Dictionary: BOT – BOU

• BOT
n. 1. 1513 obs. – a person viewed as a parasite or pest
n. 2. 1736 colloq. – a bottle
n. 3. 1916 Aust. & NZ sl. – a habitual borrower or cadger; a scrounger; a person who frequently imposes on others
n. 4. 1922 colloq. – the buttocks, the bottom
n. 5. 1968 NZ colloq. – a minor illness; a cold, etc.
n. 6. 1969 orig. science fiction usage – a robot
vb. 1921 Aust. sl. – to borrow or cadge something, especially cigarettes and liquor
 
• BOTANIST
n. 1978 US sl. – a physician who views his patients as having plant-level intelligence
 
• BOTANY BAY
vb. 1945 Aust. rhyming sl. – to run away
 
• BOTANY BAY COAT OF ARMS 
n. Bk1945 Aust. – a black eye
 
• BOTANY BAY DOZEN 
n. Bk1945 Aust. – a flogging of twenty-five lashes
 
• BOTANY BAY SWELLS 
n. 1836 Aust. – freed convicts
 
• BOTE 
n. a1300 obs. – help, remedy, salvation
 
• BOTE OF BEAM
n. 1330 obs. – remedy, improvement, restoration
 
• BOTFLY 
n. Bk1999 Aust. sl. – a scrounger
 
• BOTHER!
int. 1840 UK sl. – used for registering annoyance
 
• BOTHERATE
vb. 1905 Amer. dial. – to bother, to trouble
 
• BOTHERATION
int. 1797 colloq. – exclamation of annoyance or vexation
n. 1. 1797 UK sl. – annoyance, nuisance
n. 2. 1801 colloq. – the act of bothering; petty vexation or annoyance
n. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewilderment; perplexity
 
• BOTHERED UP
adj. 1951 Amer. dial. – apprehensive; agitated; confused; mixed up
 
• BOTHER-HEADED
adj. 1872 – stupid, thick-headed, muddled
 
• BOTHERMENT
n. 1843 Sc. & Amer. dial. – something troublesome; perplexity; bewilderment 
 
• BOTHER IT!
int. 1840 UK sl. – used for registering annoyance
 
• BOTHER ONE’S HEAD
vb. Bk1997 Irish sl. – to worry oneself with
 
• BOTHER ONE’S TIME
vb. 1933 Amer. dial. – to matter, to be of importance
 
• BOTHER YOUR ARSE
vb. 1985 Sc. & Irish sl. – to make an effort; to take the trouble to do something
 
• BOTHER YOUR BUNNIT
vb. 1985 Sc. sl. – to make an effort
 
• BOTHER YOUR PUFF
vb. 1985 Sc. sl. – to make an effort
 
• BOTHER YOUR SHIRT
vb. 1985 Sc. sl. – to make an effort
 
• BOTH HANDS
n. 1930s Amer. sl. – a ten-year prison sentence
 
• BOTHIE
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a cottage in common for farm servants
 
• BOTHIER
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a farm servant living in a ‘bothie’ (cottage)
 
• BO-THING
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a phantom, a fearful appearance
 
• BOTH SHEETS IN THE WIND 
adj. Bk2006 US sl. – alcohol intoxicated
 
• BOTH-SIDES
adj. 17C obs. – deceitful, two-faced, double-dealing
 
• BOTH THE TWO
pron. 1966 Amer. dial. – the one and the other, both
 
• BOTH TWO
pron. 1870 Amer. dial. – the one and the other, both
 
• BOTH WAYS
n. 1. 1869 UK sl. – a wager that a selected horse, dog, etc., will finish a race in the first three
n. 2. 1950 US sl. – a bet in craps both that the shooter will win and that the shooter will lose
 
• BOTH WAYS FROM THE ACE
adv. 1916 Amer. sl. – from both sides; thoroughly
 
• BOTHY
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a cottage in common for farm servants
 
• BOTRAY
n. 1998 UK sl. – crack cocaine
 
• BOTS
n. 1898 Amer. dial. – a vague feeling of unwellness; the blues
 
• BOTSEL
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – the rump of a cooked chicken
 
• BOTT
n. 1922 colloq. – the buttocks, the bottom
 
• BOTTIE
n. 1874 UK sl. – the human bottom
 
• BOTTLE
n. 1. 1893 Brit. sl. – money
n. 2. 1938 Brit. naval sl. – a reprimand or instance of reprimanding
n. 3. 1958 Brit. sl. – courage
n. 4. 1991 UK sl. – in betting, odds of 2-1
n. 5. 1992 US sl. – a dose of crack cocaine, whether or not it is actually in a small bottle
n. 6. Bk2006 US sl. – a drunkard  
vb. 1. 1946 Brit. naval sl. – to reprimand
vb. 2. c1950 Amer. dial. – to walk in a hurry
vb. 3. 1961 UK sl. – of a man: to have sex with a woman; to impregnate a woman
vb. 4. 1961 UK – to have anal sex, esp. with a woman
vb. 5. 1979 UK sl. – to smell badly; to stink
vb. 6. 1984 UK sl. – to attack someone with a bottle, esp. in the face
vb. 7. 1996 UK sl. – in prison, to conceal articles such as drugs or money in the rectum
vb. 8. 1999 UK sl. – to lose your nerve, to back down
vb. 9.  Bk2006 US sl. – to drink liquor to excess
 
• BOTTLEACHE 
n. Bk2006 US sl. – a hangover
 
• BOTTLE AND A HALF
n. 1991 UK sl. – in betting, odds of 5-2
 
• BOTTLE AND GLASS
n. 1. 1930 UK rhyming sl. for ‘arse’ – the backside; the anus
n. 2. 1959 UK rhyming sl. for ‘class’ – quality, elegant behaviour
 
• BOTTLE AND STOPPER
n. 1928 US rhyming sl. for ‘copper’ – a police officer
 
• BOTTLE BABY
n. 1. 1925 US sl. – an alcoholic
n. 2. World War II Amer. sl. – a woman with dyed blonde hair
 
• BOTTLE BLONDE
n. 1972 US sl. – a person whose blonde hair is the result of bleach, not nature
 
• BOTTLE-CAP COLONEL
n. 1986 US Vietnam War usage – a lieutenant-colonel in the US Army  
 
• BOTTLE-CRONY
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a boon-companion
 
• BOTTLED
adj. 1927 sl. – drunk
 
• BOTTLE DEALER
n. 1971 US sl. – a drug dealer who sells pills in large quantities
 
• BOTTLED EARTHQUAKE
n. a1891 Amer. sl. – intoxicating liquor
 
• BOTTLED IN A PEPPER-PATCH
adj. 1954 Amer. dial. – of whisky: very strong
 
• BOTTLED-IN-THE-BARN
n. 1940 Amer. dial. – moonshine; home-made, bootleg whisky
 
• BOTTLED SUNSHINE
n. World War II Amer. sl. – beer
 
• BOTTLED UP
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – drunk
 
• BOTTLE IT
vb. 1999 UK sl. – to lose your nerve, to back down
 
• BOTTLE LEGS
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – crooked legs
 
• BOTTLE MAN
n. 1944 US sl. – a drunkard
 
• BOTTLE MERCHANT
n. 2000 UK sl. – a coward, someone who loses nerve
 
• BOTTLE-NECK
n. 1. 1928 – any narrow opening or avenue
n. 2. 2004 S. Africa – a marijuana pipe made from the neck of a beer or soft drink bottle
 
• BOTTLENECKING 
n. Bk1947 Amer. sl. – necking
 
• BOTTLE-O;  BOTTLE-OH
n. 1898 Aust. & NZ sl. – a collector of empty bottles
 
• BOTTLE OF BEER
n. 1961 UK rhyming sl. – the ear
 
• BOTTLE OF FIZZ
vb. 1938 UK rhyming sl. for ‘The Whizz’ (pickpocketing) – to work as a pickpocket; to steal something quickly as an opportunity arises
 
• BOTTLE OF SCENT
n. 2003 UK rhyming sl. for ‘bent’ – a male homosexual
 
• BOTTLE OF WATER
n. 1961 UK rhyming sl. – a daughter
 
• BOTTLE OUT
vb. 1979 Brit. sl. – to lose one’s nerve, to avoid doing something out of fear
 
• BOTTLE POCKET
n. 1980 Amer. dial. – the left side trousers pocket
 
• BOTTLER
adj. 1938 Aust. & NZ sl. – extremely good; excellent, great, fantastic  
n. 1. a1425 obs. – a bottle maker
n. 2. 1855 Aust. sl. – a thing or event of outstanding merit; someone or something that is excellent
n. 3. 1898 sl. – a person who solicits and collects money from spectators or passers-by on behalf of a street performer or showman
n. 4. 1961 UK sl. – a man who takes the active role in anal sex
n. 5. 1994 UK sl. – a person who loses his or her nerve; a person lacking courage or spirit; a cowardly or timid person
n. 6. 1996 Irish sl. – an itinerant musician’s travelling companion
 
• BOTTLE-SCREW
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a corkscrew
 
• BOTTLE TO THE FIELD
n. 1967 sl. – in racing, bookmaker’s odds of 2-1
 
• BOTTLETOP
n. 1974 UK rhyming sl.on ‘cop’ to obtain – something gained; a thing of some value
vb. 1974 UK rhyming sl. on ‘cop’ – to catch, gain, or understand something (usually 2 words ‘bottle top’
 
• BOTTLE UP
vb. 1. 1853 UK sl. – to repress or contain your feelings
vb. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to ruin; to destroy
 
• BOTTLE UP AND GO
vb. 1947 US – to leave
 
• BOTTLEWASH
n. 1944 Amer. dial. – nonsense, ‘hogwash’
 
• BOTTLEY
adj. 2000 UK sl. – nervous
 
• BOTTLING
adj. 1919 Aust. & NZ sl. – excellent, superlatively good
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a festivity; a gathering of friends invited to a wedding
 
• BOTTOM
n. 1. 1699 colloq. – the buttocks
n. 2. 1843 Amer. dial. – stamina, endurance, staying power; used esp. of horses and dogs
n. 3. 1961 US sl. – the submissive partner in a homosexual or sado-masochistic relationship
n. 4. 1991 US sl. – a nickname for Miami, Florida
 
• BOTTOM BITCH
n. 1967 US sl. – the pimp’s favourite of the prostitutes working for him; the leader of the prostitutes
 
• BOTTOM BURP
n. 1984 UK sl. – a fart
 
• BOTTOM CAT
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – the muskrat
 
• BOTTOM CHAIRS
vb. 1926 Amer. dial. – to be lazy
 
• BOTTOM FEEDER
n. 1. 1980 US sl. – a despised person of low-status, who grasps any opportunity or means of survival
n. 2. 1996 US sl. – in poker, a low-betting player who tries to eke out meagre winnings against unskilled players
 
• THE BOTTOM FELL OUT
phr. 1966 Amer. dial. – describing a very heavy rain
 
• BOTTOM FISHER
n. 1988 US sl. – a stock investor looking for stocks with a poor recent showing
 
• BOTTOM GIRL
n. 1973 US sl. – the pimp’s favourite of the prostitutes working for him; the leader of the prostitutes
 
• BOTTOM-GRAPES
n. 1990s sl. – haemorrhoids, piles
 
• BOTTOMLESS PIT 
n. 1. Bk1995 US sl. – a person with an insatiable appetite; a very hungry person
n. 2. Bk2006 US sl. – an endless source of something, usually something troublesome
 
• BOTTOM MAN
n. 1972 US sl. – the passive partner in a homosexual relationship
 
• THE BOTTOM OF HIS SHOES WAS COMING UP
phr. 1965 Amer. dial. – he was vomiting profusely
 
• BOTTOM-ROOM
n. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – a seat for one in a church pew
n. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – as much room as a person requires in sitting
 
• BOTTOMS
n. 1. 1955 US sl. – the worst
n. 2. 1962 US sl. – dice that have been marked to have two identical faces
 
• BOTTOMSIDE UP
adj. 1966 Amer. dial. – upside down, topsy-turvy
 
• BOTTOMSIDE UPWARDS
adj. 1858 Amer. dial. – upside down, topsy-turvy
 
• BOTTOM’S UP
int. 1917 UK sl. – used as a toast
n. 1960 US sl. – a common position for anal and/or vaginal sex, in which the passive partner lies on their stomach
 
• BOTTOM UPWARDS
adj. 1954 Amer. dial. – upside down, topsy-turvy
 
• BOTTOM WEIGHT
n. 1962 UK sl. – a minimum amount
 
• BOTTOM WOMAN
n. 1969 US sl. – the pimp’s favourite of the prostitutes working for him; the leader of the prostitutes
 
• BOTTREL
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – thickset, dwarfish
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a thickset, dwarfish person
 
• BOTTY
adj. Bk1913 sl. – conceited, swaggering
n. 1874 UK sl. – the human bottom

• BOTTY-BANDIT
n. Bk2007 UK sl. – a male homosexual

• BOTTY BANGER
n. 1984 UK sl. – a fart

• BOTTY-BASHER
n. Bk2007 UK sl. – a male homosexual
 
• BOTTY BURP
n. 1984 UK sl. – a fart
 
• BOUBIE
n. Bk1911 Sc. – the lowest in a class at school
 
• BOUBOU
n. 1998 UK sl. – crack cocaine
 
• BOUCH
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a coward; a sneak
 
• BOUCHAL
n. 1913 Irish sl. – a boy
 
• BOUDEN
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – swollen, inflated
 
• BOUDOIR
n. 1945 US sl. – an army tent
 
• BOUFF
n. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – a dog
n. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – a loud bark
n. 3. Bk1911 Sc. – a noisy cough
n. 4. Bk1911 Sc. – a stupid, blundering fellow
vb. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – to bark like a large dog
vb. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – to cough noisily
vb. 3. Bk1911 Sc. – to strike, to buffet
 
• BOUFFIE
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a dog’s short bark
 
• BOUFFIN
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – given to barking
n. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – a big, stout person; used rather contemptuously
n. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – continued coughing
 
• BOUG
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a child’s name for the stomach or belly
 
• BOUGER
n. Bk1911 Sc. – the puffin
 
• BOUGHAL
n. 1913 Irish sl. – a boy

• BOUGHETTO
adj. 2000 US students’ sl. – materialistic, fashion-obsessed
 
• BOUGHT
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a curve
 
• BOUGHTEN
adj. 1. 1801 Amer. dial. – purchased, as opposed to homemade
adj. 2. 1966 Amer. dial. – of teeth: artificial, false
 
• BOUGHT GUTS
n. World War II Amer. sl. – false courage inspired by drugs or drink
 
• BOUGHTIE
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a twig
 
• BOUGHT-MADE
adj. 1967 Amer. dial. – purchased, as opposed to homemade
 
• BOUGHT TEETH
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – false teeth
 
• BOUK
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a retching, a vomiting
vb. Bk1911 Sc. – to retch, to vomit
 
• BOUKIE
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – bulky
 
• BOUKIT
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – large, bulky; swollen; corpulent; pregnant
 
• BOUKSOME
adj. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – bulky, of large size
adj. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – pregnant
 
• BOUKY
adj. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – bulky; obese
adj. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – numerous; well-attended
 
• BOUL
n. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – a term of contempt for a person
n. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – anything curved
 
• BOULDEN
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – swelled, inflated
vb. 1953 Amer. dial. – to swell  
 
• BOULDER
n. 1. 1905 Amer. dial. – a large marble
n. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – a strong blast of wind
n. 3. 1998 US sl. – crack cocaine; a piece of crack cocaine
 
• BOULDER BABY
n. 2002 US sl. – a crack cocaine addict
 
• BOULDER-HOLDER
n. 1970 UK sl. – a brassiere
 
• BOULE
n. Bk1911 Sc. – an opening in the clouds betokening fine weather
 
• BOULEVARD
n. 1. 1965 US sl. – a long straight hallway
n. 2. 1986 US sl. – in trucking, a major motorway
 
• BOULEVARD BOY
n. 1987 US sl. – a young male prostitute in an urban setting
 
• BOULEVARD COWBOY 
n. Bk1942 US sl. – a reckless driver
 
• BOULEVARDIER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a man who picks up women on the streets
 
• BOULEVERSE
vb. 1673 obs. rare – to upset, to overturn, to throw into utter disorder
 
• BOUL-HORNED
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – headstrong
 
• BOULTER 
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – anything large of its kind  
 
• BOULYA
n. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – crack cocaine
 
• BOUN
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – ready, prepared
vb. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – to betake one’s self to a place; to go
vb. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – to dress
vb. 3. Bk1911 Sc. – to make ready, to prepare
 
• BOUNCE
n. 1. 1714 – a loud or audacious boast; a boastful falsehood; impudent self-assertion, swagger
n. 2. 1819 colloq. – a boastful, swaggering fellow
n. 3. 1909 – energy, vitality; spirit, exuberance, verve
n. 4. 1937 – a buoyant rhythm
n. 5. 1957 US sl. – a jail or prison sentence  
n. 6. 1984 US sl. – a brainstorming session
n. 7. 1997 US sl. – in horse racing, a poorly run race followed by a well-run race  
vb. 1. c1225 obs. – to beat, to thump, to trounce, to knock
vb. 2. 1570 obs. – to knock loudly, esp. at a door
vb. 3. c1626 obs. – to talk big, to bluster, to hector; to swagger
vb. 4. 1640 – to talk big at; to bully; to blow up, to scold roundly
vb. 5. 1786 obs. – to slam, to bang a door  
vb. 6. 1884 Amer. dial. – to jilt; to dismiss someone
vb. 7. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally
vb. 8. Bk1934 college sl. – to fail
vb. 9. 1941 Amer. dial. – to change the direction of movement of an animal, as cattle
vb. 10. 1970 US sl. – to pay; to provide without charge
vb. 11. 1996 US sl. – to leave

• THE BOUNCE
n. 1. Bk2007 sl. – the sack from one’s job; rejection by a sweetheart
n. 2. Bk2007 sl. – one’s fate, an inevitable result
 
• BOUNCEABLE 
adj. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – bumptious, cheeky, prone to boasting
 
• BOUNCE-BACK
n. 1959 – resilience
vb. 1950 UK sl. – (‘bounce back’) to recover or return from a setback
 
• BOUNCED
adj. 1519 obs. – beaten, knocked about

• BOUNCED OUT
adj. Bk2007 sl. – fired from one’s job, ejected, expelled, or rejected
 
• BOUNCEFUL 
adj. Bk1893 Eng. dial. – arrogant, domineering, masterful
 
• BOUNCER
n. 1. 1803 – a brazen or startling lie
n. 2. 1834 – a boaster, a braggart, a swaggering liar
n. 3. 1842 – a big or large specimen of its kind
n. 4. 1862 thieves’ sl. – one who cheats by laying wagers
n. 5. 1883 US sl. – a person, usually a strong man, employed to maintain and restore order in a bar, restaurant, club or performance
n. 6. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a professional beggar  
n. 7. 1899 Amer. dial. – a large, strong, vigorous person
n. 8. Bk1911 Sc. – a lively person
n. 9. 1930 Amer. dial. – a big, fleshy girl or woman
n. 10. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a bartender
n. 11. 1945 Amer. dial. – on the railroad: a caboose
n. 12. 1972 UK sl. – the female breast
 
• BOUNCE SHOT
n. 1950 US sl. – in a dice game, a type of controlled shot by a skilled cheat
 
• BOUNCING
adj. 1. 1899 Amer. dial. – exaggerated; excessive, big
adj. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – lively; vigorous
n. 1634 – a bragging, boasting, or blustering; boastful exaggeration, lying; a good scolding
 
• BOUNCING BUFFER 
n. Bk1898 – a beggar
 
• BOUNCING CHEAT 
n. Bk1890 thieves’ sl. – a bottle
 
• BOUNCING CHIT
n. Bk1890 sl. – a bottle
 
• BOUNCINGLY 
adv. a1677 – boastfully, blusteringly
 
• BOUNCING MAD 
adj. 1834 – furiously angry
 
• BOUNCING POWDER
n. 1971 US sl. – cocaine
 
• BOUNCY
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – lively; vigorous
 
• BOUNCY-BOUNCY
n. 1960 US sl. – sexual intercourse
 
• BOUND
adj. 1. c1175 obs. – of persons and things: ready, prepared; of persons: dressed, attired
adj. 2. c1275 obs. – a landmark indicating the limit of an estate or territory
adj. 3. a1400 obs. – of a woman: pregnant
adj. 4. 1530 – confined in the bowels, constipated
adj. 5. 1759 obs. – of a cough: tight, dry
adj. 6. 1800 Amer. dial. – of a boy or girl: indentured, apprenticed
adj. 7. 1930 Amer. dial. – impotent, lacking in manhood
adj. 8. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – determined
n. 1941 Amer. dial. – an obligation, duty
vb. 1. 1393 obs. – to set bounds to, to limit; to confine within bounds
vb. 2. 1568 – to abound, to be plentiful; to exist or be present in large numbers
vb. 3. 1597 obs. – to recoil, to rebound
vb. 4. 1609 obs. – to enclose, to confine, to contain
 
• BOUNDAGE
n. 1610 obs. – a marking out the bounds or limits
 
• BOUNDAL
n. a1670 obs. – bounds, limits
 
• BOUND AND SOT
phr. 1889 Amer. dial. – of the spirit of a dead person: prevented by a spell from wandering away from the burial place
 
• BOUNDANT
adj. 1. 1649 obs. – obligatory
adj. 2. 1654 obs. – obliged
 
• BOUNDARY
n. 1939 Amer. dial. – a collection, a group, as of people
 
• BOUNDARY-RIDER 
n. 1865 Aust. – one who rides around the fences of a station, and repairs them when broken
 
• BOUNDE
n. c1320 obs. – a husbandman, a peasant, a serf
 
• BOUNDEN
adj. 1. c1325 obs. – made fast by tie, band, or bar; tired, fastened, clamped
adj. 2. a1400 arch. – under obligation, legal or moral; obliged, compelled, enforced
adj. 3. c1426 obs. – tied with the bonds of matrimony
adj. 4. c1540 obs. – pregnant
 
• BOUNDEN OUT
adj. 1931 Amer. dial. – apprenticed; made the ward of someone
 
• BOUNDER
n. 1. 1505 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a boundary, limit, landmark  
n. 2. 1542 obs. – one who occupies a district bounding another; a borderer
n. 3. a1889 – a vulgar and unwelcome pretender to polite society; a base or vile person; a nuisance; one of objectionable manners or anti-social behaviour; a cad
n. 4. Bk1898 Eng. & Amer. dial. – a heavy blow
vb. 1. 1636 obs. – to limit, bound
vb. 2. 1895 Amer. dial. – to scrub or wash the body thoroughly
vb. 3. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to bounce, to make rebound
vb. 4. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to limit, set boundaries to
 
• BOUND FOR GLORY
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – dead
 
• BOUNDIFY
vb. 1606 obs. rare – to set bounds to; to confine
 
• BOUNDING
adj. 1887 – increasing by leaps and bounds, or rapidly
 
• BOUND OUT
adj. 1929 Amer. dial. – apprenticed; made the ward of someone
vb. Bk1911 Sc. – to swell out; to enlarge
 
• BOUND ROUND
n. 1955 Amer. dial. – a swaddling cloth
 
• BOUNDURE
n. 1634 obs. – a bounding or limiting; limitation; limit or bound
 
• BOUNG-NAPPER
n. L17 sl. – a cut-purse, a pickpocket
 
• BOUNG-NIPPER
n. L17 criminal sl. – a cut-purse
 
• BOUNGY
n. 1982 Bahamas – the anus
 
• BOUNKY
n. 1982 Amer. dial. – the buttocks
 
• BOUNTITH
n. Bk1911 Sc. – something given in reward for service, over and above wages; a bonus
 
• BOUNTY
n. 1996 UK sl. – a Black person who sides with the White authorities
 
• BOUQUET OF ASSHOLES 
n. Bk2006 US sl., derogatory – an annoying or disgusting person or thing
 
• BOUQUET STRAIGHT
n. 1996 US sl. – in poker, a sequenced hand comprised of all red or all black suits, but not a flush
 
• BOUQUINIST
n. 1840 – a dealer in secondhand books of little value
 
• BOURBON
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate
 
• BOURBON BIBBER
n. 1954 US sl. – an oil worker from Kentucky
 
• BOURBON POULTICE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a drink of whisky
 
• BOURD
n. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – a jest, a joke
n. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – a scoff
n. 3. Bk1911 Sc. – an encounter, a fight
vb. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – to dally
vb. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – to jest
 
• BOURDFUL
adj. 1388 obs. – full of jesting or sport; jocular, jocose, sportive
 
• BOURIE
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a rabbit’s burrow; a fox’s den
 
• BOURKE SHOWER
n. 1945 Aust. sl. – a dust storm
 
• BOURN
n. 1523 obs. – a boundary or limit
vb. 1807 rare – to bound, to check; to set a limit or bounds to
 
• BOURNE
n. 1523 obs. – a boundary or limit
 
• BOURNVILLE BOULEVARD
n. 1997 UK sl. – the anus, the rectum
 
• BOUROCH
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a house, a home
 
• BOURRIAU;  BOURRIER
n. Bk1911 Sc. – an executioner
 
• BOURT 
vb. Bk1886 obs. – to pretend, to make believe
 
• BOUSE
n. 1567 colloq. – drink, liquor
 
• BOUSER
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a sot; a drunkard
 
• BOUSHTY
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a bed
 
• BOUSING KEN
n. 1596 thieves’ sl. obs. – a low alehouse
 
• BOUSTEOUS
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – boisterous; fierce
 
• BOUSTEROUS
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – boisterous
 
• BOUSUM
adj. Bk1911 Sc. – merry
 
• BOUSY
adj. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – covered with bushes
adj. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – hairy
adj. 3. Bk1911 Sc. – large, bulky, plump
adj. 4. Bk1911 Sc. – tipsy; fond of liquor
n. 1. L19 Irish sl. – a general term of abuse
n. 2. 20C Irish sl. – a street urchin; a lout
 
• BOUT
n. Bk1911 Sc. – the act of coming upon by surprise
prep. Bk1911 Sc. – without
vb. Bk1911 Sc. – to bolt, to spring, to leap; to rise quickly from beneath a surface
 
• BOUTCH
vb. Bk1911 Sc. – to botch, to bungle
 
• BOUTEFEU
n. Bk1911 Sc. – an incendiary; one who ‘adds fuel to fire’
 
• BOUT-GATE
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a roundabout way; an underhand means; a deceitful course
 
• BOUTGER
n. Bk1911 Sc. – a glutton
 
• BOUTROS BOUTROS GHALI
n. 2003 UK rhyming sl. for ‘Charlie’ (cocaine) – cocaine
 
• BOUVRAGE
n. Bk1911 Sc. – drink, beverage
 
• BOUZY
adj. 1. Bk1911 Sc. – big, swelling, distended; fat, overgrown
adj. 2. Bk1911 Sc. – bushy, wooded; bushy in appearance
adj. 3. Bk1911 Sc. – of a jolly and good-humoured appearance
 
• BOUZZIE
n. 1. L19 Irish sl. – a general term of abuse
n. 2. 20C Irish sl. – a street urchin; a lout


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