Dictionary: BLACKF – BLACKZ

• BLACKFACE 
n. 1704 rare, orig. & chiefly US. offensive – a dark-skinned person  
 
• BLACK-FACED 
adj. 1581 – having a dark or gloomy face or aspect
 
• BLACK-FASTING
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – practising severe fasting  
 
• BLACK-FAVOURED
adj. 1843 Ireland – of dark or grimy complexion
 
• BLACK FAY
n. 1964 Amer. dial. – a Black person who is deferential or subservient toward Whites
 
• BLACKFELLA;  BLACKFELLER;  BLACKFELLOW 
n. 1827 Aust. sl. – an Aborigine; a dark-skinned person
 
• BLACK FELLOW
n. 1. 1598 – orig. any dark-skinned man
n. 2. 1738 – a man having a black or very dark skin
n. 3. Bk1910 Ireland – a surly, vindictive, implacable, irreconcilable fellow
 
• BLACK-FISHER 
n. 1809 – one who catches salmon just after spawning; a night poacher of fish
 
• BLACK-FISHING
n. Bk1898 Sc. – a fishing illegal by night
 
• BLACKFIT
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a lovers’ go-between  
 
• BLACK FLESH
n. 1827 US – Black slaves
 
• BLACK FLY 
n. c1786 UK sl. – a clergyman, a parson
 
• BLACK FOOT 
n. 1808 Sc. rare – a go-between in a courtship or love affair; a matchmaker
 
• BLACKFORD-BLOCK 
n. a1909 UK sl. – a sporadically well-dressed man
 
• BLACKFORD-SWELL 
n. a1909 UK sl. – a sporadically well-dressed man
 
• BLACKFORD-TOFF 
n. a1909 UK sl. – a sporadically well-dressed man
 
• BLACK FRIDAY
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – Good Friday
 
• BLACK FROST
n. 1. 1709 Amer. dial. – a frost or cold that kills vegetation and usually accompanied by hoarfrost
n. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – hard frost without rime or snow  
n. 3. 1965 Amer. dial. – freezing weather not cold enough to kill vegetation
 
• BLACK-FYSE
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – of swarthy complexion  
 
• BLACKGANG
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – blackguardly  
n. US Civil War usage – (usually as ‘black gang’) all the members of a ship’s engineering department
 
• BLACK GEORGE 
n. 1889 Eng. dial. – a poacher
 
• BLACK GOB
n. 1812 Eng. dial. – a term of contempt
 
• BLACK GOWN
n. 1. 1616 obs. – a collegian or learned man
n. 2. 1731 sl. – a clergyman
n. 3. 1847 US Indian usage – a Roman Catholic priest
 
• BLACK GROUND
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – loose, dark soil
 
• BLACK-GUARD 
n. 1. 1535 obs. – the lowest menials of a royal or noble household, who had charge of pots and pans and other kitchen utensils, and rode in the wagons conveying these during journeys from one residence to another; the scullions and kitchen-knaves
n. 2. 1589 obs. – a guard or soldier dressed in black, or dark or forbidding in features or character
n. 3. 1699 obs. – a vagrant child; a young ragamuffin
 
• BLACKGUARD
adj. 1806 Amer. dial. – characterized by abusive or obscene language
n. 1. 1732 – a person, esp. a man, who behaves in a dishonourable or contemptible way; someone worthless or despicable; a villain; a rough;  an open scoundrel; a term of the utmost opprobrium
n. 2. 1750 – a foul-mouthed person; a slanderer
n. 3. Bk1898 Eng, dial. – a duster or cloth used in doing the dirtiest housework
vb. 1. 1902 Amer. dial. – to talk obscenely; to curse or swear at
vb. 2. 1950 Amer. dial. – to slander or abuse verbally; to talk in scurrilous terms about someone or something
 
• BLACKGUARD DRUNK
adj. 1949 Amer. dial. – drunk to the point of viciousness
 
• BLACK HAND
n. 1928 Amer. dial. – a witchcraft spell, a charm
 
• BLACK HAT
n. 1. 1887 Aust. sl. – a newly-arrived immigrant
n. 2. 1959 colloq., orig. US – a villain or criminal, esp. one in a film or other work of fiction; a ‘bad guy’  
 
• BLACK HANDER 
n. 1905 US hist. – a person involved in Black Hand methods of extortion (a method used by members of the Italian-American criminal underworld); a swindler, terrorist, or extortionist
 
• BLACK HAT 
n. 1. 1887 Aust. sl. – a newly-arrived immigrant
n. 2. 1959 colloq., orig. US – a villain or criminal, esp. one in a film or other work of fiction; a ‘bad guy’
n. 3. 1990 computing sl. – a person who engages in illegal or malicious hacking, creates or distributes computer viruses, etc.
 
• BLACK HAWK
n. Bk1944 services’ sl. – army necktie
 
• BLACKHEAD
n. 1. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a tadpole
n. 2. Bk1945 criminals’ sl. – a Black person
n. 3. 1954 Amer. dial. – a black rain-cloud
 
• BLACKHEART
n. 1. Bk1886 Eng. dial. – a blackguard
n. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. – a mean or ill-tempered person
 
• BLACK-HEARTED
adj. 1638 – having a wicked, malicious disposition; morally bad
 
• BLACK HOLE
n. 1844 Sc. & Eng. dial. – prison; a police cell

• BLACK-HOLE-BILL
adj. 2000 UK sl. – depressing, miserable
 
• BLACK-HOOD 
n. 1763 obs. – a non-regent member of the senate of the University of Cambridge, distinguished from a regent by wearing a black hood
 
• BLACKIE
n. 1. 1815 colloq. – a Black person
n. 2. 1885 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a blackbird
n. 3. Bk1978 railroad usage – a fireman
n. 4. 1982 Amer. dial. – the black bear
 
• BLACK INDIAN 
n. 1876 – a person of African descent living as a member of a North American Indian; now also, a person of mixed African-American and North American Indian descent
 
• BLACKING
n. 1873 Eng. dial. – a scolding; abuse
 
• BLACKING MAN 
n. 1. 1601 hist. – a man who sells or manufactures blacking for shoes
n. 2. 1819 hist. – a street trader who polishes shoes with blacking
 
• BLACK IRISH 
n. 1. Bk1998 New York sl. – an Irish person with black hair and dark complexion
n. 2. Bk1998 New York sl., usually derogatory – an Irish Protestant
 
• BLACK IS THE WHITE OF MY EYE
phr. 1844 Sc. – there is a slur on my character
 
• BLACK IVORY 
n. 1864 sl. – Black slaves
 
• BLACK JACK;  BLACKJACK
n. 1. 1819 Eng. dial. – a drinking vessel; a large copper can
n. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a cockroach
n. 3. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – gunpowder
n. 4. 1900 UK criminals’ sl., obs. – a judge or magistrate
n. 5. World War I sl. – very strong coffee without cream or milk
n. 6. 1928 US sl. – a thug, a rowdy
n. 7. 1966 S. Afr. sl., derogatory – during apartheid: a member of a police force composed of Black officers and operating in the townships
n. 8. 1967 Amer. dial. – a heavy dark soil
n. 9. 1968 Amer. dial. – illegal liquor; moonshine; illegally made whisky
n. 10. 1969 Amer. dial. – in marbles: the name of the head taw man when no marbles went out of the ring at the first shot
n. 11. 1975 Amer. dial. – gingerbread
 
• BLACKJACK ARTIST 
n. 1934 prison sl. – a prison guard overly fond of using his nightstick  
 
• BLACKJACK STEER
n. 1944 Amer. dial. – a scrawny steer from the timbered country
 
• BLACK JAUDY 
n. 1843 Sc. – a dirty-faced lassie; but generally applied to those girls who go from house to house doing the lowest kitchen work – servants of servants
 
• BLACK JEW 
n. 1807 – a Jewish person who is dark-skinned or black, esp. (in Asia and Africa) as distinguished from one of European or Levantine ancestry
 
• BLACK JOB 
n. 1839 UK sl. – a Black child born to a White couple; the assumption being that the actual father was a Black servant
 
• BLACK-KITES
n. 1891 Eng. dial. – blackberries
 
• BLACK KNIGHT 
n. 1978 business sl. – a person making an unwelcome attempt to takeover another company
 
• BLACK KNOB 
n. 1835 UK criminals’ sl., obs. – an attorney or any influential person dressed in black
 
• THE BLACK LAD
n. 1891 Sc. – the devil
 
• BLACKLAND
n. 1803 Amer. dial. – a heavy, loose, or sometimes sticky dark soil; also, countryside which has such soil
 
• BLACK-LEG
n. 1. 1767 – a swindler, esp., a swindling bookmaker
n. 2. 1771 sl. – a turf swindler
n. 3. 1776 – a professional gambler or layer of odds  
n. 4. Bk1825 Sc. obs. rare – a blackfoot; a go-between in a courtship or love affair; a matchmaker
n. 5. 1838 UK sl. – a confidence trickster, preying on visitors to the city
n. 6. 1844, depreciative usage – a person who continues to work despite a ban or strike by a trade union; a person who takes a striker’s place
n. 7. Bk1891 sl. – one who cheats at cards or billiards
n. 8. Bk1891 sl. – a thief
n. 9. L19 US sl. – a fashionable dandy
n. 10. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – in wrestling, one who makes no real attempt to throw his opponent, generally with the object of winning bets made through an accomplice
n. 11. Bk1911 Sc. – a match-maker; a lovers’ go-between  
n. 12. 1930 US criminals’ sl. – a professional criminal
n. 13. Bk1945 criminals’ sl. – an unscrupulous criminal lawyer  
n. 14. 2013 UK sl. – an informer
vb. 1897 – to take the place of a worker who is on strike, thereby helping th employer to carry on his business and defeat the ends of the strike
 
• BLACKLEG IT
vb. 1888 – of a trade-union workman: to return to work before a strike is settled
 
• BLACK LETTER LAWYER
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a lawyer versed in early English law
 
• BLACKLIE
adj. 1. Bk1911 Sc.- ill-coloured; dirty; badly washed  
adj. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – of the weather: dark with threatening clouds 
 
• BLACK-LOOKING
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – sullen, ill-tempered
 
• BLACK-MACK
n. 1519 obs. – a blackbird
 
• BLACKMAILER 
n. 1833 – one who extorts, or endeavours to extort money by blackmailing
 
• BLACK-MAMMY
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a tar-like substance used to repair small leaks in a boat
 
• BLACK MAN;  BLACKMAN
n. 1. a1398 obs. – a dark-haired or swarthy man
n. 2. a1398 – a dark-skinned man, esp. a man of sub-Saharan African or Australian Aboriginal origin or descent
n. 3. 1692 – an evil spirit, boogeyman, the devil
n. 4. 1856 Sc. – liquorice
n. 5. 1867 Eng. dial. – a go-between in love-making; the man who accompanies a suitor to the house of the intended father-in-law, to help to make the match
n. 6. Bk1900 Ireland – a surly, vindictive, implacable, irreconcilable fellow  
n. 7. Bk1911 Sc. – a nursery bogey  
n. 8. 1927 Eng. dial. – a funeral director, an undertaker
n. 9. 1962 Sc. – a piece of dried mucus in the nose
 
• THE BLACK MAN
n. 1890 Sc. – the devil
 
• BLACK MAN KISSED HER 
n. 1960 UK rhyming sl. – a sister
 
• BLACK MARIA
n. 1. 1847 US sl. – a police wagon or truck used to take arrested persons to jail
n. 2. World War I US Army usage – a large, high-explosive shell used in World War I
n. 3. 1965 Amer. dial. – an ambulance
n. 4. 1965 Amer. dial. – a hearse
n. 5. 1969 Amer. dial. – a fishing net
n. 6. 1986-7 US sl. – a Black prostitute
 
• BLACK MARIAH
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a fishing net
 
• BLACK MARKETEER 
n. 1941 – a person engaged in trading on the black market
 
• BLACK MARKETER 
n. 1942 – a black marketeer, a person engaged in trading on the black market
 
• BLACK MARKETING 
n. Bk1947 Amer. sl. – stealing dates
 
• BLACK MASTER 
n. 1823 Eng. dial. – a funeral furnisher, an undertaker
 
• BLACK MEAT 
n. 1. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – cured bacon or ham
n. 2. Bk1945 criminals’ sl. – a Black woman
 
• BLACK MIKE
n. 1968 Amer. logging usage – stew
 
• BLACK MOKE
n. 1950 Amer. dial., usually derogatory – a Black person
 
• BLACK MONDAY
n. 1. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – the first day of going to school after holidays .
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – the first Monday after holidays
 
• BLACK MONK 
n. 1297 – a monk of the order of St. Benedict, so called from the colour of the habit worn; also, a Black or Augustinian Canon
 
• BLACK-MONTH
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – November
 
• BLACKMOOR;  BLACKMOORE
n. 1547 – a black-skinned African; an Ethiopian; a Black person; any very dark-skinned person; formerly used without depreciatory force
 
• BLACK MORIAN 
n. 1526 obs. – a Black African; a dark-skinned person
 
• BLACK-MOUTH 
n. 1. 1642 rare – a foul-mouthed person; a slanderer
n. 2. 1843 Ireland – an Irish Protestant dissenter
n. 3. 1979 Ulster sl. – a Presbyterian
 
• BLACK-MOUTHED
adj. 1595 obs. – having a black mouth; fig. using foul or scurrilous language; abusive, foul-mouthed; slanderous, calumnious
 
• BLACK-MUCK
n. 1784 Eng. dial. – the ashes and cleanings of streets
 
• BLACK-MUMMER 
n. a1790 UK sl. – one unwashed and unshorn
 
• BLACK NEB
n. 1. 1832 Sc., depreciative usage – a workman who refuses to join a trades union; a workman willing to work for a master whose men are on strike; a strike-breaker
n. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – a person disaffected toward government  
n. 3. Bk1911 Sc. – carrion crow
n. 4. 1915 Ulster sl. – a Presbyterian  
 
• BLACKNECK 
n. 1978 US Southern political sl. – a rural Black Southerner who is opposed to various politically liberal programs
 
• BLACK NIGGER IN CHARGE 
n. 1973 African-American sl. – any Black authority figure; used sarcastically
 
• BLACK NIGHT
n. 1953 Amer. dial. – night time at its darkest
 
• BLACK NOB 
n. 1. 1838 Sc., depreciative usage – a blackleg, a strike-breaker, a non-unionist
n. 2. 1850 UK criminals’ sl. obs. – an attorney or any influential person dressed in black
 
• BLACK OPERATOR 
n. 1884 Amer. euphemism – a secret agent or spy  
 
• BLACKOUT
n. 1. Bk1944 services’ sl. – general issue coffee
n. 2. 1947 African-American sl. – a very dark-skinned person; a Black person
 
• BLACK OX
n. 1. Bk1881 – one worn out with age or care
n. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – a misfortune; a bereavement; a great calamity  
 
• THE BLACK OX HAS TRODDEN ON YOUR FOOT
phr. 1816 Sc. & Eng. dial. – you have known misfortune and sorrow
 
• THE BLACK OX HAS TRODDEN ON YOUR TOE
phr. 1816 Sc. & Eng. dial. – you have known misfortune and sorrow
 
• BLACK PARR
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – an imaginary monster
 
• BLACK PEEPER
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a black eye
 
• BLACK PETER
n. 1815 Sc. – a portmanteau
 
• BLACK PISHMINNIE
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a black ant  
 
• BLACK POPE
n. 1877 – a nickname for the Superior-General of the Jesuits
 
• BLACK-POT 
n. 1. c1590 UK obs. – a toper; a drunkard .
n. 2. 1873 Eng. dial. – a sausage made of fat and blood
 
• BLACK PROTESTANT 
n. 1. 1829 – a Protestant settler in Ireland at the time of the Cromwellian Settlement of 1652
n. 2. 1958 derogatory and offensive – a staunch Irish Protestant, esp. one characterized as intolerant or bigoted; also used as a more general term of abuse for an Irish Protestant
n. 3. 1968 sl. – a non-practising Protestant
 
• BLACK RASCAL 
n. Bk1914 Amer. dial., jocular usage – a Black person

• BLACK RAT
n. 1993 UK sl. – a traffic patrol officer
 
• BLACK-RING
n. Bk1903 sl. – the female pudendum
 
• BLACK ROBE 
n. 1811 Can. – esp. among North American Indians: a Christian priest, esp. a missionary
 
• BLACKS
n. 1889 Eng. dial. – mourning clothes
 
• BLACK SAM
n. 1875 Eng. dial. – the devil
 
• BLACK SANCTUS
n. 1578 obs. – a kind of burlesque hymn; a discord of harsh sounds expressive of contempt or dislike (formerly used as a kind of serenade to a faithless wife); ‘rough music’
 
• BLACKSANDER 
n. 1897 – in New Zealand: a miner who pans black sand for gold
 
• BLACK SCOUNDREL 
n. Bk1914 Amer. dial. – a Black person: used jocosely
 
• BLACK SHARK 
n. 1818 UK sl. – an attorney
 
• BLACK SHEEP
n. 1. 1640 – a disreputable or unsatisfactory member of a family, etc.; a bad character; a scoundrel, an outcast
n. 2. 1829 UK sl. – a clergyman
n. 3. 1832 sl. – a strike-breaker
n. 4. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an unseaworthy ship
 
• BLACK SHEEP OF THE FAMILY 
n. 1856 – a disreputable or unsatisfactory member of a family, etc.; a bad character
 
• BLACK SHEEP OF THE FLOCK 
n. 1816 – a disreputable or unsatisfactory member of a family, etc.; a bad character
 
• BLACKSHIRT 
n. 1. 1922 – a member of a fascist party; spec. a member of Italy’s National Fascist Party (Partito Nazionale Fascista) (1921–43), or of the British Union of Fascists (1932–40); also, more generally, a person with fascist tendencies
n. 2. 1933 hist. – in Nazi Germany: a member of the internal security force, the Schutzstaffel (S.S.)
 
• BLACK-SILK BARGE 
n. Bk1909 ballroom usage – a stout woman that, frequenting dances, dresses to minimize her amplitude
 
• BLACK SLUG 
n. 1804 UK sl. – a clergyman, a parson
 
• BLACKSMITH 
n. 1. 1248 – a smith who works in iron or black metal, as distinguished from a ‘whitesmith’ who works in tin or white metal
n. 2. 1882 US sl. – a clumsy or slipshod worker; spec. an inept journalist, one who pounds out copy or news stories
n. 3. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a door-key
n. 4. 1906 UK criminals’ sl. – a forger
n. 5. 1926 US criminals’ sl. – a safebreaker
n. 6. 1933 Aust. sl., usually derogatory – a cook on an outback station
 
• BLACKSMITH OF KIND 
n. Bk1892 Eng. dial. – a blacksmith the seventh in descent of a family of smiths
 
• BLACKSMITH’S DAUGHTER
n. 1891 Eng. dial. – a lock and key, a padlock
 
• BLACKSMITH’S EYE
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – an eye very correct in estimating size, etc.
 
• BLACKSMITH’S WIFE
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a lock and key, a padlock
 
• BLACK SMOKER 
n. 1930 drug addicts’ sl. – one who smokes opium
 
• BLACK SMOLLICHER 
n. 1911 Sc. – a person with very dark features
 
• BLACK’S MY NAIL
phr. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – there is a slur on my character .
 
• BLACK SNAKE
n. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a short-handled whip with a long lash; used on stages and dog-teams
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a train of coal cars
 
• BLACK-SOLE 
n. 1725 Sc. obs. – a “Blackfoot”, a go-between in a courtship or love affair; a matchmaker
 
• BLACK SPELL
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a sudden feeling of weakness, when sometimes the person loses consciousness
 
• BLACK-SPOOL
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a bottle of porter
 
• BLACK SPOT
n. 1936 Amer. dial. – an area shaded from the sun
 
• BLACK SPY 
n. 1. a1790 sl. – a constable; an informer
n. 2. 1823 UK sl. – a blacksmith
n. 3. 1858 UK sl., derogatory – a term of address
 
• BLACK SQUIRE
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a clerical squire
 
• BLACK-STAR
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – the starling
 
• BLACK-STARVED
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – pinched and blue with cold

• BLACKSTICK
n. c1935 US jive usage – a clarinet
 
• BLACKSTONE 
n. Bk1945 criminals’ sl. – a judge  
 
• BLACK STORY
n. 1952 Amer. dial. – a decidedly bad lie
 
• BLACK STRAP
n. 1. Bk1890 sl. – port wine
n. 2. World War I sl. – general issue coffee
n. 3. World War II Amer. sl. – thick black coffee
 
• BLACK STUFF 
n. 1. 1907 sl. – a Black person in a sexual context
n. 2. 1937 S. Afr. sl. – Black labourers
n. 3. Bk1975 US drug addicts’ usage – opium

• BLACK STUMP
n. Bk2007 Aust. sl. – a very remote region
 
• BLACK SUGAR
n. 1787 Sc. – liquorice
 
• BLACKTAIL
n. 1885 Eng. dial. – the stoat
 
• BLACK TAN
n. 1. 1856 Amer. dial. – a dog, esp. a hound, with black and tan colouring
n. 2. Bk1888 Eng. dial. – a good-for-nothing person
 
• BLACK TAR
n. 1986 sl. – an exceptionally pure form of heroin originating in Mexico
 
• BLACK-TEAPOT 
n. Bk1889 UK sl. – a Black footman
 
• BLACK TO THE BONE
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – of persons: worn by disease and having a dark or sallow complexion
 
• BLACK-TRACKER
n. 1. 1862 Aust. – an Australian Aboriginal employed by police to track down fugitives or persons lost in the bush
n. 2. 1867 Aust. – a native policeman employed in tracking down fugitive Blacks and criminals
n. 3. 1900-10 Aust. sl. – a nickname for a religious person who is overly dependent on their spiritual adviser
 
• BLACK VELVET 
n. 1. 1899 Aust. & NZ sl., offensive – a Black, Aboriginal, or Maori woman, esp. as the focus of a White man’s sexual interest
n. 2. 1982 euphemism – a dark-skinned prostitute
 
• BLACK VICTUAL
n. Bk1911 Sc. – peas and beans  
 
• BLACK WAGON
n. 1. 1967 Amer. dial. – a hearse
n. 2. 1967 Amer. dial. – an ambulance
 
• BLACK-WARD
n. 1822 Sc. obs. – a state of servitude to a servant
 
• BLACK WATER
n. 1. 1850 Amer. dial. – coffee, esp. weak coffee
n. 2. 1939 Amer. dial. – ink
n. 3. 1947 Amer. dial. – a person of mixed race, usually Black, Indian, and White
 
• BLACK WATERITE
n. 1947 Amer. dial. – a person of mixed race, usually Black, Indian, and White
 
• BLACK WATERMELON
n. 1954 Amer. dial. – a big, dark green watermelon with black seeds
 
• BLACK WAX
n. 1893 Amer. dial. – a dark soil which is sticky or wax-like
 
• BLACK WEATHER
n. Bk1911 Sc. – rainy weather  
 
• BLACK WEDNESDAY
n. Bk1944 services’ sl. – rifle calisthenics
 
• BLACK-WET
adj. 1865 Eng. dial. – thoroughly wet; sodden with water
n. Bk1898 Sc. – rain , as distinguished from snow
 
• BLACK WIDOW 
n. 1. c1940 Amer. students’ sl. – an unpopular girl  
n. 2. Bk1942 US sl. – a girl who never dates
n. 3. Bk1972 homosexual sl. – a male homosexual who habitually takes away the love-mates of other homosexuals  
 
• BLACK WIND
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a dust storm
 
• BLACK WINE
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – port wine
 
• BLACK WITCH 
n. 1645 – a witch who practices black magic; one who uses witchcraft for malicious purposes
 
• BLACK WOMAN 
n. 1788 – a black-skinned or coloured woman
 
• BLACK-WOOD
n. 1871 US – evergreen trees collectively
 
• BLACK WORD
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a very uncomplimentary remark
 
• BLACK WORK
n. 1. 1859 – undertakers’ work
n. 2. 1874 – the work of a blacksmith
 
• BLACK WORKER 
n. Bk1891 sl. – an undertaker
 
• BLACKWORM
n. 1949 Amer. dial. – an earthworm
 
• BLACKY
n. 1. 1815 colloq. – a Black person
n. 2. 1906 US sl. – a blacksmith, esp. as a nickname
 
• BLACKY-MONTH
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – November
 
• BLACKY-MOOR 
n. Bk1849 Eng. dial. – a man of colour
n. 1825 Sc. – a Black person


Back to INDEX B

Back to DICTIONARY