Dictionary: COU – COZ

• COUCH LIZARD
n. 1954 Amer. sl. – one who necks on a couch with his girl
 
• COUCH POTATO
n. 1979 sl., orig. US  – someone who spends leisure time as passively as possible, esp. watching TV or videos, eats junk food, and takes little or no exercise

• COUGAR DEN
n. 1958 US logging usage – a bunkhouse

• COUGAR JUICE
n. 1. 1958 US logging usage – kerosene
n. 2. 1958 US logging usage – home-made hard liquor

• COUGAR MILK
n. 1958 Amer. dial. – home-made hard liquor

• COUGAR RUN
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – home-made hard liquor
 
• COUGH-AND-SNEEZE
n. c1880 rhyming sl. – cheese 
 
• COUGHING CLARA
n. World War II Amer. sl. – a heavy artillery gun

• COUGHING SICKNESS
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – tuberculosis
 
• COUGH UP
vb. 1. 1894 sl. – to pay out money
vb. 2. 1966 Amer. dial. – to vomit violently
 
• COUGH UP ONE’S COOKIES
vb. 1941 Amer. sl. – to vomit

• COUILLON
adj. 1967 Amer. dial. – stupid, inept
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a fool, a hick. an inept person
 
• COULD CARE LESS
vb. 1966 US – to be indifferent to something, not care
 
• COULD EAT A HORSE
phr. 1936 sl. – hungry
 
• COULDN’T-CARE-LESS
adj. 1947 – indifferent
vb. 1946 – (as ‘couldn’t care less’) to be indifferent to something, not care
 
• COULDN’T ORGANIZE A URINE SAMPLE IN A GOLDEN SHOWER
phr. 2005 UK sl. – used of an inefficient person or organization

• COULEE
n. 1933 Amer. dial. – an excessive drinker of whisky
 
• COUNT
n. 1950s Amer. sl. – the amount
 
• COUNT DOMINOES
n. 20C sl. – dominoes whose pips add up to five or ten

• COUNTERDICT
vb. 1905 Amer. dial. – to contradict
 
• COUNTER-JUMPER
n. 1829 sl., derogatory – a shop assistant or shopkeeper

• COUNTERPIECE
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a bedspread

• COUNTERPIN
n. 1836 Amer. dial. – a bedspread
 
• COUNTESS OF PUDDLE-DOCK
n. 17C sl. – an imaginary aristocrat
 
• COUNTING DAISY ROOTS
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – dead and buried
 
• COUNTING WORMS
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – dead and buried
 
• COUNT ONE’S BEADS
vb. 1792 – to say one’s prayers
 
• COUNT ONE’S EGGS
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to be wrong, to be mistaken
 
• COUNT ONE’S POTATOES
vb. 1928 Amer. dial. – to say grace at table

• COUNTRY BLOCK
n. 1928 Amer. dial. – an indefinite distance, relatively long

• COUNTRY BOOB
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person
 
• COUNTRY BOOBOO
n. 1996 British Virgin Islands – a naive, gullible person  
 
• COUNTRY BOOKIE
n. 1904 Trinidad and Tobago – a naive rustic
 
• COUNTRY BUCK
n. 1959 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person; a hillbilly
 
• COUNTRY CADILLAC
n. 1976 US sl. – a pickup truck
 
• COUNTRY CLUB
n. 1. 1960 US sl. – a minimum security, comfortable prison generally reserved for corporate and banking criminals
n. 2. 1973 US sl. – anything that appears to be relatively comfortable and undemanding
 
• COUNTRY COUSIN
n. 1. 1908 US sl. – the bleed period of the menstrual period
n. 2. 1909 UK rhyming sl. – a dozen
n. 3. 1950 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person

• COUNTRY CRACKER
n. 1865 Amer. dial. – a backwoodsman, a rustic or countrified person

• COUNTRY FEVER
n. 1822 Amer. dial. – malaria

• COUNTRY GAWK
n. 1931 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person

• COUNTRY GOOK
n. 1973 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person

• COUNTRY HAYSEED
n. 1973 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person

• COUNTRY HICK
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person

• COUNTRY HOOSIER
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person

• COUNTRY HUNK
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person
 
• COUNTRY IKE
n. c1960 Amer. dial. – an uncouth, ignorant or rude fellow; a rustic
 
• COUNTRY JACK
n. 1930 Amer. dial. – a rustic, a countrified person; a simple fellow
 
• COUNTRY JAKE
n. 1856 US sl. – an oaf; a bumpkin

• COUNTRY JAY
n. 1899 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person

• COUNTRY JAYHAWK
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person

• COUNTRY JERK
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person

• COUNTRY JIG
n. 1973 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person

• COUNTRY JIGGER
n. 1973 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person

• COUNTRY LIGHT
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – the high beam of an automobile headlight

• COUNTRY MILE
n. 1951 US sl. – a long distance or margin
 
• COUNTRY MOUSE
n. 2003 sl. – in Antarctica: a scientist or a scientist’s assistant whose work takes them into the field, away from McMurdo Station

• COUNTRY PUNK
n. 1973 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person

• COUNTRY ROUGH
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a rude or disrespectful person

• COUNTRY RUBE
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person
 
• COUNTRY SAGER
n. 1949 Amer. dial. – a rustic; a country bumpkin; a poor White person
 
• COUNTRY SEND
n. 1997 US sl. – in a big con: sending the victim away to retrieve money
 
• COUNTRY STORE
n. 1968 US sl., Vietnam war usage – a military self-service supply centre
 
• COUNTRY STRAIGHT
n. 1978 US sl. – in poker: a hand consisting of four sequenced cards which can be converted into a five-card sequence with the correct draw at either end of the sequence
 
• COUNTRY WOOL
n. 1956 Can. – homespun wool
 
• COUNT STORE
n. 1985 US sl. – a rigged carnival game
 
• COUNT THE HOOKS!
phr. 1995 Can. military usage – used for demanding that a subordinate recognizes the uniform and rank of the superior rebuking him or her
 
• COUNT THE HOOPS!
phr. 1995 Can. military usage – used for demanding that a subordinate recognizes the uniform and rank of the superior rebuking him or her

• COUNT TIES
vb. 1893 Amer. dial. – to walk on a railroad track
 
• COUNTY
adj. 1921 Brit. sl. – snobbish, pretentious
n. 1953 US sl. – any county jail, where the accused are held before trial and prisoners convicted of misdemeanours are incarcerated for short sentences

• COUNTY ATTORNEY
n. 1933 Amer. dial. – a stew made of whatever is available

• COUNTY BEEF
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – deer shot illegally
 
• COUNTY BLUES
n. 1993 US sl. – a blue uniform issued to prisoners in a county jail
 
• COUNTY BOARDING HOUSE
n. 1965 Amer. sl. – a jail

• COUNTY HOTEL
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a county jail
 
• COUNTY MOUNTIE
n. 1. 1975 US sl. – a local police officer
n. 2. 1981 UK sl. – a member of the Ulster Defence Regiment (1970-1992)
 
• COUNT YOUR FINGERS!
phr. 1984 UK sl. – used with heavy humour to suggest distrust of a person who is shaking, or has just shaken, someone’s hand
 
• COUNTY SHOES
n. 1973 US sl. – inexpensive shoes issued to prisoners by a county jail
 
• COUNTY TIME
n. 1996 US sl. – time served in a local county jail, as opposed to a state or federal prison
 
• COUP
n. 1. 1895 Aust. sl. – in horse racing: a secret betting plunge in which a great deal of money is bet at favourable odds
n. 2. 2001 UK sl. – a crime
 
• COUPLE
n. 1935 UK sl. – several drinks, esp. beers, not necessarily two
 
• COUPLE OF BOB
n. 1. 1980 UK sl. – a non-specific amount of money (pre-1971, a ‘bob’ was a shilling)
n. 2. 1992 UK rhyming sl. – a job
n. 3. 1992 UK rhyming sl. for ‘gob’ – a lump of phlegm
 
• COUPLE OF HUMPS
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a short time; a moment
 
• COUPLE OF JERKS
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a short time; a moment
 
• COUPLE OF KICKS
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a short time; a moment
 
• COUPLE OF SHAKES
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a short time; a moment
 
• COUPLE OF WINKS
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a short time; a moment

• COUPLE-THREE
n. 1935 Amer. dial. – two or three; a few, several
 
• COUPLE WITH
vb. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally
 
• COUPLING-HOUSE
n. Bk1902 sl. – a brothel
 
• COUPON
n. 1. 1976 US sl. – in trucking: a speeding ticket
n. 2. 1980 UK sl. – the face
n. 3. 1996 US sl. – an IOU, which has not and will not be paid off
 
• COUP THE LADLE
vb. 1. 1854 Ireland  – to turn head over heels
vb. 2. 1914 Sc. – to play at seesaw

• COURAGE
n. 1981 Amer. dial. – sexual vigour or desire

• COURAGE BUMP
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a pimple

• COURIER BOATS
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – long trailing clouds high in the sky

• COURTESY
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a party at which gifts are given; a shower

• COURTHOUSE
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – an outside toilet

• COURTING APPLE
n. 1976 Amer. dial., jocular usage – an onion

• COURTING MAN
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a womanizer, a rake

• COURTING SEAT
n. 1983 Amer. dial. – a loveseat
 
• COUSE
n. 1920s sl., chiefly US – a woman, usually promiscuous or unattractive; hence, a prostitute

• COUSEN IN
vb. 1935 Amer. dial. obs. – to ingratiate oneself into favour
 
• COUSIN
n. 1. World War II Amer. sl. – a close friend
n. 2. 1938 Amer. dial. – a dupe
n. 3. 1970 Amer. dial. – a mosquito

• COUSIN ANNE
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a Welsh woman
 
• COUSIN ELLA
n. 20C rhyming sl. – an umbrella
 
• COUSIN JACK
n. 1890 – a Cornishman

• COUSIN JENNY
n. 1918 Amer. dial. – a Cornishwoman

• COUSIN ON
vb. 1917 Amer. dial. – to live with one as a relative

• COUSINS
n. 1968 Amer. dial. euphemism – a man and woman who are not married but live together as if they were

• COUSIN UP
vb. 1967 Amer. dial. – to try to gain somebody’s favour
 
• COUTER
n. Bk1903 sl. – £1

• COUTHIE; COUTHY
adj. 1938 Amer. dial. – amiable, genial, agreeable
 
• COVE
n. 1. 1567 sl. – a male person, a fellow
n. 2. 1836 Amer. dial. – a shallow lake or swamp
n. 3. Bk1892 Aust. sl. – a master or overseer of an Australian station
n. 4. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – a foolish man; an easy dupe
n. 5. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a peculiar, eccentric person
n. 6. 1969 Amer. dial. – a grove or copse

• COVE-CULL
n. 1952 Amer. dial. – a mountaineer
 
• COVEE
n. c1815 sl. – a man; often applied to the landlord of a public-house

• COVEITE
n. 1869 Amer. dial. – a person who lives in a remote part of the mountains

• COVE JUICE
n. 1952 Amer. dial. – illegally distilled whisky, moonshine
 
• COVENT-GARDEN
n. Bk1903 sl. – a farthing (1/4d)
 
• COVENT GARDEN NUNNERY
n. Bk1902 sl. – a brothel
 
• COVE OF THE BUDGING-KEN
n. M19 sl. – a landlord
 
• COVER
n. 1939 Amer. dial. – a roof
vb. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally

• COVERED CARS
n. 1960 Amer. dial. – a passenger train

• COVERED UP
adj. 1980 Amer. dial. – booked up; busy
 
• COVERED WAGON
n. 1. World War II Amer. sl. – an aircraft carrier
n. 2. 1966 Amer. dial. – an outside toilet
 
• COVER GROUND
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to go fast
 
• COVER-ME-DECENTLY
n. Bk1891 sl. – a coat
 
• COVER ONESELF WITH A WET SACK
vb. a1651 obs. – to make vain excuses
 
• COVER-SLUT
n. 1. 1639 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – something worn to cover dirt, untidiness, or sluttishness; a garment to hide slovenliness; hence, an apron 
n. 2. 1895 Eng. dial. – one who takes the blame due to another

• COVER THE WATERFRONT
vb. 1. 1948 Amer. dial. euphemism – to menstruate
vb. 2. 1984 Amer. dial. – to diaper a baby

• COVER UP
vb. 1966 Amer. dial. – to become cloudy
 
• COVESS DINGE
n. 1848 Amer. thieves’ sl., derogatory – a Black woman
 
• COVE WITH A JAZEY
n. Bk1896 sl. – a judge

• COVEY
n. 1851 Amer. dial. – a chap, a bloke
 
• COVINOUS
adj. 1570 obs. – fraudulent, deceitful, collusive, dishonest

• COVITE
n. 1869 Amer. dial. – a person who lives in a remote part of the mountains
 
• COW
n. 1. 1696 – an unpleasant or despicable female
n. 2. 1864 Aust. & NZ sl. – something unpleasant or undesirable
n. 3. Bk1903 sl. – £1,000
n. 4. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a dull young man; an awkward girl
n. 5. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – milk or cream
n. 6. 1968 Amer. dial. – a woman’s breast
n. 7. 1970 Amer. dial. euphemism – the buttocks
 
• COWABUNGA!
int. 1954 sl., orig. & chiefly US – an exclamation of exhilaration, delight, or satisfaction, esp. in surfing as the surfer climbs or rides a wave

• COW ANT
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – an aphid
 
• COWARDLY CUSTARD
n. a1800 –  a fearful or cowardly person
 
• COWARDOUS
adj. 1480 obs. – cowardly; timid; faint-hearted

• COWARDY CALF
n. 1897 Amer. dial. – a timid, cowardly, or easily frightened person
 
• COWARDY-CAT
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a very timid or cowardly person

• COW BARN IS OPEN
phr. 1966 Amer. dial. – a warning to a man that his trouser-fly is open

• COWBELL PHOSPHATE
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – whisky, esp. illegally made whisky

• COWBELLY
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – soft river mud

• COWBOY
n. 1. 1942 Amer. dial. – a reckless driver; an inexperienced driver
n. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. – a policeman
vb. 1980 Amer. dial. – to drive a car in a reckless manner

• COWBOY BIBLE
n. 1980 Amer. dial. – a little book of cigarette papers

• COWBOY COCKTAIL
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – straight whisky

• COWBOY COFFEE
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – boiled or very strong coffee

• COWBOY DRIVER
n. 1942 Amer. dial. – a reckless driver; an inexperienced driver

• COWBOY (FOUNTAIN) PEN
n. 1961 Amer. dial. – a plant stalk used for doodling in the soil

• COWBOY LEG
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a bowleg

• COWBOY PREACHER
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – an unprofessional, part-time lay preacher

• COWBOY-STEW
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a stew made of whatever is available

• COWBRUTE
n. 1923 Amer. dial. – a bull

• COW BUG
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – an aphid

• COW-CAKE
n. 19C Eng. & Amer. dial. – cow dung
 
• COW-CHILO
n. Bk1892 Chinese Pidgin – a girl
 
• COW-CLAP
n. 19C Eng. dial. – cow dung
 
• COW-CLOD
n. 20C US colloq. – cow dung
 
• COW-COD
n. 20C Jamaican usage – a whip or a club made from a dried bull’s penis
 
• COW COLLEGE
n. Bk1913 Amer. dial. – Agricultural School (of the University of Minnesota)
 
• COW-CONFETTI
n. E20 Aust. euphemism for ‘bullshit’ – nonsense

• COW COUNTY
n. 1850 Amer. dial. – a rural place, ‘the sticks’
 
• COW-COW
vb. Bk1892 Chinese Pidgin – to be very angry; to scold

• COW CRITTER
n. 1859 Amer. dial. euphemism – a bull

• COW CROWD
n. 1929 Amer. dial. – an outfit or group of cowboys

• COW CUD
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a wad or roll of paper money

• COWCUMBER
n. 1685 Amer. dial. – a cucumber
 
• COW-CUNTED
adj. 19C Brit. sl. – pert. to a woman whose genitals have been deformed by giving birth or by ‘debauchery’

• COW CUP
n. 1960 Amer. dial. – the flush of the Milky Way
 
• COW-DAB
n. 1899 Amer. dial. – cow dung

• COW DOCTOR
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – an incapable doctor or one with a bad reputation

• COWDOG
n. 1921 Amer. dial. – a cowboy

• COW EXPRESS
n. 1970 African-American – shoe leather

• COW EYE; COW’S EYE
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a very round, sometimes protruding, eye

• COW-EYED
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – having very round eyes
 
• COW-FLOP
n. 19C Eng. dial. – cow dung

• COW FOOT
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a large or clumsy foot

• COW-FOOTED
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – clumsy
 
• COW-GREASE
n. Bk1892 Chinese Pidgin – butter

• COW-HANDED
adj. 1. 1834 Amer. dial. obs. – awkward, clumsy
adj. 2. 1931 Amer. dial. – in baseball, of a batter: having the hands in reversed position; cross-handed
 
• COW-HEARTED
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – cowardly

• COW-HICK
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person
 
• COWHIDE
vb. 1794 Amer. dial. – to beat with a cowhide whip; to flog
 
• COW-HOCKED
adj. 19C sl. – having large or awkward feet; clumsy about the ankles
 
• COW IN A TIN BARN
n. World War II Amer. sl. – canned milk; canned corned beef; canned beef

• COW JOCKEY
n. 1. 1935 Amer. dial. – a dealer in cows
n. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. – a rustic or countrified person
 
• COW JUICE
n. World War II Amer. sl. – milk or cream
 
• COW KICKER
n. 1986 Amer. dial. – a cowboy

• COW KINE
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – cattle
 
• COW-KISSING
n. M20 US sl. – kissing with much movement of the tongues and lips

• COWLICK
n. 1976 African-American – a bald spot

• COWLICKS
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – illegible handwriting

• COW LOAD
n. c1937 Amer. dial. – a piece of dried cow manure

THE COW LOT GATE IS OPEN
phr. 1954 Amer. dial. – a warning that a trouser fly is open
 
• COW-OIL
n. Bk1892 Chinese Pidgin – butter

• COW PANCAKE
n. 1971 Amer. dial. – cow dung, cow manure

• COW PASTE
n. 1936 Amer. dial. – butter
 
• COW-PAT
n. 19C Eng. dial. – cow dung
 
• COW PATCH
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a remote place, or a very small or unimportant place
 
• COW-PIE
n. 20C US colloq. – cow dung
 
• COW PILOT
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a stewardess, a flight attendant
 
• COW-PLAT
n. L16 Eng, dial. – cow dung; a mass of cow dung

• COW PROD
n. 1961 Amer. dial. – a cowboy

• COW PRODDER
n. 1930 Amer. dial. – a cowboy
 
• COW-PUCKY
n. 20C colloq. – cow dung

• COWPUNCH
vb. 1881 Amer. dial. – to herd cattle
 
• COW-PUNCHER
n. 1. 1878 Amer. sl. – a cowboy
n. 2. 1975 Amer. dial. – a veterinarian

• COW-PUSHER
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – a train that stops at every station

• COW SALVE
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – butter
 
• COWS AND HORSES WILL GET OUT
phr. 20C US sl. – said to warn a male that his fly is undone

• COW’S BROTHER
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a bull

• COW SENSE
n. 1942 Amer. dial. – common sense

• COW’S GENTLEMAN FRIEND
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a bull
 
• COWSH
n. 20C Aust. sl. – ‘cowshit’; nonsense
 
• COW-SHARD
n. L16 Eng, dial. – cow dung; a mass of cow dung
 
• COW-SHARN
n. L16 Eng, dial. – cow dung; a mass of cow dung
 
• COW-SHERN
n. L16 Eng, dial. – cow dung; a mass of cow dung

• COW’S HUSBAND
n. 1942 Amer. dial. – a bull
 
• COWSLIP
n. 20C US colloq. – cow dung, esp. fresh cow dung
 
• COWSON
n. 20C Brit. sl. – a term of contempt, a son of a bitch; an unpleasant or disagreeable person 
 
• COW-SPANKER
n. 1906 Aust. & NZ sl. – a dairy farmer or stockman
 
• COW’S SPOUSE
n. L18 Brit. euphemism – a bull

• COW’S TAIL
n. 1. 1908 Amer. dial. – the last one to arrive; a tagalong
n. 2. 1970 Amer. dial. – a frayed rope
n. 3. 1970 Amer. dial. – unkempt hair

• COW’S TAILS
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – long trailing clouds high in the sky
 
• COW’S TONGUE
n. Bk1898 Eng. & Amer. dial. – a person who is mild or harsh-spoken according to circumstance; a two-faced person; a hypocrite; a gruff old codger who is soft-hearted
 
• COW-STORM
n. 1914 Amer. dial. – a drizzling rain unaccompanied by wind

• COWSUCKER
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – an old, clumsy boat

• COW TAIL
n. 1908 Amer. dial. – the last one to arrive; a tagalong
vb. 1970 Amer. dial. – (as ‘cowtail’) to drive a baseball away out yonder

• COW TOPPER
n. 1939 Amer. dial. euphemism – a bull

• COW TRAIN
n. 1951 Amer. dial. – a train that stops at every station along the way

• COW VINE
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – the wild morning glory
 
• COW-WADDIE; COW-WADDY
n. 1923 Amer. West usage – a cowboy; a ranch hand

• COW WALKERS
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – stilts
 
• COW-WEEK
n. M19 sl. – the 3 weeks immediately before Christmas, characterized in shops and factories by an increasingly heavy workload

• COW WOOD
n. 1850 Amer. dial. – dried cow dung used as fuel
 
• COWYARD CONFETTI
n. 1930s Aust. sl. – ‘bullshit’; empty talk, nonsense

• COW-YARD TAR
n. 1905 Amer. dial. – a person who is both a farmer and sailor according to the season
 
• COXBONES!
int. 1668 – an exclamation and oath; “By God’s bones!”  
 
• COXCOMB
n. L16 – a fool; a fop or dandy
 
• COXCOMB-BIRD
n. 1732 obs. – a parrot
 
• COXSWAIN OF THE PLOW
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. navy sl. – a sailor recently enlisted
 
• COXY-ROXY
adj. 1887 Eng. dial. – –merrily and fantastically tipsy or drunk
 
• COYOTE
n. 1. 1872 Amer. dial. – a squatter
n. 2. 19C Brit. – the female genitals
n. 3. 1872 Amer. dial. – an American Indian, or a person with one Indian parent
n. 4. 20C US sl. – a person who imports or exploits illegal immigrants, esp. from Mexico
vb. 1. 1857 Amer. dial. – to dig one’s way out; to get away or move surreptitiously
vb. 2. 1948 Amer. dial. – to wander about, to drift

• COYOTE AROUND THE RIM
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – to touch a subject on the edges, as in a conversation or speech, to hint
 
• COYOTE-UGLY
adj. 20C teen & high school sl. – extremely ugly

• COYOTE WELL
n. 1933 Amer. dial. – a usually hidden desert spring, a water hole

• COYOTEY
adj. 1937 Amer. dial. – mangy-looking
 
• COZY
adj. 20C teen & high school sl. – dull or lacking in interest
 
• COZZER
n. 1950 Brit. sl. – a police officer
 
• COZZIE
n. 1926 Aust. sl. – a swimsuit or pair of swimming trunks
 
• COZZPOT
n. 1962 Brit. sl. – a police officer


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