• AX-HOLDER
n. c1885 Amer. sl. – a hand
 
• AXINOMANCY
n. 1601 – divination by means of an axe-head

• AXIOMANCY
n. Bk2003 – divination involving the use of an axe-head and a bed of red-hot coals
 
• AXIOPISTICAL
adj. 1611 obs. – trustworthy
 
• AXIOPISTY
n. 1862 – trustworthiness; worthiness of being believed
 
• AXIS
n. 19C sl. – the vagina
 
• AXIS RAT
n. 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage – a German submarine
 
• AXIS SNAKE
n. 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage – a German submarine 
 
• AXIS WATER-MOCCASIN
n. 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage – a German submarine 
 
• AXLE
n. 1. c1000 obs. – the shoulder
n. 2. 1934 Amer. euphemism – the ass; the buttocks, rectum, and anus
 
• AXLE GREASE
n. 1. 1883 Amer. sl., esp. military usage – margarine or butter
n. 2. 1891 Amer. sl. – money, esp. that used for purposes of bribery
n. 3. 1943 Aust. sl. – any particularly thick and sticky hair pomade
n. 4. 20C sl. – semen
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – to grease one’s hair down
 
• AXLE-HEAD
n. 1881 Eng. dial. – the back portion of the jaw which contains the molars or ‘axle-teeth’
 
• AXLE-TOOTH
n. 1483 obs. exc. Sc. & Eng. dial. – a molar tooth
 
• AXLE-TREE
n. a1522 obs., poetic usage – the pole of the heaven; the heaven, the sky
 
• AXMAN
n. 1. L19 sl., orig. African-American – one who carries or wields a knife
n. 2. 1910s sl. – a womanizer, a sexual athlete
n. 3. 1929 Amer. sl. – a barber 
n. 4. 1970s sl., orig. African-American – a musician, esp. a guitarist
 
• AX-WADDLE
n. 1746 Eng. dial. – one who collects and deals in ashes; hence, one who crouches over the fire, a dirty person
 
• AX-WADDLER
n. 1746 Eng. dial. – one who collects and deals in ashes; hence, one who crouches over the fire, a dirty person
 
• AY
adv. c1175 obs. exc. Sc. & Eng. dial. – ever, always, continually; at all times
 
• AYAH
n. 1782 – a native-born nurse or maidservant, employed esp. by Europeans in India and other parts of South Asia
 
• AYATOLLAH
n. 1979 – a dogmatic leader; an influential or powerful person
 
• AY-DI-ME!
int. Bk1898 Sc. – an exclamation of regret or pity
 
• AY-DURING
adj. 1580 obs. – eternal, everlasting
 
• AYE
adv. 1671 Sc. & Eng. dial. – always, ever; continually
 
• AYE AND LIKE
adv. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – yes, certainly

• AYE-AYE POPEYE!
int. 1990s UK sl. – an exclamation of agreement or compliance

• AYE-AYE SHEPHERD’S PIE!
int. 1990s UK sl. – an exclamation of agreement or compliance
 
• AYE, DOOGIE AYE!
int. 1988 Sc. sl. – used for expressing disbelief in whatever you have just been told
 
• AYE, HAWKEYE!
int. 1988 Sc. sl. – used for expressing disbelief in whatever you have just been told
 
• AYE, HOOCH-AYE!
int. 1988 Sc. sl. – used for expressing disbelief in whatever you have just been told
 
• AYE, MARRY!
int. 1833 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a term of asseveration; indeed! truly!
 
• AYEMER
n. 2002 Can. sl. – in television: a morning show
 
• AYEN
n. 1911 Sc. – a year-old child
 
• AYE, POPEYE!
int. 1988 Sc. sl. – used for expressing disbelief in whatever you have just been told
 
• AYEST
vb. 1916 Sc. – to desire eagerly
 
• AYET
vb. 1. a1000 obs. – to pour out; to shed; to spill
vb. 2. a1000 obs. rare – to douse; to souse or soak in liquid
 
• AYETE
vb. 1. a1000 obs. – to kill, to destroy
vb. 2. a1000 obs. – to understand, to comprehend; to recognize, to perceive
 
• AYE, THAT EYE!
int. 1988 Sc. sl. – used for expressing disbelief in whatever you have just been told
 
• AYIELD
vb. a1000 obs. – to yield up
 
• ‘AY IS FOR ‘ORSES
phr. 1738 Brit. – used as a disdainful rejoinder when someone says ‘eh?’
 
• AY-LA!
int. Bk1898 Eng. & Amer. dial. – an exclamation of surprise or grief
 
• AY LASTING
adj. c1340 obs. – everlasting
 
• AYLE
adv. 1686 Eng. dial. – all along, always
n. a1325 obs. – a grandfather
 
• AYLESBURY (DUCK)
n. 1990s euphemism, rhyming sl. for ‘fuck’ – anything at all, nothing
 
• AYLESBURY’ED
adj. 1990s rhyming sl. (Aylesbury ducked – fucked) – exhausted
 
• AYNE
adj. 1483 obs. – first-born, eldest
 
• AYNESS
n. 1587 obs. – everlastingness; applied as a special term to the ‘second degree of eternity; possessed by angels and spirits
 
• AYO!
int. 1995 US sl. – used as a greeting
 
• AYOND
prep. 1724 Eng. & Amer. dial. – beyond
 
• AYONT
adv. 1768 Sc. & Eng. dial. – of place: farther, beyond
prep. 1. 1792 Sc. & Eng. dial. – of place: further than, on the other side of, beyond
prep. 2. 1843 Sc. – in excess of, beyond
prep. 3. 1895 Sc. – of time: after, later than
 
• AYRAB
n. 1940s US sl., derogatory – an Arab
 
• AYRABA
n. 1. 1942 Amer. dial. – a huckster; a street peddler of vegetables and fruits
n. 2. 20C sl. – a street urchin
 
• AYRE
n. 1539 chiefly Sc. – a ridge of sand or gravel formed by the sea; a gravelly beach; also, a sandbank
vb. 1. c1440 obs. – to march, to proceed, to make one’s way; to move about, as opposed to remain still
vb. 2. c1540 obs. – to plough
 
• AYROM
n. 1850 Eng. dial. – an unpleasant upstir, display of temper, tantrums
 
• AYRTON (SENNA)
n. 1990s Brit. rhyming sl. for ‘tenner’ – £10, a £10 note
 
• AYSE
n. Bk1852 obs. – ease
vb. Bk1852 obs. – to make at ease
 
• AYST
vb. 1916 Sc. – to desire eagerly
 
• AYUH!
int. 1894 Amer. dial. – yes
 
• AY-WHEN
adv. c1485 obs. rare – at every time; always
 
• AYWHERE
adv. c1000 obs. – everywhere
 
• AZAM
adj. Bk1904 Eng. dial. – of a door: half open, ajar
 
• AZLE FANG
n. 1824 Sc. – a molar tooth
 
• AZOON
adv. 1790 Eng. dial. – presently
 
• AZOTE
n. 1. 1892 Amer. dial. – a switch or whip; anything used as a whip
n. 2. 1934 Amer. dial. – calamity
 
• AZOTH
n. 1477 – the alchemists’ name for mercury, as the essential first principle of all metals
 
• AZTEC HOP
n. 1962 sl. – diarrhoea suffered by visitors to Mexico
 
• AZTEC REVENGE
n. 1978 sl. – diarrhoea suffered by visitors to Mexico
 
• AZTEC STATE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – Arizona
 
• AZTEC TWO-STEP
n. 1970 sl. – diarrhoea suffered by visitors to Mexico
 
• AZUREAN
adj.1882 rare – azure
 
• AZUREOUS
adj. Bk1835 rare – azure; of a clear blue colour
 
• AZURINE
adj. 1577 – blue, azure
 
• AZURN;  AZURNE
adj. 1637 obs. rare – of a blue colour
 
• AZURY
adj. 1600 – bluish; tinted with soft clear blue
n. 1504 obs. – azure hue or colour
 
• AZZ
n. 2002 US sl. – the buttocks
 
• AZZALD
adj. 1841 Eng. dial. – bad-tempered, irritable
n. 1. 1830 Eng. dial. – a silly, insignificant, mean person
n. 2. 1881 Eng. dial. – an ill-tempered person; an habitual fault-finder
n. 3. 1891 Eng. dial. – a peevish, wayward, mischievous child
 
• AZZARD
n. 1. 1790 Eng. dial. – a silly, insignificant, mean person
n. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a peevish, wayward, mischievous child
 
• AZZARDLY
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – poor, ill-thriven
 
• AZZLED
adj. Bk1890 Eng. dial. – crabbed; sour; churlish
 
• AZZLE-TOOTH
n. 1788 Eng. dial. – a molar tooth
 
• AZZY
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a wayward child


Back to INDEX A

Back to DICTIONARY


Updated: September 5, 2022