Dictionary: BARC – BARL

• BARCAROLE
n. 1854 – an Italian boatman
 
• BAR CAT
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a lynx
 
• BAR-CLAW
n. 1908 Sc. – a dog’s dew-claw
 
• BARCOO BILL
n. 1910 Aust. sl. – a bushman
 
• BARCOO BUSTER
n. Bk1999 Aust. sl. – a westerly wind in outback Queensland
 
• BARCOO ROT
n. Bk1999 Aust. sl. – a festering skin disease
 
• BARCOO SALUTE
n. 1973 Aust. sl. – a gesture with which one brushes flies from one’s face, considered to be typical of Australians
 
• BARCOO SPEW
n. Bk1999 Aust. sl. – illness accompanied by attacks of vomiting
 
• BAR COOTIE
n. 1920 US sl. – the habitual occupier of a bar, day in, day out; a heavy drinker, a drunkard
 
• BARD
n. 1. 1449 Sc. – a strolling musician or minstrel
n. 2. c1450 – one of an ancient Celtic order of minstrel-poets whose primary function appears to have been to compose and sing (usually to the harp) verses celebrating the achievements of chiefs and warriors, and who committed to verse historical and tradition facts, religious precepts, laws, genealogies, etc.; used for ‘poet’ in modern Celtic languages; in Welsh, a poet or versifier who has been recognized at the Eisteddfod
n. 3. 1667 poetic usage – a lyric or epic poet; a poet generally
n. 4. 1825 Sc. – bold, noisy woman; a scolding woman
 
• BARDACH
adj. 1. 1768 Sc. – stout, fearless 
adj. 2. 1824 Sc. – quarrelsome, uncivil in managing a dispute
n. 1550 rare – a boy or young man who is made use of as a (typically passive) sexual partner by an older man; generally, a (younger) passive partner in homosexual anal intercourse; a catamite; often used contemptuously, sometimes as a more general term of abuse
 
• BARDACIOUS
adj. 1. 1908 Amer. dial. – audacious, unceremonious
adj. 2. 1926 Amer. dial. – thorough, marvellous, remarkable, excellent, first-rate
 
• BARDACIOUSLY
adv. 1901 Amer. dial. – thoroughly, completely, extremely
 
• BARDASCIO
n. 1632 rare – a boy or young man who is made use of as a (typically passive) sexual partner by an older man; generally, a (younger) passive partner in homosexual anal intercourse; a catamite; often used contemptuously, sometimes as a more general term of abuse
 
• BARDASH
n. 1550 rare – a boy or young man who is made use of as a (typically passive) sexual partner by an older man; generally, a (younger) passive partner in homosexual anal intercourse; a catamite; often used contemptuously, sometimes as a more general term of abuse
 
• BARDASS
n. 1550 obs. – a boy or young man who is made use of as a (typically passive) sexual partner by an older man; generally, a (younger) passive partner in homosexual anal intercourse; a catamite; often used contemptuously, sometimes as a more general term of abuse
 
• BARDESS
n. 1822 rare – a female bard, a poetess
 
• BARDIE
adj. 1. 1706 Sc. – forward, pert, shameless, insolent
adj. 2. Bk1898 Sc. – bold, fierce, turbulent
n. 1. 1773 Sc. – a minor poet, a humble bard
n. 2. 1808 Sc. obs. – a gelded cat
vb. 1882 Sc. – to vituperate, to bandy words with
 
• BARDILY
adv. 1788 Sc. – pertly, boldly
 
• BARDINESS
n. 1825 Sc. – forwardness, pertness, esp. as shown in conversation
 
• BARDISH
adj. a1662 Sc. obs. – rude, insolent
 
• BARDIST
n. 1588 obs. rare – an adherent or follower of the bards
 
• BAR DITCH
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – the strip of grass and streets between the sidewalk and the curb
 
• BARDLET
n. 1867 – a young or inexperienced poet
 
• BARDLING
n. 1813 – a young or inexperienced poet
 
• BARD OF AVON
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – William Shakespeare
 
• BAR-DOG
n. 1907 Amer. dial. – a bartender
 
• BAR-DOGGING
n. 1971 Amer. dial. – tending bar
 
• BARDOLATER
n. 1903 – a worshipper of the ‘Bard’
 
• BARDOLATRY
n. 1901 – worship of the ‘Bard of Avon’, i.e. Shakespeare
 
• BARD STUFF
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – whisky
 
• BARDY
adj. 1. 1788 Sc. – bold, fierce, turbulent
adj. 2. 1822 Sc. – forward, pert, shameless, audacious; insolent; defiant
 
• BARE
adj. 1. 1297 obs. – defenseless, unprotected, deserted
adj. 2. c1305 obs. – laid waste, desolate
adj. 3. 1399 obs. – poor in quality, paltry, worthless
adj. 4. 1583 obs. – simple, without luxury; unpolished, rude
adj. 5. 1847 Amer. dial. – of coffee, tea, or liquor: undiluted
adj. 6. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – audacious; also, mean, base
adv. 1. c1325 arch. – no more than, at most; scarcely, barely
adv. 2. c1340 obs. – thoroughly, completely
n. 1. c1300 obs. – a naked part of the body; the bare skin
n. 2. 1683-4 obs. – a bare space or place
 
• BARE-ARSE
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – naked
 
• BARE AS A BALCHIN
adj. 1881 Eng. dial. – bald (balchin = an unfledged bird)
 
• BARE AS A JAYBIRD
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – completely bare; naked
 
• BARE AS ONE’S HAND
adj. c1420 – very bare
 
• BARE-ASS
adj. 1936 Amer. dial. – naked
 
• BARE-ASSED
adj. 1. 1965 Amer. dial. – naked; completely nude with the buttocks uncovered
adj. 2. 20C US sl. – immature; pert. to a young male whose buttocks are not hairy
 
• BARE-ASS NAKED
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – naked
 
• BAREBACK
adj. 20C US sl. – pert. to an act of copulation performed without a condom
 
• BARE-BACKS
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – sheep after being shorn
 
• BARE-BONE
n. 1596 – a lean, skinny person
 
• BAREBONES
adv. 1940 Amer. dial. – bareback, without a saddle
 
• BARE-BUB
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – an unfledged bird
 
• BAREFACED
adj. 1605 arch. – unconcealed, undisguised, open
 
• BAREFEETED
adj. 1928 Amer. dial. – without shoes, barefoot
 
• BAREFOOT
adj. 1. 1805 Amer. dial. – of horses: unshod
adj. 2. 1847 Amer. dial. – of coffee, tea, or liquor: undiluted
adj. 3. 1933 Amer. dial. – of bread: plain, without anything added
 
• BAREFOOT-BROTH
n. Bk1898 Sc. – broth made with butter and vegetables, without any meat
 
• BARE-FOOTED
adj. 1. 1847 Amer. dial. – of coffee, tea, or liquor: undiluted
adj. 2. 1941 Amer. dial. – of horses: unshod
 
• BAREFOOT-HEAD
n. 1867 Eng. dial. – a baldheaded man
 
• BAREFOOT-KAIL
n. 1787 Sc. – broth made with butter and vegetables, without any meat
 
• BARE-GOLLIN
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a newly hatched featherless bird
 
• BARE-GOLLOCK
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a newly hatched featherless bird
 
• BARE-GOLLY
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a newly hatched featherless bird
 
• BARE-GORP
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – an unfledged bird
 
• BARELIES
adv. 1787 Sc. – scarcely, barely, hardly
 
• BARELINS
adv. 1885 Sc. – barely
 
• BARELLET
n. 1611 obs. – a little barrel or cask
 
• BARELY
adv. 1. c1340 obs. – without qualification or reserve; unconditionally; wholly, completely; absolutely, positively
adv. 2. 1577 arch. – merely, simply, only
 
• BARE-MAN
n. 1609 Sc. obs. – a bankrupt who gives up all his goods to his creditors
 
• BARE-NAKED
adj. 1914 Amer. dial. – naked
 
• BARENESS
n. 1. 1552 obs. – leanness
n. 2. 1607 obs. – mere or simple quality; mereness
 
• BAREPOLES
adj. 20C sl. – naked
 
• BARE-POWED
adj. 1874 Sc. – bareheaded
 
• BARE-SNAKED
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – naked
 
• BARE-VAMPED
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – standing in one’s stockings, without shoes
 
• BARF
n. 1. 1678 Eng. dial. – a long low ridge or hill, generally isolated
n. 2. 1960s US sl. – vomit
n. 3. 1996 US sl. – beef
vb. 1. 1956 sl., orig. and chiefly US – to vomit 
vb. 2. 1983 US sl. – in computing: to fail to operate
vb. 3. 1993 US sl. – in hot rodding and drag racing: to damage something completely or partially, leaving parts scattered

• BARF BAG
n. 1988 US sl. – a disgusting or very unpleasant person
 
• BARF BUDDY
n. 1977 US sl. – a drinking companion
 
• BARFLOG
vb. 1908 Sc. – to beat one’s hands crosswise around the shoulders to keep oneself warm
 
• BAR-FLY
n. 1906 US sl. – a too-frequent frequenter of bars and saloons

• BARF ONE OUT
vb. Bk2007 US sl. – to disgust; to nauseate someone
 
• BARFUL
adj. 1601 obs. – full of bars or hindrances 
 
• BARGAIN
n. 1. 1375 obs. exc. Sc. – contention or contest for the mastery; struggle, combat, fight, battle; controversy
n. 2. c1400 arch. – a transaction that entails consequences, esp. unpleasant ones; a (bad or unfortunate) ‘business’
n. 3. 1602 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a small farm-holding
n. 4. 1790 Eng. dial. – an indefinite number or quantity of anything
n. 5. 1892 Eng. dial. – a load, esp. a wagon load
vb. 1375 Sc. obs. – to contend, to strive, to struggle, to fight
 
• BARGAINER
n. c1500 Sc. obs. – a quarreller, a wrangler, a bully
 
• BARGAINING
n. 1375 Sc. obs. – wrangling, contest, struggle, fighting
 
• BARGAIN OF FOOLERY
n. 1892 Eng. dial. – stuff and nonsense, or a stupid and empty thing
 
• BARGAIN-TACKER
n. 1898 Sc. – the foreman, who undertakes the work in a section of a lead mine
 
• BARGE
n. 1. 1470-85 obs. – a rowing-boat; a ferry-boat
n. 2. 1746 Eng. dial. – a fat, heavy person; anything large
n. 3. 1790 Eng. dial. – a great fat hog
n. 4. 1882 Amer. dial. – orig. a horse-drawn wagon or sleigh used for transporting a large number of people; now also a bus, esp. a school bus
n. 5. Bk1898 Ireland – a scolding woman
n. 6. 1930 Sc. – an argument, a talk
n. 7. c1960 Amer. jocular usage – a big foot
vb. 1. 1860 Eng. dial. – to scold, to abuse
vb. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to boast, to brag
 
• BARGE-ARSE
n. 1. 19C Brit. sl. – markedly protruding buttocks
n. 2. 19C Brit. sl. – a nickname for a person with markedly protruding buttocks
 
• BARGE-BELLIED
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – having a large or protuberant belly
 
• BARGH
n. 1. 1674 Eng. dial. obs. – the steep face of a hill; a road up it
n. 2. 1678 Eng. dial. – a long low ridge or hill, generally isolated
n. 3. 1693 obs. – a mine
 
• BARGHAM
n. Bk1898 Sc. – any untidy, clumsy piece of dress, but esp. anything wrapped around the neck
 
• BARGHEST
n. 1. 1732 – a goblin, fabled to appear in the form of a large dog, with various horrible characteristics, and to portend imminent death or misfortune
n. 2. 1788 Eng. dial. – a ghost, wraith, or hobgoblin
n. 3. 1863 Eng. dial. – a term of reproach or abuse; one who is unsightly in appearance; a noisy or ill-conducted person
n. 4. 1865 Eng. dial. – one who has the power of perceiving the disembodied spirits of living men
 
• BARGIE
n. Bk1898 Sc. – a wrangle, a squabble, a quarrel, mostly in words
vb. 1856 Sc. – to wrangle, to bandy words, to carry on a useless controversy
 
• BARGING
n. 1892 Eng. dial. – scolding in an abusive manner
 
• BARGLE
n. Bk1898 Sc. – a squabble, a quarrel, mostly in words
vb. 1856 Sc. – to wrangle, to bandy words, to carry on a useless controversy
 
• BAR-GOWN
n. 1664 – a lawyer’s gown; fig. a lawyer
 
• BARGUM
n. 1905 Amer. dial. – a bargain
 
• BAR-HEAD
n. 1950 Amer. cowboy usage – a horse that cannot be trained to work or to be ridden
 
• BAR HOG
n. 1915 Amer. dial. – a gelded hog  
 
• BAR HUSTLER
n. Bk1972 homosexual sl. – a male prostitute who solicits his customers in bars 
 
• BARI
n. 1970s S. Afr. sl. – a fool; one who has newly arrived at a township from the countryside
 
• BARICK
n. 1916 Amer. dial. – a hill
 
• BARISH
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – scanty, rather bare
 
• BARK
n. 1. c1374 arch. – outer covering; outside, external part
n. 2. 1377 obs. – the rind, husk, or shell of fruit and grains
n. 3. 1598 poetic usage – a rowing boat; formerly a large flat boat, a barge 
n. 4. 1721 Eng. dial. – the skin, epidermis
n. 5. 1790 Eng. dial. – a box or receptacle, formerly made of bark, used for holding candles or candle-ends
n. 6. 1848 Amer. dial. obs. – a scalp
n. 7. 1869 Eng. dial. – an Irishman
n. 8. 1871 colloq. – a cough
n. 9. 1871 – the sound of cannon-firing
n. 10. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – the hard outside of cooked or uncooked meat 
n. 11. 1923 Sc. – the scab formed over a wound or sore
n. 12. 1925 Amer. logging usage – any outer layer, as a potato peel, or pie crust 
n. 13. 1941 Amer. dial. – the hull of a walnut
n. 14. 1990s UK prison sl. – cannabis
vb. 1. 1592 obs. rare – to embark
vb. 2. 1790 Sc. & Eng. dial. – of dirt: to clot, to harden, to encrust, to adhere
vb. 3. 1850 – to scrape or rub off the skin, esp. from the shins and joints; to graze, to abrade
vb. 4. 1871 colloq. – to cough
vb. 5. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to boast, to ‘crow’
vb. 6. 19C – to call out or ‘spiel ‘ at the entrance of a cheap shop or show to attract customers
vb. 7. 1958 Amer. dial. – to scalp
vb. 8. 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage – to complain about an assignment or duty 
vb. 9. Bk2007 Aust. sl. – to vomit
 
• BARK AGAINST THE MOON
vb. 1655 – to clamour or agitate to no effect; to protest in vain
 
• BARK AT THE MOON
vb. 1655 – to clamour or agitate to no effect; to protest in vain
 
• BARK-EATER
n. 1. 1958 Amer. dial. – in logging: a logger; a sawmill hand
n. 2. 1969 Amer. dial. – a porcupine
 
• BARKED
adj. 1958 Amer. dial. – bald
 
• BARKEEP
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a bartender
 
• BARKEN
n. 1671 Eng. dial. – an enclosed space or yard; a farmyard
vb. 1790 Sc. & Eng. dial. – of blood or dirt: to clot, to become hardened, or encrusted
 
• BARKER
n. 1. 1402 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a tanner; a worker with leather
n. 2. 1483 – a noisy assailant
n. 3. 1699 – one who ‘barks’ at a cheap shop or show to entice people inside; an auction-room or shop tout
n. 4. 1815 sl. – a pistol
n. 5. 1842 sl. – a cannon
n. 6. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a dog
n. 7. Bk1944 services’ sl. – a big artillery gun 
n. 8. 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage – a cougher 
n. 9. 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage – one who complains 
 
• BARKER’S EGG
n. 1980s sl., orig. Aust. – dog excrement, esp. when very old 
 
• BARKER’S NEST
n. 1980s sl., orig. Aust. – a pile of dog excrement 
 
• BARKING
adj. 1968 Brit. sl. – insane, mad  
n. 1. 1549 – angry or assailing outcry
n. 2. 1813 – harsh coughing
 
• BARKING AND FLEEING
phr. 20C – spending one’s property in a prodigal way; on the verge of ruin
 
• BARKING DOGS
n. 1939 Amer. jocular usage – tired or aching feet 
 
• BARKING IRON
n. 1791 Ireland cant – a pistol
 
• BARKING MAD
adj. 1900s sl. – absolutely crazy, highly eccentric, insane, mad

• BARKING MOONBAT
n. 2004 sl. – an uncontrolled, eccentric, or erratic person
 
• BARKING SPIDER
n. 1. 1980s US college sl. – the audible breaking of wind
n. 2. 1990s sl. – the anus
 
• BARKING WOLF
n. 1867 Amer. dial. obs. – a coyote
 
• BARKLE
vb. 1874 Eng. dial. – of dirt: to cake, to encrust, to adhere
 
• BARKLOVES
n. 1929 Sc. – bare feet; used jokingly
 
• BARL
n. c1820 Amer. dial. – a barrel
 
• BARLA-FUMBLE
n. a1550 Sc. obs. – a call for a truce by one who has fallen in wrestling or play; also used improperly for a fall or tumble
 
• BARLEY
int. 1814 Sc. & Eng. & Amer. dial. – a cry for truce in a game, used by children when a short rest or break is wanted
n. 1814 Sc. – a truce, a rest
vb. 1865 Eng. dial. – to claim by right of first choice, to bespeak
 
• BARLEY-BAIRN
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a child born in wedlock, but is born within six months of marriage
 
• BARLEY-BIRD
n. 1. 1882 Eng. dial. – the nightingale
n. 2. 1883 Eng. dial. – the Ray’s wagtail, Motacilla flava  
n. 3. 1885 Eng. dial. – the common gull, Larus canus
n. 4. 1887 Eng. dial. – the siskin, Chrysomitris spinus
n. 5. 1889 Eng. dial. – the wryneck, Jynx torquilla
 
• BARLEY BLIND
adj. 1796 sl. obs. – intoxicated
 
• BARLEY-BREE
n. 1724 Sc. & Eng. dial. – malt liquor, esp. whisky or ale
 
• BARLEY BRIGHT
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a children’s game of chase
 
• BARLEY-BROO
n. 1724 Sc. – malt liquor, esp. whisky or ale
 
• BARLEY-BROTH
n. 1. 1593 – strong ale 
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – whisky
 
• BARLEY-BUGGLE
n. 1880 N. Ireland – a scarecrow
 
• BARLEY-BUMP
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a sluggard
 
• BARLEY-CAP
n. 1598 obs. – a tippler
 
• BARLEY-CHILD
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a child born in wedlock, but is born within six months of marriage
 
• BARLEY-CORN
n. 19C Eng. dial. – beer or ale
 
• BARLEYCORN SPRINTS
n. 1858 Amer. loggers’ usage – dysentery following a drunk
 
• BARLEY-FEVER
n. 1. 1828 Sc. – illness caused by drinking to excess
n. 2. 1828 Sc. – intoxication
 
• BARLEY-FUMMEL!
int. 1827 Sc. obs. – the call for a truce by one who has fallen in wrestling or fighting
 
• BARLEY-HOOD
n. a1529 – a fit of drunkenness, or of ill humour or temper brought on by drinking
 
• BARLEY-ISLAND
n. a1640 obs. – an ale-house
 
• BARLEY JOHNNY
n. 1891 Sc. – whisky
 
• BARLEY JUICE
n. 1. L17 sl. – beer
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – whisky
 
• BARLEY ME!
int. 1956 Amer. dial. – in children’s games: that’s mine!
 
• BARLEY-MOOD
n. 1790 – a fit of drunkenness, or of ill humour or temper brought on by drinking; barley-hood
 
• BARLEY OUT!
int. 1917 Amer. dial. – in children’s games: a call for truce
 
• BARLEY-SICK
adj. 1. c1440 obs. – intoxicated
adj. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – sick from excessive drinking
 
• BARLEY-SOWER
n. 1887 Eng. dial. – the common gull, Larus canus
 
• BARLEY-STRAW
n. a1721 – a trifle
 
• BARLEY-UNCTION
n. 1746 Sc. obs. – malt liquor; whisky
 
• BARLEY WATER
n. 1. L17 sl. – beer
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – whisky
 
• BARLEY WINE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – whisky
 
• BARLIC
adj. 1790 Sc. obs. – angry, drunken
 
• BARLIC-HOOD
n. 1728 Sc. – a fit of obstinacy or violent ill temper; also, a state of drunkenness
 
• BARLING
n. 1611 obs. – a pole
 
• BARLOW KNIFE
n. 1779 Amer. dial. – a single-bladed pocket knife


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