Dictionary: BAH – BAJ

• BAH
int. 1. 1817 – an exclamation of contempt
int. 2. 1982 Amer. dial. – dirty! filthy! often used as a warning to children
n. 2000 African-American sl., derogatory – a woman (Bitch-Ass Ho)
 
• BA-HA
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bronchitis 
 
• BAHAKAS
n. 1950s US sl. – the buttocks, behind
 
• BAHAMA MAMA;  BAHAMA MOMMA
n. 1980s African-American sl. – a fat, unattractive “Black Mammy” stereotype, supposedly typical of the West Indies
 
• BAHANGS
adv. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – of clothes: hanging down untidily, ragged at the bottom
 
• BAHAUDUR
n. 1828 Anglo-Indian – a conceited or self-important fellow
 
• BAH-FUNGOO!
int. 1950s US sl. – an exclamation of contempt or dismissal, e.g. go fuck yourself!
 
• BAHLI-BAHLI!
int. 1963 US military in E. Asia (Korean) – hurry up!
 
• BAH-MA
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a grandmother
 
• BAHNHOF QUEEN
n. 1980 US sl. – a German streetwalker
 
• BAHOOKEY; BAHOOKIE
n. 1. 1990s US sl. – the buttocks, the behind
n. 2. 1994 UK sl. – the anus
 
• BAHU
n. 1959 South Asian – a daughter-in-law, esp. one who follows the tradition of living with her husband’s family after marriage
 
• BAIARDOUR
n. 1780 obs. – a mason’s labourer or who helps to carry the ‘baiard’, a large hand-barrow with six handles on which building stones are carried
 
• BAIBLE
vb. 1887 Sc. – to sip often, to tipple; to drink carelessly, with spilling
 
• BAICH
adj. 1924 Sc. – backward
n. 1808 Sc. obs. – a child
 
• BAICHE
n. B1700 Sc. – a child
 
• BAICHIE
n. B1700 Sc. – a child; used rather contemptuously
vb. 1808 Sc. obs. – to cough

• BAIDIE
adj. Bk2007 UK sl. – bad-tempered, aggressive, provocative

• BAIGEL
n. 1990s S. Afr. sl. – a spoilt young male
 
• BAIGLE
n. 1. 1821 Sc. – a disagreeable, dirty person; an objectionable person; a sight, a fright
n. 2. Bk1879 Eng. dial. – an opprobrious epithet applied to a depraved woman
n. 3. 1897 Sc. – a thin man; an odd figure
vb. 1. 1825 Sc. – to walk slowly, as if much fatigued
vb. 2. Bk1898 Sc. – of a child: to run or walk with short steps
 
• BAIGNET
n. 1962 Amer. dial. – a fritter or doughnut
 
• BAIGNEUR
n. Bk1898 – a bath keeper (French)
 
• BAIJAN;  BAIJEN 
n. 1. 1708 Sc. – a first-year student at a Scottish university; no only used in Aberdeen and St. Andrews
n. 2. 1825 Sc. – a novice, a beginner in any trade, art, or science
 
• BAIKIE
n. 1900 Sc. – a small stool
 
• BAIKINS
n. Bk1898 Sc. – a beating, a drubbing
 
• BAIL
n. 1. 1292 obs. – a handing over, delivery, giving
n. 2. a1400 obs. – charge, custody, jurisdiction, power
n. 3. 2000s sl. – credit
vb. 1. 1581 obs. – to liberate from imprisonment
vb. 2. c1600 rare – to confine
vb. 3. 1768 – to deliver goods in trust, upon a contract expressed or implied that the trust shall be faithfully executed on the part of the bailee
vb. 4. 1940s African-American sl. – to enjoy oneself
vb. 5. 1970s African-American & teen sl. – to terminate a relationship, to break up
vb. 6. 1977 US sl. – to leave, to depart, to go; to play truant; hence, to run out on, to renege on someone
vb. 7. 1990s sl. – to run
vb. 8. 1990s sl. – to throw away
vb. 9. 20C teen & high school sl. – to put something down
 
• BAILABLE
adj. 1502 obs. – capable of being delivered; deliverable
 
• BAIL BANDIT
n. 1991 colloq. – someone who commits a crime while on bail awaiting trial
 
• BAILCH
n. 1. 1768 Sc. – a very fat or lusty person, breathless from corpulence
n. 2. Bk1898 Sc. – a brat; a contemptuous term for a child
 
• BAILE
n. 1. 1844 Amer. dial. – a dance or ball, esp. one at which Spanish or Mexican folk dances are performed
n. 2. 1880 Amer. dial. – a dance hall
 
• BAIL ‘EM FROM SALEM
n. Bk1945 jive usage – a bondsman
 
• BAILER
n. 1916 Amer. dial. – one who asks questions
 
• THE BAILEY
n. 1. M19 sl. – the Central Criminal Court, London; usually known as the ‘Old Bailey’
n. 2. L19 Aust. sl. – prison in general
 
• BAILI
n. Bk1888 obs. – a steward, a bailiff
 
• BAILIE
n. 1. 1297 obs. – in England, formerly applied to the king’s officers generally, including sheriffs, mayors, etc. nominated by him, but especially to the chief officer of a hundred; a bailiff
n. 2. 1375 Sc. obs. – the chief magistrate of a barony or part of a county, having functions equivalent to those of a sheriff
n. 3. 1484 Sc. – a municipal magistrate corresponding to the English alderman
n. 4. 1880 Sc. – a man, boy or girl in charge of the cows on a farm
n. 5. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a clever man
 
• BAILIE-BOY
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a boy employed on large farms to take messages and make himself generally useful
 
• BAILIER
n. 1834 Eng. dial. – a bailiff or sheriff’s officer
 
• BAILIFF
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a clever man
 
• BAILIFF OF MARSHAM
n. 17C sl. – the ague or malarial fever
 
• BAILING WIRE ARTIST
n. Bk1978 railroad usage – a mechanic whose skill is in question 
 
• BAILIRIC
n. 1570 obs. – bailiwick; a district or place under the jurisdiction of a bailie or bailiff
 
• BAILIVATE
n. 1721 obs. – the office of a bailiff
 
• BAILLE
n. 1825 Sc. – a mistress; a sweetheart
 
• BAILLIE
n. c1305 obs. – the jurisdiction, authority, charge, or office of a bailie or bailiff; jurisdiction or charge committed to an officer, delegated authority; stewardship
 
• BAILLIE LOON
n. 1916 Sc. – a lad in charge of the cattle
 
• BAILLY
n. c1305 obs. – the jurisdiction, authority, charge, or office of a bailie or bailiff; jurisdiction or charge committed to an officer, delegated authority; stewardship 
 
• BAIL ON
vb. 1. 1960s US teen sl. – to oppress, to give a hard time to, to trouble
vb. 2. 1960s US teen sl. – to break a date
vb. 3. 1990s sl. – to leave someone
 
• BAIL OUT
n. 1990s US sl. – (as ‘bail-out’) an evasion, an escape
vb. 1. 1940s US sl. – to leave in a hurry, to run off to escape from a difficult situation
vb. 2. 1940s Aust. sl. – to lock out
vb. 3. 1970s sl., orig. military – to go mad or insane
vb. 4. 1980s US sl. – to die
vb. 5. 1980s US sl. – to abandon, to terminate a relationship
 
• BAIL SOMEONE OUT
vb. 1970s sl., orig. US – to rescue someone
 
• BAIL THAT!
int. 20C teen & high school sl. – screw that!
 
• BAIL UP
int. 1. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a command to cows: stand still!
int. 2. M19 sl. – stop!
vb. 1. 1883 Sc. – to tie up, to fasten
vb. 2. M19 sl. – to arrest
vb. 3. M19 sl. – to rob
vb. 4. M19 Aust. sl. – to trap, to corner
vb. 5. 1990s Aust. sl. – to stop someone on the street for a chat
 
• BAILY
n. 1825 – a superintendent of an estate; a bailiff; a steward; a sheriff’s officer
 
• BAILYAMENT
n. 1913 Sc. – a state of prosperity or period of full vigour
 
• BAIN
adj. 1. c1325 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – ready, willing, inclined
adj. 2. c1440 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – flexible, lithe, supple, limber, pliant
adj. 3. 1691 Eng. dial. – nimble, clever
adj. 4. 1805 Eng. dial. – of a road: convenient, direct, near
adj. 5. 1864 N. Eng. dial. – direct; near, short
adv. 1. c1325 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – readily, willingly
adv. 2. a1700 N. Eng. dial. – conveniently near, handy
n. 1. 1475 obs. – a quantity of water or other liquid placed in a suitable receptacle in which one may bathe; the vessel in which the water is held
n. 2. 1483 obs. – an act of bathing; a bath
n. 3. 1494 obs. – a room or building fitted up for bathing, having hot baths, etc.; a public bath
n. 4. 1538 obs. – a spring of hot or medicinal water
n. 5. 1910s W. Indies – the buttocks
vb. 1398 obs. – to bathe or wash; to drench
 
• BAINED
adj. c1440 obs. – of peas and beans: burst, split
 
• BAINING
n. 1528 obs. – bathing
 
• BAING
n. 1911 Sc. – an old done horse
 
• BAINGIE
n. 1933 Sc. – a crowd
 
• BAINGIED
adj. 1853 Sc. obs. – ? handled roughly
 
• BAINGLE
n. 1870 Sc. – a term of abuse applied to a woman
 
• BAINING
n. 1528 obs. – bathing
 
• BAIN KEEPER
n. 1569 – the attendant of a room or building fitted up for bathing, having hot baths, etc.
 
• BAINLY
adv. c1400 obs. – readily, willingly; at once
 
• BAINS
n. 1541 – brothels
 
• BAINSOME
adj. 1. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – near at hand
adj. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – obliging, helpful
 
• BAIRD
n. 1. 1825 Sc. – a poet or bard; in old laws contemptuously applied to those strolling rhymers who were wont to oppress the lieges
n. 2. 1825 Sc. – a noisy, turbulent person: generally applied to a scold
 
• BAIRDIE
n. 1872 Sc. – the rubbing of a man’s rough chin against the face of someone else, or squeeze another’s chin with the hand 
 
• BAIRGE
n. 1. 1825 Sc. – an affected bobbing walk
n. 2. 1866 Sc. – the voice lifted up in a strong and loud manner, either in speaking, reading, weeping, or calling after one
n. 3. 1866 Sc. – a person who raises his voice in a strong, loud manner
n. 4. 1925 Sc. – forcible effort
vb. 1. 1825 Sc. – to walk with a jerk or spring upwards; to strut
vb. 2. 1847 Sc. – to collide violently; to threaten with violence; to move clumsily and noisily
vb. 3. 1887 Sc. – to speak in a loud and angry manner; to scold, to rail, to taunt loudly
vb. 4. 1897 Sc. – to bark like a dog on the chain
 
• BAIRGIN’
adj. 1. 1866 Sc. – having the habit of lifting up the voice in a loud manner
adj. 2. 1866 Sc. – much given to weeping noisily
 
• BAIRMAN
n. Bk1720 – a poor insolvent debtor, left bare and naked, who was obliged to swear in court that he was not worth about five shillings and five pence; a bankrupt who gives up all his goods to his creditors; a pauper
 
• BAIRN
n. 1. c1000 – a child; a son or daughter
n. 2. 1898 Sc. – a weak-minded or childish person
vb. 1827 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to beget, to conceive; to render pregnant
 
• BAIRN-BAIRN
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a grandchild
 
• BAIRN-BED
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – the womb 
 
• BAIRNBUND
adj. 1908 Sc. – of a woman: hindered by having a child to take care of
 
• BAIRN-CLOUTS
n. 1895 Sc. – baby clothes, dolls’ clothes
 
• BAIRN-DOLE
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – inheritance
 
• BAIRNED
adj. 1. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – pregnant
adj. 2. 19C Sc. – in a state of dotage
 
• BAIRNEY
n. 1874 Sc. – a little child
 
• BAIRN-FOLK
n. 1891 Sc. – children
 
• BAIRN-FOND
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – child-loving
 
• BAIRN-GAM
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – child’s play
 
• BAIRNHEID
n. 1. a1300 obs. exc. N. Eng. dial. – childhood, infancy
n. 2. c1505 obs. – childishness
 
• BAIRNHOOD
n. 1866 Sc. – childhood
 
• BAIRNIE
adj. 1908 Sc. – childish
n. 1. 1874 Sc. – a little child
n. 2.  Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a soft character, having very childish perceptions
 
• BAIRNIE OF THE EYE
n. 1825 Sc. – the pupil of the eye
 
• BAIRNISH
adj. 1826 Eng. dial. – childish; silly
 
• BAIRNISH-LAKE
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – child’s play
 
• BAIRNISHNESS
n. 1874 Eng. dial. – childishness; weakmindedness
 
• BAIRN-LAKE
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – child’s play
 
• BAIRN-LIKE
adj. 1874 Eng. dial. – childish; weak-minded
 
• BAIRN-LILE
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – early infancy
 
• BAIRNLINESS
n. Bk1898 Sc. – childishness
 
• BAIRNLY
adj. 1. 1533 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – childish
adj. 2. 1603 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – child-like; in childhood
a0dj. 3. 1932 Sc. – in a state of dotage
 
• BAIRNLY-LIKE
adj. 1895 Sc. – childish
 
• BAIRN-PART
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – inheritance
 
• BAIRN-PLAY
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – child’s play
 
• BAIRN’S-BAIRN
n. 1932 Sc. – a grandchild
 
• BAIRN’S BARGAIN
n. 1825 Sc. – a bargain that can be easily broken
 
• BAIRN’S BED
n. 1549 N. Eng. dial. – the womb
 
• BAIRN-SIGN
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – evidence of being in the family way
 
• BAIRN’S-LAKINS
n. 1891 Eng. dial. – children’s playthings, toys
 
• BAIRN’S-MAID
n. Bk1845 Sc. – a nursery maid, a nurse
 
• BAIRNSWOMAN
n. 1823 Sc. – a child’s maid or nurse
 
• BAIRN-TEAM
n. c885 N. Eng. dial. – brood of children; offspring; family
 
• BAIRN-TIME
n. 1. 1786 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a large family; offspring
n. 2. 1824 Sc. & Eng. dial. – the time of life for child-bearing
n. 3. 1830 Sc. – childhood
n. 4. 1923 Sc. – the time when the children are at home, as from school
 
• BAIRN-WOMAN
n. 1823 Sc. – a nursemaid, a nurse
 
• BAIRNWORT
n. 1. 1788 Eng. dial. – the common daisy, Bellis perennis
n. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – the violet
 
• BAIRSE
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – impertinent, impudent
 
• BAISDLIE
adv. 1709 Sc. obs. – in a state of confusion
 
• BAISE
adj. 1825 Sc. obs. – sad, sorrowful
n. 1. 1571 obs. – a bastard
n. 2. 1833 Sc. – confusion, bewilderment
n. 3. Bk1898 Sc. – haste, expedition
vb. 1. 1825 Sc. obs. – to persuade, to coax
vb. 2. 1871 Sc. arch. – to lower, to lay low
vb. 3. Bk1898 Sc. – to move or walk with energy
 
• BAISED
adj. 1. 1706 Sc. – confused, bewildered
adj. 2. 1825 Sc. – concerned, afraid
 
• BAISELER
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a person who takes care of cattle
 
• BAISEMAIN
n. 1656 – a kiss of the hands
 
• BAISEMAINS
n. 1707 – compliments, respects
 
• BAISEMENT
n. c1654 obs. – a kissing
 
• BAISEMENTS
n. c1654 obs. rare – compliments, respects
 
• BAISIER
n. c1450 obs. – a kiss; a kissing
 
• BAISLE
vb. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to make dirty
 
• BAISS
adj. 1. 1820 Sc. obs. – ashamed
adj. 2. 1825 Sc. obs. – sad, sorrowful
vb. 1825 Sc. – to beat, to drub
 
• BAISSING
n. 1825 Sc. – a beating, a drubbing 
 
• BAISSLE
vb. 1923 Sc. – to rush about in a busied or hurried manner; to busy or exert oneself
 
• BAIST
adj. 1780 Sc. obs. – low, despicable
 
• BAISTLY
adj. 1873 Eng. dial. – dirty; like a beast
 
• BAIT
n. 1. 1570 – food, refreshment; a feed for horses, or slight repast for travellers, upon a journey; light refreshment taken between meals
n. 2. 1579 – a halt for refreshment in the course of a journey; a stoppage for rest
n. 3. 1662 obs. – a hasty meal like a traveller’s; a snack
n. 4. 1857 sl. – a fit of bad temper; a rage; anger; a fit of anger
n. 5. 1851 Amer. dial. – a sufficient or excessive quantity or amount
n. 6. 1872 US sl. – intended prey or victim
n. 7. M19 US sl. – one’s intended prey or victim 
n. 8. 1908 Amer. dial., esp. African-American – an earthworm
n. 9. 1934 Amer. dial. – in marbles: the marbles which a player puts in the game as his ‘ante’
n. 10. 1940s sl. – an individual who is likely to get into trouble or face unwanted attention, esp. as a suffix, -bait
n. 11. 1959 sl. – an individual who is likely to get into trouble or face unwanted attention
n. 12. 1961 US sl. – a homosexual male who is sexually appealing to his peers
n. 13. 1965 sl. – an attractive man or woman used to lure a victim into a con-game or a mugging
n. 14. 1972 US homosexual sl. – an undercover policeman used for entrapment of homosexuals
n. 15. Bk1975 Amer. sl. – a person, esp. a youth, living in a neighbourhood or having psychological problems which, or associated with friends who, may lead him to become a drug addict; a potential drug addict
n. 16. 1980s African-American sl. – a woman with noticeable body odour
n. 17. 1995 sl. – a young person, usually a girl, who is under the age of sexual consent
n. 18. 20C US sl. – an effeminate male or a masculine female who draws attention from homosexuals
n. 19. M20 sl. – a sexually attractive young woman 
vb. 1. c1374 obs. – of the eyes: to feast
vb. 2. 1375 – of travellers: to stop at an inn, orig, to feed the horses, but later also to rest and refresh themselves; hence, to make a brief stay or sojourn
vb. 3. c1386 obs. – to feed, to take nourishment
vb. 4. 1634 Sc. & Eng. dial. – of men and horses: to stop to feed
vb. 5. 1869 Eng. dial. – of a fire: to feed
vb. 6. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to take a rest, to cease from labour for a short time
vb. 7. 1903 Amer. dial. – to entice, to lure, provoke
vb. 8. 1968 Amer. dial. – to curry favour
vb. 9. 20C sl. – to make a bluff with the intention of being exposed for later strategic advantage
 
• BAITAND
adj. 1330 obs. – hastening, in haste 
 
• BAIT AND BOARD
n. 1903 Amer. dial. – food and shelter for a horse
 
• BAIT CAN
n. 1926 Amer. dial. – a lunch bucket, esp. among loggers
 
• BAITCHEL;  BAITCHIL
vb. 1825 Sc. – to beat soundly
 
• BAITED FOR WIDOW
adj. 1960 Amer. dial. – spruced up; dressed to catch the attention of widows or other women
 
• BAITER
n. 1611 – a tormenter; a tease
 
• BAITHE
vb. c1300 obs. rare – to grant; to agree, to consent
 
• BAITHERSHIN!
int. 1843 Ireland – an expletive; it may be so
 
• BAITIE-BUM
n. Bk1898 Sc. – a lazy fellow; a simpleton
 
• BAITIE-BUMMIL
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a petty fumbler
 
• BAITING
n. 1. c1440 – the act of taking wayside refreshment or of giving food to horses upon a journey
n. 2. 1475 – the place at which, or occasion when, a halt is made for refreshment on a journey
 
• BAITING-STOCK
n. Bk1888 obs. – an object to be baited by everybody; a laughingstock
 
• BAITING-TIME
n. 1886 Eng. dial. – time for refreshment
 
• BAIT-LAYER
n. 1900 Aust. & NZ sl. – an outback cook, a station cook; later, an army cook, a restaurant cook
 
• BAITLESS
adj. 1600 rare – without food, without refreshment
 
• BAIT THE HOOK
vb. 1970s US homosexual sl. – to have sexual intercourse
 
• BAIT-TIME
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – the time for taking food
 
• BAITWORM
n. 1949 Amer. dial. – the common worm used for bait; an earthworm
 
• BAITY
adj. 1921 sl. – bad-tempered; in a rage, angry
 
• BAIVENJAR
n. 1825 Sc. obs. – a tatterdemalion, a ragamuffin
 
• BAIVER
vb. 1887 Sc. – to gad about; to run after shows, weddings, etc.
 
• BAIVERING
adj. 1887 Sc. – gadding about; taking interest in trifles, finery, etc.
 
• BAIZE
n. 1833 Sc. – confusion, bewilderment
vb. 1. 1603 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to stupefy, to frighten, to alarm
vb. 2. 1871 Sc. arch. – to lower, to lay low
 
• BAJA
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a steep descent, road, or trail
 
• BAJADA
n. 1866 Amer. dial. – a steep descent, road, or trail
 
• BAJADERE
n. 1598 – a dancing girl of the East
 
• BAJAN
n. 1. 1642 – a freshman at the Scotch universities, where the term was adopted from the University of Paris
n. 2. 1825 Sc. – a novice, a beginner in any trade, art, or science
n. 3. 1832 – a native or inhabitant of Barbados
 
• BAJAN SPREE
n. 20C W. Indies & Trinidad – a small, spontaneous party
 
• BAJARDOUR
n. Bk1708 obs. – a carter; the bearer or carrier of any weight or burden
 
• BAJE(E)
n. 1960 W. Indies – a Bajan, a native of Barbados
 
• BAJIE
n. 1960 W. Indies – a Bajan, a native of Barbados
 
• BAJULATE
vb. 1613 obs. rare – to carry a heavy burden; to carry as a ‘badger’
 
• BAJULUS 
n. Bk1922 – a pedagogue; a teacher, esp. a strict or pedantic one


Back to INDEX B

Back to DICTIONARY