Dictionary: BET – BETZ

 BET
adj. 1. 1843 Ireland & Eng. dial. – beaten, exhausted
adj. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – beaten, bruised
adv. c888 obs. – better
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a letter of the alphabet
 
• THE BET
n. c1340 – the advantage
 
• BETAINT
vb. 1594 obs. – to tinge
 
• BETAKE
vb. 1. c1205 obs. exc. Sc. – to hand over, to deliver, to give up, to grant, to place at a person’s disposal
vb. 2. 1297 obs. – to hand over to the care of; to entrust, to commit, to give in charge to
vb. 3. c1300 obs. – to allot, to assign
vb. 4. 1382 obs. – to give in marriage
vb. 5. 1642 obs. – to bid adieu, to say goodbye
vb. 6. 1865 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to overtake, to capture, to recover
vb. 7. Bk1898 Sc. – to resort, to have recourse to
 
• BE TAKEN AWAY
vb. 1898 Eng. dial. – to die
 
• BE TAKEN BAD
adj. 1900s sl. – discomfited
vb. M19 sl. – to have fallen ill
 
• BE TAKEN SHORT
vb. 1890 sl. – to have an urgent need to urinate or defecate
 
• BETAKE ONESELF TO ONE’S HEELS
vb. 1598 – to retreat in flight, to run away
 
• BETALL
vb. 1630 obs. – to pay
 
• BETANGLEMENT
n. 1881 – tangled condition
 
• BE TARRED WITH THE SAME STICK
vb. 1817 Sc. – to share undesirable qualities
 
• BETATTERED
adj. 1618 – all in tatters, ragged
 
• BETAWDER
vb. a1689 obs. – to bedizen with tawdry finery, to adorn gaudily
 
• BETEACH
vb. 1. c1000 obs. – to show, to point out  
vb. 2. c1000 obs. – to  hand over as a trust; to entrust, to commit, to give in charge to
vb. 3. a1000 obs. – to hand over, to deliver, to give up, to yield
vb. 4. a1300 obs. – to teach, to instruct
vb. 5. a1300 obs. – to allot, to assign
vb. 6. c1314 obs. – to bid adieu or goodbye
 
• BETEACH ONE GOOD DAY
vb. c1400 obs. – to wish or bid one good day
 
• BETEAR
vb. 1580 obs. – to suffuse with tears
 
• BETCHELL
vb. 1857 Sc. – to beat
 
• BETCHELLAN
n. Bk1898 Sc. – a beating
 
• BETCHELLIN’
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a beating, a drubbing
 
• BETEE
vb. 1. c893 obs. – to draw over as a covering; to cover, to veil  
vb. 2. c1175 obs. – to employ, to spend, to bestow time, pains, etc.
vb. 3. c1205 obs. – to pull or tug at
vb. 4. c1205 obs. – to bring about, to manage, to arrange
 
• BETEEM
vb. 1. 1565 obs. – to think fit or proper; to vouchsafe, to grant, to consent
vb. 2. 1590 obs. – to vouchsafe, to accord, to grant, to concede
vb. 3. 1602 obs. rare – to allow or permit to do something
vb. 4. 1618 obs. rare – to pour all about
vb. 5. 1627 obs. – to think a person worthy, to admit the worth of
vb. 6. 1790 Eng. dial. – to bestow, to indulge with
vb. 7. 1855 rare – to give birth to
vb. 8. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to demean, to lower
 
• BETEEMING
n. 1871 rare – copious outpouring, profusion
 
• BETELING BLOCK
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a block of wood on which to beat clothes while washing
 
• BETELL
vb. 1. 1048 obs. – to speak for, to answer for, to justify
vb. 2. c1205 obs. – to lay claim to; to win, to rescue
vb. 3. c1205 obs. – to speak of, to declare, to narrate
vb. 4. a1225 obs. – to calumniate, to deride, to deceive
 
• BETHANK
n. 1826 Sc. – thanks, indebtedness, acknowledgement
vb. 1593 obs. rare – to thank
 
• BE THE DAD OF ALL RING-TAILS
vb. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to excel in mischief, to be the ringleader
 
• BETHEL
n. 1. 1840 – a place of worship for seamen
n. 2. 1865 – any place of worship other than those of the established church; a nonconformist chapel
 
• BETHERAL
n. 1815 Sc. – an inferior church officer in Scotland, often combining those of clerk, beadle, sexton, gravedigger, bellringer
 
• BETHERELL
n. 1790 Ireland – a bedridden person; a helpless cripple
 
• BETHERSHIN!
int. 1888 Ireland – an expletive, it may be so
 
• BE THE WORSE FOR WEAR
vb. 20C colloq. – to be tipsy
 
• BETHINK
vb. 1. a1000 obs. exc. Sc. & Eng. dial. – to think of or about; to bear in mind; to call to mind, to recollect
vb. 2. c1175 obs. – to think of, to imagine, to conceive
vb. 3. c1220 obs. – to think over a thing with a view to decision or action; to consider
vb. 4. a1225 obs. – to devise, to contrive, to plan, to arrange
vb. 5. c1300 arch. – to consider, to reflect, to meditate, to think
vb. 6. c1320 obs. – to think upon or remember a person
vb. 7. 1682 obs. – to regret, to repent, to grudge
vb. 8. 1842 Eng. dial. – to begrudge; to abstain from
vb. 9. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to remind
 
• BETHINKING
n. 1340 – the act of thinking, considering, reflecting, or remembering
 
• BETHOUGHT
adj. 1. c1200 obs. – of a thing: intended, purposed, contrived
adj. 2. c1205 obs. – of a person: minded, disposed; chiefly in combination with well-, ill-, etc.
 
• BETHOUT
conj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – unless
prep. 1800 Eng. dial. – without
 
• BETHRALL
vb. 1596 obs. rare – to enthrall, to enslave
 
• BE THRONG IN THE REED
vb. 1853-62 Ireland – to be too much crowded
 
• BETHROUGH
prep. c1425 obs. rare – throughout
 
• BETHROW
vb. 1393 obs. rare – to twist about, to torture
 
• BE THROWN BACK
vb. 1899 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to suffer a relapse in illness
 
• BETHUMP
vb. 1595 – to thump soundly
 
• BETHWACK
vb. 1555 – to pelt, to thrash, to cudgel soundly
 
• BETIDE
n. 1590 obs. rare – befalling, event, fortune, chance
vb. 1. c1250 – to happen, to befall
vb. 2. 1554 obs. rare – to become or befit anyone
 
• BETIDER
n. 1674 obs. rare – that which befalls; an accident
 
• BETIDING
n. c1374 obs. – happening, occurrence
 
• BETIE
vb. 1578 obs. – to tie round, to bind fast
 
• BETIMBER
vb. a1000 obs. – to build  
 
• BETIME
adv. 1. c1250 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – at an early hour, early in the day
adv. 2. a1300 obs. – in good time, early, seasonably
vb. a1225 obs. – to betide, to happen, to befall
 
• BETIME
adv. 1875 Eng. dial. – early
 
• BETIMED
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – exhausted by fatigue
 
• BETIMELY
adj. 1594 obs. rare – early
 
• BETIMES
adv. 1. c1314 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – at an early time, period, or season; early in the year, early in life
adv. 2. c1380 – in good time, in due time; while there is yet time, before it is too late
adv. 3. c1400 – in a short time, soon, speedily, anon, forthwith
adv. 4. 1481 – at an early hour, early in the morning
adv. 5. Bk1911 Sc. & Amer. dial. – occasionally, now and then
 
• BETINE
vb. 1659 obs. rare – to set fire to
 
• BET-LICK
n. 1895 Sc. – the conquering blow
 
• BETOIL
vb. 1622 obs. – to worry or exercise with toil
 
• BETOKEN
vb. 1. c1175 obs. – to signify, to mean; to denote, to express in words
vb. 2. c1175 obs. – to be a type or emblem of; to typify, to symbolize
 
• BET ONE’S BLUE BAR
vb. 1970 Amer. dial. – to be certain of something
 
• BET ONE’S SHIRT ON
vb. 1892 – to bet all one’s money on, esp. a horse in a race
 
• BETONGUE
vb. 1639 – to assail with the tongue; to abuse
 
• BE TOO BIG FOR ONE’S BRITCHES
vb. 1835 Amer. dial. – to assume more than one’s proper authority; to feel important, independent, or disturbingly confident
 
• BE TOOK
vb. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to be arrested
vb. 2. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to die
 
• BE TOOK BAD
adj. 1900s sl. – discomfited
vb. M19 sl. – to have fallen ill
 
• BE TOO SLOW TO CATCH A COLD
vb. 1966 Amer. dial. – to be extremely slow
 
• BE TOO SLOW TO CATCH THE ITCH
vb. 1952 Amer. dial. – to be extremely slow
 
• BE TOO SLOW TO CATCH THE SEVEN-YEAR ITCH
vb. 1966 Amer. dial. – to be extremely slow
 
• BETORN
adj. a1300 obs. – torn; torn about the sides, tattered
 
• BE TO THE DOOR
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to be taken by surprise
 
• BETOTLED;  BETOTTLED
adj. 1790 Eng. dial. – confused, distressed, bewildered, stupid
 
• BETOUCH-US-TOO!
int. 1725 Sc. obs. – alas! well-a-day!  
 
• BET-PIYAN
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a polecat or skunk
 
• BETRADE
vb. c1375 obs. – to betray
 
• BETRAISE
vb. 1. a1300 obs. – to betray
vb. 2. c1374 obs. – to be a traitor to; to be treacherous; to deceive the trustful or innocent  
vb. 3. c1400 obs. – to reveal, to disclose incidentally  
vb. 4. c1400 obs. – to seize, entrap, ensnare the unsuspecting  
 
• BETRAISH
vb. 1. a1300 obs. – to betray
vb. 2. c1374 obs. – to be a traitor to; to be treacherous; to deceive the trustful or innocent
vb. 3. c1400 obs. – to reveal, to disclose incidentally
vb. 4. c1400 obs. – to seize, entrap, ensnare the unsuspecting
 
• BETRAISING
n. c1385 obs. – betraying
 
• BETRAP
vb. 1. a1000 obs. – to catch in a trap; to entrap, to ensnare, to circumvent, to enclose
vb. 2. 1509 obs. – to deck, to adorn
 
• BETRAUT
vb. c1400 N. Eng. dial. obs. – to betray
 
• BETRAVAIL
vb. 1. 1387 obs. – to work at; to compose a book, to be the author of, to write
vb. 2. 1388 obs. – to do violence to, to violate, to rape
vb. 3. 1393 obs. – to work for; to earn by labour
 
• BETRAY
n. 1600 obs. rare – a treacherous giving up to an enemy; betrayal
vb. 1588 obs. – to cheat, to disappoint
 
• BETRAYMENT
n. 1548 rare – betrayal
 
• BETRAYNTED
adj. 1583 obs. rare – over-excited, borne or carried away
 
• BETRENCH
vb. 1656 obs. rare – to cut up, to carve, to slash
 
• BETREND
vb. c1374 obs. – to wind or draw round; to encompass
 
• BETROTHED
adj. 1651 obs. – plighted, pledged
 
• BETROW
vb. 1556 obs. – to trust
 
• BETRUMP
vb. 1513 obs. rare – to deceive, to cheat; to elude, to slip from
 
• BETRUMPET
vb. 1828 rare – to trumpet the praises of, to commend or praise loudly
 
• BETRUST
n. 1656 obs. – an entrusting, a trust
vb. 1. c1440 obs. – to trust, to place confidence in a person
vb. 2. 1619 obs. – to entrust
 
• BETRUSTED
adj. a1461 obs. – trusted in, or confided in
 
• BETRUSTMENT
n. Bk1888 obs. – an entrusting, a trust
 
• BETSEY
n. 1. 1832 sl., orig. US – a gun; often applied to one’s favourite gun
n. 2. Bk1975 Amer. dial. – the sun
 
• BETSY
n. 1. 1832 sl., orig. US – a gun; often applied to one’s favourite gun
n. 2. 1965 Amer. dial. – a cow or calf
n. 3. 1967 Amer. dial. – an automobile
n. 4. Bk1975 Amer. dial. – the sun
 
• BETTAMY
adj. 1843 Eng. dial. – superior, better
 
• BETTANT
adj. c1400 obs. – in a hurry, hastening eagerly
 
• BETTER
adj. 1. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – of the hand or foot: the right
adj. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – greater, more higher in price
adv. Bk1911 Sc. – repeatedly; with renewed efforts
n. Bk1911 Sc. – the best
vb. Bk1911 Sc. – to improve in  health
 
• BETTER A LATE THRIVE THAN NEVER DO WELL
phr. 1892 Eng. dial. obs. – applied to one who marries or otherwise prospers late in life
 
• BETTER-CHEAP
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – cheaper, at a less price
 
• BETTER END
n. 1848 Eng. dial. – the higher classes; a superior kind; the greater part, majority
 
• BETTER FASHION
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – recovering from illness
 
• BETTER FRACTION
n. World War II Amer. sl. – one’s wife
 
• BETTERGATES
adv. 1892 Sc. – in a better way or manner
 
• BETTER HALF
n. 1842 sl. – a spouse
 
• THE BETTER HAND
n. 1523 obs. – the upper hand, superiority
 
• BETTER HAVE THE QUEEN FOR ONE’S AUNT THAN THE KING FOR ONE’S UNCLE
phr. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – used to express the relative value of male and female influence
 
• BETTER HOYLE
n. 1879 Eng. dial. – a parlour
 
• BETTERING
n. 1863 Eng. dial. – amendment
 
• BETTERINGS
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – superiors, those in a higher position
 
• BETTERISH
adj. 20C colloq. – somewhat better, of somewhat superior sort
 
• BETTER-LIKE
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – better-looking; looking better in health, etc.
 
• BETTERLINS
adv. Bk1911 Sc. – better
 
• BETTERLY
adj. 1882 Eng. dial. – better; superior
 
• BETTERMENT
n. 1885 Sc. & Eng. dial. – improvement
 
• BETTERMER
adj. 1843 Eng. dial. – superior, better
 
• BETTERMORE
adj. 1843 Eng. dial. – superior, better
 
• BETTERMOST
adj. 1744 colloq. – best, superior, above the average
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – the advantage, the upper hand
 
• BETTERMY
adj. 1843 Eng. dial. – superior, better
 
• BETTER PENNY
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial.  – something in addition
 
• BETTER SIDE
n. Bk1911 Sc. – what is more or older than
 
• BETTERSOME
adj. 1843 Amer. dial. obs. – better
 
• BETTER SORT
n. Bk1911 Sc. – the upper classes
 
• BETTER THAN A KICK IN THE HIND-END
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate
 
• BETTER THAN A KICK IN THE PANTS
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate
 
• BETTER THAN A POKE IN THE EYE
adj. 1852 – adequate
 
• BETTER THAN A POKE IN THE EYE WITH A BURNT STICK
adj. 1852 – adequate
 
• BETTER-TO-DO
adj. 1. 1898 – above the well-to-do in social condition or worldly circumstances; more prosperous
adj. 2. 1970 Amer. dial.- well-off
 
• BETTING TOOL
n. Bk1942 Amer. turf sl. – a racehorse
 
• BETTLE
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a blow, a stroke
 
• BETTY
n. 1. 1879 Eng. dial. – a nickname for the kettle
n. 2. Bk1896 sl. – a short crowbar, used by housebreakers
n. 3. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a country lass
n. 4. 1912 Amer. dial. – a chamber pot
n. 5. 1967 Amer. dial. – a woman; a schoolteacher
n. 6. 1989 US sl. – a young attractive woman
n. 7. Bk2007 sl. – a girl who is a nonparticipant in sports such as skateboarding
vb. 1882 Eng. dial. – to idle; to do petty work
 
• BETTY ABOUT
vb. 1851 colloq. – to fuss about, like a man who busies himself with a woman’s duties

• BETTY BRACELETS
n. 1950s UK homosexual sl. – a police officer or the police in general
 
• BETTY-CAT
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a she-cat
 
• BETTYFUSS
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a fussbudget
 
• BETWADDLED
adj. 1927 Amer. dial. – infatuated; so in love as to be unable to use good judgement
 
• BETWATTLE
vb. 1844 Eng. dial. – to bewilder
 
• BETWATTLED
adj. 1. 1790 Eng. dial. – in a distressed and confused state of mind; confounded, bewildered, stupefied, surprised
adj. 2. 19C Eng. dial. – hardly sober
adj. 3. 1927 Amer. dial. – infatuated; so in love as to be unable to use good judgement
 
• BETWEEN A ROCK AND A HARD PLACE
phr. Bk1942 Amer. colloq. – without a satisfactory alternative; in difficulty; bewildered; perplexed; baffled
 
• BETWEEN BUZZARD AND HAWK
adj. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – neither good nor bad, nondescript
 
• BETWEEN DAYLIGHT AND DAYLIGHT
phr. 1969 Amer. dial. – during the night
 
• BETWEEN GRASS AND HAY
phr. 1968 Amer. dial. – between summer and winter
 
• BETWEEN-HANDS
adv. 1801 Sc. & Eng. dial. – at intervals
 
• BETWEEN HAWK AND BUZZARD
phr. 1. 1856 Amer. dial. – in a difficult or uncomfortable position
phr. 2. 1912 Amer. dial. – at twilight, when it is too dark to tell a hawk from a buzzard
 
• BETWEEN HAY AND GRASS
phr. 1. 1848 Amer. dial. – between boyhood and manhood; not fully mature
phr. 2. 1928 Amer. dial. – vague; indefinite; inconclusive; colourless
phr. 3. 1939 Amer. dial. – between seasons of plenty, hence, in a difficult or uncomfortable position
 
• BETWEEN JOBS
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a short cigar
 
• BETWEEN-MAID
n. 1890 – a maidservant who assists both the cook and the housemaid
 
• BETWEENS
n. 1872 – intermediate things or events
 
• BETWEENST
adv. 1887 Amer. dial. – between
 
• BETWEEN THE BARK AND THE WOOD
phr. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a well-adjusted bargain where neither party has the advantage
 
• BETWEEN THE BEETLE AND THE BLOCK
adj. 1589 – in a precarious or dangerous position
 
• BETWEEN THE FACE AND EYES
phr. 1975 US sl. – where a blow or shocking news hits
 
• BETWEEN THE LIGHTS
n. 1862 Eng. dial. – twilight
 
• BETWEEN THE TINING AND THE WINNING
phr. 1825 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – said of being in a critical position, which may result either in ruin or in success
 
• BETWEEN THE TWO WORLDS
adj. 1893 Eng. dial. – almost unconscious
 
• BETWEEN TOWN AND TOWN
phr. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – while going from one place to another
 
• BETWEEN TWO MINDS
adj. 1862 Ireland & Sc. – in doubt or suspense; undecided
 
• BETWEENWHILES
adv. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – in the interval, at intervals
 
• BETWEEN YOU AND ME AND JACK MUM
adv. 20C Irish sl. – secretly, in confidence
 
• BETWEEN YOU AND ME AND THE BED-POST
adv. 1830 sl. – told in confidence
 
• BETWEEN YOU AND ME AND THE GATE-POST
adv. 1871 Eng. & Amer. dial. – secretly; in confidence
 
• BETWEEN YOU AND ME AND THE LAMP POST
adv. 1941 Amer. dial. – secretly; in confidence

• BETWEEN YOU AND ME AND THE POST
adv. 1796 Amer. dial. – secretly; in confidence
 
• BETWEESH
prep. 1768 Sc. & Ireland – between  
 
• BETWIT
vb. 1678 Eng. dial. – to upbraid, to taunt
 
• BETWITCHELLED
adj. 19C Eng. dial. – overcome with inquisitiveness
 
• BETWITTERED
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – excited, frightened, overcome with pleasing excitement
 
• BETWITTING
n. 1869 Eng. dial. – upbraiding, reproach
 
• BETWIX
prep. 1843 Eng. dial. – between
 
• BETWIXEN
prep. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – between
 
• BETWIXT A BALK AND A BREAKDOWN
phr. 1884 Amer. dial. – of health; about average
 
• BETWIXT AND BETWEEN
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – mediocre
phr. 1968 Amer. dial. – a temporary insignificant task between more important jobs
 
• BETWIXT AND BETWEENTIMES
adv. 1954 Amer. dial. – meanwhile
 
• BETWIXT YOU AND ME AND THE GATE
phr. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – between ourselves


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