Dictionary: COF – COL

• CO-FAIR
n. 1949 Amer. dial. – a close friend

• COFE
n. 17C – a man

• COFFEE BEAN
n. 1951 Amer. dial. – a whirligig beetle
 
• COFFEE BOILER
n. US Civil War usage – a malingerer; a shirker
 
• COFFEE-COOLER
n. 1. 1886 Amer. dial. – one who seeks and secures a duty more congenial than his regular duties; one who is always looking for an easy job; a loafer, an idler, a shirker
n. 2. 1914 Amer. dial. – a prospector

• COFFEE COOLERS
n. 1972 African-American – the lips

• COFFEE CUP
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a dandelion

• COFFEE-DRINK
n. 1945 Amer. dial. – a wake, a funeral watch

• COFFEE GRAINS
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – the buttocks
 
• COFFEE GRINDER
n. 1. World War II Amer. sl. – a machine gun
n. 2. 1950 Amer. dial. – an old, broken-down car
n. 3. 1969 Amer. dial. – an outboard motor
 
• COFFEE MILL
n. 1. 1887 Amer. dial. – a revolver
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a machine gun
 
• COFFEE POT
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a motorcycle
n. 2. 1945 Amer. dial. – a small or leaky steam engine

• COFFEE SISTER
n. 1928 Amer. dial. – a lover of coffee

• COFFEE-STRAINER
n. 1977 Amer. dial. – a bushy moustache

• COFFEE-WATER
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – very weak coffee
 
• COFFIN
n. 1. 1916 Amer. dial. – a pie crust; a deep-dish pie or its pan
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an unseaworthy ship
n. 3. 1945 Amer. dial. – a dangerous plane to fly, esp. one that is in a dilapidated, run-down condition
n. 4. 1968 Amer. dial. – a trunk

• COFFIN-BEARER
n. 1925 Amer. dial. – the great black-backed gull
 
• COFFIN BRIG
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an unseaworthy ship

• COFFIN-CARRIER
n. 1872 Amer. dial. – the great black-backed gull

• COFFIN FODDER
n. 1961 Amer. dial. – a person who looks ready to die

• COFFIN MONEY
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – burial insurance
 
• COFFIN NAIL
n. 1. 1888 sl., orig. US – a cigarette
n. 2. 1915 Amer. dial. – a person who smokes too much

• COFFIN STICK
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a cigarette
 
• COFFIN TACK
n. 1897 Amer. sl. – a cigarette
 
• COFFIN VARNISH
n. 1881 US sl. – liquor, esp. cheap whisky
 
• COG-BELL
n. 1736 Eng. dial. – an icicle

• COGE IT
vb. 1889 Amer. dial. – to drink heavily and habitually
 
• COGGER
n. 1. 1580 – a sharper, cheat, deceiver, swindler, one who beguiles
n. 2. 1611 – a false flatterer or fawner
n. 3. 1775 – one who puts up cogs in a wheel
n. 4. 19C Eng. dial. – a fighter
n. 5. 19C Eng. dial. – a striped snail shell
n. 6. 19C – in mining: one who builds up supports with cogs or shocks

• COGGLE
vb. 1. 1843 Amer. dial. – to wobble or be unsteady
vb. 2. 1902 Amer. dial. – to repair hastily

• COGGLED UP
adj. 1917 Amer. dial. – rickety, wobbly
 
• COGGLETY
adj. 19C Eng. dial. – shaky, unsteady, unstable, rickety

• COGGLY
adj. 1916 Amer. dial. – of irregular shape
 
• COGIE
n. 19C sl. – the vagina
 
• COGILATE
vb. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to suppose, to reckon
 
• COGITABUND
adj. 1649 rare – deep in thought; thoughtful, meditating, musing
 
• COGITABUNDOUS
adj. 1627 – deep in thought, thoughtful, meditating, musing
 
• COGNAC-EYED
adj. Bk2004 Amer. World War I sl. – drunk
 
• COGNACKED
adj. Bk2004 Amer. World War I sl. – drunk
 
• COGNIZE
vb. 1821 – to take note of, to notice, to observe; to know or perceive, to recognize
 
• COGNOSCENTI
n. 1940s homosexual usage – the world of homosexuals, its style, language, ethos, etc.
 
• COGNOSCIBLE
adj. 1648 – capable of being known, knowable, ascertainable, recognizable
n. 1683 – that which can be known
 
• COGS
n. 1. L18 sl. – the testicles
n. 2. Bk1896 sl. – dice
n. 3. 1940s African-American sl. – sunglasses
 
• COG-SHOULDER
n. E17 sl. – an arrest

• COHAB
n. 1888 Amer. dial. – a person who lives in illegal cohabitation; a polygamous Mormon
 
• COHIBIT
vb. 1544 rare – to restrain, check, hinder; to restrict

• COHOGLE
vb. 1. 1829 Amer. dial. – to hoodwink, to dupe, to cheat, to bamboozle
vb. 2. 1855 Amer. dial. – to associate

• COHOOTER
n. 1930 Amer. dial. – a busy, voluble leader in community affairs
vb. 1930 Amer. dial. – to talk constantly and to little purpose

• COIL
n. 1936 Amer. dial., West. usage – a rope
 
• COIL UP ONE’S ROPES
vb. 19C Brit. naval sl. – to die
 
• COIN
n. Bk1903 sl. – money
 
• COINCIDATE
vb. 1657 obs. rare – to coincide

• COIN HILL
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – the part of a town where the well-off people live
 
• COIN IT
vb. 1863 sl. – to make a profit
 
• COIN MONEY
vb. 1863 sl. – to make a profit
 
• COINQUINATE
vb. a1528 obs. – to soil all over, to pollute, to defile
 
• COIT
n. 1941 Aust. sl. – the buttocks
 
• COJONES
n. 1. 1932 sl., orig. US – courage  
n. 2. 20C US sl. – the testicles (the ‘j’ is pronounced as an ‘h’)
 
• COKE
n. 1. c1903 sl., orig. US – cocaine
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an incredible story
vb. 1924 sl., orig. US – to take cocaine
 
• COKED
adj. E20 US drug culture sl. – intoxicated with or under the effects of cocaine
 
• COKE-FREAK
n. 20C US sl. – a frequent user of cocaine
 
• COKER-NUT
n. M19 sl. – the head
 
• COKE STORY
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an incredible story
 
• COKE UP
vb. 1924 sl., orig. US – to take cocaine
 
• COKEY;  COKIE
n. 1916 sl., orig. US – a cocaine addict
 
• COKITTEN
n. Bk1942 Amer. college sl. – a flirt
 
• COKUM
adj. 1. M19 sl. – resourceful, cunning
adj. 2. M19 sl. – sensible
adj. 3. M19 sl. – sorted out; arranged satisfactorily

• COLA
n. 1938 Amer. dial. – a carbonated soft drink
 
• COLD
adj. 1. 1859 Amer. dial. – lacking enthusiasm, unwilling to participate fully
adj. 2. 1915 Amer. dial. – plain, clear; certain
adj. 3. 1927 Amer. dial. – of a cheque: worthless, fraudulent
adj. 4. 1942 African-American – very good, excellent
adj. 5. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – dead 
 
• COLD ADAM
n. 1699 obs. – water as a drink
 
• COLD AS A BAY STREET BANKER’S HEART
adj. 1987 Can. sl. – very ungenerous, or very cold
 
• COLD AS A NUN’S CUNT
adj. 1955 Aust. sl. – extremely cold
 
• COLD AS A NUN’S NASTY
adj. 1971 Aust. sl. – extremely cold
 
• COLD AS A PADDOCK
adj. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – very cold
 
• COLD AS BELIX
adj. 1955 Amer. dial. – very cold
 
• COLD AS BILLY BEDAM
adj. 1938 Amer. dial. – very cold
 
• COLD AS BLAZES
adj. 1943 Amer. dial. – very cold
 
• COLD AS BLITZEN
adj. 1966 Amer. dial. – very cold
 
• COLD AS BLIXEN
adj. 1911 Amer. dial. – extremely cold
 
• COLD AS BLIXES
adj. 1908 Amer. dial. – very cold
 
• COLD AS BLIXUM
adj. 1906 Amer. dial. – extremely cold
 
• COLD AS BLUGEONS
adj. 1969 Amer. dial. – very cold
 
• COLD AS WHIZZ
adj. 1874 Amer. dial. – very cold
 
• COLD BISCUIT
n. 1. 1961 US high school jargon – a person lacking any apparent sex appeal
n. 2. 1972 US sl. – a female who does not respond to sexual overtures
 
• COLD-BLOODED
adj. 1. 1962 African-American sl. – out-and-out; absolute  
adj. 2. 1969 African-American sl. – striking; exceptional; splendid; very cool 
 
• COLD BLOW
n. 1971 US sl. – air conditioning
 
• COLD BLUFF
n. 1980 US sl. – in poker: a large bet on a poor hand designed to mislead other players

• COLDBOX
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – an icebox

• COLD BUMPS
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – goosebumps
 
• COLD-BUST
vb. 1986 US sl. – to catch someone in the act; to reveal your own guilt inadvertently
 
• COLD-CALL
vb. 2002 UK sl. – to go into a pub hoping to make a sexual contact
 
• COLDCOCK
vb. 1. 1918 US sl. – to hit someone without warning, esp. with a blow to the head that knocks the person to the ground
vb. 2. 1937 Amer. dial. – to hurl, dart, or fling in a decisive manner
 
• COLD COFFEE
n. 1976 US sl. – beer
 
• COLD COMFORT
n. 1987 US necrophile usage – sexual activity with a corpse
 
• COLD COOK
n. 1720s sl. – an undertaker
 
• COLD COOKSHOP
n. c1830 sl. – an undertaker’s premises
 
• COLD COOK’S SHOP
n. c1830 sl. – an undertaker’s premises
 
• COLD CROTCH
n. 1993 US sl. – the application of an ice pack on the scrotum of a man who has overdosed on heroin
 
• COLD-CUNT
vb. 1982 US sl. – of a woman: to treat someone with hostility
 
• COLD DECK
n. 1. 1857 US sl. – in card games: a stacked deck of cards
n. 2. 1952 Can. logging usage – logs swept into a stack to be moved after drying
vb. 1884 Amer. dial. – (as ‘cold-deck’) to deceive, to cheat

• COLD DECKER
n. 1920 Amer. dial. – a person who uses a stacked deck of cards; a cheat
 
• COLD DOPE
n. 1951 US sl. – in horse racing: information based on empirical evidence
 
• COLD DRAW
n. 1964 Can. – in curling: a rock curled into an open house or into the house without rubbing or knocking out another rock
 
• COLD ENGLISH
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – iced tea
 
• COLDER THAN A NUN’S ASS
adj. 1972 Amer. sl. – very cold
 
• COLDER THAN A POLAR BEAR’S ASS
adj. c1944 Amer. sl. – very cold
 
• COLDER THAN A WITCH’S TIT
adj. 1978 Aust. sl. – extremely cold; also, extremely unfriendly
 
• COLDER THAN BILLY BE DAMNED
adj. 1958 Amer. dial. – very cold
 
• COLDER THAN BILLY HELL
adj. 1958 Amer. dial. – very cold
 
• COLDER THAN BILLY THUNDER
adj. 1958 Amer. dial. – very cold
 
• COLDER THAN BLAZES
adj. 1943 Amer. dial. – very cold
 
• COLDER THAN BLIXENS
adj. 1927 Amer. dial. – very cold
 
• COLDER THAN WHALEY
adj. 1935 Amer. dial. – very cold
 
• COLD FEET
n. 1896 sl., orig. US – fear of doing something risky or dangerous; a reluctance to proceed
 
• COLD FINGER WORK
n. 1948 US sl. – picking the pocket of a man preoccupied with sex
 
• COLD FISH
n. 1. 1924 US sl. – an unfriendly person
n. 2. 1977 Can. sl. – a standoffish, unwelcoming girl
 
• COLD-FOOTED
adj. 1. 1918 Amer. dial. – cowardly, unventuresome
adj. 2. 1964 Amer. dial. – of a horse: lame
adv. 1966 Amer. dial. – firmly, frankly, bluntly
 
• COLD-FOOTER
n. 1916 Aust. & Amer. dial. – a cowardly soldier, or someone too cowardly to become a soldier; a timid or cowardly person
 
• COLD HARBOUR
n. 1899 – a place of shelter from the weather for wayfarers, constructed by the wayside

• COLD HEAT
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – goosebumps
 
• COLD HOLE
n. 1991 US sl. – during Vietnam: an enemy tunnel that has been verified as empty
 
• COLDIE
n. 1953 Aust. sl. – a glass, bottle, or can of cold beer

• COLD IN HAND
adj. 1942 Amer. dial. – without cash, broke
 
• COLD IN THE DONG
n. 1981 US sl. – gonorrhea
 
• COLD IRON
n. L17 sl. – a sword
 
• COLD LAMPING
n. 1990s African-American sl. – explaining hitherto complex, impenetrable matters
 
• COLD LEAD
n. 19C sl. – a bullet
 
• COLD LIKE DOG NOSE
adj. 2003 Trinidad & Tobago – very cold
 
• COLD MEAT
n. 1. L18 sl. – a corpse
n. 2. 1910s sl. – one who has been knocked unconscious
 
• COLD-MEAT CART
n. 1820 sl. – a vehicle used to carry dead bodies; a hearse
 
• COLD MEAT CRATE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a hearse
 
• COLD MEAT JOB
n. 20C police jargon – any case that involves a corpse
 
• COLD MEAT PARTY
n. 1908 US sl. – a funeral or wake
 
• COLD MEAT TRAIN
n. 20C sl. – a funeral procession or a train that serves a cemetery
 
• COLD MEAT WAGON
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a hearse
 
• COLD MUTTON
n. L18 sl. – a corpse

• COLD-NATURED
adj. 1908 Amer. dial. – prone to feel cold; said of persons
 
• COLD ONE
n. 1. 1927 US sl. – a cold beer
n. 2. 1962 US sl. – an empty wallet, purse, or safe

• COLD-OUT
adj. 1940 Amer. dial. – whole, entire, full
adv. 1933 Amer. dial. – really, completely, plain

• COLDOVERS
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – food saved for another meal; leftovers
 
• COLD PAN
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an unattractive person

• COLD PIMPLES
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – gooseflesh
 
• COLD PIT
n. 1993 US sl. – in motor racing: a member of the pit crew who works behind the wall separating the pit from the race track
 
• COLD-PLATE
vb. 1993 US sl. – to attach a legitimate license plate to a stolen vehicle that matches the description of the vehicle to which the license plate belongs
 
• COLD POTATO
n. 1. 1960 UK rhyming sl. (‘potater’) – a waiter, esp. a slow or inefficient one
n. 2. 1967 Amer. dial. – a dull, idle, boring, or worthless person
n. 3. 1967 Amer. dial. – something that is dull, boring, or worthless
 
• COLD PROWL
n. 1976 Can. sl. – an assumed easy house to rob
 
• COLD-READ
vb. 1989 US sl. – of a fortune-teller: to tell a fortune without background information on the customer, relying on observations and the customer’s answers for the predictions

• COLD SCALD
n. 1839 Amer. dial. – a misfortune
 
• COLD SHAKE
n. 1. 1883 Amer. dial. – a dismissal; the cold shoulder
n. 2. 1989 US sl. – a method of preparing pills for injection by crushing and then dissolving them in cold water instead of heating with a flame

• COLD SHEETS
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – doughnuts; generally, tough doughnuts

• COLD SHUT
n. 1958 Amer. dial. – a tough doughnut
 
• COLD SPOT
n. 1967 US sl. – a glass of iced tea
 
• COLD STEEL
n. World War II Amer. sl. – bayonets (in hand-to-hand fighting)
 
• COLD STORAGE
n. 1. 1949 US sl. – a morgue
n. 2. 1949 US sl. – solitary confinement
n. 3. 1966 Amer. dial. – a county or city jail
 
• COLDSTREAM GUARDS; COLDSTREAMS
n. 1992 UK rhyming sl. – playing cards

• COLD TEA
n. 1907 Amer. dial. – beer
 
• COLD TEA SIGN
n. 2002 UK sl. – an irreverent indicator of a geriatric’s death in hospital
 
• COLD TURKEY
adj. 1953 US sl. – used of an attempt to break a drug addiction: sudden and complete without narcotics or medication to ease the withdrawal symptoms
n. 1. 1921 sl., orig. US – the sudden completely giving up of an addictive drug, esp. as a method of withdrawal
n. 2. 1980 US sl. – in blackjack: a hand composed of two face cards
n. 3. 1988 US sl. – in poker: two kings dealt consecutively
vb. 1949 US sl. – to withdraw from a habit or addiction suddenly and without any tapering off

• COLD-WEATHER BUMPS
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – goosebumps
 
• COLD WEATHER INDICATORS
n. 2001 US sl. – a woman’s nipples
 
• COLD WIRE
n. 1941 US sl. – an unsuccessful or unlikable person
 
• COLD-WITHOUT
adj. Bk1902 colloq, – of drinks: unmixed with water
 
• COLE
n. Bk1903 sl. – money
 
• COLGATE
n. 2003 Trinidad & Tobago – any toothpaste  
 
• COLI
n. 1978 US drug culture sl. – marijuana grown in Colombia
 
• COLIANDER SEEDS
n. L17 UK sl. – money
 
• COLIFOR TOSTAO
n. 1973 US sl. – marijuana; a ‘toasted cauliflower’ in unconventional Spanish
 
• COLIN
n. 2002 UK sl. – an erection
 
• COLISEUM CURTAINS
n. 2002 UK sl. – the foreskin
 
• COLLABO
n. 2003 UK sl. – an artistic collaboration
 
• COLLACHRYMATE
adj. 1593 obs. rare – mingled with tears; accompanied with weeping
vb. 1. 1593 obs. rare – to weep or lament with, or in sympathy with others; to commiserate
vb. 2. 1657 obs. rare – to exude in the form of tears
 
• COLLAR
n. 1. 1871 sl., orig. US – an arrest
n. 2. 1960 US sl. – an improvised seal between a dropper and needle used to inject drugs
n. 3. 1973 US sl. – a police officer
n. 4. 2000 UK gypsy usage – hard, laborious work
n. 5. 2000 US sl. – the steering column of a car
vb. 1. 1613 sl. – to grab someone by the collar, literally or figuratively; to arrest
vb. 2. 1700 UK sl. – to appropriate something; to steal something
vb. 3. 1938 US sl. – to understand something; to grasp something  
vb. 4. 1951 US sl. – in horse racing: to run neck and neck
vb. 5. 1971 Aust. sl. – from a male’s perspective: to have sex
 
• COLLAR A HOT
vb. 1947 US sl. – to eat a meal 
 
• COLLAR AND CUFF
n. 1934 UK rhyming sl. for ‘puff’ – a homosexual male

• COLLAR AND ELBOW
adj. 1926 Amer. dial. – of an eating establishment or manner of serving food: family style, informal; placed on the table, where each person serves himself

• COLLAR AND HAMES
n. 1961 Amer. dial. – a stiff collar and necktie

• COLLAR AND SHOULDER
adj. 1926 Amer. dial. – of an eating establishment or manner of serving food: family style, informal; placed on the table, where each person serves himself

• COLLAR AND TIE
adj. 1927 Amer. dial. – white-collar
 
• COLLARS AND CUFFS THAT MATCH
phr. 1984 US sl. – applied to a person, usually a woman, whose hair is neither bleached nor dyed

• COLLARS-FOR-DOLLARS
n. 2001 US sl. – a situation in which an arresting officer trades the criminal’s release for a share of the proceeds of the crime
 
• COLLAR THE JIVE
vb. 1947 US sl. – to understand what is being said

• COLLASH
vb. 1908 Amer. dial. – to clash, to collide

• COLLASP
vb. 1916 Amer. dial. – to collapse

• COLLATERAL
n. 1914 Amer. dial. – a clutter of personal belongings; odds and ends, such as found in an attic

• COLLATION
n. 1861 Amer. dial. – refreshments served to one’s guests at a meeting or ceremony
 
• COLLATS       
n. 2000 UK sl. – money (‘collateral’)
 
• COLLECT
n. 1966 Aust. sl. – a win at gambling
vb. 1. 1937 UK sl. – to call for a person and proceed with him or her
vb. 2. 1982 Aust. sl. – to win at gambling; to take your winnings
 
• COLLECT CALL
n. 1976 US sl. – a citizens’ band radio message for a specific named person
 
• COLLECTION BOX
n. 1982 Bahamas sl. – the vagina

• COLLECTOR HIGHWAY
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a ‘road that collects traffic and feeds it on to a main road’
 
• COLLECT RENT
vb.  Bk1903 cant – to rob travellers on the  highway
 
• COLLEGE
n. 1. 1699 UK sl. – jail
n. 2. 1892 Amer. dial. euphemism – a privy

• COLLEGE-CALLED
adj. 1977 Amer. dial. – qualified by virtue of one’s education
 
• COLLEGE CLASSIQUE
n. 1963 Can. – in Quebec: a specialized, college-preparatory school
 
• COLLEGE EYE
n. 1991 US Vietnam war usage – a Lockheed EC-121 Warning Star aircraft  
 
• COLLEGE HILL
n. 1970 US sl. – a well-off section of town
 
• COLLEGE JOE
n. 1961 US sl. – a quintessential college student
 
• COLLEGE TRY
n. 1918 US sl. – a sincere effort, despite the likelihood of failure
 
• COLLEGE WIDOW
n. 1900 US sl. – a woman who lives in or near a college town and dates men from the college year after year
 
• COLLEYFLOWER
n. 1976 Amer. dial. – a cauliflower
 
• COLL-HARDY
adj. 1581 obs. rare – foolhardy; foolishly rash
 
• COLLIBY
n. c1450 obs. – a small present or gift
 
• COLLIE
n. 1970 Jamaica sl. – marijuana
 
• COLLIEBUCTION
n. 1864 Sc. – a noisy squabble, a disturbance, a wrangle
 
• COLLIE DUG
n. 2002 Sc. rhyming sl. for ‘mug’ – a man; implying that to some degree the person is a fool or a victim
 
• COLLIE KNOX
n. 1980 UK rhyming sl. – the pox
 
• COLLIE MAN
n. 1977 Jamaican sl. – a marijuana dealer
 
COLLIFOBBLE
vb. 1. 19C Eng. dial. – to talk secretly together
vb. 2. 19C Eng. dial. – to cheat
 
COLLI-MOLLIECOLLI-MOLLYCOLLY-MOLLY
adj. 1711 – a jocular corruption of melancholy
 
COLLINS STREET SQUATTER
n. 1960s Aust. (Melbourne) sl. – a man, usually a youth, who frequents bars, cafes, etc. for no other reason that meeting his friends, gossiping and wasting time
 
• COLLIOCH
n. 1814 Ireland – an old woman
 
• COLLISION MATS
n. World War II Amer. sl. – pancakes; waffles
 
• COLLOCALISM
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a colloquial localism
 
• COLLOCUPLICATE
vb. 1623 obs. – to enrich
 
• COLLOGUE
n. E19 – a private talk; a secret plan or scheme
vb. 1. L16 – to wheedle, to coax
vb. 2. L18 – to confer privately and confidentially; to scheme or plot
 
• COLLOQUACIOUS
adj. 1837 humorous nonce word – given to colloquy, discourse, or conversation  
 
• COLLOQUIALANGUAGE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – colloquial speech
 
• COLLOQUIALS
n. L19 UK society usage – informal conversation
 
• COLLOUGH
n. 1814 Ireland – an old woman
 
• COLLUTULATE
vb. 1623 obs. – to defile
 
• COLLY
n. 1. 1960 UK sl. – an erection
n. 2. 1961 UK sl. – a cauliflower
vb. 1941 Amer. dial., esp. African-American – to understand, to comprehend
 
• COLLYFOGLE
vb. 19C Eng. dial. – to deceive, to cheat; to wheedle; to entice by flattery

• COLLY-FOX
vb. 1943 Amer. dial. – to idle about, and make mischief
 
• COLLYMOLLY
adj. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – melancholy

• COLLYROBIN
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – the kohlrabi
 
• COLLYWOBBLES
n. 1. 1823 sl. – stomach pain or an unsettled condition of the stomach
n. 2. 1969 Amer. dial. – menstruation
 
• THE COLLYWOBBLES
n. 1959 sl. – a feeling of internal queasiness at the prospect of a difficult or frightening undertaking;  intense anxiety or nervousness
 
COLNEY (HATCH)
n. 1960 UK rhyming sl. – a match
 
COLO
adj. Bk1892 Chinese Pidgin – cold
 
COLOGUE
vb. L18 – to confer privately and confidentially; to scheme or plot
 
COLOMBIAN
n. 1971 US sl. – extremely potent marijuana from Colombia
 
COLOMBIAN GOLD
n. 1976 US sl. – marijuana from Colombia, yellow in colour
 
COLOMBIAN MARCHING POWDER
n. 1992 US sl. – cocaine
 
COLOMBIAN NECKLACE
n. 1995 US sl. – a form of execution intended to set an example in which the victim’s throat is slit
 
COLOMBIAN NECKTIE
n. 1997 US sl. – a form of execution intended to set an example in which the victim’s throat is lit and the tongue pulled down through the gaping wound
 
COLOMBIAN RED
n. M20 US drug culture sl. – marijuana grown in Colombia
 
COLOMBO
n. 1976 US drug culture sl. – marijuana grown in Colombia, reddish in colour  
 
COLONEL
n. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – an auctioneer
n. 2. 1936 Amer. dial. – a native or resident of Kentucky
 
COLONEL BLIMP
n. 1. 1934 sl., derogatory – someone with reactionary views; a very conservative man
n. 2. 1992 UK rhyming sl. – a shrimp (seafood)
 
COLONEL (GADAFFI)
n. 2002 UK rhyming sl. – a café
 
COLONEL KLINK
n. 2002 US sl. – any high-ranking prison officer
 
COLONEL (PRESCOTT)
n. 1930s UK rhyming sl. – a waistcoat
 
COLONEL SANDERS
n. 1979 US sl. – a mature male homosexual who is especially attracted to boys or young men
 
COLONIST
n. c1810 sl. – a louse

COLOR
n. 1. 1851 Amer. dial. – gold
n. 2. 1965 Amer. dial. – a crayon

COLORADO MOCKINGBIRD
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a donkey or mule

COLORED
n. 1916 Amer. dial. – a Black person; Black people

COLORED PEOPLE’S TIME
n. 1926 Amer. dial. – an hour or two later than the prescribed time

COLOR-STRUCK
adj. 1934 Amer. dial. – conceited, vain, or egotistical because of the colour of one’s skin; preferring light-skinned to dark-skinned people
 
COLOUR-BLIND
adj. 1943 US sl. – given to embezzlement or other thievery
 
COLT
n. 1. 1864 sl. – a life-preserver (a short club with a heavy weighted end used as a weapon
n. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. – an illegitimate child

COLT OVER THE FENCE
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – an illegitimate child
 
A COLT’S TOOTH
n. c1386 – an addiction to youthful pleasures
 
COLUMBIAN
n. M20 US drug culture sl. – marijuana grown in Colombia
 
COLUMBIAN RED
n. M20 US drug culture sl. – marijuana grown in Colombia
 
COLUMBIA RED
n. M20 US drug culture sl. – marijuana grown in Colombia

COLUMBIA RIVER TURKEY
n. 1945 Amer. dial. – a salmon
 
COLUMBINE
n. 19C Brit. sl. – a prostitute
 
COLUMBO
n. M20 US drug culture sl. – marijuana grown in Colombia


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Updated: September 8, 2022