Dictionary: CL – CLIZ

• CLABBER
adj. 1940 Amer. dial. – cloudy, threatening to storm
n. 17C sl. – sour buttermilk
vb. 1933 Amer. dial. – to become cloudy

• CLABBER CHEESE; CLABBERED CHEESE
n. 1904 Amer. dial. – cottage cheese

• CLABBERHEAD
n. 1940 Amer. dial. – a foolish or foul-talking person

• CLABBER-MOUTHED
adj. 1940 Amer. dial. – silent

• CLABBERY
adj. 1969 Amer. dial. – cloudy, threatening to storm

• CLABBY
adj. 1966 Amer. dial. – said of milk just beginning to turn sour
 
• CLACK
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – idle talk
 
• CLACK-BOX
n. 1. 19C Eng. dial. – a garrulous person; a chatterbox
n. 2. 19C Eng. dial. – the mouth
 
• CLACKERS
n. 1950 US sl. – the teeth, esp. false teeth

• CLACKY
n. 1. 1970 Amer. dial. – a doctor who doesn’t have a very good reputation; one who is not very capable
n. 2. 1970 Amer. dial. – hard gravy
 
• CLAFF
n. 19C Brit. sl. – the female genitals
 
• CLAIRE RAYNERS
n. 1997 Brit. rhyming sl. – trainers
 
• CLAM
n. 1. 1825 US sl. – the mouth
n. 2. 1886 US sl. – a dollar
n. 3. L19 US sl. – an oaf, a blockhead; someone with a totally closed mind
n. 4. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a sneaking fellow
n. 5. 1973 Amer. dial. – a marble

• CLAM CATCHER
n. 1845 Amer. dial. – an inhabitant of New Jersey

• CLAM DIGGERS
n. 1969 Amer. dial. jocular usage – the hands

• CLAM IT!
int. 1969 Amer. dial. – be quiet!
 
• CLAMJAMPLIVE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – nonsense

• CLAMMISH
adj. 1969 Amer. dial. – silent, close-mouthed

• CLAM MOUTH
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a person who doesn’t talk very much; one who keeps his thoughts to himself
 
• CLAMMUX
n. 19C Eng. dial. – a worthless slattern

• CLAMMY
adj. 1967 Amer. dial. – silent, close-mouthed
 
• CLAMOSE
adj. c1380 obs. – noisy, clamorous

• CLAMP
vb. 1. 1965 Amer. dial. – to castrate a young animal by means of a clamp or rubber band
vb. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. – to walk heavily, making a lot of noise

• CLAMPERS
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – the teeth
 
• CLAM SHELL
n. 1825 US sl. – the mouth
 
• CLAN
n. 1978 jocular usage – relations
 
• CLANCULARIOUS
adj. 1656 obs. – private, secret; unknown; clandestine, underhand
 
• CLANG-BANGER
n. 1870 Eng. dial. – a talebearer, a gossiping mischief-maker
 
• CLANGERS
n. 20C Brit. sl. – the testicles
 
• CLANGLUMSHOUS
adj. 1841 Sc. – sulky
 
• CLANKER
n. 1927 US sl. – a silver dollar
 
• CLANKS
n. E20 US sl. – delirium tremens
 
• CLAP
n. 1. 1587 sl. – gonorrhoea
n. 2. 1966 Amer. dial. – the mouth
vb. M17 sl. – to infect with gonorrhea
 
• CLAP A GUY ON
vb. 1814 nautical sl. obs. – to put a stop to; to cease
 
• CLAP EYES ON
vb. 1838 – to see, esp. unexpectedly or finally
 
• CLAP HANDS!
int. c1940 – a silly witticism often addressed to anyone carrying a load needing both hands, effort, and concentration

• CLAPHAT
adj. 1909 Amer. dial. – hasty, hurried, reckless

• CLAPJACK
n. 1940 Amer. dial. – a pancake
 
• CLAP OF THUNDER
n. 1. Bk1890 sl. – a glass of brandy
n. 2. E19 Brit. sl. – a glass of gin
 
• CLAPPED
adj. 20C – infected with gonorrhea
 
• CLAPPERCLAW
vb. 1. 1590 arch. exc. Eng. dial. – to claw, scratch, slap, fight with the open hand and nails; to beat with the open hand, to thrash (generally used of women)
vb. 2. 1692 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to abuse with the tongue, to scold vehemently

• CLAPPERCLAWING
n. 1834 Amer. dial. – a fight, a beating; a tirade
 
• CLAPPERDUDGEON
n. 1567 arch. – a beggar born; also used as a term of reproach or insult  

• CLAPPERED MILK
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – sour milk that has thickened or curdled
 
• CLAPPERS
n. E20 Brit. sl. – the testicles
 
• CLAPPER-TONGUE
n. 1822 Sc. – a loud, noisy tongue; incessant talk; a female who is loud in speech or much given to gossip
 
• CLAPPER-TONGUED
adj. 1845 Sc. – having a tongue that is constantly wagging
 
• CLAPSTER
n. 19C Brit. sl. – a male who is infected with gonorrhea
 
• CLAPT
adj. 20C sl. – infected with gonorrhea
 
• CLAPTRAP
n. 1. 19C colloq. – nonsense; something introduced solely to get applause
n. 2. 19C sl. – a sexually loose woman presumed to be infected with gonorrhea
n. 3. 1966 Amer. dial. – the mouth
 
• CLAP-TRAPPERY
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – nonsense
 
• CLAP UNDER HATCHES
vb. 1945 Amer. dial. – to incarcerate
 
• CLAP YOUR HANDS!
int. c1940 – a silly witticism often addressed to anyone carrying a load needing both hands, effort, and concentration
 
• CLARABELLE
n. M20 US drug culture sl. – tetrahydrocannabinol (T.H.C.), i.e. synthetic marijuana
 
• CLARET
n. E17 sl. – blood
 
• CLARISONOUS
adj. 1731 rare – having a clear sound; sounding loud or shrill
 
• CLARK GABLE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a nickname for a handsome man
 
• CLARK RUSSELL JAWING-MATCH
n. Bk1896 sl. – wordy warfare

• CLARRY; CLARY
n. 1936 Amer. dial. – dressings for bread, as butter, jam, honey, jelly, etc.
 
• CLART
n. 1. E19 Eng. dial. – a slovenly person; a slatternly woman
n. 2. E19 Eng. dial. – mud or filth
n. 3. E19 Eng. dial. – nonsense; flattery or cheap talk
n. 4. 20C Amer. dial. – faeces
vb. 1. 13C – to make dirty or to smear with any sticky substance
vb. 2. 1944 Amer. dial. rare – to defecate
 
• CLARTY-FARTY
adj. 19C Eng. dial. – moving briskly about; frisking; unsettled
 
• CLARTY-PAPS
n. 19C Eng. dial. – a filthy, slatternly woman or wife

• CLASH
n. 1899 Amer. dial. – idle talk
 
• CLASS
adj. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – stylish, dandified
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate
 
• CLASSY
adj. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – stylish, fine, neat, trim
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate
 
• CLASSY ARTICLE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an attractive young woman
 
• CLASSY CHASSIS
n. 1930s sl. – an attractive figure; thus, an attractive woman
 
• CLASSY LAYOUT
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something beautiful or attractive
 
• CLASSY SETUP
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something beautiful or attractive
 
• CLATCHY
adj. 1911 Amer. dial. – cluttered; disorderly; in confusion
 
• CLATTER
n. 1. 1859 Amer. dial. obs. – a blow
n. 2. 1899 Amer. dial. – idle gossip; fast and idle talk
n. 3. Bk1914 criminals’ sl. – a patrol wagon
n. 4. 1967 Amer. dial. – a crowd, a group of people
 
• CLATTER-BOX
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – one who talks too much

• CLATTER-BRAIN
n. 1939 Amer. dial. – a gossip; a noisy, do-nothing person

• CLATTERER
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a particular or fussy woman

• CLATTERERS
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – false teeth
 
• CLATTERFART
n. 1552 obs. – a chatterer, a babbler, a blabber, a tale-teller

• CLATTERMENTS
n. 1895 Amer. dial. – belongings; things you won’t throw away

• CLATTERS
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – false teeth

• CLATTER UP
vb. 1970 Amer. dial. – to make a place untidy or disorderly

• CLATTERWACKING; CLATTERWHACKING
n. 1851 Amer. dial. – a clatter, a racket; noisy talking
 
• CLATTY
adj. 1. 1889 Amer. dial. – cluttered, messed up; disorderly; confused
adj. 2. 1911 Amer. dial. – damp, moist
 
• CLAUDICANT
adj. 1624 obs. – lame, limping, halting
 
• CLAUDICATE
vb. 1623 obs. rare – to limp, to be lame, to halt
 
• CLAVA
n. 17C sl. – sour buttermilk
 
• CLAVICULARIOUS
adj. 1656 obs. – pertaining to a key
 
• CLAW
n. Bk1914 criminals’ sl. – in a gang of pickpockets, the expert operator who lifts the money and valuable collateral from the victim’s person
vb. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to start, to hurry  
vb. 2. Bk1914 criminals’ sl. – to snatch; to appropriate
vb. 3. 1970 Amer. dial. – to say uncomplimentary things about a person
 
• CLAWBACK
adj. 1577 obs. – flattering, sycophantic
n. 1549 obs. exc. dial. – a flatterer, sycophant, toady, parasite, wheedler; one who strokes the back
vb. 16C – to flatter, to curry favour with (NED notes that the verb form is from a misquotation)
 
• CLAWED-OFF
adj. L17 cant – infected with venereal disease
 
• CLAW-HAMMER
n. Bk1891 sl. – a dress coat
 
• CLAW ME AND I WILL CLAW THEE
phr. 1531 – scratch my back, and I will scratch yours; support me, and I will support you; stand by me, and I will stand by you

• CLAW-OFF
n. 1929 Amer. dial. – an excuse
vb. 1892 Amer. dial. – (as ‘claw off’) to make excuses; to get out of an embarrassing or threatening situation
 
• CLAW ONE’S TOES
vb. c1460 obs. – to gratify or indulge oneself
 
• CLAW ON THE GALL
vb. c1386 obs. – to touch a person on a sore or tender point  

• CLAW OUT
vb. 1892 Amer. dial. – to make excuses; to get out of an embarrassing or threatening situation
 
• CLAW SOMEONE’S KAIM
vb. 1844 Sc. – to administer a drubbing, to haul over the coals
 
• CLAY
n. M20 US drug culture sl. – T.H.C., the active ingredient in marijuana

• CLAYBANK
adj. 1853 Amer. dial. – of a horse: yellowish-brown or cream-coloured
 
• CLAY-BRAINED
adj. 1596 – dull, doltish; stupid; with brains made of clay

• CLAY-EATER
n. 1. 1841 Amer. dial., usually derogatory – a poor or low-class person
n. 2. 1891 Amer. dial. – a resident of North Carolina, South Carolina, or Georgia
 
• CLEAN
adj. 1. 1926 sl. – honest; often applied to someone not carrying incriminating material, such as drugs or weapons
adj. 2. 1953 sl. – applied to a person free from or cured of addiction to drugs
adj. 3. 1967 African-American – dressed up, well-dressed
vb. 1812 sl. – to fraudulently deprive someone of all or most of their money
 
• CLEAN AS A GUT
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – orderly, tidy, neat
 
• CLEAN AS A LEEK
adv. 1725 Sc. – perfectly, completely, entirely
 
• CLEAN AS A MACKEREL
adv. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – completely, entirely
 
• CLEAN AS A WHISTLE
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – orderly, tidy, neat
 
• CLEANED OUT
adj. Bk1890 sl. – having lost all your money, ruined
 
• CLEAN FROM THE STILL
adj. Bk1902 colloq, – of drinks: unmixed with water
 
• CLEAN GONE
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – dead

• CLEANLY
adj. 1807 Amer. dial. – clean, free from dirt

• CLEAN OFF
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – of clouds: to decrease
 
• CLEAN ONE’S CLOCK
vb. 1. 1966 Amer. dial. – to beat someone thoroughly
vb. 2. 1971 Amer. sl. – to pass another vehicle at great speed

• CLEAN ONE’S PLOW
vb. 1931 Amer. dial. – to beat, whip or punish someone; to injure severely
 
• CLEAN OUT
vb. 1. 1812 sl. – to deprive of money
vb. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to ruin; to destroy
 
• CLEAN OUT THE RUST
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to exercise
 
• CLEAN PEELER
n. 1997 US sl. – to a surfer: a perfect wave

• CLEANSER
n. 1958 Amer. dial. – a dry cleaner

• CLEANSE UP
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – of clouds: to decrease
 
• CLEAN SHEETS
n. 1991 US Vietnam war usage – a bed or cot
 
• CLEAN SHIRT DAY
n. Bk1890 sl. – Sunday
 
• CLEANSKIN
n. 1. 1907 Aust. sl. – a novice
n. 2. 1942 Aust. sl. – a person of integrity, esp. in a political context
n. 3. 1943 Aust. sl. – orig. an unbranded sheep
n. 4. 1943 Aust. – a person without a criminal record
n. 5. 1989 Aust. sl. – in horse racing: a jockey who has never been disqualified in a race
 
• CLEAN SOMEONE’S CLOCK
vb. 1959 Amer. sl. – to thrash someone; to trounce
 
• CLEAN SOMEONE’S GREENS
vb. 1972 US sl. – to thrash someone
 
• CLEAN SOMEONE’S PLOW
vb. 1919 Amer. sl. – to thrash someone
 
• CLEAN THE CARPET
vb. 2001 US sl. – of a female: to masturbate
 
• CLEAN THE CLOCK
vb. 1929 Amer. sl. – railroad: to apply the emergency brakes

• THE CLEAN THING
n. 1835 Amer. dial. – an honest, honourable or straightforward action
 
• CLEAN-UP
int. 1946 Amer. dial. – (as ‘clean up!’) begone! used in driving away an unwanted dog
n. 1867 sl., orig. US – profit
vb. 1831 sl., orig. & chiefly US – (as ‘clean up’) to make a profit
 
• CLEAN UP ONE’S ACT
vb.1950 colloq. – to start behaving more appropriately, responsibly, or acceptably; to give up bad behaviour, illegal activity, drug use, etc.
 
• CLEAN YOUR EARS
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to listen
 
• CLEAR
adj. L17 sl. – intoxicated with alcohol
 
• CLEAR CRYSTAL
n. c1860 sl. – white spirits, esp. gin; loosely, brandy and rum
 
• CLEAR DECKS
vb. M19 nautical sl. – to clear the table after a meal

• CLEAREY; CLEARIE; CLEARSIE
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – a transparent glass marble
 
• CLEAR LIGHT
adv. 1907 Amer. dial. – completely, entirely
n. M20 US drug culture sl. – the drug LSD
 
• CLEAR MCCOY
n. 1900s sl. – first-rate whisky or beer

• CLEARN
adv. 1837 Amer. dial. obs. – all the way, entirely
vb. 1909 Amer. dial. – to clean or clear off
 
• CLEAR OFF
vb. c1830 – to depart
 
• CLEAR OUT
vb. c1830 – to depart
 
• CLEAR OUT DOUBLE-QUICK
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to depart hurriedly
 
• CLEAR SWING
n. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – a good opportunity
 
• CLEAR THE HARROWS
vb. 1892 Sc. – to get one’s object, to attain one’s desire
 
• CLEAT
n. 19C Brit. sl. – the glans penis
 
• CLEAVAGE
n. 20C US colloq. – a crease at the top of the buttocks, the upper part of the gluteal furrow
 
• CLEAVE
n. L18 Brit. sl. – a wanton or sexually loose woman; a woman who copulates readily
 
• CLEAVED
adj. L18 cant – pert. to a non-virgin female
 
• CLEAVER
n. L18 Brit. sl. – a sexually loose woman
 
• CLEAVE THE CLOUDS
vb. B1900 – to act foolishly and to no purpose
 
• CLEFT
adj. L18 Brit. sl. – pert. to a non-virgin female
n. 19C colloq. – the female genitals
 
• CLEFT OF FLESH
n. 19C Brit. sl. – the female genitals
 
• CLEMENT FREUDS
n. 1990s rhyming sl. – haemorrhoids
 
• CLEMENTIOUS
adj. 1632 obs. – mild and humane in the exercise of power or authority; merciful, lenient, kindly towards those in one’s power
 
• CLENCH-HOOKS
n. 19C Eng. dial. – claws, talons
 
• CLEOPATRICAL
adj. 1597 – extravagantly luxurious, after the manner of Cleopatra 
 
• CLEPTOMANIA
n. 1830 – a mania for stealing

• CLEVEL; CLEVIL
n. 1892 Amer. dial. – a grain of corn
 
• CLEVER
adj. 1. 1758 Amer. dial. – pleasant, good-natured, affable
adj. 2. 1775 Amer. dial. – healthy, chipper; spry, lively, active
adj. 3. 1781 Amer. dial. – agreeable but somewhat simple-minded; gullible
adj. 4. 1816 Amer. dial. – of animals: docile, gentle; well-trained
adj. 5. 1899 Amer. dial. – pretty, handsome
adj. 6. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – generous
adj. 7. 1931 Amer. dial. – aggressively flirtatious; promiscuous; said of a woman
adj. 8. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate
 
• CLEVERALITY
n. 1828 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – cleverness, smartness, ability
 
• CLEVER-BOOTS
n. 1847 sl. – a smart or knowing person; generally used ironically or sarcastically
 
• CLEVER-BREECHES
n. 1892 Eng. dial. – a wiseacre, a conceited person: applied ironically
 
• CLEVER-CLOGS
n. 1847 sl. – a smart or knowing person; generally used ironically or sarcastically
 
• CLEVER DICK
n. 1847 sl. – a smart or knowing person; generally used ironically or sarcastically

• CLEVERLY
adj. 1784 Amer. dial. – in good health

• CLEVERNESS
n. 1890 Amer. dial. – amiability
 
• CLEVER STICK
n. 1959 sl. – a clever, smart, or knowing person; often used ironically or sarcastically
 
• CLEVER-STICKS
n. 1959 sl. – a clever, smart, or knowing person; often used ironically or sarcastically

• CLEW
n. 1. 1870 Amer. dial. – a blow, a slap
n. 2. 1950 Amer. dial. – a ball of yarn
n. 3. 1950 Amer. dial. – a hair bun
vb. 1927 Amer. dial. – to strike, to hit
 
• CLIBBY
adj. 1598 obs. Eng. dial. – adhesive, sticky
 
• CLICK
n. 20C teen & high school sl. – a clique
vb. 1. 19C US sl. – to form a friendship to get on well with a person or an idea
vb. 2. 19C US sl. – to experience mutual sexual attraction with a member of the opposite sex
vb. 3. 1939 sl. – to suddenly understand
 
• CLICKED IT
adj. Bk2004 Amer. World War I sl. – got killed; was wounded
 
• CLICKER
n. 1859 US sl. – a knockdown blow

• CLICKERS
n. 1950 Amer. dial. jocular usage – false teeth
 
• CLICKET
adj. 19C Eng. dial. – voluble
n. 1. c1325 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – the latch of a gate or door
n. 2. 1375 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a catch, trigger, bolt that fastens anything by falling or springing into position
n. 3. c1386 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a latch-key
n. 4. c1450 – a valve or lid that shuts with a click; the valve of a pump
n. 5. a1500 – supposed by some to be a she-fox
n. 6. 1611 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a contrivance for making a clicking sound; a clapper or rattle carried by beggars in France, like the ‘clap-dish’ in England; bones rattled as accompaniment to music; anything that makes a rattling noise
n. 7. 1611 – a chattering tongue
n. 8. 19C Eng. dial. – a wooden salt-box with a hinged lid, hung against the wall in old-fashioned kitchens
n. 9. 19C Eng. dial. – a small wedge
n. 10. 19C Eng. dial. – a thin board, having four or five small arched apertures, placed before the mouth of a hive in the winter months to protect the bees from mice or other vermin
vb. 1. 1362 – to latch or lock; to fasten the wooden latch of a door by inserting a peg above it, thus preventing it from being raised 
vb. 2. 1573 – to chatter
vb. 3. 1575 – of the fox or hare: to be in heat, to copulate
vb. 4. 19C Eng. dial. – to protect hives by means of a ‘clicket’ (see noun 10)
vb. 5. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally
 
• CLICK-HANDED
adj. 1868 Eng. dial. – left-handed
 
• CLICK-MA-DOODLE
adj. 19C Eng. dial. – badly done
n. 19C Eng. dial. – a rickety article; a badly finished piece of work

• CLIFTED
adj. 1929 Amer. dial. – split

• CLIMATE FEVER
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – typhoid fever
 
• CLIMAXER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent
 
• CLIMB
vb. 17C sl. – to copulate with a woman; to mount and coit a woman
 
• CLIMBER
n. 1. 1833 sl. – an ambitious person
n. 2. 20C criminals’ sl. – a cat burglar

• CLIMBING LANE
n. 1977 Amer. dial. – on a highway: the outer lane for slow traffic
 
• CLIMB ON THE BANDWAGON
vb. 1950 – to join or give support to a party or movement that seems to be assured of success
 
• CLIMB PARNASSUS
vb. 1774 – to write poetry
 
• CLIMBS
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a ladder
 
• CLIMB THE GOLDEN STAIRCASE
vb. L19 US colloq. – to die
 
• CLIMB THE LADDER
vb. 19C – to be hanged
 
• CLIMB THE LEAFLESS TREE
vb.  E19 sl. – to be hanged

• CLIMB THE MOUNTAIN
vb. 1954 Amer. dial. – to say foolish things
 
• CLIMB THE WOODEN HILL TO BEDFORDSHIRE
vb. 1961 UK sl. – to go upstairs to bed
 
• CLIMB UP THE WALL
vb. 1951 sl. – to become angry
 
• CLINAH
n. 1895 Aust. sl. – a girlfriend or female lover
 
• CLINCH
n. 1. Bk1891 sl. – a prison
n. 2. 1901 sl., orig. US – an embrace
vb. 1899 colloq. orig. US – to embrace

• CLINCH BAR
n. 1941 Amer. dial. – a crowbar
 
• CLINCHED
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – drunk
 
• CLINCHPOOP
n. 1568 obs. – a term of contempt for one considered wanting in gentlemanly breeding; a vulgar, ill-bred fellow; an oaf; a dunce; a lout, a clown
 
• CLINER
n. 1895 Aust. sl. – a girlfriend or female lover
 
• CLINGS LIKE SHIT TO A SHOVEL
phr. 19C colloq. – describes the adherence of a sticky substance or a clingy person
 
• CLINIC
n. c1955 sl. – a public-house
 
• CLINK
n. 1. E16 sl. – a prison
n. 2. 1720s Sc. – money; hard cash
n. 3. E18 Eng. dial. – a smart sharp blow
n. 4. 20C US sl., derogatory – a Black person
n. 5. c1860 sl. – very inferior beer
n. 6. c1870 sl., chiefly military usage – a coin
n. 7. 1919 school sl. – detention
vb. c1850 sl. – to put in prison
 
• CLINKER
n. 1. 19C Brit. sl. – fecal or seminal matter adhering to the anal or pubic hairs
n. 2. 1836 Brit. sl. – an excellent person or thing; a thing, animal, or person of the first quality
n. 3. 1905 Amer. dial. – an industrious or diligent person
n. 4. 1905 Amer. dial. rare – a cheat
n. 5. 20C US & Can. sl. – a mistake or fault, esp. a wrong note in music
n. 6. 20C sl., chiefly US – something of poor quality, such as a film
n. 7. M20 N. Amer. sl. – a wrong musical note, a discord; an error in performance, a blunder
 
• CLINKERBALLS
n. 19C Eng. dial. – balls of dried dung in sheep’s wool

• CLINKERS
n. 1895 Amer. dial. – insects
 
• CLINKING
adj. M17 sl. – exceedingly good; excellent; first-rate
 
• CLIP
n. 1. 1830 colloq. – a sharp, often slanting, blow
n. 2. 1901 Amer. dial. – a likable, shrewd, forward, or lively young woman
n. 3. 20C colloq. – speed
vb. 1. OE arch. & Eng, dial. – to clasp with the arms, to embrace, to hug
vb. 2. 1855 colloq. – to hit smartly; to strike against in passing
vb. 3. M19 US colloq. – to move or run quickly
vb. 4. 1949 Amer. dial. euphemism – to castrate
vb. 5. 20C colloq. – to strike with a sharp, often slanting, blow
vb. 6. E20 N. Amer. sl. – to murder; to execute; to kill, esp. by shooting
vb. 7. E20 sl., orig. US – to swindle; to rob, to steal; to obtain (money) by deception or cheating

• CLIP AND CLEAN
adv. 1881 Amer. dial. – completely, entirely; ‘free and clear’

• CLIP AND CLEAR
adv. 1818 Amer. dial. – completely, entirely; ‘free and clear’

• CLIP AND CLEAR-BOARD
adv. 1833 Amer. dial. – completely, entirely; ‘free and clear’
 
• CLIP AROUND THE EAR
n. 1830 sl. – a blow
 
• CLIP ARTIST
n. 1941 US sl. – a petty thief or swindler

• CLIPE
n. 1930 Amer. dial. – a blow; a stroke from a staff or club

• CLIP IN
vb. 1916 Amer. dial. – to run in for a short visit; implies a hurried call
 
• CLIP IT
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to go fast
 
• CLIP IT OFF
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to go fast
 
• CLIP-JOINT
n. 1932 sl., orig. US – a bar, club, etc. that charges exorbitant prices
 
• CLIPPED-DICK
n. 20C US sl., derogatory – a nickname for a Jewish man
 
• CLIPPED IN THE RING
adj. 1597 sl. – seduced, deflowered
 
• CLIPPER
n. 1. 1836 Amer. dial. – a likable, shrewd, forward, or lively young woman
n. 2. M19 sl. – a first-rate person or thing; an excellent specimen

• CLIPPERS
n. 1967 Amer. dial. jocular usage – false teeth
 
• CLIPPIE
adj. 1. 19C Sc. – very talkative
adj. 2. 19C Sc. – sharp of speech; snappish, pert
n. 1. 19C Sc. – a talkative woman; an impudent girl
n. 2. 19C Sc. – a person wearing too neatly cut clothes
n. 3. 19C Sc. obs. – a shorn sheep
n. 4. 1941 Brit. sl. – a bus conductress
 
• CLIPPING
adj. 1. M19 sl. – first-rate, excellent
adj. 2. 20C colloq. – fast
 
• CLIPPY
n. 1941 Brit. sl. – a bus conductress
 
• CLIP-SHEAR(S)
n. 1898 Sc. – the earwig
 
• CLIPSOME
adj. 1816 rare – fit to be embraced or clasped
 
• CLIP-WIT
adj. 1896 Sc. – sharp or shrewd of speech
n. 19C Sc. – a sharp-tongued, quarrelsome or quick-witted person
 
• CLISH-CLASH
n. L17 Sc. – idle gossip or talk; nonsense
 
• CLISH-MA-CLAVER
n. 1728 Sc. – idle or foolish talk; gossip; nonsense; false or scandalous reports, rumour
vb. 1821 Sc. – to indulge in idle talk, gossip, etc.
 
• CLIT
n. c1866 sl. – the clitoris

• CLITCH
vb. 1891 Amer. dial. – to stick together

• CLITCHY
adj. 1816 Amer. dial. – sticky, clammy, glutinous
 
• CLIT-CLAT
n. 1869 Eng. dial. – a talkative person, a gossip; a telltale, a blab; the noise made by a talkative person; foolish talk, gossip 
 
• CLITORIZE
vb. 19C Brit. sl. – to stimulate a woman sexually by manipulating the clitoris; to perform sexual foreplay on a woman
 
• CLITTER
vb. 1. a1528 obs. – to talk excessively, to chatter
vb. 2. 1530 – to make a thin vibratory rattle; to cause to vibrate and rattle lightly
vb. 3. 1844 – to emit the sound of a grasshopper or cicada
 
• CLITTY
n. c1866 sl. – the clitoris


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