Dictionary: CLO – CN

• CLOAK-AND-SUITER
n. 1. E20 US sl., derogatory – a Jewish man
n. 2. E20 US sl. – a Jewish tailor
 
• CLOAKROOM
n. L19 Brit. euphemism – a lavatory; a room containing a number of lavatories

• CLOB
vb. 1967 Amer. dial. – to walk heavily
 
• CLOBBER
n. 1. 1879 Brit. sl. – personal belongings, such as clothes and accessories;  gear, equipment
n. 2. 1890 Brit. sl. – unspecified things, paraphernalia
n. 3. 1899 Amer. dial. – sour milk that has thickened or curdled
vb. 1. L19 sl. – to dress oneself; frequently followed by ‘up’
vb. 2. 1946 sl. – to beat or batter; to hit repeatedly, to assault by hitting; to thrash
vb. 3. 20C – to criticize severely
vb. 4. 20C sl. – to defeat utterly
 
• CLOBBERED
adj. 1. L19 sl. – dressed up
adj. 2. 1951 US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol

• CLOBBERED MILK
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – sour milk that has thickened or curdled

• CLOBBER-FOOT
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a big or clumsy foot
 
• CLOBBERING MACHINE
n. 20C NZ colloq. – pressure to conform with accepted standards
 
• CLOBBERIOUSNESS
n. 1577 obs. rare – the rabble, the ‘unwashed’

• CLOBBERS
n. 1. 1967 Amer. dial. – unusually big or clumsy feet
n. 2. 1970 Amer. dial. – men’s low, rough work shoes

• CLOBHOBBLE
vb. 1966 Amer. dial. – to walk clumsily
 
• CLOCK
n. 1. 19C Brit. sl. – the female genitals
n. 2. M19 – the downy seed head of a dandelion
n. 3. 1918 sl. – the face
n. 4. 1939 Amer. colloq. – a taxi meter
n. 5. 1942 Amer. sl. – the heart; the ‘ticker’
n. 6. 1959 sl. – a punch in the face
vb. 1. 1929 sl., orig. US – to look at, watch, observe, notice
vb. 2. 1932 Amer. sl. – to strike sharply or heavily; to strike with the fist; to punch in the face; to hit
vb. 3. 1959 Amer. sl. – to plan
vb. 4. 1961 Amer. sl. – to count up or evaluate
vb. 5. 1976 Amer. sl. – to catch sight of, to see; hence, to recognize, to identify
vb. 6. 1978 Amer. criminals’ sl. – to reconnoitre a place to be robbed
vb. 7. 1989 Amer. sl. – of a prostitute: to get a customer
vb. 8. 1990 Amer. sl., esp. African-American usage – to acquire; to earn. to ‘rack up’
 
• THE CLOCK
n. 1950 Aust. sl. – twelve months imprisonment
 
• CLOCK A DAFFY
vb. 20C S. Afr. sl. – to tell a deceitful story with the intention of tricking the hearer

• CLOCK BIRD
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – a cuckoo
 
• CLOCKER
n. L20 sl. – a person who turns back the milometer of a motor vehicle so that it registers a falsely low mileage
 
• CLOCKEY
n. 1. Bk1890 sl. – a travelling clockmaker
n. 2. Bk1890 sl. – a watchman

• CLOCKIFY
vb. 1953 Amer. dial. – to repair clocks
 
• CLOCK-SETTER
n. 1856 Amer. nautical sl. – a complainer or busybody
 
• CLOCK STOPPER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something or someone unattractive
 
• CLOCK-WATCHER
n. 1911 sl. – someone who does no more work than is strictly necessary
 
• CLOCK WATCHING
n. 1942 UK sl. – the act of working no harder, or for no longer, than is minimally required
 
• CLOCK-WEIGHTS
n. 19C Brit. sl. – the testicles
 
• CLOCKWORK ALONG
vb. 1990s UK sl. – to go smoothly; ‘to go like clockwork’
 
• CLOCKWORKS
n. 1947 US sl. – the brain
 
• CLOCKY
n. 1991 US sl. – sudden waving arm movements of a surfer trying to get his balance
 
• CLOD
n. 1. 1605 colloq. – a blockhead; a clumsy, awkward person; a dull, unresponsive person; a dolt; an oaf or simpleton
n. 2. L18 Sc. – a small loaf of (esp. coarse) bread
n. 3. 1925 Brit. sl. – a copper coin; usually used in the plural
n. 4. 1965 Amer. dial. – a gauche, rude, unpleasant, or unmannerly person
n. 5. 1967 Amer. dial. – a big, clumsy foot
vb. 1966 Amer. dial. – to walk heavily, making a lot of noise
 
• CLODBUSTER
n. 1. 1950 US sl. – a farmer
n. 2. 1950 Amer. dial. – a heavy rain
n. 3. 1950 Amer. dial. – a clumsy or awkward person

• CLODBUSTERS
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – men’s square-toed shoes

• CLOD-CRUSHER
n. 1. 1897 Amer. dial. – a big or clumsy foot
n. 2. 1914 Amer. dial. – a country bumpkin; a rustic or countrified person

• CLODDERED MILK
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – milk that has thickened or curdled
 
• CLODDISH
adj. M19 – boorishly stolid, clumsy and awkward
 
• CLODDY
adj. LME – boorishly stolid, clumsy and awkward

• CLODDY-HOP
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a rustic; a country bumpkin

• CLOD FITTER
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a big or clumsy foot

• CLOD-FOOT
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a big or clumsy foot
 
• CLOD-HEAD
n. 17C Brit. & US – an oaf; a dolt

• CLOD-HEEL
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person

• CLODHOBBLE
vb. 1966 Amer. dial. – to walk clumsily

• CLODHOP
vb. 1966 Amer. dial. – to walk clumsily
 
• CLODHOPPER
n. 1. 1699 rural colloq. – a bumpkin; a rustic ploughman; an oaf who walks among clods of dirt; an agricultural labourer
n. 2. 1824 colloq. – someone who moves clumsily or without skill; a clumsy, awkward person; a lout
n. 3. 1836 Amer. dial. – a large shoe, esp. a coarse or heavy work shoe
n. 4. 1950 Amer. dial. – a big or clumsy foot
  
• CLODHOPPING
adj. Bk1942 Amer. colloq. – large and clumsy; awkward; loutish, boorish, rustic

• CLOD JUMPER
n. 1917 Amer. dial. – a rustic; a country bumpkin

• CLODKNOCKER
n. 1. 1918 Amer. dial. – a big or clumsy foot
n. 2. 1946 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person
n. 3. 1946 Amer. dial. – a heavy shoe
n. 4. 1966 Amer. dial. – a big marble

• CLOD-MASHER
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – a big or clumsy foot
 
• CLODPATE
n. 1636 – a stupid fellow, a blockhead, a dolt, an oaf
 
• CLODPATED
adj. 1639 arch. – blockheaded
 
• CLODPOLE
n. 1601 Brit. & US – a blockhead; a bumpkin; a lout; an oaf; a dolt
 
• CLODPOLISH
adj. 20C US colloq. – stupid; boorish, rustic
 
• CLODPOLL
n. 1601 Brit. & US – a blockhead; a bumpkin; a lout; an oaf; a dolt

• CLODS
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – men’s low, rough work shoes
 
• CLOD-SKULLED
adj. 18C Brit. colloq. – stupid; oafish
 
• CLOG
n. 1. LME obs. exc. Sc. – a thick piece of wood; a log
n. 2. ME – an impediment; an encumbrance
n. 3. L16 obs. – a fir cone; a pine cone
n. 4. 1968 Amer. dial. – a big or clumsy foot
vb. 1. L16 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to satiate, surfeit, cloy
vb. 2. 20C sl. – in soccer, to foul an opponent

• CLOG FOOT
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a big or clumsy foot
 
• CLOGGER
n. M18 Brit. colloq. – a player in soccer who habitually fouls in tackling

• CLOGHOPPER
n. 1. 1950 Amer. dial. – a big or clumsy foot
n. 2. 1969 Amer. dial. – an awkward, stupid, or unmannerly person
 
• CLOGS TO CLOGS IN THREE GENERATIONS
phr. 1868 – the return of a family to poverty after one generation of prosperity

• CLOMBER
vb. 1967 Amer. dial. – to walk heavily and noisily

• CLOMP
vb. 1. 1903 Amer. dial. – to walk heavily and noisily
vb. 2. 1941 Amer. dial. – to clamp, to fasten
vb. 3. 1968 Amer. dial. – to limp

• CLOMPER
n. 1903 Amer. dial. – a heavy boot
vb. 1967 Amer. dial. – to walk heavily and noisily

• CLOMPERS
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – false teeth
 
• CLOMPS
n. 19C Eng. dial. – an oaf
 
• CLONE
n. 1. 20C colloq. – a person or thing bearing a very close resemblance to another person or thing
n. 2. 20C sl. – a mobile phone that has been given the electronic identity of an existing mobile phone, so that calls made on the second phone are charged to the owner of the first phone
vb. 20C sl. – to give a mobile phone the electronic identity of an existing mobile phone (see noun)
 
• CLONK
vb. 1. 1943 colloq. – to hit forcibly
vb. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. – to walk heavily and noisily
 
• CLONKER
n. 1. 19C Eng. dial. – an icicle
n. 2. 1967 Amer. dial. – a big or clumsy foot

• CLONK OUT
vb. 1967 Amer. dial. – to lose consciousness
 
• CLOOP
n. 1848 – a muted popping sound, as of a cork being drawn from a bottle
vb. 1872 – to make a muted popping sound, as of a cork being drawn from a bottle
 
• CLOOTIE
n. 1. 1785 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – the devil (usually in the form “Auld Clootie”)
n. 2. 19C Ireland – a left-handed person
 
• CLOOTS
n. L18 Sc. & N. Eng. – the Devil

• CLOPPER
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a slipper
 
• CLOSE
adj. M17 – stingy, niggardly, grudging any expense
vb. 1942 Amer. dial. – to turn off a light

• CLOSE ABOARD
adj. 1916 Amer. dial. – very near
 
• CLOSE AS AN OYSTER
adj. L19 US sl. – silent, secretive
 
• CLOSE AS A QUARTER TO NINE
adj. 1997 Amer. dial. – very close
 
• CLOSE AS FIVE MINUTES TO ELEVEN
adj. World War II Amer. sl. – in love
 
• CLOSE AS GOD’S CURSE TO A WHORE’S ASS
adj. M18 – very close indeed
 
• CLOSE AS OAK
adj. 17C colloq. – very retentive of secrets; secretive
 
• CLOSE AS SHIRT AND SHITTEN ARSE
adj. M18 – very close indeed
 
• CLOSE AS TWENTY MINUTES TO EIGHT
adj. World War II Amer. sl. – in love

• CLOSE-CLAPPED
adj. 1960 Amer. dial. – chunky
 
• CLOSED BOOK
n. 1913 – a thing of which one has no understanding

• CLOSED WINTER
n. 1933 Amer. dial. – a hard winter, one characterized by heavy snowfalls and blizzards
 
• CLOSE-FISTED
adj. 1608 – mean, grudging
 
• CLOSE-HANDED
adj. 1585 obs. – mean, grudging

• CLOSE HERDIN’
n. 1939 Amer. dial. – cheek-to-cheek dancing
 
• CLOSE-LIPPED
adj. 1853 – reticent, discreet
 
• CLOSE-MOUTHED
adj. 1881 – reticent, discreet
 
• CLOSE ONE’S DAYS
vb. c1400 – to die
 
• CLOSE ONE’S FACE
vb. L19 sl. – to be quiet
 
• CLOSER THAN A QUARTER TO NINE
adj. 1997 Amer. dial. – very close
 
• CLOSE STOOL
n. E15 Brit. – a covered chamber pot ; a chamber pot concealed in a chest or other furniture
 
• CLOSET
n. 1. 18C colloq. – a privy; a water closet
n. 2. 20C US – the water tank of a modern toilet
 
• CLOSET CASE
n. 1. 1958 US college sl. – a socially inept, embarrassing or unattractive person
n. 2. 1968 US college sl. – a person who studies a great deal
n. 3. 1969 US sl. – a man who conceals his homosexual proclivities
n. 4. M20 US colloq. – anyone who does anything in secret
 
• CLOSET-MAN
n. 20C sl. – a sanitary inspector; an inspector of privies
 
• CLOSET OF DECENCY
n. 19C Brit. euphemism – a water closet; a privy
 
• CLOSET OF EASE
n. M17 Brit. – a privy        
 
• CLOSE TO TAW
adj. 1954 Amer. dial. – close to home
 
• CLOSE TO THE BLANKET
adj. 1942 Amer. sl. – nearly without money
 
• CLOSET QUEEN
n. 1959 sl. – a secret male homosexual
 
• CLOSET QUEER
n. M20 US sl. – a homosexual male who keeps his homosexuality a secret
 
• CLOSET STOOL
n. 20C US – the toilet; the water-flush basin found in a bathroom
 
• CLOSE YOUR FACE!
int. 1896 Amer. sl. – be quiet!
 
• CLOSE YOUR YAP!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – be quiet!
 
• CLOT
n. 19C colloq. – a fool; an oaf
 
• CLOTCHY
adj. 1. 19C Eng. dial. – clumsy, awkward
adj. 2. 19C Eng. dial. – liable to colds
 
• CLOT-HEAD
n. 19C colloq. – a fool; an oaf
 
• CLOTH EARS
n. 1. 1912 sl. – an inattentive listener
n. 2. 1965 sl. – a deaf person
 
• CLOTH-EARED
adj. 1965 sl. – deaf
 
• CLOTHESLINE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – rumour
 
• CLOTHES-PEGS
n. 1. 1940s Aust. sl. – teeth
n. 2. 1940s rhyming sl. – the legs
 
• CLOTHES PROP
n. 1. 19C Brit. sl. – the penis, esp. when erect
n. 2. 1900s sl. – a silly, empty-headed person
 
• CLOTHING OF CARE
n. a1300 obs. – mourning-dress
 
• CLOTH-MARKET
n. 1801 sl. – a bed

• CLOTH’S LOW
phr. 1966 Amer. dial. – a warning to a woman that her slip is showing

• CLOTTED MILK
n. 1941 Amer. dial. – sour milk that has thickened or curdled
 
• CLOTTYMOLES
n. 1866 Eng. dial. – clenched fists
 
• CLOUD
n. 1. 1913 Amer. dial. – a Black person; a crowd of Black persons
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. college sl. – an attractive girl
 
• CLOUD 9
n. 1950s Amer. sl. – euphoria

• CLOUDBURSTER
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a very heavy rain, a cloudburst

• CLOUDBUST
n. 1939 Amer. dial. – a very heavy rain, a cloudburst

• CLOUDBUSTER
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a very heavy rain, a cloudburst
 
• CLOUD-COMPELLER
n. 1865 humorous usage – a smoker, especially of tobacco
 
• CLOUD KISSING
n. World War II Amer. sl. – touching the clouds in an airplane

• CLOUDSPOUT
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a cloudburst or waterspout; a sudden rush of water coming from heavy rain
 
• CLOUD WAGON
n. World War II Amer. sl. – an airplane
 
• CLOUDY
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; confused; muddled
 
• CLOUT
n. 1. a1400 – a blow
n. 2. Bk1893 sl. – the ‘menstrual cloth’
n. 3. 19C Brit. – a woman’s underclothes
n. 4. 1950 Amer. dial. – an awkward, stupid, or unmannerly person; a person considered to be rough or countrified; a rustic
n. 5. 20C Amer. dial. – a diaper
vb. 1. c1314 – to hit
vb. 2. Bk1914 criminals’ sl. – to steal any kind of valuables in any manner
 
• CLOUTER-HEAD
n. c1861 Eng. dial. – a foolish, stupid person; one deficient in understanding
 
• CLOUTERLY
adj. 1675 obs. – like a botcher; clumsy, awkward, clownish
adv. 1593 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – clumsily, awkwardly

• CLOVE
n. 1777 Amer. dial. – a ravine or valley; a mountain pass
 
• CLOVEN
adj. L18 cant – pert. to a non-virgin female
 
• CLOVEN SPOT
n. 19C Brit. – the female genitals  
 
• CLOVEN TUFT
n. L17 Brit. – the female genitals
 
• CLOVER-EATER
n. 1869 US sl. – a Virginian
 
• CLOVER-FIELD
n. 19C Brit. – the female pubic hair
 
• CLOVER-KICKER
n. 1918 US sl. – a yokel; a rustic; a farmer
 
• CLOWES
n. L17 Brit. cant – a rogue  
 
• CLOWN
n. 1. 16C – a bumpkin or rustic oaf
n. 2. 20C US – any oaf or jerk  
 
• CLOWS
n. L17 Brit. cant  – a rogue  
 
• CLUB
n. 1. 17C – the penis
n. 2. 1791 Amer. dial. – a bunch or gathering of hair; a knot or bun
n. 3. 1965 Amer. dial. – a big or clumsy foot
vb. 1. 19C Brit. sl. – to coit a woman; to use the ‘club’ (penis) on a woman
vb. 2. 1969 Amer. dial. – to walk heavily and noisily

• CLUBBIES
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – men’s square-toed shoes

• CLUBBY
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a very awkward, clumsy person
 
• CLUB CRAWLING
n. 1950s Amer. sl. – moving from nightclub to nightclub  
 
• CLUB-FIST
n. 1575 obs. – a large clenched fist that can deal a heavy blow; hence, a rough, brutal fellow, a thug

• CLUBFOOT
adj. 1954 Amer. dial. – having large, clumsy feet
n. 1. 1954 Amer. dial. – a big or clumsy foot
n. 2. 1965 Amer. dial. – a person who stumbles; an awkward, clumsy person

• CLUBFOOTED
adj. 1954 Amer. dial. – having large, clumsy feet

• CLUB IN
vb. 1904 Amer. dial. – to contribute to a common purpose
 
• CLUB SANDWICH
n. M20 US sl. – a type of real or imaginary sexual intercourse for three  
 
• CLUCK
n. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a hen  
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a gullible person; a dupe
n. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a mechanical device which will not work
n. 4. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an error; a mistake; a blunder
n. 5. 20C US sl., derogatory – a very dark Black person
n. 6. 20C US colloq. – a stupid oaf; a fool  
 
• CLUCKEY
n. 19C Eng. dial. – a crazy, weak-minded person
 
• CLUCKHEAD
n. 20C US colloq. – a stupid oaf  
 
• CLUCKY
adj. 1. E20 Aust. sl. – pregnant
adj. 2. 20C US colloq. – stupid; oafish
adj. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – boorish; rustic
 
• CLUE
vb. 1950s Amer. sl. – to apprise or advise  
 
• CLUELESS 
adj. 1943 teen & high school sl. – lost, stupid
 
• CLUFF
n. 1. 1804 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – a blow with the palm of the hand, esp. on the ear or cheek; a cuff or slap
n. 2. 1825 Sc. – an idle, trifling person
vb. 1. 1825 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – to strike with the palm of the hand, to cuff or slap
vb. 2. 1825 Sc. – to laze, to sit idly by the fire

• CLUMBER
vb. 1970 Amer. dial. – to walk heavily

• CLUMP
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – an awkward or clumsy person
 
• CLUMPER
n. a1825 sl. – a clumsy shoe or boot 
 
• CLUMPERTON
n. c1534 obs. – a clown, a clodhopper; a countryman; a silly or stupid fellow

• CLUMPETY-CLUMP
adv. 1968 Amer. dial. – walking heavily

• CLUMSE
n. 1899 Amer. dial. – a stupid, awkward person

• CLUMSY-JACK
n. 1908 Amer. dial. – a clumsy, awkward fellow
 
• CLUNCH
n. E17 Brit. colloq. – a bumpkin or a boor
 
• CLUNCHFIST
n. 1. 1589 obs. – a knock-down argument
n. 2. 1606 obs. – a miser, a niggardly person, one who is close-fisted
n. 3. 1662 obs. – a clenched fist 
 
• CLUNCH-FISTED
adj. 1644 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – close-fisted, niggardly, covetous, stingy
 
• CLUNCHY
adj. 1. 1863 Eng. dial. – clinging, close, clodlike
adj. 2. 19C Eng. dial. –  short, thick, and clumsy
adj. 3. 19C Eng. dial. – quick-tempered; short tempered; easily offended
 
• CLUNK
n. 1. 1934 Amer. dial. – a dull, stupid person; a foolish person; a clumsy or careless person
n. 2. 1938 Amer. dial. – an old, dilapidated vehicle
n. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a gullible person; a dupe
n. 4. 1943 Amer. dial. – a hard blow

• CLUNKER
n. 1. 1968 Amer. dial. – a hard blow
n. 2. 1950 Amer. dial. – an old, dilapidated vehicle
n. 3. 1966 Amer. dial. – a bullfrog

CLUNKHEAD
n. 1952 Amer. dial. – a dull, stupid person; a foolish person; a clumsy or careless person
 
• CLUNKS
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a gullible person; a dupe

• CLUPPER
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a big or clumsy foot
 
• CLUSTERFIST
n. 1. 1611 obs. – a clumsy-fisted fellow; a clown, boor, lout
n. 2. 1652 – a close-fisted, mean, or grasping fellow; a miserly fellow, a niggard
 
• CLUSTEROUS
adj. 1583 obs. rare – in a cluster, thronging, gathering close together

• CLUTCH
n. 1. 1929 Amer. dial. – a clump of trees
n. 2. 1967 Amer. dial. – a piggyback ride
 
• CLUTCH AT STRAWS
vb. 1837 – to resort in desperation to any utterly inadequate expedient, like a person drowning
 
• CLUTCH-FIST
adj. a1643 – miserly
n. 1. a1643 – a miser, a niggard
n. 2. 17C – a very large fist
 
• CLUTTER
n. Bk1998 sl. – the collective name for the many advertising spots on television

• CLUTTER HOLE
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a small space in a house where you can hide things or get them out of the way
 
• CLY
n. 1. c1690 thieves’ cant – money
n. 2. c1690 thieves’ cant – a pocket 
vb. 1567 thieves’ cant – to seize, to take; to steal  
 
• CLYDE
n. 1950s Amer. sl. – a term of address, usually for a ‘square’
 
• CLYDESDALE
n. 20C teen & high school sl. – a good-looking guy
 
• CLY-FAKER
n. 1823 criminals’ sl. – a pickpocket
 
• CLY FULL OF RIDGE
n. Bk1903 sl. – a pocket full of money  
 
• CLYSTER-PIPE
n. 1. 17C sl. – a doctor
n. 2. L17 sl. – the penis
n. 3. 18C sl. – an apothecary
 
• CLY THE JERK
vb. 1609 cant – to be whipped at the post
 
• C-NOTE
n. 1. 1930 US sl. – a $100 note
n. 2. 1990 US sl. – a prison sentence of 100 years
 
• C-NOTE CHARLIE
n. 1949 US sl. – in a casino: a gambler who insists on betting wit $100 notes, not betting chips
 
• CNS-QNS
adj. 2003 medical sl. – unintelligent (in doctors’ shorthand – Central Nervous System-Quantity Not Sufficient)


Back to INDEX C

Back to DICTIONARY