Dictionary: BEAT – BEATZ

• BEAT
adj. 1. 1832 sl. – tired, exhausted, emotionally and physically
adj. 2. 1844 Eng. dial. – bruised with walking or hard work
adj. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; perplexed; baffled; amazed, astonished, at a loss
adj. 4. 1944 Amer. sl. – worthless, inferior, no good
adj. 5. 1947 Amer. sl. – sad; disillusioned; world-weary; depressed
adj. 6. 1940s US sl. – of drugs: adulterated
adj. 7. 1950s Amer. sl. – broke, penniless
adj. 8. 1950s US drug culture sl. – of a drug addict: craving for a dose of a drug
adj. 9. 1980s sl. – very ugly
adj. 10. 2000 US sl. – excellent, admirable, fashionable
int. 20C teen & high school sl. – that’s terrible!
n. 1. L18 sl., orig. UK criminals’ usage – a street or streets as walked by a prostitute
n. 2. 1827 Amer. dial. – something that surpasses; an incomparable circumstance
n. 3. 1855 Amer. sl. – a remarkable or unexcelled person; an outstanding person, one who beats all rivals
n. 4. 1863 sl. – a swindler; a confidence trickster
n. 5. 1865 Amer. dial. – a worthless, idle fellow; a shiftless, unreliable person; one who regularly fails to pay his debts
n. 6. 1874 US sl. – a policeman who walks a beat
n. 7. M19 sl. – an area in which a pickpocket works
n. 8. M19 sl. – a loafer, a layabout, a sponger
n. 9. M19 US sl. – an escape, usually from prison
n. 10. 1930s US criminals’ sl. – a swindle
n. 11. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a hasty or unceremonious departure
n. 12. 1950s US prison sl. – the area in which a criminal gang operates, thanks to bribing a local politician or police department
n. 13. 1958 – a member of the ‘beat generation (orig. applied to a group of young people, predominantly writers, artists, and their adherents in San Francisco; later applied to similar groups elsewhere, adopting unconventional dress, manners, habits, etc., as a means of self-expression and social protest; a beatnik
n. 14. 1965 Amer. dial. – a person who saves in a mean way, or is greedy in money matters
n. 15. Bk1972 US homosexual sl. – one who causes homosexuals trouble; a homophobic thug
n. 16. 1975 US sl. – a prostitute’s client who likes to be beaten, often bringing his own equipment with him
n. 17. 20C US sl. – information
vb. 1. c1360 obs. – to strike together the eyelids or the teeth 
vb. 2. 1470 obs. – to debate, to discuss; to reason about, to argue 
vb. 3. 1579 obs. – insist with iteration on or upon 
vb. 4. 1586 obs. – to exchange blows; to fight 
vb. 5. 1708 Eng. dial. – to bruise the feet with excessive walking
vb. 6. 1849 Amer. sl. – to cheat; to swindle; to bilk; to trick
vb. 7. 1859 Amer. sl. – to avoid paying a debt, bill, fare, etc.
vb. 8. 1859 Amer. sl. – to succeed in robbing; to rob
vb. 9. M19 sl. – to defeat intellectually; to baffle, to confuse
vb. 10. 1902 Amer. sl. – to escape from prison
vb. 11. 1912 Amer. sl. – to evade punishment or conviction
vb. 12. 1940s African-American sl. – of a man: to have heterosexual intercourse
vb. 13. 1950s Amer. sl. – to steal
vb. 14. 1959 Amer. sl. – to leave a place quickly
 
• BEAT ABOUT THE BUSH
vb. 1520 – to avoid coming to the point; to delay talking about something difficult or unpleasant 
 
• BEAT A DJE
vb. 20C W. Indies sl. – to be in the mood for a physical fight or verbal confrontation, esp. one that will last for several days
 
• BEAT AKEYBO
vb. M19 sl. – to be confusing
 
• BEAT ALL
vb. L18 sl. – to surpass in every way
 
• BEAT ALL COCKFIGHT
vb. 20C W. Indies sl. – to be unbelievable, unheard of, or utterly ridiculous
 
• BEAT ALL CREATION
vb. 20C US sl., World War II usage – to be excellent
 
• BEAT ALL HOLLER
vb. L18 sl. – to surpass in every way
 
• BEAT ALL HOLLOW
vb. L18 sl. – to surpass in every way
 
• BEAT ALL NATURE
vb. 1825 Amer. dial. arch. – to be surprising or astonishing
 
• BEAT ALL TO STICKS
vb. M19 sl. – to thrash, to beat severely
 
• BEAT A MONKEY SHOW
vb. 1858 Amer. sl. – to be remarkably amusing, exasperating or the like
 
• BEAT AND BREEZE 
vb. Bk1947 Amer. sl. – to leave, to ‘beat it’
 
• BEAT A RAP
vb. 1. 1920s sl. – to be found not guilty in a court
vb. 2. 1940s US sl. – in a non-judicial context: to extricate oneself from difficult circumstances
 
• BEAT A RETREAT
vb. World War II Amer. sl. – to withdraw
 
• BEAT AROUND
vb. 1960 Amer. dial. – to potter, to trifle, to loaf or idle; to gad about; to wander aimlessly
 
• BEAT ARTIST
n. 1. 1971 Amer. police sl. – a swindler
n. 2. 1973 drug addicts’ sl. – an addict who robs to support his habit
n. 3. 1985 drug addicts’ sl. – a drug dealer who cheats his customers, usually with bogus or counterfeit drugs
 
• BEAT-ASS
adj. 1. 2000s US sl. – excellent, outstanding
adj. 2. 2000s US sl. – second-rate
vb. 1. 1940s US sl. – (as ‘beat ass’) to leave, to depart
vb. 2. 1974 Amer. sl. – to rush
 
• BE AT A THING LIKE NEED-FIRE
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to do anything with great effort or industry
 
• BE AT A VARY
vb. 1766 Sc. obs. – to be at a loss; to feel uncertain  
 
• BEAT A TRICK
vb. 1970s US criminals’ sl. – of a prostitute: to rob a client
 
• BEAT BANAGHAN
vb. L18 sl., orig. Irish – to tell fabulous, fantastic tales
 
• BEAT BANAGHER
vb. a1845 – to surpass everything
 
• BEAT BANNAGHER
vb. L18 sl., orig. Irish – to tell fabulous, fantastic tales
 
• BEAT BASHER
n. 1950s UK juvenile sl. – a policeman
 
• BE AT BAT
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to have a turn in conversation
 
• BEAT BOBTAIL
vb. 1898 Amer. dial. – to surpass (one’s) expectation or comprehension
 
• BEAT BOX 
n. 1. 1980s sl. – an electronic drum machine
n. 2. 1980s sl. – a large, portable tape deck
n. 3. Bk1995 Amer. sl. – the person who provides the (verbal) rhythmic beat in a rap song
 
• BEAT BOY
n. Bk1992 rap sl. – a rapper
 
• BEAT CHEEKS
vb. 1990s US sl. – to leave (at speed)
 
• BEAT COP
n. 1941 colloq., orig. US – a police officer who patrols a beat
 
• BEAT-DOWN
adj. Bk2007 US sl. – tired, exhausted
n. 1980s African-American sl. – a fight; a beating
vb. 1980s African-American sl. – (as ‘beat down’) to fight, to beat up, to defeat severely
 
• BEAT’EM;  BEATEM
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – the conqueror; the one who excels all others; often used in cock-fighting
 
• BEATEMEST
adj. 1831 Amer. dial. – most remarkable or unusual
 
• BEAT-‘EM-UP
n. 1990s sl. – an action film or computer game
 
• BEATEN
adj. 1. c1340 obs. – embroidered
adj. 2. a1543 obs. – well-worn, trite
adj. 3. a1593 obs. – of persons: inured to anything, experienced 
 
• BEATENEST
adj. 1860 Amer. dial. – finest; very exceptional; most remarkable or unusual
n. 1907 Amer. dial. – one’s best; one’s utmost effort
 
• BEATEN-OUT
adv. M19 sl. – impoverished
 
• BEATER
n. 1. 1483 – a person who beats; one who strikes repeated blows, a striker; a punisher; one who beats a drum, etc.
n. 2. 1509 obs. – a street loafer or ruffian
n. 3. 1592 UK criminals’ sl. – one who lures a victim into a crooked game of cards or dice
n. 4. 1845 US colloq. – a person who beats or excels others; an excellent person
n. 5. 1937 Amer. dial., esp. African-American usage – a person who doesn’t pay his bills
n. 6. 1940s African-American sl. – cash; money
n. 7. 1950 Amer. dial. – a heavy hammer or maul; a sledge hammer; also, a wedge  used in splitting wood
n. 8. 1965 Amer. dial., esp. African-American usage – a person who sets out to cheat others while pretending to be honest
n. 9. 1965 Amer. dial., esp. African-American usage – a tramp
n. 10. 1980s US sl. – a junky old car
n. 11. Bk1995 Amer. sl. – a beatnik; a member oft the Bohemian subculture that flourished in the 1950s
 
• BEATER-CASES
n. 18C UK criminals’ sl. – shoes
 
• BEATERMOST
adj. 1843 Amer. dial. obs. – most remarkable or unusual  
 
• BEATERS
n. 1. 1859 Amer. criminal sl. – shoes, boots
n. 2. 1969 Amer. dial. – false teeth
 
• BEAT FEET
vb. 1. 1944 Amer. sl. – to hurry
vb. 2. 1944 Amer. sl. – to leave; to clear out
 
• BEAT FOR THE YOLK
phr. 1940s African-American sl. – short of cash, temporarily impoverished
 
• BEAT GOOSE
vb. 1883 – to strike the hands under the armpits to warm them
 
• BEATH
vb. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to decay, to wither
 
• BEAT HELL
vb. M19 sl. – to surpass, to exceed in expectation, to surprise
 
• BEAT HER ON THE BACK
vb. 1929 Amer. dial. – in railroading: to make fast time, work an engine at full stroke
 
• BEAT INTO FITS
vb. M19 sl. – to defeat or surpass completely
 
• BEAT HOLLOW
vb. 1771 Amer. sl. – to surpass, to outdo
 
• BEATIFIC
adj. 1649 – making blessed; imparting supreme happiness or blessedness
 
• BEATIFICAL
adj. 1605 – making blessed; imparting supreme happiness or blessedness 
 
• BEATIFICATE
vb. a1636 obs. – to make supremely happy or blessed 
 
• BEATIFICATION
n. 1502 – the act of rendering, or condition of being rendered, supreme happy or blessed 
 
• BEATIFIED
adj. 1575 – made supremely happy or blessed 
 
• BEATIFY
vb. 1535 – to make supremely happy or blessed 
 
• BE AT INCHES WITH
vb. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – to be very near
 
• BEATINGEST
adj. 1903 Amer. dial. – most remarkable or unusual
 
• BEATING STICK
n. 1952 Amer. dial. – a stick used to beat clothes while washing them
 
• BEATING-STOCK
n. 1552 obs. – a jocular title given to one who is subjected to beating 
 
• BEATING THE GUMS
n. Bk1947 Amer. sl. – talking
 
• BEATING UP
adj. 1967 Amer. dial. – said of the wind when it begins to increase
 
• BEATING WITH CHILD
adj. 1691 Eng. dial. – breeding
 
• BEATIN’S
n. 1896 Amer. dial. – the advantage
 
• BEAT IN TIME
vb. 1896 Amer. dial. – to waste time; to busy oneself with unimportant things
 
• BEATION
n. 1652 obs. rare – blessing
 
• BEAT IT
int. Bk2006 US sl. – go away!; get out!
vb. 1. 1665 sl. – to go away, to clear out   
vb. 2. 1665 sl. – to go in a hurry  
 
• BEAT IT ON THE HOOF
vb. 1691 obs. – to go on foot
 
• BEATITUDE
n. 1491 – supreme happiness or blessedness
 
• BEAT IT UP
int. 2000 US sl. – speak clearly!
vb. 1933 sl. – to have rowdy fun, typically resulting in breakages
 
• BEAT IT WHILE THE BEATING IS GOOD
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to depart hurriedly
 
• BEAT LIKE A RED-HEADED STEPCHILD
vb. 1999 Amer. dial. – to beat severely; to best definitively in a game or contest
 
• BEAT LIQUOR
vb. 20C W. Indies sl. – to drink heavily
 
• BE AT MARKET
vb. 1776 obs. – to be for sale  
 
• BEATMEAT
n. 1980s US homosexual sl. – masturbation
 
• BEAT MOLL 
n. Bk1945 criminals’ sl. – a prostitute who walks the streets for trade of her profession
 
• BEATNIK 
n. 1958 – a member of the ‘beat generation (orig. applied to a group of young people, predominantly writers, artists, and their adherents in San Francisco; later applied to similar groups elsewhere, adopting unconventional dress, manners, habits, etc., as a means of self-expression and social protest
 
• BEATNIKOID 
n. 1960 – a college student attempting to be a beatnik
 
• BE AT NUMBER ONE, LONDON
phr. Bk1893 sl. – the ‘menstrual flux is on’
 
• BEAT-NUTS 
n. 1975 US sl. – an obsessive masturbator
 
• BEAT OFF
n. 1. 1970-72 US sl. – (as ‘beat-off’) an unattractive, repulsive person; one who is so unappealing sexually that it is thought he or she must resort to masturbation as the only available sexual activity
n. 2. 1970s US sl. – an act of masturbation
vb. 1. 1920s US criminals’ sl. – to rob, to break into
vb. 2. 1960s US sl. – of a male: to masturbate
vb. 3. 1960s US sl. – to masturbate another person
vb. 4. 1960s US sl. – to waste time, to loaf around
 
• BEAT OFFICER 
n. 1. 1846 US – in Alabama & Mississippi: a local official serving a particular beat (the principal subdivision of a county)
n. 2. 1868 orig. US – a police officer who patrols a beat (the round or course habitually traversed by a watchman, police officer, etc., on duty)
 
• BEATOMEST
adj. 1845 Amer. dial. – most remarkable or unusual

• BEAT ONE’S BOATS
vb. 1990s US jocular usage – to depart, to run away
 
• BEAT ONE’S CHOPS
vb. 1946  Amer. sl. – to talk loudly or to no purpose; to chatter; to complain
 
• BEAT ONE’S DUMMY
vb. 1930s sl. – to masturbate
 
• BEAT ONE’S GUMS
vb. 1935 Amer. sl. – to talk loudly or to no purpose; to chatter; to complain
 
• BEAT ONE’S HOG
vb. 1970s sl. – to masturbate
 
• BEAT ONE’S MEAT
vb. 1967 sl., orig. US – to masturbate
 
• BEAT ONE’S SKIN
vb. 1940s African-American sl. – to applaud, to clap
 
• BEAT ONE’S TIME
vb. 1. 1869 Amer. sl. – to confound one
vb. 2. 1932 Amer. sl. – to steal someone’s sweetheart
 
• BEAT ONE’S WAY
vb. 1. 1873 Amer. sl. – to get along by sponging, cheating, or swindling
vb. 2. 1873 Amer. sl. – to make one’s way by stealing rides on railroad trains, usually in freight cars
 
• BEAT OUT
adj. 1. 1746 Amer. dial. – tired, exhausted
adj. 2. 1943 Amer. dial. – mentally or nervously exhausted; at one’s wits end
vb. Bk1888 – to overpower completely; to exhaust
 
• BEAT OUT OF FITS
vb. M19 sl. – to defeat or surpass completely
 
• BEAT OUT THE TIME
vb. 1889 Eng. dial. – to while away the time
 
• BEAT OVER THE GROUND
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to re-discuss
 
• BEAT OVER THE OLD GROUND
vb. 1792 – to discuss topics already treated of 
 
• BEAT PAD
n. 1930s US drug culture sl. – a place where drugs are consumed
 
• BEAT POET
n. 1955 orig. US – any of a group of American poets who emerged chiefly in California in the 1950s and were noted for their
rejection of social and poetic conventions
 
• BEAT POUNDER
n. 1942 criminals’ sl. – a policeman, esp. one who patrols his beat on foot
 
• BEAT QUEEN
n. Bk2000 Aust. sl. – a male homosexual who frequents beats (a public place which homosexual men frequent to pick up casual partners)
 
• BE AT RAP-CHAFTS
vb. Bk2000 Aust. sl. – to have nothing to eat
 
• BEAT REPORTER
n. Bk1999 baseball usage – in baseball: a journalist who writes about a particular subject on a daily basis; spec. a sportswriter who covers a major-league team on a daily basis

• THE BEATS
n. Bk2007 sl. – a physical attack
 
• BEATS A HEN A-FLYING
phr. 1966 Amer. dial. – to be surprising or astonishing; to be exasperating
 
• BEATS A HEN A-ROUTING
phr. 1966 Amer. dial. – to be surprising or astonishing; to be exasperating
 
• BEATS ALL!
int. M19 sl. – an exclamation of incomprehension
 
• BEAT SKIN
vb. 1940s African-American sl. – to applaud, to clap
 
• BEATS ME!
int. M19 sl. – an exclamation of incomprehension
 
• BEAT SOMEONE FOR
vb. 1950s sl. – to take a person’s money, whether it is offered or not; to rob or trick someone out of their money
 
• BEAT SOMEONE OUT OF SOMETHING
vb. 1849 US sl. – to swindle, to cheat
 
• BEAT SOMEONE’S EARS IN
vb. World War II Amer. sl. – to do violence; to assault
 
• BEAT SOMEONE’S TIME
vb. 1. M19 US sl. – to confuse, to confound
vb. 2. 1930s African-American & college sl. – to cheat or be cheated in a love affair
 
• BEAT SOMEONE TO THE GUN
vb. 1920s US sl. – to start first, to do something before somebody else
 
• BEAT SOMEONE TO THE PUNCH
vb. 1. 1960s sl., orig. African-American usage – to arrive at a destination sooner than another person
vb. 2. 1960s sl. – to appreciate or understand something faster than another person
 
• BEATSTER
n. 1958 – a beatnik; a member of the ‘beat generation (orig. applied to a group of young people, predominantly writers, artists, and their adherents in San Francisco; later applied to similar groups elsewhere, adopting unconventional dress, manners, habits, etc., as a means of self-expression and social protest; a beatnik 

• BEAT TAR
vb. 20C W. Indies sl. – to walk around
 
• BEAT THE AIR
vb. c1375 – to fight to no purpose or against no opposition; to make futile attempts
 
• BEAT THE BAGS OFF
vb. 1920s sl. – to overcome totally
 
• BEAT THE BAND
vb. 1900 – to exceed, to surpass, to beat everything
 
• BEAT THE BARGAIN
vb. 1640 obs. – to endeavour to bring down the price; to chaffer for the lowest terms; to cheapen  
 
• BEAT THE BEAVER
vb. 1970s sl. – of a woman: to masturbate
 
• BEAT THE BEJESUS OUT OF
vb. 1908 sl. – to hit repeatedly; to assault by hitting
 
• BEAT THE BISHOP
vb. L19 sl. – to masturbate
 
• BEAT THE BOARDS
vb. 1940s African-American sl. – to dance; to tap-dance
 
• BEAT THE BOOBY
vb. 1785 obs. – to strike the hands under the armpits to warm them; to slap or rub one’s hands over one’s body, arms, etc., as a way of stimulating the circulation and warming oneself  
 
• BEAT THE BOOKS
vb. 1944 Amer. sl. – to study hard
 
• BEAT THE BOX
vb. 1915 Amer. sl. – to play dance music on a piano
 
• BEAT THE BRAINS
vb. a1593 – to think persistently and laboriously
 
• BEAT THE BREEZE
vb. 1. 1944 Amer. sl. – to gossip, to chat, to talk, to boast
vb. 2. World War II Amer. sl. – to travel with great speed
 
• BEAT THE BRICKS
vb. 1920s US sl. – to walk the streets, esp. when in search of work
 
• BEAT THE BUGS
vb. c1833 US sl. – to surpass all others
 
• BEAT THE BULL
vb. 1974 Amer. sl. – to gossip, to chat
 
• BEAT-THE-BUSH
adj. E19 sl. – non-committal, evasive
 
• BEAT THE BUSH
vb. L16 UK criminals’ sl. – to ensnare a victim
 
• BEAT THE CAN OFF OF
vb. World War II Amer. sl. – to do violence
 
• BEAT THE CARS
vb. 1. 19C US sl. – to surpass in every way
vb. 2. 1922 Amer. dial. – to be the last straw
 
• BEAT THE CATS
vb. 1909 Amer. dial. – to be surprising or astonishing
 
• BEAT THE CLOCK
vb. 20C – to complete a task before a stated time
 
• BEAT THE CUNT OUT OF
vb. 1980s UK sl. – to beat severely
 
• BEAT THE DAISY
vb. 1971 US sl. – to masturbate
 
• BEAT THE DAYLIGHTS OUT OF ONE
vb. M18 sl. – to beat one severely
 
• BEAT THE DEVIL AND DR. FOSTER
vb. 1848 Ireland – to excel, to surpass
 
• BEAT THE DEVIL OUT OF
vb. World War II Amer. sl. – to do violence
 
• BEAT THE DEVIL ROUND A BUSH
vb. 1908 Eng. dial. – to accomplish something by indirection or subterfuge; to be evasive or dilatory
 
• BEAT THE DEVIL ROUND A STUMP
vb. 1908 Eng. dial. – to accomplish something by indirection or subterfuge; to be evasive or dilatory
 
• BEAT THE DEVIL ROUND THE GOOSEBERRY BUSH
vb. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to tell a long story without much point
 
• BEAT THE DEVIL ROUND THE STUMP
vb. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to accomplish one’s purpose while saving one’s conscience by indirection
 
• BEAT THE DRUM FOR
vb. Bk2006 US sl. – to promote or support someone or something
 
• BEAT THE DUMMY
vb. 1930s US sl. – to masturbate
 
• BEAT THE DUTCH
vb. 1775 – to be amazing; to be surprising or astonishing; to be exasperating; to surpass all others; often used in negative constructions
 
• BEAT THE GANGER
vb. 20C US drug culture sl. – to smoke opium
 
• BEAT THE HEAD
vb. 1579 – to think persistently and laboriously
 
• BEAT THE HELL OUT OF
vb. 20C US sl., World War II usage – to do violence
 
• BEAT THE HOOF
vb. 1687 obs. – to go on foot
 
• BEAT THE HOUND OUT OF
vb. 1966 Amer. dial. – to thrash or beat thoroughly
 
• BEAT THE JEWS
vb. 1845 US sl., offensive – to surpass all others
 
• BE AT THE LAND-END
vb. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – to be quite worn out
 
• BEAT THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS OUT OF
vb. M18 sl. – to beat severely; to administer a violent thrashing
 
• BEAT THE MARKET
vb. 1655 obs. – to endeavour to bring down the price; to chaffer for the lowest terms; to cheapen 
 
• BEAT THE MEAT
vb. 1967 sl., orig. US – to masturbate
 
• BEAT THE MILL
vb. 20C US sl., World War II usage – to type; (mill = typewriter)
 
• BE AT THE NECKING
vb. Bk1905 Sc. – to be courting
 
• BEAT THE PANTS OFF
vb. 1934 colloq. – to beat convincingly; to utterly defeat
 
• BEAT THE PRICE
vb. 1592 obs. – to endeavour to bring down the price; to chaffer for the lowest terms; to cheapen
 
• BEAT THE PUP
vb. 1956 Amer. sl. – of a male: to masturbate
 
• BE AT THE RACES
vb. 20C sl. – to walk the streets as a prostitute
 
• BEAT THE RAP
vb. 1927 US sl. – to escape punishment, esp. a prison sentence
 
• BEAT THE RECORD
vb. Bk1903 sl. – to surpass all previous performances
 
• BEAT THE SAP OUT OF
vb. World War II Amer. sl. – to do violence
 
• BEAT THE SCARF
vb. 1901 Sc. – to strike the arms vigorously across the chest to promote warmth
 
• BEAT THE SCARFS
vb. 1882 Sc. – to flap the arms against the sides to keep oneself warm on a cold day

• BE AT THE SCHOOL OF PLACEBO
vb. M14 sl. – to be a toady or sycophant 
 
• BEAT THE SHEETS
vb. 1954 Amer. sl. – to sleep soundly
 
• BEAT THE SHIT OUT OF
vb. 1966 sl. – to thrash or beat a person severely; to hit repeatedly; to assault by hitting
 
• BEAT THE SIDEWALK
vb. c1917 Amer. sl. – to walk a police beat
 
• BEAT THE SKIN
vb. Bk1942 US sl. – to applaud
 
• BEAT THE STREETS
vb. c1375 – to walk up and down; to run about idly 
 
• BE AT THE TAKING-SIDE
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to receive something instead of paying
 
• BEAT THE TAR OUT OF
vb. 1884 sl. – to do violence; to hit repeatedly; to assault by hitting; to do violence 
 
• BEAT THE THROTTLE WITH A STICK
vb. 1958 Amer. logging railroad usage – to attempt to get more steam out of an engine 
 
• BEAT THE WADDING OUT OF
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – to beat very thoroughly
 
• BEAT THE WATER
vb. 1579 obs. – to fight to no purpose or against no opposition; to make futile attempts 
 
• BEAT THE WIND
vb. 1815 – to fight to no purpose or against no opposition; to make futile attempts 
 
• BEAT TIME
vb. 1965 Amer. dial. – to waste time; to busy oneself with unimportant things
 
• BE-ATTLED
adj. 1939 Amer. dial. – confused, mixed up
 
• BEAT TO A FRAZZLE
vb. World War II Amer. sl. – to do violence
 
• BEAT TO A JELLY
vb. World War II Amer. sl. – to do violence
 
• BEAT TO A MUMMY
vb. World War II Amer. sl. – to do violence
 
• BEAT TO CHUCKS
vb. Bk1911 Sc. – to surpass utterly
 
• BEATTOCKS
n. Bk1911 Sc. – mashed potatoes
 
• BEAT TO THE CHOPS 
adj. Bk1947 Amer. sl. – tired out; orig. said of a trombone player
 
• BEAT TO THE WHEEL
vb. 1920s US sl. – to start first, to do something before somebody else
 
• BEAT-UP
adj. 1. World War II Amer. sl. – damaged; worn out; of unimpressive appearance; completely exhausted
adj. 2. 2000 US sl. – unfair
 
• BEAT UP ON
vb. 1940s African-American sl. – of a man: to have heterosexual intercourse
 
• BEAT UP THE QUARTERS OF
vb. 1. 1670 – to arouse; to disturb
vb. 2. 1823 – to visit unceremoniously
 
• BEAT WITH THE HEAT 
adj. Bk1947 Amer. sl. – hot and tired 


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