Dictionary: BLAD – BLAR

• BLAD
n. 1. 1785 Sc. – a large portion of anything; a fragment  
n. 2. 1789 Sc. – a slap, a blow  
n. 3. 1808 Sc. – a person who is of weak, a soft constitution, whose strength is not in proportion to his size or looks; often applied to a young person, who has become suddenly tall, but is of a relaxed habit
n. 4. 1825 Sc. – a heavy fall of rain  
n. 5. 1879 Sc. – a person who walks with long and heavy steps
n. 6. Bk1898 Sc. – a dirty spot, a discoloration  
n. 7. Bk1898 N. Ireland – a useless thing
n. 8. Bk1898 Sc. – a long and heavy step in walking  
n. 9. Bk1911 Sc. – a person of weak, soft constitution, from rapid overgrowth  
vb. 1. 1721 Sc. – to slap, to strike; to thrust violently  
vb. 2. 1810 Sc. – to abuse, to defame  
vb. 3. 1825 Sc. – of wind and rain: to beat against, to drive in gusts  
vb. 4. 1876 Sc. – to spoil, to injure, esp. by wind and rain, or by a blow  
vb. 5. 1890 Sc. – to blow or flap about in the wind
vb. 6. Bk1898 Sc. – to walk heavily and clumsily; to take long steps, treading heavily  
 
• BLADDED
adj. 1870 Sc. – spoilt, injured
 
• BLADDER 
n. 1. 1579 – an inflated pretentious man; a windbag; a talkative, long-winded, boring person
n. 2. 1757 Eng. dial. – a pimple, a burn or scald
n. 3. 1864 Eng. dial. – a football
n. 4. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a bagpipe
n. 5. 1935 US criminals’ sl. – an unattractive and/or aging prostitute; the implication is of diseased matter
n. 6. c1935 circus usage, arch. – a toy balloon
 
• BLADDERDASH
n. Bk1911 Sc. – nonsense  
 
• BLADDERED
adj. 1992 Brit. sl. – drunk
 
• BLADDER-HEAD 
n. 1. Bk1883 – a stupid and tiresome talker; one who will keep on arguing and who will have the last word
n. 2. Bk1886 Eng dial. – a coarse, brutal bully
 
• BLADDER MOUTH 
n. Bk1886 Eng. dial. – a coarse, noisy talker, devoid of sense; a noisy fool
 
• BLADDER OF LARD 
n. 1. Bk1864 UK sl., derogatory – a bald-headed man
n. 2. 1886 UK sl., derogatory – a fat man
 
• BLADDERSCAT
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a deceiving person; one you cannot trust
 
• BLADDERSKATE 
n. 1. a1680 Sc. – a silly foolish person; an indistinct or indiscreet talker; a babbler
n. 2. 1870 Sc. – a boaster
 
• BLADDERSKYTE 
n. Bk1876 Sc. – a silly foolish person
 
• BLADDING
adj. 1785 Sc. – breezy, gusty
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a spoiling, destruction
 
• BLADDY
adj. 1825 Sc. – gusty, unsettled
 
• BLADE
n. 1. 1597 – a gallant, an easygoing fellow, a good fellow; also, a spruce or dashing fellow; sharp-witted, dashing, wild, or reckless fellow; a beau
n. 2. 1773 Sc. – a human being, a person
n. 3. Bk1860 sl. – a man; in ancient times, the term for a soldier
n. 4. Bk1887 Eng. dial. – a depreciatory term for a woman.
n. 5. Bk1891 – a swordsman
n. 6. 1915 Amer. dial. – one’s wife or girlfriend
n. 7. 1949 Amer. sl.  – a young man, esp. one who believes himself socially adroit, sophisticated, and witty
n. 8. 1960s teen sl. – a homosexual man, regardless of his age
n. 9. 1974 US medical usage – a surgeon  
n. 10. 1983 Ulster sl. – a showily or bizarrely dressed woman
n. 11. 1993 US sl. – an expert; a connoisseur; a wise man or one posing as such
n. 12. 1995 sl. – a young homosexual male
n. 13. 1996 Ulster sl. – a cantankerous, verbally abusive woman
n. 14. Bk1999 baseball usage – in baseball: a nickname for a thin, wiry player
vb. Bk1911 Sc. – to slap; to spoil
 
• BLADE-FORGER 
n. 1831 – a maker of blades
 
• BLADE GLOMMER 
n. Bk2006 carnival usage – a sword swallower
 
• BLADER 
n. 1. 1577 obs. – the user of a blade; a swordsman
n. 2. 1598 obs. – a maker of blades; a blade-smith
 
• BLADERDASH
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – nonsense
 
• BLADESMITH 
n. c1540 – a sword cutler
 
• BLADEY!
int. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – an assertive expletive: by our Lady!
 
• BLADGE 
n. Bk1855 Eng. dial. – a low, coarse, vulgar woman
 
• BLADHUNK
n. Bk1891 sl. – a prison
 
• BLADROCK
n. 1825 Sc. – a talkative, silly fellow
 
• BLADRY
n. Bk1911 Sc. – foolishness, deception
 
• BLADS AND DAWDS
n. 1825 Sc. – large leaves of greens boiled whole in a sort of broth
 
• BLAE
adj. 1. 1785 Sc. & Eng. dial. – of a bluish tinge, lead-coloured  
adj. 2. 1807 Sc. – bleak, cold
adj. 3. Bk1911 Sc. – disappointed
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a loud bleat
vb. 1. Bk1898 Sc. – to make very cold, to numb
vb. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – to bleat as a lamb
vb. 3. Bk1911 Sc. – to cry as a child
 
• BLAEFLUMMERY
n. Bk1911 Sc. – nonsense; vain imaginations
 
• BLAELIKE
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – livid, pale
 
• BLAFF
n. 1894 Sc. – a blow
vb. 1894 Sc. – to bang
 
• BLAFFART
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a blow
 
• BLAFFERE 
n. Bk1967 obs. – a stammerer
 
• BLAFFOORDE 
n. Bk1855 obs. – a person who stammers, or has any defect in his speech
 
• BLAFLUM
n. 1. 1788 Sc. – nonsense, idle talk, deception, a hoax
n. 2. 1825 Sc. – a pompous, empty-headed person
vb. 1727 Sc. – to coax, to cajole; to deceive
 
• BLAFUM 
n. 1. 1788 Sc. – nonsense, idle talk, deception, a hoax  
n. 2. 1825 Sc. – a pompous, empty person; chiefly applied to males
 
• BLAG
n. 1. 1870 Eng. dial. – the blackberry
n. 2. 1885 Brit. sl. – an act of robbery (with violence)
vb. 1. 1866 Eng. dial. – to gather blackberries
vb. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to employ one’s time in a profitless way
vb. 3. 1933 Brit. sl. – to rob (with violence), to steal
vb. 4. 1950s Brit. sl. – to scrounge, to cadge, to deceive, to bamboozle
 
• BLAGAIRD 
n. Bk1892 Eng. dial. – a blackguard
 
• BLAGGARD
n. 1902 Amer. dial. – a blackguard
vb. 1902 Amer. dial. – to talk obscenely; to curse or swear at
 
• BLAGGER 
n. 1. 1963 Brit. sl. – a person who seeks to obtain or achieve something by persuasive talk or plausible deception; a bluffer, a scrounger, a cadger, a sponger; a smooth talker, a persuasive person
n. 2. 1938 sl. – one who blags, or robs, esp. a bank robber; a thief
 
• BLAGGERD 
n. Bk1884 – a blackguard; one addicted to swearing and low language
 
• BLAG MERCHANT 
n. c1950 sl. – a pay-roll robber  
 
• BLAGUE
n. 1. 1837 – pretentious falsehood; blustering humbug; mendacious boasting
n. 2. 1870 Eng. dial. – the blackberry
vb. 1883 – to tell lies in jest; to hoax, to humbug
 
• BLAGUEUR 
n. 1883 – one who talks pretentiously; a joker or teller of stories
 
• BLAH
adj. 1. 1922 sl., orig. US – boring, dull, tedious
adj. 2. 1924 sl. – insane, mad
adj. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – inattentive; absent-minded
adj. 4. Bk1975 US sl. – nonsensical; worthless
int. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – nonsense! it is ridiculous!
n. 1. 1918 US sl. – pretentious talk or writing; insincere or exaggerated talk intended to flatter or deceive; humbug or flattery; nonsense
n. 2. 1923 US sl. – a fool, an idiot
n. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – boasting
n. 4. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something worthless
n. 5. 1967 US sl. – a small or insignificant person
vb. 1924 sl. – to talk pretentiously or ostentatiously
 
• BLAH-BLAH
n. 1918 US sl. – pretentious talk or writing; insincere or exaggerated talk intended to flatter or deceive; humbug or flattery
vb. 1924 sl. – to talk pretentiously or ostentatiously
 
• THE BLAHS
n. 1968 sl., orig. & chiefly US – a state of mental depression; the blues
 
• BLAICK
n. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – a puzzle
n. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – a scoundrel
vb. Bk1911 Sc. – to puzzle, to mystify, to baffle
 
• BLAID
n. 1790 Eng. dial. obs. – a little boil
 
• BLAIDRY
n. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – nonsense, foolish talk
n. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – phlegm coughed up
n. 3. Bk1911 Sc. – unmerited applause
 
• BLAIK
n. Bk1898 Sc. – a puzzle
vb. 1895 Sc. – to puzzle, to mystify, to baffle
 
• BLAIN
n. 1856 Sc. – a fault; a blemish; a scar; discolouration of skin after a sore
 
• BLAINCH
vb. Bk1911 Sc. – to cleanse
 
• BLAIR
n. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – a loud sound; a cry
n. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – the bleat of a sheep
vb. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – to make a noise; to cry aloud
vb. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – to bleat as a sheep

• BLAIR OUT
vb. 1993 UK sl. – to criticize, to denigrate, to belittle
 
• BLAIRHAWK 
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a rude, noisy person
 
• BLAISTER
vb. Bk1911 Sc. – to blow with violence
 
• BLAIT
adj. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – naked, bare
adj. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – shy, sheepish; modest, retiring
adj. 3. Bk1911 Sc. – stupid, easily imposed on
 
• BLAITH
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – blithe, glad
 
• BLAITIE BUM 
n. 1540 Sc. obs., derogatory – a lazy or feckless person; an idler; a simpleton, a fool, a bungler; a sheepish fellow
 
• BLAITLY
adv. Bk1911 Sc. – bashfully
 
• BLAIZE
n. 1809 Sc. – a blow
 
• BLAKE 
adj. 1. c1275 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – pale, wan
adj. 2. 1747 Eng. dial. – yellow, of a golden colour, generally applied to butter and cheese, etc.
adj. 3. 1790 Eng. dial. – of a dusky colour, livid
adj. 4. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – cold, exposed, bleak
vb. 1. a1225 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to turn pale
vb. 2. 1867 Eng. dial. – to become out of breath, to faint; esp. of children exhausted with crying, coughing, or laughing
 
• BLAKEN         
vb. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to turn yellow
 
• BLALA
n. 1972 Hawaii – a brother, a friend, a pal  
 
• BLAM
adv. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – suddenly
 
• BLAMED
adj. 1840 – confounded
adv. 1845 – confoundedly, excessively
 
• BLAMEFUL 
adj. 1. c1386 – conveying blame or censure; blaming, fault-finding
adj. 2. c1430 – fully meriting blame, blameworthy
 
• BLAME GOOD
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate

• BLAMMING
adj. 2000 UK sl. – exciting
 
• BLAN-BEC
n. 1846 Amer. dial. – a greenhorn
 
• BLANC-BEC
n. 1846 Amer. dial. – a greenhorn
 
• BLANCH
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a flash or sudden blaze
 
• BLANCO 
n. Bk2006 US sl. – a White person
 
• BLANDANDER
vb. 1888 colloq. – to tempt by blandishment; to cajole
 
• BLANDER
n. 1340 obs. rare – a flatterer
vb. 1. Bk1898 Sc. – to babble; to waste time in gossiping; to spread a report or calumny; to exaggerate or misstate
vb. 2. Bk1898 Sc. – to scatter sparingly, to disperse in a scanty way
 
• BLANDIGO
adj. 19C Eng. dial. obs. – cloudy
n. 1691 Eng. dial. obs. – a shower of rain
 
• BLANDILOQUENT
adj. 1599 rare – in the language of compliment; smooth-speaking, flattering, fair-spoken
 
• BLANDILOQUOUS
adj. 1615 obs. rare – smooth-talking, flattering, fair-spoken
 
• BLANDISH
n. 1805 Sc. – flattery
 
• BLANE
n. Bk1911 Sc. – the mark left by a wound

• BLANG
n. 2004 US sl. – expensive, ostentatious clothing and jewellery
 
• BLANGE
n. 1890 Eng. dial. – a mixture
vb. 1877 Eng. dial. – to mix
 
• BLANK
adj. 1. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – disappointed
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – inattentive; absent-minded
n. 1. 1790 Eng. dial. – a spark from a fire
n. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a disappointment
vb. 1. 1816 Eng. dial. – to disappoint
vb. 2. 1977 Brit. sl. – to deliberately ignore someone
 
• BLANKER
n. 1825 Eng. dial. – a spark or ember of burning wood, straw, etc.
 
• BLANKET
n. 1. 1851 Amer. dial. – in whaling: a large strip of whale blubber
n. 2. 1918 Amer. sl. – a pastry crust
n. 3. 1925 Amer. hobo sl. – an overcoat
n. 4. 1927 Amer. sl. – a pancake
n. 5. 1954 Amer. dial. – a beaver pelt, esp. a large one
n. 6. 1967 Amer. jocular usage – a dollar bill
n. 7. Bk1975 US sl. – a cigarette paper
vb. 1903 – to suppress, to put in the shade
 
• BLANKET-ASS
n. 1967 Amer. sl. – an American Indian, used contemptuously; usually considered vulgar
 
• BLANKET BAY
n. 1775 Amer. nautical sl. – bed
 
• BLANKET-BUCK
n. 1967 Amer. dial., derogatory – an American Indian
 
• BLANKET BUSTED
adj. 1958 Amer. logging usage – said of a man who has lost everything on a bet, including his bedroll
 
• BLANKET DRAWERS
n. 1958 Amer. logging usage – long handled underwear about of the same itchiness and same thickness as a horse blanket
 
• BLANKET DRILL
n. 1922 military sl. – sleep
 
• BLANKET-FAIR
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. & sl. – bed
 
• BLANKET FEVER
n. 1969 Amer. lumberjack usage – refers to the condition of a lumberjack who stays in bed in the morning after the other men are up; usually a lazy lumberjack
 
• BLANKET HARBOR
n. 1870 Amer. nautical sl. – bed
 
• BLANKETHEAD
n. 1956 Amer. sl. – an American Indian; used contemptuously
 
• BLANKET-HEEZIE
n. Bk1911 Sc. – one who tosses another in a blanket
 
• BLANKET HOIST
n. 1969 Amer. lumberjack usage – a punishment as well as a game; if a lumberjack got out of place, others would put him in a blanket, get hold of the sides of the blanket, and hoist him in the air a few times
 
• BLANKET MAN
n. 1872 Amer. dial. – a tramp; an itinerant worker
 
• BLANKET-MARKET
n. 1882 Eng. dial. – bed-clothes
 
• BLANKET NIP
n. 1906 Amer. dial. – a piece of old blanket folded around the feet inside the shoe packs for warmth; hence, a sock
 
• BLANKET PARTY
n. a1969 Amer. military sl. – a form of retribution in which a soldier is surprised, covered with a blanket, and beaten
 
• BLANKETS
n. 1. 1899 Amer. sl. – pancakes
n. 2. 1925 Amer. sl. – cigarette papers
n. 3. Bk1944 services’ sl. – hot cakes
 
• BLANKET SHEET
n. 1888 – a newspaper in folio form
 
• BLANKET SOLDIER
n. World War II Amer. sl. – a military policeman; so called because his other names are unfit for publication
 
• BLANKET SQUAD
n. 1958 Amer. dial. – in logging: a new crew coming in to the camp in the old days, each man carrying his blankets
 
• BLANKET STIFF
n. 1872 Amer. Hobo & West. sl. – a migratory labourer who carries his belongings in a blanket roll or other bundle; a tramp
 
• BLANKET WIFE
n. World War II Amer. sl. – a prostitute

• BLANKETY-BLANK
n. 1953 US sl. – any taboo or forbidden word or expression
 
• BLANK FILE
n. World War II Amer. sl. – a stupid soldier
 
• BLANKO WATER
n. Bk1944 services’ sl. – coffee
 
• BLANKS
n. 1. Bk1892 Anglo-Indian sl. – Whites or Europeans (used by themselves)
n. 2. 20C  sl. – in dominoes; 0-0
 
• BLANNY
n. 1926 Amer. dial. – ingratiating or flattering speech; cajolery
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – to ingratiate oneself, esp. by using flattering speech
 
• BLANSCUE
n. 1825 Eng. dial. – a catastrophe; an unforeseen accident
 
• BLAP
vb. 1971 Amer. military sl. – to kill or destroy
 
• BLARE
n. 1. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a fuss, a to-do, a disturbance
n. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – a noisy scolding
n. 3. Bk1911 Sc. – the bleat of a sheep or goat
vb. 1. 1784 Sc. & Amer. dial. – of animals: to bleat, to bellow, to bray
vb. 2. 1839 Eng. dial. – to cry, to weep, to lament; to roar
vb. 3. 1856 Eng. dial. – to speak loudly, to shout in a rude or angry manner
vb. 4. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to let out secrets, to blab
vb. 5. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to protrude, to thrust out the tongue
vb. 6. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to wander about; to rush about
vb. 7. 1908 Amer. dial. – to break forth in vituperation
vb. 8. 1912 Amer. dial. – to open wide
vb. 9. 1930 Amer. dial. – to open the eyes widely; to stare wildly
 
• BLARED
adj. 1966 Amer. dial. – of an eye: wide-open, bulging
 
• BLARE-EYED
adj. 1964 Amer. dial. – having wide-open, bulging eyes
 
• BLARE OUT
vb. 1908 Amer. dial. – to break forth in vituperation
 
• BLAREY-EYED
adj. 1970 Amer. dial. – having eyes which turn outward; wall-eyed
 
• BLARING
n. 1. 1813 Eng. dial. – a crying aloud; a roaring
n. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – loud talking, noisy, senseless talk
 
• BLARING AND STARING
phr. Bk1896 Eng. dial. – aimlessly or wildly wandering and staring
 
• BLARNEY
n. 1. 1796 – insincere or exaggerated talk intended to flatter or deceive; humbug or flattery; nonsense
n. 2. 1797 Amer. sl. – a flatterer
vb. 1803 – to flatter; to deceive with insincere or flattering talk, to persuade; to wheedle
 
• BLARNEYFEST
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a conversation devoted to boasting or undependable talk
 
• BLARNEYFIED
adj. 1834 – wheedling, flattering
 
• BLARNEYING
n. 1892 Ireland – flattery, humbug
 
• BLART
n. 1873 Eng. dial. – a loud noise; meaningless talk
vb. 1. 1825 Sc. – to fall flat in the mud
vb. 2. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to cry, to lament; to roar
vb. 3. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to cry out, to make a noise; to scold, to rate
vb. 4. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to let out a secret; to spread abroad news or scandal
 
• BLARTING
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – the crying or whining of a child


Back to INDEX B

Back to DICTIONARY