Dictionary: COM – COME

• COMADRE
n. 1834 Amer. dial. – a godmother; a close woman friend of a family

• COMANCHE
n. 1980s US homosexual use – a man who uses cosmetics

• COMANCHE PILL
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a laxative
 
• COMATO-CRAPULOSE
adj. 1850 humorous nonce word – in a state of drowsiness and headache consequent on intoxication

• COMB
n. 1. 1824 Amer. dial. – the ridge or peak of a roof; the strip of material covering the ridge
n. 2. 1848 Amer. dial. obs. – the crest of a wave
n. 3. 1969 Amer. dial. – a pine cone
 
• COMB DOWN
vb. Bk1892 Aust. sl. – to ill-treat; to thrash

• COMBER
n. 1840 Amer. dial. – a long curling wave
 
• COMBINATION CHIP
n. Bk1914 criminals’ sl. – a till; a cash drawer with belling device

• COMBINDER
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a combine harvester

• COMBING DOWN; COMBING OUT; COMBING OVER
n. 1959 Amer. dial. – a scolding
 
• COMBO
n. 1896 Aust. sl. – a White man who lives with an Aboriginal woman
 
• COMBOMAN
n. 1896 Aust. sl. – a White man who lives with an Aboriginal woman

• COMB ONE’S HAIR
vb. 1928 Amer. dial. – to whip, to beat, to thrash; to scold severely, to find fault with

• COMB ONE’S HEAD
vb. 1795 Amer. dial. – to whip, to beat, to thrash; to scold severely, to find fault with

• COMB ONE’S WOOL
vb. 1927 Amer. dial. – to whip, to beat, to thrash; to scold severely, to find fault with

• COMBOOZELATED
adj. M20 US sl. – drunk

• COMB THE KINKS OUT OF ONE
vb. 1911 Amer. dial. – to correct faulty notions; to ‘set someone straight’

• COMBUSTIBLE
n. 1975 Amer. dial. – a gale of wind approaching hurricane velocity
 
• COME
n. 1. 1923 sl. – ejaculated semen
n. 2. 1967 US sl. – an orgasm
n. 3. 1992 UK rhyming sl. (Come and Go) – snow
vb. 1. c1600 sl. – to achieve orgasm
vb. 2. 1970 UK sl. – to yield to bribery or persuasion
 
• COME ABOUT
vb. 19C Brit. colloq. – to copulate with a woman; said by women of men
 
• COME ABOUT A WOMAN
vb. 19C Brit. colloq. – to coit a woman
 
• COME A-CALLYHOOTIN’
vb. c1960 Amer. dial. – to move very fast or rapidly and noisily
 
• COME A CROPPER
vb. 1. 1999 UK – to fall heavily; to be victim of an accident
vb. 2. 20C colloq. – to fail completely
 
• COME ACROSS
vb. 1. 1887 Amer. dial. – to occur to one
vb. 2. 1921 US sl. – to have sex as the result of persuasive insistence
vb. 3. 1951 Amer. dial. – to interrupt
vb. 4. 1967 Aust. sl. – to take part in sexual intercourse; generally of a woman
vb. 5. 1970 Amer. dial. – to make oneself clear
vb. 6. 1973 US sl. – to agree to become an informer
vb. 7. 2002 UK sl. – to give the appearance of having a specified characteristic

• COME A DODGE
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – to play a trick

• COME AGAIN?
phr. 1970 US – please repeat or restate what you just said
 
• COME A GUTSER
vb. 1918 Aust. sl. – to come undone; to fail miserably; to fall heavily; to trip over and fall

• COME-ALL-YOU
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – a commotion, a to-do. a fist fight; a free-for-all
 
• COME ALOFT
vb. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally
 
• COME-AND-GO
adj. 1968 Amer. dial. – easygoing; taking things as they come and not worrying
n. 1992 UK rhyming sl. – (as ‘come and go’) snow
 
• COME APART
vb. 1. 1930s sl. – to collapse emotionally; to lose control of one’s feelings
vb. 2. 1961 Amer. dial. – of a horse: to buck
 
• COME A PEARLER
vb. M19 sl. – to fall down; to trip over an obstacle, usually sustaining some form of injury
 
• COME A-POLING
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to be slow
 
• COME A PURLER
vb. M19 sl. – to fall down; to trip over an obstacle, usually sustaining some form of injury
 
• COME A RIVER
vb. 1970s US sl. – of a woman: to have a very intense orgasm
 
• COME-AROUND
n. 1. 1960s US sl. – menstruation
n. 2. 1990s W. Indies sl. – a person who is tolerated but not welcome
vb. 1. 1905 Amer. dial. – (as ‘come around) to coax, to entice
vb. 2. 1910s US sl. – (as ‘come around’) to menstruate
 
• COME A STOOMER;  COME A STUMER
vb. 1900 Aust. sl. – to lose one’s money

• COME AT
vb. 1872 Amer. dial. – to suggest, to imply, to mean

• COME-AT-ABLE
adj. 1859 Amer. dial. – accessible procurable
n. 1839 Amer. dial. – something that is readily accessible

• COME AT ONESELF
vb. 1966 Amer. dial. – to regain consciousness, to come to
 
• COME A TUMBLE
vb. 1992 UK rhyming sl. for ‘rumble’ – to detect something; to understand something
 
• COME A-ZOONIN’
vb. 1884 Amer. dial. – to come running
 
• COME BACK-OVER
vb. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – to return
 
• COME BIG
vb. 1989 Aust. sl. – of a bettor in horse racing: to bet more than usual on a race
 
• COME-BY-CHANCE
adj. 19C Eng. dial. – accidental
n. 1. 1760 colloq. – an illegitimate child
n. 2. 19C Eng. dial. – something that comes into your possession by accident
 
• COME BY THE LAME POST
vb. 1658 obs. – to be behind time
 
• COME CAPTAIN ARMSTRONG
vb. Bk1891 turf sl. – in horse racing: to ‘pull’ a horse and thus prevent him from winning
 
• COME CLEAN
vb. 1919 sl., orig. US – to tell the truth

• COME CLEAR
vb. 1927 Amer. dial. – to be exonerated, to be acquitted on trial
 
• COME COPPER
vb. 20C criminals’ sl. – to inform the police
 
• COME DARK HOME
vb. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to come home after dark
 
• COME DARK OVER
vb. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to become dark
 
• COME DAY, GO DAY
adj. 1918 Amer. dial. – easygoing, indolent, unambitious, lackadaisical
phr. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – applied to an improvident person who spends all and saves nothing

• COME DOWN IN A PILE
vb. 1950 Amer. dial. – to die
 
• COME DOWN LIKE TRAINED PIGS
vb. 1951 US sl. – in horse racing: to finish a race exactly as predicted
 
• COME DOWN ON
vb. 1. 1888 sl. – to reprimand
vb. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to humiliate
vb. 3. 1972 African American – to fight; to confront; to assault
 
• COME DOWN ON LIKE A TON OF BRICKS
vb. 1888 sl. – to reprimand
 
• COME DOWN TO CASES
vb. 1918 Amer. dial. – to come to the point
 
• COME DOWN TO HARDPAN
vb. 1861 Amer. dial. – to face up to reality; to become realistic
 
• COME DOWN UPON
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to humiliate
 
• COME DOWN WITH A HARK
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to come down with a run, to fall suddenly
 
• COME DOWN WITH THE DERBIES
vb. L17 UK criminals’ sl. – to pay a bill or debt
 
• COMEDY MERCHANT
n. Bk1891 theatrical sl. – an actor

• COME EASY, COME GO
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – easygoing

• COME EASY, GO EASY
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – easygoing
 
• COME FAIR
vb. 1665 obs. – to become favourable
 
• COME HALF LARKS WITH SOMEONE
vb. 1923 Brit. sl. – to impose on someone’s credulity

• COME-HERE
n. 1936 Amer. dial. – an outsider; one who does not have roots in a community
 
• COME HIGH OR COME LOW
adv. 2003 Trinidad and Tobago – anyway, nevertheless, no matter what
 
• COME-HITHER LOOK
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a flirtatious glance
 
• COME HOME
vb. 1997 US sl. – of the effects of LSD: to dwindle, diminish and vanish
 
• COME HOME EARLY
vb. 1951 US sl. – in horse racing: to establish and hold an early lead to win a race
 
• COME HOT
vb. 1985 US sl. – in a confidence swindle: to complete the swindle which the victim immediately understands to have been a swindle
 
• COME IN
vb. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to calve
 
• COME IN A PEA
vb. 1959 Amer. dial. – to come very close to doing something
 
• COME IN AT THE CABIN WINDOW
vb. 1794 US nautical sl. – to be appointed a ship’s officer without having had sea experience
 
• COME IN PUDDING-TIME
vb. M17 colloq. – to come in good time, before it’s too late
 
• COME IN THROUGH THE CABIN WINDOW
vb. World War II Amer. Navy sl. – to obtain a commission
 
• COME IT OVER SOMEONE
vb. 1827 sl. – to try to get the better of someone by trickery
 
• COME IT WITH SOMEONE
vb. 1827 sl. – to try to get the better of someone by trickery
 
• COME LIKE SALT
vb. 2003 Trinidad and Tobago – to be in great abundance
 
• COME NIGH AS A PEA
vb. 1901 Amer. dial. – to come very close to doing something

• COME-OFF
n. 1. 1884 Amer. dial. – a circumstance, an outcome, or some particular behaviour, often unfortunate
n. 2. 1934 Amer. dial. – a thing or creature
 
• COME OFF IT!
int. 1912 sl. – I don’t believe it
 
• COME OFF OF IT!
int. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – don’t be ridiculous!
 
• COME OFF THE GRASS
vb. a1891 US sl. – to stop talking foolishness
 
• COME OFF THE RAILS
vb. M19 sl. – to suffer an emotional breakdown
 
• COME-ON
int. 1603 – an exclamation of disbelief, disapproval, etc.
n. 1. 1898 criminals’ sl. – a prospective victim
n. 2. 1902 Amer. dial. – an allurement; bait
 
• THE COME-ON EYE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a flirtatious glance
 
• COME ON LIKE GANGBUSTERS
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to begin or proceed in a vigorous fashion
 
• COME ON ONE’S GUAVA
vb. 1970s S. Afr. sl. – to make a fool of oneself
 
• COME ON STRONG
vb. 1. 1940s Amer. sl. – in horse racing: to gain steadily and rapidly in a race
vb. 2. 1950s sl. – to speak aggressively, forcefully; to make one’s presence and opinions felt; to create a strong impression
vb. 3. 1950s sl. – to be seductive
vb. 4. 1970s Amer. sl. – to be vehement and positive
 
• COME ON THE RING
vb. a1400 sl. – to take one’s turn
 
• COME ON TO SOMEONE
vb. 1980s Amer. sl. – to make a sexual advance
 
• THE COME-ON TYPE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a gullible person; a dupe
 
• COME OUT
vb. 1. 1840s Amer. sl. – to declare oneself; to take a position
vb. 2. 1896 Amer. sl. – to end; to eventuate
vb. 3. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – to succeed
vb. 4. 1941 sl, orig. US – to admit to one’s homosexuality
 
• COME OUT AHEAD
vb. 1930s Amer. sl. – to win

• COME OUTER
n. 1860 Amer. dial. – a dissenter, one who drops out of an established organization, usually religious but sometimes political
 
• COME OUT IN THE WASH
vb. 1903 – to be dealt with as a natural consequence  
 
• COME OUT OF A BAG
vb. 1983 Amer. sl. – to behave in an objectionable manner
 
• COME OUT OF SOAK
vb. L19 sl. – to get over one’s hangover
 
• COME OUT OF THE CANE
vb. 1906 Amer. dial. – to come out of retirement, privacy, or inactivity
 
• COME OUT OF THE CLOSET
vb. 1971 sl, orig. US – to admit to one’s homosexuality  
 
• COME OUT OF THE LITTLE END OF THE HORN
vb. 17C colloq. – to get the worst of a bargain; to be reduced in circumstances; to fail
 
• COME OUT OF THE STICKS
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – lacking manners, uncouth, boorish
 
• COME OUT OF THE WOODWORK
vb. 1973 UK – of someone or something unpleasant: to appear; to arrive on the scene; to emerge
 
• COME OUT ON TOP
vb. 1930s Amer. sl. – to win
 
• COME OUT WITH THE CAKES
vb. 1874 Eng. dial. – to be silly or half-witted

• COME OVER
vb. 1. 1954 Amer. dial. – to pay a debt
vb. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. euphemism – to die
 
• COME OVER ALL PECULIAR
vb. 2003 UK sl. – to feel suddenly physically indisposed or emotionally upset
 
• COME OVER ALL QUEER
vb. 1937 UK sl. – to feel suddenly physically indisposed or emotionally upset
 
• COME OVER ALL UNNECESSARY
vb. 1984 UK sl. – to become sexually excited
 
• COME-O’-WILL
n. 1. 1815 Sc. – an illegitimate child
n. 2. 1815 Sc. – a person (or thing) that comes of his own accord, or without being invited
n. 3. 1815 Sc. – a plant, tree, etc. that springs up spontaneously
n. 4. 1815 Sc. – a newcomer to a place who can show no ancient standing there
 
• COMER
n. Bk1913 Amer. dial. – a person making rapid progress

• COMER-AND-GOER
n. 1899 Amer. dial. – a tourist
 
• COME ROUND
vb. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to begin to menstruate
 
• COME ROUND ON THE PAINT
vb. 1953 Aust. sl. – of a racehorse: to take a bend on the inside

• COME-SEE
n. 1933 Amer. dial. – a delicate child; ‘The child has come to the world, indecisively, to see whether or not it wishes to stay.’
 
• COME SHORT HOME
vb. 17C colloq. – to be put in prison

• COME SICK
vb. 1948 Amer. dial. – to menstruate
 
• COMESSATION
n. 1. c1380 obs. – a frolic and jovial meeting to eat, drink, and make good cheer; feasting, banqueting, revelling
n. 2. 1648 obs. – eating together
 
• COMESTIBLE
adj. 1483 obs. – fit to eat, edible, eatable
n. 1837 – an edible, an article of food
 
• COME STRONG
vb. 1. 20C sl. – to speak aggressively, forcefully; to make one’s presence and opinions felt
vb. 2. 1950s sl. – to be seductive
 
• COME THE ABDABS
vb. 1940s sl. – to fool someone
 
• COME THE ACID
vb. 1917 sl. – to act contrarily, or aggressively; to argue; to be unpleasant or offensive; to speak in a caustic or sarcastic manner
 
• COME THE ACID DROP
vb. 1910s sl. – to act contrarily, or aggressively; to argue; to be unpleasant or offensive; to speak in a caustic or sarcastic manner
 
• COME THE BIG FIGURE
vb. 1848 Amer. sl. – to do or provide what is required
 
• COME THE BLUDGE ON
vb. 1958 Aust. sl. – to sponge upon someone
 
• COME THE CUNT
vb. 1984 UK sl. – to be particularly obstreperous or unpleasant
 
• COME THE KINK
vb. M19 US sl. – to steal a Black slave from the country, and dispose of them in town
 
• COME THE LA-DI-DA
vb. c1883 sl. – to show off in dress and manner
 
• COME THE LARDY-DAH
vb. c1883 sl. – to show off in dress and manner
 
• COME THE OLD ABDABS
vb. 1940s sl. – to hoax, to fool
 
• COME THE OLD ACID
vb. 1953 UK sl. – to behave in an  unpleasant, aggressive, or overbearing manner; to speak in a sarcastic or caustic way 
 
• COME THE OLD ACID DROP
vb. 1962 UK sl. – to be heavily sarcastic or especially impudent
 
• COME THE OLD CUNT
vb. 1984 UK sl. – to be particularly obstreperous or unpleasant
 
• COME THE OLD SOLDIER
vb. 1. 1818 UK sl., orig. military usage  – to wheedle; to impose on someone  
vb. 2. 1984 UK sl. – to hector someone; to domineer someone, by virtue of supposed greater knowledge
 
• COME THE OLD TIN SOLDIER ‘
vb. 1977 UK sl. – to be impertinent or obstructive
 
• COME THE PADDY OVER
vb. 1821 sl. – to bamboozle, to humbug
 
• COME THE RAW PRAWN
vb. 1962 UK sl. – to bluff, to make yourself a nuisance
 
• COME THE RAW PRAWN OVER
vb. 1942 Aust. sl. – to try to deceive someone
 
• COME THE SPOON
vb. c1865 sl. – to make love, esp. if sentimental
 
• COME THE TIN SOLDIER
vb. 1977 UK sl. – to be impertinent or obstructive
 
• COME THROUGH
vb. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to be converted to a religious life; to get religion
vb. 2. 1916 Amer. dial. – to confess fully
vb. 3. 1916 Amer. dial. – to pay a debt
 
• COME THROUGH THE HARD
vb. 1795 Sc. – to encounter difficulties; to experience adverse fortune
 
• COME THROUGH WITH ALL HAIRS LYING FLAT
vb. 1934 Amer. dial. – to come through unscathed
 
• COME TO A GOAT’S HOUSE FOR FEATHERS
vb. 1972 Amer. dial. – to ask a person for something which he would not be expected to have
 
• COME TO AN ANCHOR
vb. 18C Eng. colloq. – to sit down

• COME-TOGETHER
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a fight between two people, mostly with words
 
• COME TO GRIEF
vb. 1. 1850 UK – to get into serious trouble; to fail
vb. 2. 1854 UK – to take a tumble; to have a fall
 
• COME TO HANDGRIPS
vb. 1571 – to come to close combat
 
• COME TO HANDSTROKES
vb. 1548 obs. – to come to blows or hand-to-hand fighting
 
• COME TO HANDY STROKES
vb. 1548 obs. – to come to blows or hand-to-hand fighting

• COME-TO-HEAVEN COLLAR
n. 1925 Amer. dial. – a wing collar
 
• COME TO NEARPOINTS
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to come very near an agreement  

• COME TO ONE’S MILK
vb. 1927 Amer. dial. – to yield to authority, to comply; to cease to be stubborn

• COME-TOO-SOON
n. 1940 Amer. dial. – a child born out of wedlock
 
• COME TO TAW
vb. 1838 Amer. dial. – to meet expectations or requirements; to come up to scratch
 
• COME TO THE ABOVE OF
vb. a1387 obs. – to attain superiority or mastery over, to overcome
 
• COME TO THE GOAT’S HOUSE FOR WOOL
vb. 1946 Amer. dial. – to ask a person for something which he would not be expected to have
 
• COME TO THE LICK-LOG
vb. 1942 Amer. dial. – to face facts, to make a difficult decision
 
• COME TO THEMSELVES
vb. 1899 Sc. – to perish, to die
 
• COME TO THE SEAM-NEEDLE
vb. 1944 Amer. dial. – to reach a good stopping place

• COME TO TIME
vb. 1937 Amer. dial. – to yield to authority, to comply
 
• COME UNCRUNK
vb. 1973 Amer. dial. – of an engine: to stop running
 
• COME-UP-AND-SEE-ME-SOMETIME LOOK
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a flirtatious glance
 
• COME UP ‘MONGST THE MISSIN’
vb. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to die; to be lost  
 
• COME UPON THE RAKE
vb. 18C sl. – to live in a rakish or dissolute manner

• COMEUPPANCE
n. 1941 Amer. dial. – an advantage

• COME-UPPER
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – an able, energetic person who gets things done
 
• COME UP SMILING
vb. M19 sl., orig. boxing usage – to face a difficult circumstance without showing fear or complaining
 
• COME UP TAILS
vb. 1970s US sl. – to find oneself in an unpleasant or problematic situation
 
• COME UP TO CHALK
vb. 1836 US sl. – to fulfil expectations; to be satisfactory
 
• COME UP TO TAW
vb. 1846 Amer. dial. – to meet expectations or requirements; to come up to scratch
 
• COME UP TO THE CHALK
vb. 1836 US sl. – to fulfil expectations; to be satisfactory
 
• COME UP WITH THE RATIONS
vb. 1925 Brit. sl., derogatory – to get a service or other medal not awarded for gallantry

• COME WITH ONE’S HORNS DOWN
vb. 1912 Amer. dial. – to come as if ready for a contest, as a bull when he is angry
 
• COME YOUR LOT
vb. 1964 UK sl. – to experience an orgasm
 
• COME YOUR MUTTON
vb. 1961 UK sl. – of a male: to masturbate
 
• COME YOUR TURKEY
vb. 1961 UK sl.  – of a male: to masturbate


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