Dictionary: BJ – BLACKE

• BJ
n. 1949 US sl. – an act of oral sex; a blow job
 
• BJAKK 
n. 1908 Sc. – a small person; also, a person of very slight physical strength, used disparagingly
 
• BJARTIN 
n. Bk1914 Sc. – a youth, a boy, a young lad
 
• BJM 
n. 1960s teen sl. – a fellator (Blow Job Man)  
 
• BJOCHEL 
n. 1908 Sc. – a weak, incapable person, esp. a person with a bad gait, weak in the knee joints
 
• B JOINT
n. 1993 US sl. – a bar where women coax customers to buy drinks
 
• BJs
n. 2003 UK sl. – crack cocaine
 
• BK 
n. Bk1972 homosexual sl. – a homosexual who is the active partner in anal intercourse (Brownie King)
 
• BK LOUNGE
n. 1985 US sl. – a Burger King™ fast food restaurant
 
• BLA
n. 1. 1918 US sl. – insincere or exaggerated talk intended to flatter or deceive; humbug or flattery
n. 2. 1972 Hawaii – a brother, a friend, a pal
 
• BLAA
n. 1939 Amer. dial. – the bleat of a calf or sheep
 
• BLAB
n. 1. c1374 – an open-mouthed person; one who has not sufficient control over his tongue; a revealer of secrets or of what ought to be kept private; a babbler, a tattler, a telltale; a gossip
n. 2. Bk1898 Sc. – a large quantity of strong drink
n. 3. 1942 Amer. jocular usage, sometimes derogatory – the mouth
vb. 1. 1583 – to speak revealingly
vb. 2. 1825 Sc. – to make a gurgling noise with the lips in drinking or in taking liquid food; to slobber
vb. 3. 1871 Sc. – to drink much and frequently; to tipple
vb. 4. Bk1898 Sc. – to pour out suddenly; to spurt out
 
• BLABBAN
n. Bk1898 Sc. – the act of drinking to excess
 
• BLABBER
n. 1. 1557 – one who blabs; one who reveals secrets; a telltale; a tattler
n. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – idle talk, chatter
n. 3. Bk1898 Sc. – a tippler
n. 4. Bk1898 Sc. – a quantity of strong liquor
n. 5. 1942 Amer. jocular usage, sometimes derogatory – the mouth
n. 6. 1980s Aust. sl. – a TV remote control
vb. 1. c1375 – to talk loquaciously
vb. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to cry, to blubber
vb. 3. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to tope, to drink largely
 
• BLABBER-BOX
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – one who talks too much
 
• BLABBERER 
n. c1375 – one who reveals secrets; a telltale, a tattler
 
• BLABBER-FEST
n. 1968 Amer. sl. – a gathering of people for talking or gossip
 
• BLABBERGUTS 
n. 1977 US sl. – one who talks too much or betrays secrets; a gossip; a telltale
 
• BLABBERLIP 
n. c1551 UK sl. – an indiscreet talker, a gossip, a telltale
 
• BLABBERMOUTH
n. 1916 sl., orig. US – one who reveals secrets, a telltale, a gossip, an indiscreet talker
vb. Bk2006 US sl. – to tell secrets in public
 
• BLABBERSKITE 
n. Bk1878 Eng. dial. – a voluble, boastful speaker; a vain-talking fellow; a talkative, blustering person
 
• BLABBING-BOOK 
n. Bk1881 – a telltale
 
• BLAB-BLAB
n. c1960 Amer. dial. – a too-ready talker; a gossip; a blabmouth
 
• BLAB-CHOPS
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a talkative person, a gossip
 
• BLAB-FEST
n. 1942 Amer. sl. – a gathering of people for talking or gossip; a conversation; a discussion
 
• BLAB-MOUTH
n. 1850 Eng. dial. – a talkative person; a gossip
 
• BLAB-MOUTHED
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – talkative
 
• BLABMOUTHER 
n. 1893 US sl. – a talkative person; an indiscreet talker; a gossip, a telltale
 
• BLABO 
n. Bk1945 criminals’ sl. – one who talks too much
 
• BLAB OFF
vb. 1. Bk1944 services’ sl. – to talk out of turn
vb. 2. Bk1975 US sl. – to reveal a secret; to say what  is better left unsaid
 
• BLAB-TIT 
n. 1894 Eng. dial. – an indiscreet talker; a telltale
 
• BLAB-TONGUE
n. 1600 – an indiscreet talker; a telltale 
 
• BLAB-TONGUED
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – talkative; unable to keep a secret
 
• BLACK
adj. 1. 1818 Sc. & Eng. dial. – sad, melancholy; unlucky, malignant, wicked
adj. 2. Bk1898 Sc. – of wind or weather: foul, overcast
n. 1. 1614 – a man of ‘black’ skin; a member of a dark-skinned race, esp. a person of sub-Saharan African origin or descent; also, a person of Australian Aboriginal origin or descent
n. 2. 1619 obs. – a mute or hired mourner at a funeral
n. 3. c1686 obs. – a black-haired person
n. 4. 1722 obs. – one of a band of poachers who went about their work with blackened faces
n. 5. 1750 – in chess and draughts: the player using the black or coloured pieces
n. 6. 1776 sl. – a blacksmith
n. 7. 1797 UK sl. – a shabby rogue; a blackguard
n. 8. Bk1825 Sc. – a scoundrel
n. 9. 1826 sl. obs. – a blackleg, a person who continues to work despite a ban or strike by a trade union; a person who takes a striker’s place
n. 10. 1870 Eng. dial. – dark discolouring stain; dirt
n. 11. 1931 UK sl. – a blackmailer
n. 12. 1998 sl. – a term of address to a fellow Black man
n. 13. Bk1998 sl. – black coffee
vb. 1. 1866 Eng. dial. – to scold, to abuse; to defame
vb. 2. 1928 sl. – to blackmail
 
• BLACK ACE
n. M17 sl. – the female genital area
 
• BLACK ACID
n. 1970 US sl. – LSD
 
• BLACK ACTION
n. 1991 US sl. – casino betting in $100 increments
 
• BLACK-ACTUALLY
adv. 1928 Amer. dial. – truly, absolutely
 
• BLACK AFRICAN
n. 1. 1633 – a dark-skinned African; esp. one who is a native or inhabitant of sub-Saharan Africa
n. 2. 1970s drug culture sl. – marijuana
 
• BLACK AMERICAN 
n. 1818 – a native or inhabitant of the United States who is Black; an African-American
 
• BLACKAMOOR
n. 1. 1525 – a black-skinned African; an Ethiopian; a Black person; any very dark-skinned person; formerly used without depreciatory force
n. 2. M17 – a devil, the devil
n. 3. 1956 NZ sl. – a black Angus or Friesian cow
 
• BLACK-A-MOORE 
n. 1547 – a black-skinned African; an Ethiopian; a Black person; any very dark-skinned person; formerly used without depreciatory force
 
• BLACKAMORE 
n. 1525 – a black-skinned African; an Ethiopian; a Black person; any very dark-skinned person; formerly used without depreciatory force
 
• BLACKAMORIAN 
n. 1526 obs. – a black-skinned African; an Ethiopian; a Black person; any very dark-skinned person
 
• BLACK AND DECKER 
n. 1982 baseball usage – in baseball: a player used for odd jobs, such as warming up bullpen pitchers
 
• BLACK-AND-TAN
n. 1. 1868 sl., orig. & chiefly US, usually offensive – a person of mixed race, esp. a person of mixed Black and White descent
n. 2. 1884 Amer. dial. – a dog, esp. a hound, with black and tan colouring
 
• BLACK-AND-WHITE 
n. 1. 1965 US sl. – a police officer
n. 2. Bk1975 US sl. – an ice-cream soda made with vanilla ice cream and chocolate sauce
n. 3. Bk1997 gambling cheats’ usage – a casino dealer, who typically wear black slacks and a white shirt or blouse
 
• BLACK ANGEL 
n. 1. Bk1972 homosexual sl. – a Black man
n. 2. Bk1992 US criminals’ sl. – one who hides from the law  
 
• BLACK ANKLE
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a person of mixed race, usually Black, Indian, and White
 
• BLACK ANNIE
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a police vehicle; a black Maria
 
• BLACK APE
n. 1884 Amer. dial., derogatory – a Black person
 
• BLACK ARMY
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a swarm of fleas
 
• BLACK ARR
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a stain on the character
 
• BLACK-ARR’D
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – sullied, stained
 
• BLACK ART
n. 1591 thieves’ sl. obs. – lock-picking, burglary
 
• BLACK-ARTIST 
n. 1. 1593 rare – a practitioner of the black art; a magician, a necromancer
n. 2. Bk1992 criminals’ sl. – an individual engaged in the professions of burglary or lock-picking
 
• BLACK AS A BAG
adj. 1887 Eng. dial. – very dark
 
• BLACK AS A BLEG
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – very black (bleg = blackberry)
 
• BLACK AS A COAL-MINER’S ASSHOLE AT MIDNIGHT
adj. 1976 Amer. sl. – utterly black
 
• BLACK AS COAL 
adj. Bk1995 US sl. – extremely dark or evil
 
• BLACK AS NEWGATE
adj. Bk1902 sl. – very black
 
• BLACK AS OLD NICK
adj. 1809 Amer. dial. – very black
 
• BLACK AS ONE’S HAT
adj. 1710 – absolutely black
 
• BLACK AS SIP
adj. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – extremely black
 
• BLACK AS TAR
adj. 1966 Amer. dial. – very black
 
• BLACK AS THE CROOK 
adj. 1826 Sc. – very black (crook = a hook in a chimney for hanging a pot or kettle on)
 
• BLACK AS THE DEVIL’S ARSE
adj. 1774 US sl. – as black as can be; pitch-black
 
• BLACK AS THE EARL OF HELL
adj. 1952 Amer. dial. – very black
 
• BLACK AS THE NIGHT 
 adj. Bk1995 US sl. – extremely dark
 
• BLACK AS TOAL’S CLOAK
 adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – very dark
 
• BLACK AS TOBEY’S BEHIND
adj. 1958 Amer. dial. – very black
 
• BLACK AS TOBY’S HILL
adj. 1997 Amer. dial. – very black
 
• BLACK AS ZIP
adj. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – extremely black
 
• BLACK AUSTRALIAN 
n. 1863 – a native or inhabitant of Australia who is Black; an Australian Aboriginal
 
• BLACK-AVISED
adj. 1856 Sc. & Eng. dial. – having a dark complexion, swarthy
 
• BLACK-BABBLING
adj. 1624 – babbling maliciously, slanderous
n. 17C – malicious talk
 
• BLACK-BACK 
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a backbiter
 
• BLACK BACKRA 
n. 1958 W. Indies – a respected Black man
 
• BLACK-BAG 
n. Bk1891 sl. – a pleader in the law courts

• BLACK BAG JOB
n. Bk2007 US sl. – a break-in or other covert operation carried out by a government agency
 
• BLACK-BAG TOTER
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a doctor
 
• BLACKBAITER 
n. c1840 Amer. sl. obs. – any person in favour of Black slavery; a person with intolerant attitude toward Blacks
 
• BLACK BALL 
n. 1980 US sl. – a dark-complexioned Black person
 
• BLACK-BEAR-AWAY
n. 1889 Eng. dial. – the bat  
 
• BLACK BEAUTY
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – prizefighter Joe Louis
 
• BLACK BEETLE 
n. 1894 UK sl. – a constable in the Thames River police
 
• BLACK BEETLES
n. 1. Bk1890 sl. – the lower orders, the rabble  
n. 2. 1959 UK sl. – Roman Catholic priests
 
• BLACK BELLY 
n. 1. 1952 US sl., derogatory – a Black person
n. 2. 1973 W. Indies – a policeman
 
• BLACK BELT
n. 1. 1954 – in judo or karate: one who has earned certification of highest proficiency
n. 2. 1970 Amer. dial. – the section of a city which is populated predominantly by Blacks; the poor section of a city; a ghetto
 
• BLACK BERN
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – blackberries
 
• BLACKBERRY 
n. 1859 US sl., contemptuous usage – a Black person
 
• BLACKBERRY BABY 
n. Bk1996 Amer. dial. – an illegitimate child   
 
• BLACKBERRY MOUCHER 
n. 1825 Eng. dial. – a boy who plays truant to pick blackberries
 
• BLACKBERRY RAIN
n. 1947 Amer. dial. – a spring storm or cold snap
 
• BLACKBERRY SQUALL
n. 1953 Amer. dial. – a late cold spell in May or early June
 
• BLACKBERRY STORM
n. 1906 Amer. dial. – a spring storm or cold snap
 
• BLACKBERRY SUMMER
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a spell of fine weather in the blackberry season
 
• BLACKBERRY SWAGGER 
n. c1850 sl. – a hawker of tapes, shoelaces, etc.
 
• BLACKBERRY WINTER
n. 1904 Amer. dial. – a late cold spell in May or early June  
 
• BLACK BESS
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a gun
 
• BLACK BETSY
n. 1. 1969 Amer. dial. – a police vehicle; a black Maria
n. 2. Bk1975 US sl. – a baseball bat; orig. the name of Babe Ruth’s bat
 
• BLACKBETTS
n. 1846 Amer. dial. – liquor; a bottle of liquor passed among the guests at a wedding
 
• BLACK BETTY
n. 1823 Amer. dial. – liquor; a bottle of liquor passed among the guests at a wedding
 
• BLACKBIRD
n. 1. 1634 obs. – a sweet singer; a songster  
n. 2. 1853 sl., orig. & chiefly nautical usage – a Black person who has been taken captive as a slave
n. 3. 1865 Aust. sl. – an Aborigine
n. 4. 1875 sl., orig. & chiefly nautical usage – an indentured labourer recruited in the south Pacific to work on a sugar plantation
n. 5. 1894 sl., usually derogatory – a Black person
n. 6. 1895 criminals’ sl. – a blackmailer or confidence man
n. 7. 1903 US sl. – a Black child
n. 8. World War II Amer. sl. – a Black aviator
n. 9. 1966 Amer. dial. – one whose family looks down upon his activities
n. 10. 1980 US sl. – a dark-complexioned Black person
n. 11. 1980 US sl. – an itinerant or migratory worker
n. 12. Bk1986 US lumberjacks’ usage – a man proficient in riding logs on a river drive  
n. 13. Bk1992 criminals’ sl. – a White man who works in the slave trade
 
• BLACKBIRD-CATCHER 
n. 1869 sl. – a slave trader
 
• BLACKBIRD CATCHING
n. Bk1892 Aust. sl. – the slave trade; recruiting coloured labourers in the South Sea Islands
 
• BLACKBIRDER
n. 1. 1876 sl., orig., nautical usage, chiefly Aust. and south Pacific – a person engaged in press-ganging or kidnapping labourers in the south Pacific region for work on the sugar plantations; also, a slave trader
n. 2. 1888 – a man or a vessel engaged in ‘black-birding’ or slave traffic
 
• BLACKBIRD STORM
n. 1953 Amer. dial. – a short cold spell in late spring, after the appearance of the blackbirds
 
• BLACK BITCH 
n. 1. Bk1898 Sc. – a gun
n. 2. Bk1972 homosexual sl. – a Black man
 
• BLACK BLEGS
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – blackberries
 
• BLACK BLIZZARD
n. 1934 Amer. dial. – a dust storm
 
• BLACK-BLUTTER
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a blackberry; a bramble  
 
• BLACKBOARD ERASER
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a schoolchild who makes a special effort to get in good with the teacher in hopes of getting a better grade
 
• BLACK BOB
n. 1790 Eng. dial. – any small black beetle; a cockroach
 
• BLACK BOGGLE
n. 1856 Eng. dial. – a nursery bogy
 
• BLACK BOGY
n. 1856 Eng. dial. – a nursery bogy
 
• BLACK BOMBER
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – prizefighter Joe Louis
n. 2. 1963 sl. – an amphetamine tablet
 
• BLACK-BONNET
n. 1785 Sc. – an elder of the church  
 
• BLACK-BOO
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a nursery bogey  
 
• BLACK BOTTLE
n. 1927 Amer. dial. – a poisonous drink
 
• BLACK BOTTOM
n. 1915 Amer. dial. – the part of a town where Black people live
 
• BLACK-BOTTOM ROAD
n. c1970 Amer. dial. – a road paved with blacktop
 
• BLACK BOW-WOWERS
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – blackberries
 
• BLACK-BOX 
n. c1698 UK criminals’ sl. – a lawyer; from the tin boxes where they kept their papers
 
• BLACK BOY 
n. 1. 1530 – a dark-skinned boy or youth
n. 2. 1594 obs. – a Black man, esp. a Black manservant
n. 3. 1810 rare, offensive – an Australian Aboriginal man
n. 4. 1821 UK criminals’ sl. – a lawyer
n. 5. 1835 UK sl. – a parson, a clergyman
n. 6. 1852 UK sl. – a chimney sweep
n. 7. 1867 Eng. dial. – a flea
n. 8. 1893, offensive – an Aboriginal guide accompanying  explorers
 
• BLACKBOYD
n. 1817 Sc. – a blackberry  
 
• BLACKBOYS
n. Bk1892 Aust. sl. – aboriginal servants in Australia
 
• BLACK BREEKS 
n. 1894 Sc. – a minister
 
• BLACK BRITON 
n. 1971 – a Black British person
 
• BLACK BUGGY
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a hearse
 
• BLACK-BUMPER
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a member of an Amish or Mennonite sect which allows the use of cars and other motor-driven vehicles
 
• BLACK-BURNING
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – causing intense blushing or shame  
 
• BLACKBUTT 
n. 1910 Aust. sl. – a native Australian
 
• BLACK CAKE 
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – wedding cake
 
• BLACK CANADIAN 
n. 1968 – a native or inhabitant of Canada who is black
 
• BLACKCAP    
n. 1. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a person who bids at an auction merely to raise the price
n. 2. 1899 UK criminals’ sl. obs. – the member of a gang of thieves who slyly elicits information from household servants about the household where they work and passes it on; he usually does not take part in the crime itself but receives his cut for supplying the information
n. 3. 1968 Amer. dial. – a wave resulting from strong wind
 
• BLACK CAP AND WHITE SHEEP 
n. 1920 criminals’ sl. obs. – the member of a gang of thieves who slyly elicits information from household servants about the household where they work and passes it on; he usually does not take part in the crime itself but receives his cut for supplying the information
 
• BLACK CAT 
n. 1. Bk1945 criminals’ sl. – a preacher  
n. 2. 1719 UK sl. – clergymen; parsons
 
• BLACK CATTLE 
n. 1. 1719 UK sl. – clergymen; parsons
n. 2. Bk1922 Eng. sl. obs. – Black slaves
 
• BLACK CHRISTMAS
n. 1938 Amer. dial. – a snowless period in late December
 
• BLACK-CLOCK
n. 1875 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a cockroach; a black beetle
 
• BLACK-CLOTH JOB
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – an easy task; ‘gentleman’s work’
 
• BLACK CLOUD 
n. 1938 US sl. – a Black person; used derisively
 
• BLACKCOAT
n. 1. 1616 – a depreciative term for a clergyman, a parson
n. 2. 1916 Amer. dial. – a man that is not wearing a mask at a costume ball
n. 3. 1943 Aust. sl. – (‘black coat’) a waiter
 
• BLACK-COATED WORKER 
n. Bk1958 Eng. sl. – an office worker, as opposed to a manual worker  
 
• BLACK-CORK
n. Bk1911 Sc. – porter  
 
• BLACK COVE 
n. 1. 1809 sl. – a prison turnkey; a warder
n. 2. 1852 UK sl. – a chimney sweep
 
• BLACK COVE DUBBER 
n. a1790 UK criminals’ sl. – a jailer, a turnkey
 
• BLACK COW
n. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – a misfortune  
n. 2. c1930 US lunch-counter usage – root beer; an order of root beer
n. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – chocolate milk
n. 4. Bk1975 US sl. – a soda made with root beer and vanilla ice cream
 
• THE BLACK COW HAS TRODDEN ON YOUR FOOT
phr. 1816 Sc. & Eng. dial. – you have known misfortune and sorrow
 
• BLACK CRAWS
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – dried nasal mucus
 
• BLACK DARK
n. 1939 Amer. dial. – night time at its darkest
 
• BLACK DIAMOND 
n. 1. 1821 UK sl. – a person whose rough exterior hides a heart of gold; a rough but clever, or good, person
n. 2. 1860 slave trade usage – a Black slave
n. 3. 2007-8 S. Afr. sl. – an affluent, salaried Black person
 
• BLACK DIAMONDS
n. Bk1890 sl. – coal
 
• BLACK DISHES
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – cooking utensils, by contrast with glass and china
 
• BLACK DISPATCH
n. Bk1892 Amer. sl. – a rumour on which no reliance can be placed
 
• BLACK DOCTOR 
n. 1876 Sc. – a horse-leech   
 
• BLACK DOCTORS 
n. Bk1886 Anglo-Indian – the native dressers in a hospital
 
• BLACK DOG
n. 1. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a fit of bad temper
n. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a gun
 
• BLACK-DOGGED
adj. 1943 Amer. euphemism – damned, darned
 
• A BLACK DOG HAS WALKED OVER HIM
phr. 1834 – said of a sullen, discontented, or morose person
 
• BLACK DOLL 
n. Bk1945 criminals’ sl. – a Black woman
 
• BLACK-DOY
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a black beetle
 
• BLACK DRAUGHT
n. 1. Bk1891 sl. – a chimney-sweep
n. 2. 1935 Amer. dial. – a poisonous drink
 
• BLACK DRESS MAN 
n. 1875 UK prison sl. rare – a convict who wears a black uniform as a mark of misconduct; one who has been found guilty of assaulting a warder
 
• THE BLACK DROPS
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a state of mild physical discomfort; not actually sick, but feeling not quite right
 
• BLACK DUCK 
n. 1767 sl., contemptuous usage – a Native American Indian
 
• BLACK DUST 
n. Bk1984 African-American sl. – an extremely dark-skinned person
 
• BLACK DUSTER
n. 1962 Amer. dial. – a heavy sandstorm
 
• THE BLACK EAGLE
n. Bk1944 services’ sl. – the guy you get all your confidential latrine rumours from  
 
• BLACKED EBONY 
n. Bk1945 criminals’ sl. – a Black person
 
• BLACK ENOUGH TO HOLD AN EGG
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – said of strong coffee
 
• BLACKER THAN TOBY’S HEEL
adj. 1901 Amer. dial. – very black
 
• BLACKEE;  BLACKEY;  BLACKIE;  BLACKY 
n. 1732 colloq., offensive – a Black person; usually African, but also Indian, Aboriginal
 
• BLACK ENOUGH TO HOLD AN EGG 
phr. 1965 Amer. dial. – said of strong coffee
 
• BLACKER THAN TOBY’S HEEL 
adj. 1901 Amer. dial. – very black
 
• BLACKETEER 
n. 1942 colloq. – a trader in black-market goods
 
• BLACK EYE
n. 1. 1795 US – a severe blow or rebuff
n. 2. c1900 US sl. – a lowered status or reputation; something that will injure one’s prestige
 
• BLACK-EYED SUSAN
n. 1. 1889 US sl. – a revolver
n. 2. 1977 euphemism – a prostitute


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