Dictionary: BELM – BEND

• BELOMANCY
n. 1646 – divination by means of arrows
 
• BELONGER 
n. 1. 1577 obs. – a person who is dependent on another; an adherent; a follower
n. 2. 1985 – in the Caribbean: a native of a particular island; a non-immigrant
n. 3. 1999 sl. – a person of African descent living in the West Indies
 
• BELOOK
vb. 1. c1175 obs. – to look; to look at, consider; to look about one, cast one’s eyes about 
vb. 2. 19C Eng. dial. – to weep
 
• BELOUKE
vb. 1. c825 obs. – to enclose, to encompass   
vb. 2. c897 obs. – to shut a person, etc. in or out
vb. 3. 971 obs. – to close, to shut a door, etc.
 
• BELOVE
n. 1546 obs. rare – a beloved person
vb. 1. c1205 obs. – to be pleased with, to approve, to like
vb. 2. c1205 obs. – to please, to be pleasing to a person
vb. 3. 1377 obs. – to love  
 
• BELOVER
n. 1491 obs. rare – a lover
 
• BELOVING
adj. 1606 obs. – loving  
n. 1589 obs. rare – liking, pleasure
 
• BELOW
vb. 1377 obs. rare exc. Sc. – to make low or lowly; to humble; to demean
 
• BELOWNDER
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – the noise of a heavy fall
 
• BELOW NEIGHBOUR
n. 1895 Eng. dial. – one who lives on a lower story of the same house
 
• BELOW PAR
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – somewhat ill; indisposed
 
• BELOW THE BELT
adj. 1890 sl. – unfair, unreasonable
 
• BELOW THE FORD
adj. 1966 Amer. dial. – under the weather; not actually sick, but not feeling just right
 
• BELOW THERE!
int. 1896 – a warning addressed to persons to beware of a descending object
 
• BELOW THE SALT
adj. 1640 – in an inferior position
phr. 1599 – at the lower part of the table; i.e. among the less honoured guests

BELOW THE ZONE
adj. 1989 US sl.,Vietnam war usage – of a military promotion: unexpectedly early
 
• BELPER
n. 1892 Eng. dial. – a heavy fall
vb. 1864 Eng. dial. – to cheat; to overreach
 
• BELSABUB
n. c950 – the Devil
 
• BELSCHNICKEL
n. 1945 Amer. dial. – St. Nicholas, Santa Claus or St. Nicholas’ servant whose duty it was to punish naughty children or reward good ones
 
• BELSEBUB
n. c950 – the Devil
 
• BELSH
n. 1. 17C Brit. sl. – beer and ale
n. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – a very fat person
vb. 1825 Eng. dial. – to clean the tails of sheep by cutting away dirty or matted wool
 
• BELSHACH
n. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – a contemptuous term for a child; a brat
n. 2. 1933 Sc. – a person who talks in a rather clumsily rapid and eager manner  
 
• BEL-SHANGLE 
n. 1847 UK sl. – a fool
 
• BELSHIE
adj. 19C Sc. – fat and at the same time diminutive; fat and small or short
 
• BELSH NICHEL
n. 1830 Amer. dial. – St. Nicholas, Santa Claus or St. Nicholas’ servant whose duty it was to punish naughty children or reward good ones
 
• BELSIER
n. 1377 obs. – a grandfather; an ancestor
 
• BELSIRE
n. 1377 obs. – a grandfather; an ancestor
 
• BELSIZE
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. obs. – bulky, of good size
 
• BELSNICKEL
n. 1. 1823 Amer. dial. – St. Nicholas, Santa Claus or St. Nicholas’ servant whose duty it was to punish naughty children or reward good ones
n. 2. 1967 Amer. dial. – a person in disguise who visits friends or relatives at Christmas time to play pranks or beg for gifts or refreshments
 
• BELSNICKLE
n. 1823 Amer. dial. – St. Nicholas, Santa Claus or St. Nicholas’ servant whose duty it was to punish naughty children or reward good ones
vb. 1881 Amer. dial. – to go about merrymaking, usually from door to door and in fantastic costume, during the Christmas season
 
• BELSNICKLER
n. 1964 Amer. dial. – a person in disguise who visits friends or relatives at Christmas time to play pranks or beg for gifts or refreshments
 
• BELSWAGGER
n. 1. 1592 obs. – a swaggering gallant or bully; a whoremonger, a lecher, a pimp
n. 2. 1721 – one who makes a noise, and puts on an air of importance
 
• BELT
n. 1. a1300 obs. – an axe
n. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a heavy fall
n. 3. 1899 colloq. – a heavy blow or stroke
n. 4. 1954 – a violent singer
n. 5. 1959 Aust. sl. – a prostitute
n. 6. 1959 Aust. sl. – a sexually appealing young woman
n. 7. Bk1975 US sl. – in baseball: a hit
n. 8. 1995 US colloq. – a drink or shot of alcohol
n. 9. 20C Brit. sl. – an act of copulation
n. 10. 20C US drug culture – a marijuana cigarette
n. 11. 20C US drug culture – the ‘charge’ from narcotics or from a marijuana cigarette
vb. 1. 1649 – to hit, to thrash with a belt
vb. 2. 1890 Eng. dial. – to hurry, to hustle
vb. 3. 19C Brit. sl. – of the male: to coit
vb. 4. Bk2006 US sl. – to drink something

• BELT AROUND
vb. 1953 US sl. – to travel; to go junketing
 
• BELTASHAZUR’S OFF-OX
n. 1867 Amer. dial. – a person or thing one does not know and cannot identify
 
• BELTED
adj. 1. 20C US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol
adj. 2. 20C US sl. – intoxicated with drugs or marijuana
 
• BELTED EARL 
n. 1936 Amer. sl. – one who assumes or pretends to noble birth
 
• BELTER
n. 1. 1812 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – a heavy blow or series of blows
n. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – anything very large of its kind
n. 3. Bk1909 Eng. dial. – a prostitute
n. 4. 1953 colloq., orig. US – a singer with a loud, powerful penetrating voice; in depreciative sense, one whose performances are thought to lack restraint, finesse, or subtlety
n. 5. 1977 US sl. – a drinker; a heavy drinker
n. 6. 1980 sl. – an admirable, exciting, or exceptional person
n. 7. Bk2007 sl. – something wonderful, excellent, or exciting
 
• BELTER-WERRITS
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a teasing child
 
• BELTESHAZZAR’S OFF-OX 
n. 1867 US sl. – a headstrong person
 
• BELTING
adj. 2005 UK sl. – excellent, exciting
n. 1854 – a beating, a thrashing
 
• BELTMAN 
n. 1908 Aust. & NZ – a member of a surf life-saving team who swims out to a person in difficulty, wearing a belt attached to a long line by which the two can be pulled to safety
 
• BELT SWIMMER 
n. 2014 Aust. & NZ – a member of a surf life-saving team who swims out to a person in difficulty, wearing a belt attached to a long line by which the two can be pulled to safety
 
• BELT THE CADGER
vb. Bk1898 Sc. – to vomit
 
• BELT THE GRAPE
vb. M20 US sl. – to drink heavily
 
• BELT-TIGHTENER 
n. 1. 1944 – a person who tries to reduce his or her expenditure; one hired, elected, or appointed to introduce (rigorous) economies
n. 2. 1967 rare – a person who staves off, bears, or puts up with hunger pangs
 
• BELT UP
int. 1930s sl. – be quiet!
vb. 1930s sl. – to hold one’s peace; to be quiet
 
• BELTWAY BANDIT 
n. 1980 Amer. sl. – one of the horde of businesses, consultants, lobbyists, etc. who cluster about the federal government
 
• BELTZNICKEL
n. 1940 Amer. dial. – St. Nicholas, Santa Claus or St. Nicholas’ servant whose duty it was to punish naughty children or reward good ones
 
• BELUE
n.  1474 obs. rare – a great beast, a monster; a sea-monster, a whale  
 
• BELUTE
vb. 1760 – to cover with mud or dirt
 
• BELVE
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a gulp, a draught
vb. 1. 1864 Eng. dial. – to drink greedily
vb. 2. 1867 Eng. dial. – of people and cattle: to roar, to bellow
 
• BELVER
vb. 1. 1872 Eng. dial. – to roar, to bluster, to cry loudly
vb. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to belch
 
• BELVERING
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – noisy, blustering
 
• BELVIDERE 
n. Bk1889 sl. – a handsome fellow
 
• BELVING
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – shouting, bellowing
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a shouting, a bellowing
 
• BELWEATHER 
n. Bk1699 sl. – a noisy clamorous man
 
• BELY
vb. Bk1911 Sc. – to besiege
 
• BELYING
n. 1. 1587 – giving of the lie; denial
n. 2. 1632 – telling lies of anyone; calumniation
 
• BELYORE 
n. 1924 Sc. – a noisy clamorous person  
 
• BELYVE
adv. Bk1911 Sc. – immediately
 
• BELZEBUB
n. c950 – the Devil
 
• BELZIBUB
n. 1940 Amer. dial. – a child born out of wedlock
 
• BEMAD
vb. 1605 – to make mad, to madden
 
• BE MADE TO RIDE THE HASP
vb. Bk1902 Sc. – to be brought before one’s superiors and reprimanded
 
• BEMANG
vb. Bk1911 Sc. – to hurt; to injure; to maul
 
• BEMANGIT
adj. 1806 Sc. – injured
 
• BEMANGLE
vb. 1553-87 – to cut about; to hack, to mangle
 
• BE MAN OF ONE’S MEAT
vb. 1891 Sc. – to have a healthy appetite and digestion
 
• BE MAN-RUED
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – of a woman: to repent of a marriage she was about to make  
 
• BEMAR
vb. c1400 obs. – to injure seriously
 
• BEMARE 
n. c950 obs. – a trumpeter
 
• BEMARTELLED
adj. 1598 obs. – beaten
 
• MASHED ON
vb. 1883 sl. – to have a sentimental admiration for, to be ‘gone’ on, to be infatuated
 
• MASKING
vb. 1. 1830 – of a storm: to be ‘brewing’
vb. 2. 1887 – of a person: to be sickening for a disease
 
• BE MATCHES
vb. c1300 obs. – to be equal in prowess
 
• BEMAUL
vb. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to maul; to bruise or soil by fighting or rough play
 
• BEMAZE
vb. 1890 Eng. dial. – to astonish, to bewilder, to daze
 
• BEMAZED
adj. a1225 – stupefied, bewildered
 
• BEMBE 
n. 1996 W. Indies – a bully; a large strong person of either sex
 
• BEME
n. a800 obs. – a trumpet
vb. 1. c1000 obs. – to blow on a trumpet
vb. 2. a1225 obs. – to make a loud din or noise
 
• BEMEAN
vb. 1. a1300 obs. – to mean, to signify, to import
vb. 2. 1459 obs. rare – to mediate, to intercede
vb. 3. 1651 – to render mean or base; to lower in dignity, to abase
vb. 4. 1889 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to degrade oneself, to stoop
 
• BEMEET
vb. 1605 obs. – to meet with
 
• BEMENT
vb. Bk1911 Sc. – to render demented
 
• BEMER
n. c950 obs. – a trumpeter
 
• BEMERCY
vb. 1640 obs. – to treat with mercy, to show mercy to
 
• BEMETE
vb. c893 obs. – to measure
 
• BE METTLE TO ONE’S TEETH
vb. 1887 Sc. – to be full of spirit
 
• BEMING
n. 1. 1513 obs. – trumpeting
n. 2. 1513 obs. – noisy buzzing
 
• BEMIST
vb. 1. 1598 – to becloud, to dim
vb. 2. 1609 – to overtake with mist
vb. 3. 1627 – to confuse the senses of; to bewilder; to puzzle
 
• BEMMLE
n. 1824 Sc. – an ill-made man; an ungainly walker
 
• BEMOANABLE
adj. 1611 obs. – deplorable, lamentable
 
• BEMOCK
vb. 1607 – to mock at, to flout; to delude mockingly
 
• BEMOIL
vb. 1596 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to encumber with dirt and mire; to bemire
 
• BEMOIST
vb. 1567 obs. – to make moist
 
• BEMOISTEN
vb. 1590 – to make moist
 
• BEMONSTER 
vb. 1608 – to make monstrous
 
• BEMOSSED HEAD 
n. Bk1856 college usage – in the German universities: a student during the sixth and last term
 
• BEMOURN
vb. a1000 obs. – to mourn over; to lament, to bewail
 
• BEMOUTH
vb. a1843 – to talk grandiloquently, to declaim; to mouth the praises of a person
 
• BEMOW
vb. 1388 obs. – to mock, to mock at  
 
• BEMUCH
vb. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to grudge
 
• BEMUCKED
adj. 1864 Eng. dial. obs. – soiled, made dirty  
 
• BEMUD
vb. 1599 – to confuse, to muddle
 
• BEMUDDLE
vb. 1862 – to confuse or muddle completely
 
• BEMUFFLE
vb. 1583 – to wrap, to envelop
 
• BEMULCE
vb. 1531 – to soothe or soften
 
• BEMUSE
vb. 1. 1735 – to make utterly confused or muddled, as with intoxicating liquor; to put into a stupid stare, to stupefy
vb. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to intoxicate; to make dead drunk
 
• BEMUSED
adj. 1. 18C sl. – intoxicated with alcohol
adj. 2. 1822 Sc. & Eng. dial. – dazed, stupefied with drink, astonishment, anger, etc.
 
• BE MUSTARD
vb. 1. 1920s Brit. sl. – to be excellent at anything
vb. 2. E20 Brit. sl. – to be sexually attractive; to be ‘hot’ as mustard
 
• BE MUSTARD AT
vb. 1920s Brit. sl. – to be excellent at anything
 
• BE MUSTARD ON
vb. c1950 colloq. – to be very eager or keen on
 
• BE MY GEORGIE BEST!
int. 1977 UK rhyming sl. for ‘be my guest’ – do as you wish; you are welcome to have whatever has been asked for
 
• BE MY GUEST
phr. 1950s Amer. sl. – do as you please; often an ironic acquiescence to something ill advised  
 
• BEN
adj. 1. 16C sl. – good
adj. 2. 1774 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – inner, interior
adv. c1425 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – inside, within, towards the inner part; in or into an inner part of the house; into the parlour, etc. from the kitchen; in the parlour or chamber
int. 1896 Amer. dial. – an exclamation in marbles, used as a call to give one player a particular advantage or to deny an advantage to another
n. 1. c1698 UK criminals’ sl. – a simpleton, a fool
n. 2. 1788 – a hill, a mountain; a mountain-peak
n. 3. 1791-9 Sc. & N. Eng. & Amer. dial. – the inner room
n. 4. 1812 sl. – an overcoat
n. 5. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – the truth
n. 6. 1965 Amer. dial. – a storage bin; the place where grain is kept in a barn
n. 7. Bk2007 UK sl. – a £10 note or the sum of ten pounds
prep. 1684 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – in, within, or into the inner part of a house
 
• BEN-A-HOOSE
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – belonging to the parlour or the best room
adv. Bk1911 Sc. – in the parlour
 
• BEN-A-HOOSE-WOMAN
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a parlour-maid
 
• BENAME
vb. 1. c1000 obs. – to declare or utter solemnly or on oath; to promise with an oath
vb. 2. 1579 obs. rare – to name, to mention by name
 
• BENANE
prep. 1886 Eng. dial. – beneath
 
• BENASTY
vb. 1917 Amer. dial. – to soil, to make dirty; to befoul; to degrade
 
• BE NAUGHT BUT TEETH AND EYES
vb. B1900 Eng. dial. – to be ill-favoured
 
• BE NAUGHTY
vb. Bk1902 sl. – to play the whore
 
• BENAUT
adj. 1. 1969 Amer. dial. – uncomfortable, esp. as the result of anxiety; hard-pressed
adj. 2. 1969 Amer. dial. – of the atmosphere: close, oppressive, moist and warm
 
• BENBITER
n. 1. Bk1898 Sc. – a deceitful person; a backbiter
n. 2. Bk1898 Sc. – a dog
 
• BEN BLOCK 
n. Bk1904 – a nickname for a sailor
 
• BEN BOX 
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a casket
 
• BENCH
n. 1. c1386 obs. – a footstool
n. 2. 1518 – the judge or magistrate sitting in the seat of justice
vb. 1. 1917 US sl. – to discharge
vb. 2. 20C Amer. sl. – to take someone out of active play in a sporting event
vb. 3. 20C Amer. sl. – to remove someone from an activity
 
• BENCH-BABBLER 
n. 1549 rare – one who sits idly whistling on a bench; a tavern loafer; spec. one rollicking idly on a tavern bench; a term of reproach  
 
• BENCH BLANKET 
n. Bk1999 baseball usage – in baseball: a substitute player whose constant presence on the bench is said to ‘warm’ it  
 
• BENCH BOSS 
n. 1. 1894 Amer. – a working foreman in a factory, esp. in a pottery
n. 2. 1909 – in sports: a coach, esp. one who also plays on the team
 
• BENCH COACH 
n. 1. 1905 – in sports: orig. a person who coaches a team by does not play for it, as distinguished from a player-coach
n. 2. 1945 – in baseball: an assistant coach, typically taking on the responsibilities of a second in command to the head coach
 
• BENCHED LEGS
n. 1859 Amer. dial. – crooked or sprawling legs
 
• BENCHER
n. 1. 1279 – one who officially sits on a bench; a magistrate, judge, parliamentarian, assessor, senator, alderman, etc.
n. 2. 1534 – a tavern loafer; specifically, one rollicking idly on a tavern bench; a term of reproach
n. 3. 1856 – in Canada: a member of the regulating body of the Law Society in all provinces except New Brunswick
n. 4. L19 US sl. – any idle or ineffectual person
n. 5. 1935 US sl. – one who visits opium dens, but only to observe, not smoke  
n. 6. 20C teen & high school sl. – an old person, such as is found on benches in shopping malls, etc.
 
• BENCH-FICE
n. 1912 Amer. dial. – a cur-dog with long body and short legs like a bench
 
• BENCH-FLOPPER 
n. 1917 US sl. – a tramp, a vagrant
 
• BENCH HAND 
n. 1851 – a person who works at a workbench in a factory or workshop
 
• BENCH-HOLE
n. 1555 obs. – a privy
 
• BENCHING!
int. 1966 Amer. dial. – in marble play: used as a call to give one player a particular advantage or to deny an advantage to another
 
• BENCH JOCKEY
n. 1  1925 – in baseball: a player on the bench who verbally abuses or mocks members of the opposing team in an attempt to distract them
n. 2  1939 baseball usage – in baseball: a substitute who rides the bench or seldom gets to play
n. 3  Bk1975 Amer. sl.  – a mechanic
n. 4  20C Amer. sl. – a person who mainly sits on the sidelines and offers advice
 
• BENCH-JUMPER
n. 1. 1920s Amer. dial. – a person who constantly changes churches
n. 2. 1969 Amer. dial. – a holy roller
 
• BENCH-KNEED
adj. 1906 Amer. dial. – bowlegged; having crooked legs; esp. used of dogs, and in derogation, of persons
 
• BENCH-KNEED FISTE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a dog with legs spread apart and bent at the knees, such as a bulldog
 
• BENCH-LEGGED
adj. 1866 Amer. dial. – bowlegged; having crooked legs; esp. used of dogs, and in derogation, of persons
 
• BENCH LEGS
n. 1859 Amer. dial. – crooked or sprawling legs
 
• BENCHLET
n. 1865 – a little bench, a stool
 
• BENCH MAN
n. 1658 rare – a (male) judge or magistrate sitting in court
 
• BENCH-MASTER 
n. Bk1885 Eng. – a governor of an inn of court; an alderman
 
• BENCH NIB(S) 
n. 1930 criminals’ sl. – a judge  
 
• BENCH PERFORMER 
n. Bk1999 baseball usage – in baseball: an exceptionally good utility player who is always ready to replace another player whose performance is faltering during the course of a game
 
• BENCH PLAYER 
n. 1888 orig. US – in sports: a player who is not in the team’s starting line-up; a substitute, reserve
 
• BENCH POLISHER 
n. Bk1999 baseball usage – in baseball: a substitute player whose constant presence on the bench is said to ‘polish’ it
 
• BENCH SCIENTIST 
n. 1970 – a scientist who works in a laboratory; a research scientist  
 
• BENCH-WARMER
n. 1. 1662 sl. – orig. someone who sits idly on a bench, esp. a substitute in a sports team; hence, any lazy or ineffectual person
n. 2. 20C US sl. – a tramp; a vagrant
 
• BENCH-WHISTLER 
n. 1542 obs., depreciative usage – one who sits idly whistling on a tavern bench; a tavern loafer; an idler, a good-for-nothing; a term of reproach
 
• BEN COVE
n. 17C sl. – a good fellow; a friend
 
• BEN CULL
n. 19C sl. – a good fellow; a friend
 
• BEND
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – bold
adv. 1809 Sc. – bravely
n. 1. c890 obs. – a band, bond, or fetter
n. 2. c1000 obs. – a ribbon, strap, band, used for ornament or as part of a dress; a sash, hat-band, bandage
n. 3. a1250 obs. – a moral or spiritual bond or restraint; the bands or bonds of matrimony
n. 4. 1297 obs. – confinement at childbirth  
n. 5. c1400 obs. rare – a ‘stripe’ inflicted by a lash or rod
n. 6. 1475 obs. exc. Amer. dial. – an organized company of men; a band; a party, a faction; a gang; a company
n. 7. 1513 Sc. obs. – a spring, a leap, a bound
n. 8. 1529 obs. – a bending of the body; a bow
n. 9. 1591 obs. – turn of mind, inclination, bent  
n. 10. 1601 obs. rare – inclination of the eye in any direction, glance
n. 11. 1727 Sc. – a draught of liquor
n. 12. 1887 sl. – a drunken spree
n. 13. M19 sl. – a waistcoat
n. 14. Bk1911 Sc. – a foolish, foppish fellow
n. 15. 1960s sl. – an experience created by a hallucinogenic drug
n. 16. 1965 Amer. dial. – thin, flexible ice that will bend when you step on it but will bear one’s weight
n. 17. 1980s rap music sl. – a prostitute
n. 18. 20C Anglo-Irish – an appointment; a rendezvous
vb. 1. 1036 obs. – to put in bonds, to fetter  
vb. 2. 1513 obs. – to harness the horses to a cart or other vehicle; to yoke
vb. 3. 1530 obs. – to aim a blow, weapon, etc.
vb. 4. c1530 Sc. obs. – to spring, to leap, to bound
vb. 5. 1727 Sc. – to drink hard or greedily
vb. 6. 1864 sl. – to pervert; to corrupt; to put to a dishonest or corrupt use; to commit some form of fraudulent manoeuvre, esp. as in losing a race deliberately, bribing a policeman or a sporting competitor
vb. 7. Bk1911 Sc. – to cock a gun
 
• BEND A BEND
vb. World War II Amer. sl. – to round a curve or corner at great speed
 
• BEND-A-BOW
n. 1896 Amer. dial. – thin, flexible ice that will bend when you step on it but will bear one’s weight
 
• BENDACIOUS
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bendable
 
• BEND A CORNER
vb. World War II Amer. sl. – to round a curve or corner at great speed
 
• BEND AN EAR
int. 1970 Amer. sl. – listen!
vb. 1935 Amer. sl. – to pay attention; to listen
 
• BEND DOUGHNUT
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – thin, flexible ice that will bend when you step on it but will bear one’s weight
 
• BEND DOWN FOR
vb. L19 sl. – to consent to buggery
 
• BEND-DOWN PLAZA
n. 20C W. Indies & Jamaica – a row of roadside peddlers, specializing in items that are hard to get in shops, because of import restrictions
 
• BENDED KNEES
n. 20C rhyming sl. – a cheese
 
• BEND ‘ER
vb. World War II Amer. sl. – to round a curve or corner at great speed
 
• BENDER
int. 19C sl. – nonsense! humbug! rubbish!
n. 1. 1727 Sc. – a drinker
n. 2. 1827 US – a bout of drinking; a spree; a riotous feast; often lasting several days and including random acts of excess, violence, etc.
n. 3. 1836 sl. – a sixpence
n. 4. 1842 Eng. dial. – a big or good specimen of its kind; a ‘whopper’; anything exceptional or outstanding
n. 5. 1849 sl. – the leg
n. 6. 1894 Amer. dial. – thin, flexible ice that will bend when you step on it but will bear one’s weight
n. 7. M19 US sl. – a rampage
n. 8. M19 sl. – a shilling
n. 9. M19 sl. – the arm
n. 10. M19 sl. – the elbow
n. 11. M19 sl. – the knee
n. 12. Bk1911 Sc. – a silly fellow
n. 13. 1930s sl. – a male homosexual
n. 14. 1960s drug culture sl. – a drug party
n. 15 1980s UK sl. – a makeshift shelter
 
• BENDER AND ARRS
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a bow and arrows

• BENDERED
adj. 2000 UK students’ sl. – drunk
 
• BENDER MENDER
n. 1988 Sc. sl. – a hangover cure, esp. a stiff drink
 
• BENDERS
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – delirium tremens
 
• BENDIFIED
adj. 1919 Amer. dial. – bent
 
• BENDING DRILL
n. 1945 UK military sl. – an act of defecation in the open-air
 
• BENDING ICE
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – thin, flexible ice that will bend when you step on it but will bear one’s weight
 
• BENDING ROD
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a divining rod; a short stick used to show where there’s water
 
• BENDIT
adj. Bk1898 Sc. – ready to spring, crouching
 
• BEND OF THE ARM
n. 1891 Eng. dial. – the elbow
 
• BEND OF THE FILBERT
n. 18C sl. – a bow of the head; a nod
 
• BEND ONE OVER
vb. E20 US criminals’ sl. – to position someone for pederasty; to dominate or humiliate someone; usually said of a male
 
• BEND ONE’S BACK
vb. 1920s Aust. sl. – to work hard
 
• BEND ONE’S ELBOW
vb. 20C sl. – to have a drink
 
• BEND OVER
int. 1960s sl. – you’re bothering me!
vb. 1960s US sl. – to submit; to give in to someone
 
• BEND OVER BACKWARDS
vb. 1925 sl., orig. US – to make one’s maximum effort, orig. with the implication of doing something disadvantageous or distasteful to oneself
 
• BEND OVER, BROWN EYES
phr. 1989 US sl. – an instruction to a patient about to undergo a rectal examination
 
• BENDS
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – the accoutrements of a horse
 
• THE BENDS
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – delirium tremens
 
• BENDSOME
adj. 1861 rare – pliable, yielding, flexible
 
• BEND SOMEONE’S EAR
vb. 1. 1940s sl., orig. US – to speak privately, to whisper
vb. 2. 1942 Amer. sl. – to chatter on interminably and probably tediously; to talk at tedious length to someone; also, to have someone’s attention
 
• BEND THE BROWS
vb. 1387 – to winkle the brow; to frown, to scowl
 
• BEND THE CRAB
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – to do a somersault
 
• BEND THE ELBOW
vb. 1823 sl. – to drink alcohol
 
• BEND THE HABIT
vb. L19 drug culture sl. – to decrease one’s narcotics intake in an attempt to withdraw from addiction
 
• BEND THE THROTTLE
vb. 1. Bk1944 services’ sl. – to fly above normal cruising speed
vb. 2. c1945 US sl. – to drive very rapidly
 
• BENDUDELUMS
n. 1. 1968 Amer. dial. – large pieces of broken ice in salt water
n. 2. 1969 Amer. dial. – ice that will bend when you step on it, but not break
 
• BEND UP
vb. 1999 UK sl. – to encourage or enable another’s intoxication
 
• BENDY
adj. 1. 1965 Amer. dial. – said of something that bends or yields easily; pliable, limber
adj. 2. 1990s US teen sl. – extremely fashionable, smart, ‘cool’
n. 1. 19C – the devil
n. 2. 1965 Amer. dial. – thin, flexible ice that will bend when you step on it but will bear one’s weight
 
• BENDY-BOW
n. 1. 1903 Amer. dial. – a sudden short dip in a road
n. 2. 1950 Amer. dial. – thin, flexible ice that will bend when you step on it but will bear one’s weight
 
• BENDY DOUGHNUT
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – thin, flexible ice that will bend when you step on it but will bear one’s weight
 
• BENDY-GO
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – thin, flexible ice that will bend when you step on it but will bear one’s weight
 
• BENDY ICE
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – thin, flexible ice that will bend when you step on it but will bear one’s weight
 
• BENDY-LEATHER
n. Bk1898 Eng. & Amer. dial. – ice in a half-thawed condition, yet elastic and capable of bearing a weight


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