Dictionary: BAC – BACKC

• BACA
n. 1992 Norfolk Island – tobacco 
 
• BACALAO
n. 1996 Jamaica sl. – the unwashed vagina
 
• BACCA
n. 1792 UK – tobacco
 
• BACCA-BOX
n. 1. 1900s sl. – the mouth
n. 2. 1900s sl. – the nose
 
• BACCAH
n. 1823 sl. – tobacco
 
• BACCALARE
n. E19 – a self-conceited fellow, a coxcomb
 
• BACCALAUR
n. 1661 obs. rare – a young knight, not old enough, or having too few vassals, to display his own banner, and who therefore followed the banner of another; a novice in arms
 
• BACCALAUREAT
n. 1927 Sc. – at Glasgow University: a student in his third year
 
• BACCALAUREATE
n. 1696 – a young knight, not old enough, or having too few vassals, to display his own banner, and who therefore followed the banner of another; a novice in arms 
 
• BACCALOR
n. 1661 obs. rare – a young knight, not old enough, or having too few vassals, to display his own banner, and who therefore followed the banner of another; a novice in arms
 
• BACCA-PIPES
n. M19 sl. – whiskers curled in small, close ringlets
 
• BACCARARO
n. 1688 – a White man
 
• BACCARE!
int. 1596 obs. – back! stand back!
 
• BACCARO
n. 1847 Amer. dial. – one who herds cattle or breaks wild horses; a cowboy
 
• BACCATED
adj. 1731 obs. – set with pearls
 
• BACCATOTAL
n. 1870 Eng. dial. – a total abstainer from tobacco
 
• BACCER
n. 1823 colloq. – tobacco
 
• BACCHAL 
n. Bk1902 – a drunken reveller
 
• BACCHANAL
adj. 1711 – indulging in drunken revelry; riotously drunken; roistering
n. 1. 1536 –  an occasion of drunken revelry; an orgy
n. 2. 1812 – a noisy or drunken reveller
 
• BACCHANALIA
n. 1. 1633 – drunken revelry; a tippling bout; an orgy
n. 2. 1651 obs. – a drinking song
 
• BACCHANALIAN
adj. 1565 – given to drunken revelry; riotously drunken, roistering 
n. 1617 – a drunken reveller; a tippler
 
• BACCHANALIANISM
n. 1855 – drunken revelry
 
• BACCHANALISM
n. 1858 – drunken revelry
 
• BACCHANALIZATION
n. 1798 – a turning into drunken revel
 
• BACCHANALIZE
vb. 1656 – to indulge in drunken revelry
 
• BACCHANT
adj. 1800 – wine-loving
n. 1699 – a priest, priestess, or inspired votary of Bacchus; hence, a drunken reveller; a roisterer
 
• BACCHANTE
n. 1797 – a priestess or female votary of Bacchus; hence a female bacchanal
 
• BACCHATION
n. 1656 obs. – riot, drunkenness
 
• BACCHEAN
adj.  obs. – drunken, sottish
 
• BACCHIC
adj. 1699 – riotously drunken, roistering, jovial
n. 1676 obs. – a drinking song
 
• BACCHICAL
adj. 1663 obs. – riotously drunken, roistering, jovial
 
• BACCHI PLENUS
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – drunk
 
• BACCHUS
n. c1640 obs. – wine or intoxicating liquor personified
 
• BACCHUS’ DEW
n. 1559 – the juice of the grape, wine, or other fermented or distilled drink
 
• BACCHUS MARSH
n. 1990s Aust. sl. – a semi-erect penis
vb. 1990s Aust. sl. – to have a semi-erect penis
 
• BACCHUS OIL
n. 1714 Sc. – spirituous liquor, wine, whisky, etc.
 
• BACCO
n. 1792 sl. – tobacco
 
• BACCO CHEWER
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a grasshopper
 
• BACCRA;  BACKRA;  BAKRA 
n. 1688 – a White man
 
• BACCY
n. 1792 UK – tobacco

• BACCY BILLUP
n. 2000 UK playground usage – a cigarette
 
• BACCY-BOX
n. 1. 1900s sl. – the mouth
n. 2. 1900s sl. – the nose
 
• BACCY STICK
n. 1885 Amer. sl. – a leg
 
• BACCY WEED
n. 1980s drugs sl. – marijuana
 
• BACE
n. a1560 obs. – a blow; a beating
 
• BACH
int. Bk1911 Sc. – exclamation of disgust
n. 1. 1857 US sl. – a bachelor
n. 2. 1873 Eng. dial. – a sandbank or small hill lying within or near a river
n. 3. 1884 Eng. dial. – a river or stream; the valley through which a stream flows
n. 4. 1889 – a term of endearment common in Wales and the border counties; frequently following a personal name: dear, little one, friend
n. 5. 1920s Aust. & NZ colloq. – a small makeshift hut; a small holiday house
n. 6. 1920s NZ sl. – a farm-worker’s cottage
n. 7. 1984 NZ sl. – a vacation cottage
vb. 1879 sl., orig. US – to live by oneself, and cater for oneself as a bachelor
 
• BACHARES
n. Bk1872 – a baker
 
• BACHCHA
n. 1830 Anglo-Indian – a child
 
• B-ACHE
n. 1938 US Military Academy usage – a complaint
vb. 1900 US Military Academy usage – to complain, to whine
 
• BACHE
n. 1. 1873 Eng. dial. – a sandbank or small hill lying within or near a river
n. 2. 1884 Eng. dial. – a river or stream; the valley through which a stream flows
n. 3. M19 US sl. – a bachelor
 
• BACHEL
n. 1825 Sc. – a mean, feeble creature
 
• BACHELDER
n. 1739 Amer. dial. – a bachelor
 
• BACHELETTE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an unmarried woman
 
• BACHELOR
n. 1. 1297 – a young knight, not old enough, or having too few vassals, to display his own banner, and who therefore followed the banner of another; a novice in arms
n. 2. c1386 – an unmarried man
n. 3. 1604 obs. – an inexperienced person; a novice
n. 4. 1632 obs. rare – a maid, a single woman
n. 5. 1650 – a lean drunkard 
n. 6. 1885 Ireland – an admirer; a suitor
n. 7. 1950 Amer. dial. – the last piece of food left on a plate
n. 8. 1992 US sl. – in police work: an officer who works best alone
 
• BACHELOR BAIT
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an unmarried girl
 
• BACHELOR-BIRD
n. 1888 Eng. dial. – a chaffinch
 
• BACHELORETTE
n. 1. 1965 – an unmarried female who has her own income and lives independently, apart from her family or relatives
n. 2. 20C – an apartment suitable for a bachelor girl
 
• BACHELOR-FINCH
n. 1890 Eng. dial. – a chaffinch
 
• BACHELOR GIRL
n. 1895 orig. US – an unmarried woman who has her own income and lives independently, apart from her family or relatives 
 
• BACHELOR HALL
n. 1833 – apartments for bachelors
 
• BACHELORIZE
vb. M19 – to live as a bachelor
 
• BACHELOR LADY
n. 1924 rare – an unmarried woman who has her own income and lives independently, apart from her family or relatives
 
• BACHELOR MAID
n. 1894 rare – an unmarried woman who has her own income and lives independently, apart from her family or relatives
 
• BACHELOR-MAN
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an unmarried man
 
• BACHELOR MOTHER
n. Bk1975 Amer. sl. – a mother who raises her children alone, being separated, divorced, or widowed
 
• BACHELOR OF ARTS
n. 1823 UK prison sl. – one who has served six months of a prison sentence
 
• BACHELOR OF LAW
n. 1650 sl. – a drinker with ‘a purple face’
 
• BACHELOR PAD
n. 1976 US sl. – the apartment of a young, single, urbane, sophisticated man
 
• BACHELOR PRESIDENT
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – James Buchanan, 15th US president
 
• BACHELOR’S BABY
n. L18 sl. – an illegitimate child
 
• BACHELOR’S BUTTON
n. 1908 Amer. dial. – a substitute for a button; a wooden peg used as a button; a gripper, a fastener
 
• BACHELOR’S BUTTONS
n. L16 sl. – a foetus, presumably of an illegitimate child
 
• BACHELOR SCHOLAR
n. Bk1856 college usage – at Cambridge: a Bachelor of Arts who remains in residence after taking his degree, for the purpose of reading for a fellowship or acting as private tutor
 
• BACHELOR’S FARE
n. L18 sl. – bread and cheese and kisses
 
• BACHELOR’S HALL
n. 1746 Amer. sl. – the home of a bachelor
 
ֳ• BACHELORS’ HALL
n. 1746 UK sl. – a residence of unmarried men
 
• BACHELOR’S SON
n. L18 sl. – an illegitimate child
 
• BACHELOR’S WIFE
n. 1. 1562 – the ideal wife of which a bachelor theorizes or dreams
n. 2. 1950s US sl. – a metal plunger with a long wooden handle used for washing clothes in a tub
n. 3. 20C US sl. – a mistress
n. 4. 20C US sl. – a prostitute
 
• BACHELOR-WOMAN
n. 1. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a spinster
n. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – an unmarried female who has her own income and lives independently, apart from her family or relatives
 
• BACHELRY
n. a1500 obs. – a body of unmarried men
 
• B-ACHER
n. 1905 US Military Academy usage – a chronic complainer
 
• BACHIE
n. 20C W. Indies – a room or any small place kept by a man for sole living or for conducting love affairs away from the family home
 
• BACH IT
vb. L19 sl., orig. US – to live by oneself
 
• BACHLE
n. Bk1997 Irish sl. – a down-and-out person; a destitute person; an awkward person
 
• BACHLER
n. 1825 Sc. – a hawker, a peddler
 
• BACHLING
adj. 1583 Sc. – shambling, stumbling
 
• BACHY
n. 1. 1996 Guyana – a room where a man lives alone or brings women for sex
n. 2. 2003 Trinidad and Tobago – a small house occupied by a single man

• BACIL
n. 1657 obs. rare – a little stick 

• BACILLOPHOBIA
n. Bk1991 -an abnormal fear ofgerms
 
• BACK
adj. 1. 1821 Sc. – late, backward, falling, behindhand
adj. 2. 1885 Eng. dial. – of the seasons: late, backward
adj. 3. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – old-fashioned; ancient; belonging to bygone times
adj. 4. 1930s African-American sl. – well-established, traditional, tried and tested 
adj. 5. 1940s US sl. – served and drunk alongside or together with an alcoholic drink, usually as an order to the barman, as ‘Scotch with soda back’
adv. 1. 1842 African-American – really, very much, completely 
adv. 2. 1888 Eng. dial. – behindhand, late
n. 1. 1566 obs. – a following; a body of followers or supporters; support, backing
n. 2. 1615 obs. – the ridge of the nose
n. 3. 1888 Eng. dial. – a hill
n. 4. 19C Brit. – a privy; a ‘backhouse’
n. 5. 1960s sl. – a dollar bill
n. 6. 1970 US sl. – the musical accompaniment which a jazz band gives a soloist
n. 7. 1973 US sl. – an illegal gambling operation
n. 8. 1980s sl. – the anus
n. 9. 1982 US sl. – a drink taken immediately after another, a ‘chaser’
n. 10. 1989 US sl. – back-up, help, support
n. 11. 1993 African-American teen sl. – the posterior, the buttocks 
n. 12. 1995 African-American sl. – a bodyguard 
n. 13. 1996 Guyana – potency, virility
n. 14 20C sl. – a painful or bad back
vb. 1. 1362 obs. – to cover the back of, to clothe
vb. 2. 1578 obs. – to draw back, to withdraw
vb. 3. M17 sl. – to have sexual intercourse
vb. 4. 1790 Eng. dial. – to beat, to thrash
vb. 5. 1790 Eng. dial. – to conquer
vb. 6. 1821 Eng. & Amer. dial. – to mount a horse; to ride on a horse
vb. 7. 1840 Eng. & Amer. dial. – to carry on the back or shoulder
vb. 8. 1859 Sc. & Amer. Amer. dial. – to address an envelope or letter
vb. 9. B1870 Eng. colloq. – to support
vb. 10. 1890 Eng. dial. – to change, to alter
vb. 11. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to keep down or under; to retard
vb. 12. 1905 Sc. – to bank a fire
vb. 13. 1923 Sc. – to wager
vb. 14. 1932 Sc. – to give a horse its first lesson in carrying a rider
vb. 15. 1968 Amer. dial. – to mend temporarily
 
• BACKA
n. 1823 sl. – tobacco
 
• BACK-ABOOT
adj. 1886 Sc. – lonely, remote
 
• BACK-A-BUSH
adj. 20C W. Indies & Jamaica – far away, deep in the country, in the ‘back of beyond’
 
• BACK-ACTUALLY
adv. 1928 Amer. dial. – truly, absolutely
 
• BACKAGE
n. 1887 – the back part of a building or row of buildings; the line or outlook of buildings or plots of land on the rear side
 
• BACK-AH-YARD
n. 1. 1930s US sl. – a poor area of the city
n. 2. 1960s W. Indies – home
n. 3. 1960s W. Indies – the Caribbean
n. 4. 1977 W. Indian and Black British usage – the general concept of home
 
• BACK ALLEY
n. L19 African-American sl. – the main street of an otherwise run-down or ‘red-light’ area
 
• BACK-ALLEY BUTCHER
n. Bk1988 sl. – an abortionist
 
• BACK-ALLEY DEAL
n. L19 African-American sl. – a deal between one unsuspecting victim and the person who intends on and succeeds in cheating them
 
• BACK-ALONG
adv. 1. 1877 Eng. dial. – backwards
adv. 2. 1880 Eng. & Amer. dial. – of time: back; formerly; in the past; recently; a little while ago
adv. 3. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – of position: far in the rear; a long way off
 
• BACKANAHAN
adj. 1996 Belize – untrustworthy, underhanded
 
• BACK AND BELLY
adv. 2003 Trinidad and Tobago – entirely, completely
n. 1. 1995 W. Indies – (usually as ‘back-and-belly’) a hypocrite; an untrustworthy person
n. 2. 1996 W. Indies – (usually as ‘back-and-belly’) a very thin person
 
• BACK AND EDGE
adj. 1748 obs. – adjoining, close by
adv. 1641 – through everything, fully, wholly, thoroughly, completely
 
• BACK AND FACE
adv. 1820 Sc. – completely 
 
• BACK AND FILL
vb. 1. 1777 Amer. dial. – to move backward and forward repeatedly without making actual progress
vb. 2. 1840 – to vacillate or waver; to take too long about coming to a decision; to hesitate, to be irresolute
vb. 3. 1940s US sl. – to charm a potential victim before subjecting them to a confidence trick
vb. 4. 1975 Amer. dial. – in farming: to turn a cart in a small area by repeatedly backing and going ahead in short takes 
 
• BACK AND FORE
phr. 1653 arch. or Eng. dial. – backwards and forwards; to and fro
 
• BACK-AND-FORTH
n. 1941 Amer. dial. – talk between two persons; conversation
 
• BACK-AND-FRONT
n. 1958 W. Indies – a hypocrite
 
• BACK-AND-NECK
n. 1996 W. Indies – a very thin person
 
• BACK AND SIDE
adv. c1400 obs. exc. Sc. – all over, completely
 
• BACK AND TO
adv. 1856 Amer. dial. – to and fro; back and forth
 
• BACK-ANSWER
n. 1894 Eng. dial. – a retort; a rude reply
 
• BACKARE!
int. a1553 obs. – back! stand back!
 
• BACKARTLY
adv. 1885 Eng. dial. – in a backward or reluctant manner
 
• BACKASSED
adj. 1. Bk2006 US sl. – pert. to a manner that is backward, awkward, or roundabout
adj. 2. Bk2007 US sl. – perverse; clumsy
 
• BACKASSWARD(S)
adj. 1940s US sl. – confused, muddled, backwards
adv. 1. 1947 Amer. sl. – backwards
adv. 2. 1951 US sl. – in the wrong order
 
• BACK A TAIL
vb. 1973 Aust. sl. – to engage in anal sex

• BACK BAY
n. Bk1975 US sl. – a fashionable residential area in a city or town
 
• BACK-BEARAWAY
n. 1796 Eng. dial. – the bat
 
• BACKBEAT
n. 1. 1970s African-American sl. – an underlying them or quality
n. 2. 1970s African-American sl. – one’s heartbeat
 
• BACKBEAT OF THE TREY THIRTY
n. 1980s African-American sl. – the third day of the month
 
• BACK-BEREND
adj. 1292 obs. – bearing on the back
 
• BACK-BIRN
n. 1768 Sc. – a burden carried on the back
 
• BACKBITER
n. c1230 – one who backbites; a slanderer or secret calumniator; a tattletale
 
• BACK BLOCK
n. Bk1892 Aust. sl. – the country outside the margin of the settled districts
 
• BACK-BLOCKER
n. 1. 1870 Aust. – a resident in the remote and sparsely-inhabited interior
n. 2. 1910 NZ sl. – a resident of a remote area, esp. the area beyond the river gorges in Canterbury and Otago, New Zealand
 
• BACK BLOCKS
n. 1872 Aust. – land in the remote and sparsely-inhabited interior; also, land distant or cut off from a river-front
 
• BACKBLOCKSER
n. c1920 Aust. colloq. – one who livers in a remote or rural area
 
• BACKBLOW
n. 1642 obs. – a blow struck at the back or from behind
 
• BACKBODY
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – the posteriors
 
• BACKBONE
n. 1. 1938 Amer. dial. – pork meat from near the backbone
n. 2. 1982 US sl. – the spine of a book
 
• BACKBONE FENCE
n. 1939 Amer. dial. – a stake-and-rail fence
 
• BACK-BONE-LINKS
n. 1785 Sc. obs. – the spine
 
• BACKBONE TO BREAKFAST TIME
adj. 1900s US sl. – very unsatisfactory, totally confused, chaotic
 
• BACK BOTTIE
n. 1980s Aust. sl. – the anus
 
• BACK BOTTOM
n. 2001 Aust. sl. – the rump or posterior
 
• BACK-BRACK
n. 1918 Sc. – excessive fatigue
 
• BACK-BRAYING
n. 1876 Eng. dial. – a beating, a thrashing
 
• BACK-BREADTH
n. 1864 Sc. – a fall on the back
 
• BACKBREAKER
n. 1. 18C sl. – an exhausting, demanding, usually physical task; a difficult task or taskmaster
n. 2. 1867 – the leader of a gang of farm-labourers
n. 3. 1931 Amer. dial. – a tree stump cut close to the ground
n. 4. 1980s drug culture sl. – LSD cut with strychnine
 
BACK-BREED
n. 1. 1864 Sc. – the breadth of one’s back; hence, a throw, a fall
n. 2. a1890 Sc. – a burial allotment
 
• BACKBRUSH
n. 1934 Amer. dial. – backwoods
 
• BACK-BURDEN
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a load borne on the back
 
• BACK BURNER
n. 1963 sl. – a condition or position of low priority
 
• BACK-BUSTER
n. 1965 US sl. – a dive in which one lands flat on the water
 
• BACK-CA’
n. 1. 1830 Sc. – a reverse, a relapse
n. 2. 1894 Sc. – a retort, a snub
 
• BACKCAP
n. 1. 1872 Amer. sl. – act of ruining by defamation
n. 2. 1883 African-American sl. – an insult based on attacking the subject’s famil
n. 3. 1930s African-American sl. – a sharp or witty reply, as offered in the ritual name-calling known as dozens
n. 4. 1945 US sl. – an answer
vb. 1. 1887 Amer. sl. – to attempt to thwart or ruin by defaming someone; to depreciate, disparage, or criticize meanly
vb. 2. 1889 African-American sl. – to insult someone by disparaging their family
 
• BACK-CAST
adj. 1. 1580 – cast or thrown backwards
adj. 2. 1825 Sc. – retrospective
adv. 1874 Eng. dial. – of time: long ago, in the past
n. 1. 1818 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a misfortune, reverse; an unexpected blow; used often of a relapse during illness or a moral backsliding
n. 2. Bk1898 Sc. – a retrospect
n. 3. 1901 – backtalk 
 
• BACKCHAT
n. 1. 1901 sl. – saucy or impertinent replies to a superior; cheek, impudence, abuse, insulting speech; altercation, heated talk
n. 2. 1930s US criminals’ sl. – the back door
n. 3. 1963 Aust. sl. – sexual badinage, verbal flirting
vb. 1919 Aust. sl. – to answer back in an insolent manner
 
• BACK-CHEAT
n. E18 criminals’ sl. – a cloak 
 
• BACKCLAP
vb. 1896 Amer. sl. – to insult someone; to disparage 
 
• BACK CLEAR OFF THE BOARDS
vb. 1898 Amer. sl. – to surpass thoroughly 
 
• BACK-COME
n. 1825 Sc. – a return
vb. 1. L18 Sc. – to return
vb. 2. 19C Sc. – of food: to repeat in eructation
 
• BACK-COMING
n. 1818 Sc. – a return
 
• BACK CORNER
n. 1958 Amer. dial. – in logging: the far end of a logging operation
 
• BACK-COUNTRYMAN
n. 1796 – one who lives in the country lying towards or in the rear of a settled district; a rustic
 
• BACKCOURTMAN
n. 1974 – in basketball: a player who plays the backcourt and brings the ball out into the offensive zone


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Updated: September 9, 2022