Dictionary: BOO – BOOM

• BOO
n. 1. L19 US sl. – money
n. 2. 1892 Amer. dial. – mucus in the nose
n. 3. Bk1911 Sc. – a bow, a bend
n. 4. Bk1911 Sc. – a bull
n. 5. Bk1911 Sc. – a manor-house; a farmhouse; a village
n. 6. Bk1911 Sc. – an object of terror; a bugbear
n. 7. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a tramp
n. 8. 1930s African-American sl. – a bad scare; a serious fright
n. 9. 1959 sl., orig. US – marijuana
n. 10. 1967 Amer. dial. – brother
n. 11. 1970s sl. – a ghostwriter
n. 12. L20 US sl. – a person’s boyfriend or girlfriend
n. 13. 2000s sl. – methamphetamine
n. 14. Bk2007 US sl. – a term of endearment, esp. towards a partner of either sex
vb. 1. Bk1898 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to bow, to bend, to twist
vb. 2. 1934 Amer. dial. – of hunting dogs: to bark confusedly while running in a pack
 
• BOOAY
n. M20 NZ colloq. – the remote rural districts
 
• BOOB
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – boorish; rustic
n. 1. 1908 sl., orig. US – a prison cell
n. 2. 1909 sl. – a stupid person, a dolt, a blockhead; a silly or childish person
n. 3. Bk1914 criminals’ sl. – an inferior in any sense; a gullible person, a dupe, a victim
n. 4. World War II Amer. sl. – a Navy recruit
n. 5. 1949 Amer. dial. – a woman’s breast
n. 6. 1959 sl. – an error, a blunder, a foolish mistake
vb. M20 sl. – to make a foolish mistake
 
• THE BOOB
n. 1908 sl., orig. US – prison
 
• BOOBADS
n. Bk1998 sl. – ads for bras and other female undergarments
 
• BOOBEE
n. 1982 Amer. dial. – a term of endearment
 
• BOOBERY
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – stupidity
 
• BOOBIE
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – brother
 
• BOOBIES
n. 1934 sl. – the breasts
 
• BOOBISH
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – boorish; rustic
 
• BOOBISHNESS
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – stupidity
 
• BOOBOISIE
n. E20 US sl. – boobs as a class, stupid people
 
• BOOBOLOGY
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – the study of fools
 
• BOO-BOO
n. 1. 1965 Amer. dial. – a woman’s breast
n. 2. 1967 Amer. dial. – brother
n. 3. 1968 Amer. dial. – mucus in the nose
n. 4. E20 sl., orig. US – a foolish mistake
n. 5. E20 sl., orig. US – a prank, a trick
 
• BOOB SQUAD
n. World War II Amer. sl. – a squad of newly recruited soldiers
 
• BOOB STUNT
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an error; a mistake; a blunder
 
• BOOB TUBE
n. 1. 1978 sl. – a woman’s close-fitting strapless top
n. 2. 20C sl. – a television
 
• BOOBY
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – boorish; rustic
n. 1. 1599 sl. – a foolish person
n. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – the lowest in a class of children at school
n. 3. 1916 Amer. dial. – a woman’s breast
n. 4. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – mother’s milk
n. 5. 1968 Amer. dial. – a hard blow, as with the fist
 
• THE BOOBY
n. 1929 US sl. – prison
 
• BOOBY HATCH
n. 1. 1859 Amer. dial. – a jail; a police station
n. 2. 1896 sl., orig. & chiefly US – a mental hospital
n. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a wagon or sleigh with a removable hood
n. 4. 20C US sl. – a cell; an asylum
 
• THE BOOBY HATCH
n. 1859 US sl. – prison
 
• BOOBY HOUSE
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a jail; a police station
 
• BOOBYISH
adj. L18 – awkward and silly
 
• BOOBY PRIZE
n. 20C – awarded in fun or ridicule to the last competitor, lowest scorer, etc.
 
• BOOBY TRAP
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a firework that is set off when the strings at each end are pulled
 
• BOOBY WAGON
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – the vehicle that takes arrested people to the police station or to jail
 
• BOOCOODLES
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a great deal; a large number, many
 
• BOO-DADDY
n. 1. 1888 Amer. dial. – a ghost, hobgoblin; often used to threaten children
n. 2. 1987 Amer. dial. – nasal mucus
 
• BOODGEREE
adj. Bk1892 Aust. sl. – good
 
• BOODIE
n. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – a small and unattractive person; a dwarf
n. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – a ghost, a hobgoblin
n. 3. Bk1911 Sc. – dried nasal mucus
 
• BOODIE-BO
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a bugbear; an object of dread
 
• BOODJER-RE
adj. 1793 Aust. – good, excellent
 
• BOODLE
n. 1. E17 sl., chiefly US – a crowd, pack, lot
n. 2. 1833 Amer. dial. – a large amount or number
n. 3. 1858 Amer. dial. – counterfeit money; money illegally or dishonestly acquired or used; proceeds of corruption
n. 4. 1862 sl. – a stupid person, a dolt, a blockhead
n. 5. Spanish-American War era – candy, cake, ice cream, etc.
n. 6. 1883 sl., orig. US – a bribe
n. 7. 1883 sl., orig. US – money
n. 8. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – the whole
n. 9. 1965 Amer. dial. – a great deal of money
vb. 1890 sl., orig. US – to bribe; to give or take bribes
 
• BOODLE BAG
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – a money pouch or purse
 
• BOODLE FIGHT
n. World War II Amer. sl. – a party at which ‘boodle’ (cake, candy, ice-cream, etc.) is served
 
• BOODLEISM
n. 1894 sl. – bribery and corruption; embezzlement of public funds
 
• BOODLEISTIC
adj. 1898 sl. – addicted to bribery and corruption
 
• BOODLEIZE
vb. 1886 sl. – to bribe
 
• BOODLER
n. 1894 sl. – one who practices bribery and corruption
 
• BOODLERISM
n. 1887 sl. – bribery and corruption; embezzlement of public funds
 
• BOODLERY
n. 1887 sl. – bribery and corruption; embezzlement of public funds
 
• BOODLING
n. 1890 sl. – bribery and corruption; embezzlement of public funds
 
• BOO-DOCK
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – the buttocks
 
• BOODY
n. 1. 1926 Amer. dial. – the female sex organs; sex
n. 2. 1967 Amer. jocular usage – the buttocks
n. 3. 1970 Amer. dial. – the female body
vb. 1857 rare – to sulk, mope, or be sullen; to look angry, glum, or gruff
 
• BOODYDUNK
n. 1951 Amer. dial. – a large bullfrog
 
• BOOF
n. 1. 1872 Amer. dial. – peach brandy
n. 2. 1896 Amer. dial. – a scare, a fright  
n. 3. 1940s Aust. sl. – a stupid person
vb. L20 Aust. sl. – to top up a container of liquid
 
• BOOFF
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a stroke with the hand that causes a hollow sound; the sound thus produced
vb. Bk1911 Sc. – to strike with the hand, causing a hollow sound =
 
• BOOFHEAD    
n. c1930 Aust. sl. – a fool; a very gullible person
 
• BOOF-HEADED
adj. c1930 Aust. sl. – gullible; foolish; stupid
 
• BOOFUL
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an attractive young woman
 
• BOOG
n. 1. 1968 Amer. dial. – a member or descendant of the community of French Canadians who colonized the Bayou Teche area of Louisiana after 1755; a Cajun
n. 2. 2000 UK sl. – a foolish, unfortunate, or unpleasant person; a misfit
 
• BOOGALEE
n. 1. 1966 Amer. dial. – a person of mixed Black and White ancestry
n. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. – a member or descendant of the community of French Canadians who colonized the Bayou Teche area of Louisiana after 1755; a Cajun
 
• BOOGALOO
n. M20 chiefly US – a dance with swivelling and shuffling movements
 
• BOOGER
n. 1. 1770 US sl. – an unpleasant or despicable person, usually male
n. 2. 1866 Amer. dial. – a ghost, hobgoblin; often used to threaten children
n. 3. 1891 Amer. dial. – nasal mucus; also, occasionally, mucus from the eye
n. 4. 1892 Amer. dial. – a baby, a child, esp. an impish one; a term of endearment to a child
n. 5. 1893 Amer. dial. – a louse
n. 6. 1937 Amer. dial. – an animal
n. 7. 1938 Amer. dial., sometimes derogatory – a fellow, a guy
n. 8. 1956 Amer. dial. – something distasteful, troublesome, or discomforting; something that is very difficult to do
n. 9. 1956 Amer. dial. – a storm with rain and thunder and lightning
n. 10. 1965 Amer. dial. – a very awkward, clumsy person
n. 11. 1967 Amer. dial. – a hot day
n. 12. 1968 Amer. dial. – soft rolls of dust that collect on the floor under beds or other furniture
vb. 1. 1893 Amer. dial. – of an animal, esp. a horse or steer: to shy, to behave skittishly
vb. 2. 1931 Amer. dial. – to cause to shy away; to frighten; to spook
vb. 3. 1950 Amer. dial. – to disfigure, to damage
vb. 4. 20C Aust. sl. – to expel snot from the nose  
 
• BOOGERBEAR
n. 1. 1965  Amer. dial. – a ghost, a hobgoblin, often used to frighten children
n. 2. 1977 Amer. dial. – an ugly woman
 
• BOOGERBOO
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a ghost or imaginary monster, a hobgoblin; the devil
 
• BOOGERED
adj. 1936 Amer. dial. – afraid, frightened, spooked
 
• BOOGERED UP
adj. 1931 Amer. dial. – battered, spoiled, damaged; confused
 
• BOOGERHEAD
n. 20C teen & high school sl. – an affectionate nickname for a friend
 
• BOOGERING
adj. 1931 Amer. dial. – frightening
 
• BOOGERISH
adj. 1. 1887 Amer. dial. – spooky, frightening, unpleasant
adj. 2. 1975 Amer. dial. – skittish, inclined to shy
 
• BOOGERLEE
n. 1. 1966 Amer. dial. – a person of mixed Black and White ancestry
n. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. – a member or descendant of the community of French Canadians who colonized the Bayou Teche area of Louisiana after 1755; a Cajun
 
• BOOGERMAN
n. 1. 1903 Amer. dial. – a ghost, a hobgoblin, often used to frighten children
n. 2. 1913 Amer. dial. – the devil
n. 3. 1967 Amer. dial. – a policeman
 
• BOOGER UP
vb. 1934 Amer. dial. – to damage, to spoil; to confuse, to disorder
 
• BOOGER WAGON
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – the vehicle that takes arrested people to the police station or to jail
 
• BOOGERY
adj. 1. 1900 Amer. dial. – spooky, threatening, unpleasant, objectionable
adj. 2. 1941 Amer. dial. – skittish, inclined to shy
 
• BOOGERY-EYED
adj. 1969 Amer. dial. – having very round eyes
 
• BOOGEY-MAN
n. 1. 1944 Amer. dial. – the devil
n. 2. 1967 Amer. dial. – a policeman
 
• BOOGEY WAGON
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – the vehicle that takes arrested people to the police station or to jail
 
• BOOGIE
n. 1. 1890 Amer. dial. – mucus in the nose
n. 2. 1923 Amer. dial., orig. criminals’ and tramps’ usage, derogatory or offensive – a Black person
n. 3. 1966 Amer. dial. – a louse
n. 4. 1968 Amer. dial. – a ghost, a hobgoblin, often used to frighten children
n. 5. E20 US sl. – a party, esp. a rent party
n. 6. M20 – a dance to pop or rock music
n. 7. M20 – boogie-woogie
vb. 1. 1979 sl. – to make love
vb. 2. 20C Aust. sl. – to expel snot from the nose
vb. 3. M20 – to dance; orig. to boogie-woogie music
 
• BOOGIEBEAR
n. 1965  Amer. dial. – a ghost, a hobgoblin, often used to frighten children
 
• BOOGIEBOO
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a ghost or imaginary monster, a hobgoblin; the devil
 
• BOOGIE MAN
n. Bk1942 Amer. theatrical sl. – a severe critic
 
• BOOGIE-PACK
n. c1981 sl. – a mini cassette-player with lightweight headphones, for listening while one is on the move
 
• BOOGIE-WOOGIE
n. E20 – a percussive style of playing blues, esp. on piano, with a repetitive bass figure
 
• BOOG MAN
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a ghost, a hobgoblin, often used to frighten children
 
• BOO-HAG
n. 1938 Amer. dial. – a witch, the dead spirit of a dead person, sometimes supposed to cause nightmares
 
• BOOHAL
n. M20 NZ colloq. – the remote rural districts
 
• BOO-HOLEY
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – the navel
 
• BOOHOO
vb. 1843 Amer. dial. – to weep or cry loudly, to bawl
 
• BOOJERY
adj. 1793 Aust. – good, excellent
 
• BOOJUM
n. 1. 1904 – an imaginary animal, particularly dangerous kind of ‘snark’
n. 2. 1976 Amer. dial., African-American usage – a White person
 
• BOOJY
adj. 1970 African-American sl. – bourgeois, refers to Blacks whose money and position make them think they’re White
 
• BOOK
n. 1913 Amer. dial. – a magazine or pamphlet
vb. 1. 1841 sl. – to record the name of someone who has committed an offense
vb. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – to record names of a couple for proclamation of banns of marriage
vb. 3. 1930 Amer. dial. – to butt; to push with the head or horns
vb. 4. 1969 Amer. dial. – to leave unfinished; to lay aside for the time being
vb. 5. Bk2007 US sl. – to depart, to leave
vb. 6. 20C teen & high school sl. – to move fast; to run like crazy
 
• THE BOOK
n. 1908 sl., orig. US – the maximum penalty
 
• BOOKED
adj. 1968 Amer. dial. – fatally ill; beyond recovery  
 
• BOOKER
n. a1000 obs. – a writer of books
 
• BOOKFUL
adj. 1709 obs. rare – full of knowledge or information gathered from books
n. 1599 – as much as fills a book; the entire contents of a book
 
• BOOK-HOUSE
n. 1675 obs. – a library
 
• BOOKIE
n. 1885 – a bookmaker
 
• BOOKIE-SUG
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – a sweetheart, a lover
 
• BOOKING
n. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – the act of recording names for proclamation of banns
n. 2. 1974 Amer. dial. – education derived from books or schooling
 
• BOOKISH
adj. 1. M16 – pert. to a book
adj. 2. L16 – addicted to reading books, studious; getting knowledge only from books
 
• BOOK IT
vb. 20C teen & high school sl. – to move fast; to run like crazy
 
• BOOKITY-BOOK
adv. 1935 Amer. dial. – quickly, swiftly
 
• BOOKITY SAM
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a ghost, a hobgoblin, often used to frighten children
 
• BOOK-LARE
n. Bk1911 Sc. – education; knowledge gained from books
 
• BOOK-LARED
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – educated; learned
 
• BOOK-LEAR
n. Bk1911 Sc. – education; knowledge gained from books
 
• BOOK-LEARNED
adj. c1475 – knowing books, but lacking practical experience
 
• BOOKLING
n. 1782 rare – a tiny book
 
• BOOKMAN
n. 1618 – an author or publisher; a literary man
 
• BOOKMOBILE
n. 1924, chiefly US – a mobile library
 
• BOOK OF FATE
n. 1670 – the future as being predetermined
 
• BOOK OF FOUR KINGS
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a deck of cards  
 
• BOOKOOING
n. 1935 Amer. dial. – loud talking, bullying
 
• BOOKS
n. 1896 Amer. dial. – school, the time spent in school
 
• BOOK-SHY
adj. 1902 – reluctant or unwilling to read books
 
• BOOKSY
adj. M20 colloq. – having literary or bookish pretensions
 
• BOOK-WISE
adj. 1593 – knowing books, but lacking practical experience
 
• BOOKWORM
n. Bk1942 Amer. college sl. – a diligent student
 
• BOOKY
adj. 1880 colloq. – given to books; bookish
n. 1885 – a bookmaker
 
• BOOL
n. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – a term of contempt for an old man
n. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – a thickset man or boy
n. 3. Bk1911 Sc. – a boy’s marble; a large round stone
vb. Bk1911 Sc. – to weep in childish fashion; to drawl in singing
 
• BOO-LADY
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a cow
 
• BOOL-BACKIT
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – round-shouldered; humpbacked
 
• BOOL-HORNED
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – perverse, headstrong
 
• BOOLIE
adj. 1. 1769 obs. – beloved, much-loved
adj. 2. 19C Sc. – crooked, bent, deformed; of the legs: bandy
 
• BOOLIE-BACK
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a bent back; a humpback
 
• BOOLS
n. Bk1911 Sc. – the rims of spectacles
 
• BOOLYIE
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a loud, threatening noise, like a bull’s bellow
 
• BOOM
adj. 1. 2000 sl. – excellent, exciting
adj. 2. 2000 sl. – sexually attractive
n. 1. 1980s sl. – a party
n. 2. 20C teen & high school sl. – a car stereo
vb. 1966 Amer. dial. – of plants: to grow vigorously, to thrive
 
• BOOMALALLY
n. 1952 Amer. dial. – orig. a cadet of the South Carolina Military Academy; later, any soldier, esp. one on parade marching to music
 
• BOO-MAN
n. Bk1911 Sc. – the cattleman on a large farm
 
• BOOM AROUND
vb. 1967 Amer. dial. – to move from place to place, to wander
 
• BOOMBLE
vb. 1904 Amer. dial. – to make a booming noise, as stones tumbling down
 
• BOOM BOOM
n. Bk1944 Amer. services’ sl. – any small arm
 
• BOOM DUST
n. World War II Amer. sl. – dynamite
 
• BOOMER
n. 1. 1830 Aust. – a large male kangaroo
n. 2. 1878 Amer. dial. – a red or grey squirrel
n. 3. 1883 US sl. – one who pushes an enterprise, or forces it upon public attention
n. 4. 1885 Aust. sl. – anything excessively large or notable of its kind; a huge lie
n. 5. 1890 – a settler who takes part in a boom or rush to occupy a newly opened region
n. 6. 1925 Amer. dial. – an itinerant worker
n. 7. 1970 Amer. dial. – a cloud that rolls up high before a thunder storm or rainstorm
n. 8. 1990s US – a member of the so-called baby-boom generation born between 1945 and 1960
 
• BOOMERANG
n. 1. M19 – something that recoils on its originator
n. 2. Bk1942 US sl. – a bore who is difficult to get rid of
n. 3. Bk1999 Aust. sl. – a dishonoured cheque
vb. L19 – to recoil on the originator
 
• BOOMERANG CHEQUE
n. 1950s Aust. sl. – a ‘bouncing’ cheque which is not honoured, and is ‘returned to drawer’
 
• BOOMING
adj. 1. M19 Aust. sl. – large, astonishing
adj. 2. L19 sl. – grand
adj. 3. L19 sl. – successful, flourishing
adj. 4. 1990s African-American sl. – good-looking
adj. 5. 1990s US college sl. – excellent, worthy of approval
 
• BOOMLET
n. 1897 – a small boom on the Stock Exchange
 
• BOOM OUT
vb. 2002 Can. sl. – to go to the U.S. to work
 
• BOOMPIE
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – the buttocks
 
• BOOM! POW! BAM!
int. 1990s African-American teen sl. – an exclamation used to place emphasis in one’s conversation
 
• BOOMPS-A-DAISY!
int. 1961 UK sl. – used as a childish catchphrase or light-hearted response to trivialize a minor physical accident
 
• BOOMS
n. 1960 US sl. – drums
 
• BOOM SQUAD
n. 2000 US sl. – the group of prison guards who are used to quell disturbances
 
• BOOMSTER
n. L19 sl., orig. US – a speculator
 
• BOOM STICKS 
n. Bk2006 US musicians’ sl. – drumsticks

• BOOM-TING
n. 1990s Black British sl. – something excellent or impressive
 
• BOOM WAGON
n. 1942 US sl. – in trucking: a truck hauling dynamite
 
• BOOMY
adj. E19 – having a loud, deep, resonant sound


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