Dictionary: CP – CRAZ

• CP
n. 1987 US sl. – corporal punishment
 
• C PHONE
n. 1997 US sl. – a mobile telephone
 
• C.P.R. STRAWBERRIES
n. c1918 Can. railwaymen’s usage – prunes (Canadian Pacific Railways)
 
• CRAB
adj. 1961 UK sl. – perverse; ill-humoured, mean, cross
n. 1. 1580 UK  – a sour person
n. 2. 1825 – a crabbed, cross-grained, ill-tempered person
n. 3. 1893 colloq. – a finding fault; an adverse criticism or objection
n. 4. 1896 – a book returned unsold by a bookseller to the publisher
n. 5. World War II Amer. sl. – a person who complains a lot
n. 6. World War II Amer. sl. – a girl from Annapolis, Maryland
n. 7. 1916 nautical sl. – a midshipman, esp. a junior midshipman or naval cadet
n. 8. 1947 US sl. – a first-year college student
n. 9. 1982 Bahamas sl. – the vulva
n. 10. 1983 UK sl. – a member of the Royal Air Force
vb. 1. a1400-50 obs. – to cross; to put out of humour or temper; to irritate, to anger, to enrage, to provoke
vb. 2. 1662 obs. rare – to make ill-tempered or peevish
vb. 3. 1819 sl. – to criticize adversely, to find fault with
vb. 4. 1850 Eng. dial. – to break or bruise
vb. 5. 1899 sl. – to interfere with or obstruct the working, progress, or success of
vb. 6. Bk1914 criminals’ sl. – to spoil or ruin or render impossible any plan of action
vb. 7. 1943 UK sl. – of an aircraft: to fly close to the ground or water; to drift or manoeuvre sideways
vb. 8. 1906 Amer. sl. – to complain, to argue
vb. 9. 1948 UK sl. – in horse racing: to belittle a horse’s performance
vb. 10. 1969 Amer. dial. – to insult; to annoy
vb. 11. 1970 Amer. dial. – to cheat in school exams
vb. 12. 1978 US sl. – in parachuting: to direct the parachute across the wind direction
vb. 13. 1987 US sl. – in the television and film industries: to move the camera sideways

• CRAB-APPLE TWO-STEP
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – diarrhoea

• CRABAT
n. 1483 obs. – a couch

• CRABBER
n. 1909 – a person who finds fault or criticizes adversely

• CRABBING
n. 1. c1450 Sc. obs. – vexation, crossness
n. 2. 1819 – adverse criticism, a pulling to pieces

• CRABBISH
adj. c1485 obs. – cross, crabbed
 
• CRABBIT
adj. 19C Sc. & Irish – bad-tempered, irritable
 
• CRABBY
adj. 1. 1582 obs. – having a sideways gait
adj. 2. 1776 – bad-tempered, cross-grained, perverse, fractious, peevish, morose
n. 1982 Bahamas sl. – the vulva

• CRAB FACE
n. 1706 obs. – an ugly ill-tempered looking face

• CRAB-FACED
adj. 1563 – having an ugly, ill-tempered looking face

• CRAB EYE
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a protuberant or prominent eye
 
• CRABFEST
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an exchange of grievances

• CRABLET
n. 1841 – a small or young crab

• CRABLING
n. 1822 – a small or young crab
 
• CRAB ON THE ROCKS
n. 19C Brit. – an itching (possibly from lice) on the scrotum
 
• CRABS
n. 1. 19C – body lice, specifically those found in the pubic hair
n. 2. 20C US – syphilis
 
• CRAB-SHELLS
n. 1. 1807 sl. – shoes, boots
n. 2. 19C sl. – the feet

• CRAB-SIDLE
vb. 1803 – to sidle or shuffle sideways like a crab
 
• CRAB-STICK
n. 1. 1703 – a stick or cudgel of the wood of the crab-tree; a walking-stick made of the wood of the crab-tree; hence, a stick of any kind
n. 2. 1841 – a bad-tempered, morose person or child; a disagreeable, crabbed person
 
• CRAB THE ACT
vb. 1906 Amer. sl. – to spoil things; to thwart someone’s plans; to interfere with someone or something
 
• CRABTOWN
n. US Civil War usage – Annapolis, Maryland  
 
• CRACK
adj. 1. 1793 colloq. – excellent; first-rate; expert; finest, best
adj. 2. 1835 Amer. sl. – favourite
adj. 3. 1835 Amer. sl. – celebrated, famous
n. 1. a1387 – the breaking of wind
n. 2. c1450 arch. – loud talk, boast, brag; exaggeration, a lie
n. 3. 1487 – a cannon-shot (obs.); a rifle-shot
n. 4. 1570 – a flaw, deficiency, failing, unsoundness
n. 5. 16C – the female genitals
n. 6. 1600 obs. – a lively lad; a rogue
n. 7. 1601 – a craze, unsoundness of mind
n. 8. a1640 obs. – a boaster, a braggart, a liar
n. 9. 1677 obs. – a woman of broken reputation; a prostitute
n. 10. a1701 obs. – a crazy fellow
n. 11. 1725 colloq. – a short time; a moment; an instant
n. 12. 1725 colloq. – a sharp or cutting remark; a wisecrack
n. 13. 1749 thieves’ sl. – a burglar
n. 14. 1819 thieves’ sl. – house-breaking, burglary
n. 15. 1827 Sc. – a talkative person
n. 16. 1836 colloq. – a very hard blow
n. 17. 1851 sl. – dry wood
n. 18. 19C Sc. & Irish – a friendly chat
n. 19. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent
n. 20. a1966 Ireland – fun, amusement; mischief
n. 21. 1967 Amer. dial. – a small quantity of something; a bit; something very small
n. 22. 1969 Amer. dial. – assistance
n. 23. 1985 sl., orig. US – a hard crystalline form of cocaine broken into small pieces and inhaled or smoked
n. 24. 20C sl. – a try
n. 25. 20C US sl. – any young woman or any girl
n. 26. 20C US – coition
n. 27. 20C US colloq. – the anus
n. 28. 20C US sl. – women considered as sexual objects
vb. 1. c1315 – to utter, pronounce, or tell aloud or briskly
vb. 2. a1400 obs. – to snap or split asunder
vb. 3. c1470 – to slap, to smack, to box
vb. 4. c1470 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to talk big, to boast, to brag
vb. 5. c1450 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – to chat; to gossip
vb. 6. a1500 – to open a bottle or can for the purpose of drinking; hence, to open
vb. 7. a1640 – to puzzle out, to make out, to solve
vb. 8. 1653 – to break wind
vb. 9. 1659 – to come to pieces, to collapse, to break down
vb. 10. c1725 Amer. sl. – to deflower a virgin; usually considered vulgar
vb. 11. 1725 Amer. sl., orig. criminals’ usage – to break open or into for the purpose of theft; to burglarize
vb. 12. a1500 – to open a bottle or can for the purpose of drinking; hence, to open
vb. 13. 1791 Amer. prison sl. – to break jail; to escape from prison
vb. 14. 1811 Amer. sl. – to utter a wisecrack; to speak in a jesting or sarcastic manner
vb. 15. 1835 colloq. – to shoot with firearms, to fire
vb. 16. 1845 US – of dawn: to break
vb. 17. 1880 Amer. sl. – in sports (of a racehorse or human competitor): to lose a lead as a result of loss of stamina
vb. 18. 1882 sl. – in cricket: to hit a ball hard with the bat
vb. 19. 1891 Amer. sl. – to lose one’s combative or competitive spirit
vb. 20. 1917 Amer. sl. – to suffer an emotional breakdown; to become insane
vb. 21. 1922 Amer. criminals’ sl. – to divulge a confidence; also, to inform
vb. 22. 1927 Amer. sl. – to change money; to cash a cheque
vb. 23. 1928 Amer. criminals’ sl. – to ask; to make a demand of
vb. 24. 1934 Amer. sl. – to open a book for the purpose of studying
vb. 25. 1942 Amer. sl., chiefly African-American – to taunt or insult, as with a wisecrack
vb. 26. World War II Amer. sl. – to become nervous or afraid
vb. 27. World War II Amer. sl. – to wreck an airplane
vb. 28. 1952 Amer. criminals’ sl. – to seize or place under arrest
vb. 29. 1953 Amer. sl. – to surpass or exceed a limit, record, or benchmark number
vb. 30. 1958 Amer. Air Force usage – in the US Air Force: to open sealed orders
 
• CRACK A BOTTLE
vb. 20C – to open or drink a bottle
 
• CRACK A CRIB
vb. 19C criminals’ sl. – to break into a building

• CRACK A GUT
vb. 1965 Amer. dial. – to hurt oneself with violent laughter
 
• CRACKAJACK
adj. 19C sl. – excellent, first-class, superlative
n. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a person of marked ability or excellent
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent
 
• CRACK A JUDY’S TEACUP
vb. 19C Brit. sl. – to deflower a girl
 
• CRACK A KEN
vb. 1791 Amer. criminals’ sl. – to break into a house

• CRACK A PITCHER
vb. 19C Brit. sl. – to deflower a girl

• CRACKARET
n. 1653 obs. – the breaking of wind

• CRACK A RIB
vb. 1965 Amer. dial. – to hurt oneself with violent laughter
 
• CRACK A SHORT
vb. 1965 Amer. sl. – to break into cars
 
• CRACK A TIDY CRUST
vb. c1850 – to be successful in life; to make a comfortable income
 
• CRACKBRAIN
n. c1570 – a crazy person
 
• CRACK-BRAINED
adj. 1634 – crazy, eccentric

• CRACK CORN
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – to snore

• CRACK DAY
vb. 1970 Amer. dial. – to dawn

• CRACK DOWN
vb. 1938 Amer. dial. – to lower and shoot a gun
 
• CRACKED
adj. 1. 1527 sl. – ruined; bankrupt
adj. 2. 1610 colloq. – crazy, insane, mentally unbalanced
adj. 3. 18C sl. – deflowered
adj. 4. E18 US sl. – drunk
adj. 5. 1860 obs. – penniless
adj. 6. c1930 dart-players’ sl. – to be in need of 99 points
adj. 7. 1988 Amer. sl. – intoxicated by crack
 
• CRACKED CANISTER
n. Bk1890 sl. – a broken head
 
• CRACKED EGG
n. World War II Amer. sl. – a silly or stupid person
 
• CRACKED IN THE FILBERT
adj. c1880 Cockneys’ sl. – slightly or very eccentric or insane; crazy
 
• CRACKED IN THE RING
adj. 1. 1596 sl. – flawed
adj. 2. 1613 sl. – seduced, deflowered

• CRACKEDNESS
n. 1910 – craziness, unsoundness of mind
 
• CRACKED OUT
adj. 1988 Amer. sl. – intoxicated by crack
 
• CRACKED PIECE
n. E18 Brit. sl. – a prostitute or a sportive, nonvirgin young woman
 
• CRACKED PITCHER
n. M18 colloq. – a harlot still faintly respectable
 
• CRACKED UP
adj. 1. 1977 Amer. sl. – delighted; happy
adj. 2. 1988 Amer. sl. – intoxicated by crack
 
• CRACK-‘EM-UP
n. 1978 Amer. sl. – an automotive accident
 
• CRACKER
adj. 1964 sl., chiefly NZ – fine, excellent; exceptional of its kind
n. 1. 1509 – a boaster, a braggart; a liar
n. 2. 1625 colloq. – a lie; a very tall story
n. 3. M17 cant  – the backside
n. 4. 1751 sl., obs. – a pistol
n. 5. 1766 Amer. sl. – a backwoods Southern White person regarded as ignorant, brutal, loutish, bigoted, etc.; used contemptuously
n. 6. 1833 S. Afr. colloq. – leather, generally sheepskin, trousers
n. 7. 1861 sl. – a large amount of money, esp. one won or lost on a bet
n. 8. c1865 obs. – a heavy fall; a smash
n. 9. c1870 sl. – a dandy
n. 10. c1870 sl. – a very fast pace  
n. 11. 1887 Amer. dial. – a railroad
n. 12. 1891 sl. – an excellent person or thing; something exceptionally good or fine of its type
n. 13. c1910 NZ sl. – a cartridge
n. 14 Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a fine-looking, stylish, lively person; a very attractive, admirable, or appealing person
n. 15. 1914 Brit. sl. – a sexually attractive woman
n. 16. c1920 Aust. sl. – a £1 note
n. 17. 1928 African-American, derogatory – a White racist
n. 18. 1934 Aust. & NZ sl. – any money; a trivial amount of money
n. 19. 1937 Amer. dial. – a resident of Florida
n. 20. c1950 sl. – female pudend
n. 21. 20C Aust. sl. – a brothel
n. 22. 20C railwaymen’s sl. – a fog-warning detonator
n. 23. 20C sl. – a heavy punch
n. 24. M20 Aust. sl. – a worn-out horse, sheep, bullock

• CRACKER-ASS
n. 1966 Amer. dial. derogatory – a slender or skinny person
 
• CRACKER-BARREL
adj. 20C US – rural, rustic, of homely philosophy
 
• CRACKER FACTORY
n. 1981 US sl. – a mental hospital

• CRACKER-FED
adj. 1936 Amer. dial. – urban, living in the city
 
• CRACKERJACK
adj. 1899 sl., orig. US – excellent; first-class, superlative
n. 1. 1895 sl., orig. US – someone or something exceptional; a person or thing of highest excellence; a person of marked ability
n. 2. 1910s US sl. – an arrogant, cocky person
n. 3. 1970s US students’ sl. – a fool, an oaf
vb. 20C sl. – to fake, to make-believe

• CRACKERJACK PREACHER
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – an unprofessional part-time lay preacher
 
• CRACKERJACKS
n. 1980s drug culture sl. – smokers of crack cocaine
 
• CRACKERS
adj. 1928 sl. – crazy, mad; unbalanced; infatuated
int. 1967 Amer. dial. euphemism – Christ!
n. 1. 1815 – the teeth
n. 2. 1849 S. Afr. – leather trousers
n. 3. 1900s US sl. – beans
n. 4. 1960s drug culture sl. – LSD
n. 5. 1970s drug culture sl. – amyl nitrite
n. 6. 20C Cockneys’ sl. – hair curlers
n. 7. 20C sl. – prisoners that are insane or epileptic or suicidal or injured in head and spine

• CRACKERS AND BENDERS
n. 1943 Amer. dial. – ice that will bend when you step on it, but not break; the game of running and sliding on thin ice
 
• CRACKER STATE
n. 1808 US – Georgia

• CRACKETY!
int. 1970 Amer. dial. – used as a mild oath

• CRACKEY!
int. 1830 US – an exclamation of surprise
 
• CRACK-FENCER
n. M19 sl. – a street-seller of nuts

• CRACK FULL
adj. 1967 Amer. dial. – entirely full
 
• CRACK GALLERY
n. 1980s drug culture sl. – a place where users of crack congregate to buy and smoke the drug
 
• CRACK HALTER
n. 1573 obs. – one likely to die by the gallows; a gallows-bird; a rogue, a villain
 
• CRACK HAND
n. 19C sl. – an able, competent person
 
• CRACK HARDY
vb. 1. 1916 Aust. sl. – to put up with discomfort; to grin and bear it
vb. 2. 20C Aust. sl. – to keep a secret
 
• CRACK-HAUNTER
n. 19C sl. – the penis
 
• CRACKHEAD
n. 1986 sl. – a person who uses or who is addicted to crack cocaine

• CRACK-HEADED
adj. 1796 – impaired in intellect; crazy
 
• CRACK HEMP
n. a1616 obs. – a gallows-bird; a rogue, a villain
 
• CRACK HO
n. 20C African-American sl. – a woman who will offer sex in return for crack cocaine
 
• CRACK HOUSE
n. 1980s sl. – a room or whole house in which users gather to take crack
 
• CRACK-HUNTER
n. 19C sl. – the penis

• CRACKIE
n. 1963 Amer. dial. – a broken or chipped playing marble
 
• CRACKINESS
n. c1860 colloq. – extreme eccentricity; craziness
 
• CRACKING
adj. 1. 1528 – boasting, bragging
adj. 2. 1833 sl., orig. US – excellent, first-rate
adj. 3. 1834 sl. – very fast; exceedingly vigorous
n. 1. c1440 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – exaggerated talking, bragging, boasting
n. 2. 1587 – damaging of credit, reputation, etc.; a flaw; also, financial breakdown
 
• CRACKING BUT FACKING
phr. 1930s African-American sl. – conveying hard factual information in the guise of jokes and humour
 
• CRACKING TOOLS
n. B1823 cant  – implements of house-breaking
 
• CRACK IN THE PAN
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a blow in the face
 
• CRACK INTO FAME
vb. L19 sl. – to make famous by constant praise
 
• CRACK INTO REPUTATION
vb. L19 sl. – to make famous by constant praise
 
• CRACK INTO REPUTE
vb. L19 sl. – to make famous by constant praise
 
• CRACKISH
adj. L17 colloq. – of women only: wanton; promiscuous
 
• CRACK IT
vb. 1930s sl., orig. Aust. & NZ – to succeed, to overcome obstacles, esp. to achieve a successful seduction (from the male point of view)
 
• CRACK IT FOR A QUID
vb. 1960s Aust. sl. – to work as a prostitute
 
• CRACK-JAW
adj. 1827 colloq. – difficult to pronounce
 
• THE CRACK-LAY
n. c1785 criminals’ sl. obs. – house-breaking
 
• CRACKLE
n. 1. 1591 obs. – something that makes a crackling noise; a rattle
n. 2. L17 sl. – empty chatter, foolish talk
n. 3. M20 cant  – bank notes; five pounds and upwards
vb. 1. a1500 obs. – to quaver in singing
vb. 2. 1735 obs. – to crack and break off in small pieces
vb. 3. 1878 – to crack jokes in a small way
 
• CRACKLING
n. 1947 Brit. sl., offensive –  women as objects of desire

• CRACKLINGS
n. 1899 Amer. dial. – hardened mucus in the corners of the eyes in the morning

• CRACK LOOSE
vb. 1902 Amer. dial. – to act in a threatening manner

• CRACKLY ICE
n. 1954 Amer. dial. – thin, flexible ice on water; ice that will bend but not break when stepped on
 
• CRACKMANS
n. 1610 thieves’ cant – a hedge
 
• CRACK NIX!
int. 20C market-traders’ sl. – Don’t say a word!

• CRACK-NUT
n. 1656 – a nut-cracker
 
• CRACK ON
vb. 1. 1880s sl. ?orig military usage – to pretend, esp. to pretend to be ill or hurt
vb. 2. 1928 Amer. criminals’ sl. – to ask; to made a demand of
vb. 3. 1942 Amer. sl., chiefly African-American – to taunt or insult, as with a wisecrack
vb. 4. 1974 Amer. sl. – to proposition; to hit on
vb. 5. 20C colloq. – to talk incessantly; to boast

• CRACK ONE’S BREATH
vb. 1867 African-American – to speak; usually used in negative
 
• CRACK ONE’S BUTT
vb. 1938 Amer. sl. – to strain oneself; to exert oneself to the limit
 
• CRACK ONE’S EGG
vb. 19C sl. – in cricket: to score at least one run
 
• CRACK ONE’S JAW
vb. 1932 African-American sl. – to talk, esp. boastfully

• CRACK ONE’S SIDE(S)
vb. 1953 Amer. dial. – to hurt oneself with violent laughter

• CRACK ONE’S TEETH
vb. 1888 African-American – to speak; usually used in negative
 
• CRACK OUT
vb. 1952 Amer. criminals’ sl. – to seize or place under arrest
 
• CRACK-POT
adj. 1934 colloq. – of ideas, schemes: crazily impractical, unworkable, fantastic
n. 1. c1860 colloq. – a pretentiously useless, worthless person
n. 2. 1883 colloq. – a crazy or eccentric person

• CRACK-RACK
adj. 1582 obs. – describing a succession of cracks

• CRACK-ROPE
n. a1500 obs. – a gallows-bird; also, a rogue

• CRACK-SKULL
n. 1864 rare – a person having impaired intellect; a crazy fellow
 
• CRACKSMAN
n. 1. c1810 cant – a burglar
n. 2. c1850 sl. – the ‘membrum virile’
 
• CRACK SOMEONE UP
vb. 1966 sl., orig. & chiefly US – to cause to laugh
 
• CRACK THE BELL
vb. 1909 Cockneys’ sl. – to fail, to muddle things, to make a mistake, to ruin it  
 
• CRACK THE BOOKS
vb. 1934 Amer. sl. – to study
 
• CRACK THE JOINT
vb. 1943 Amer. sl. – to break out of a place or into it
 
• CRACK THE MONICA
vb. c1860 music-halls’ sl. – to ring the bell to summon a performer to reappear
 
• CRACK THE NUT
vb. 1961 US sl. – in gambling: to make enough money to meet the day’s expenses
 
• CRACK THE QUA
vb. 1807 Amer. sl. – to break out of jail
 
• CRACK THE WHIP
vb. 20C – to assert authority suddenly or forcibly

• CRACK-TRYST
n. 1817 Sc. – a person who fails to fulfil an engagement
 
• CRACK-UP
n. 1. US Civil War usage – an accident
n. 2. 1925 Royal Air Force colloq. – an accident causing damage that can be repaired
n. 3. 1926 – collapse; a crash
n. 4. 20C colloq. – a mental breakdown
– verbs usually as ‘crack up’ –
vb. 1. 1725 Amer. sl., orig. criminals’ usage – to break open or into for the purpose of theft; to burglarize
vb. 2. 1829 colloq. – to praise highly
vb. 3. c1850 colloq. – to be exhausted; to break down whether physically or mentally; to become insane
vb. 4. US Civil War usage – to cry out
vb. 5. US Civil War usage – to fail in an examination
vb. 6. US Civil War usage – to wreck
vb. 7. 1942 sl., orig. US – to be highly amused; to laugh uncontrollably
 
• CRACK WALNUTS IN ONE’S ASS
vb. 1972 Amer. sl. – to behave stupidly
 
• CRACK WISE
vb. 1. 1774 obs. – to speak wisely or cleverly
vb. 2. 1921 Amer. sl., orig. criminals’ usage – to speak in a knowing or sardonic manner; to offer insults; to wisecrack  
 
• CRACKY
adj. 1. 1801 chiefly Sc. – abounding in conversation, talkative
adj. 2. 1850 – crazy; senseless
adj. 3. 1930 Amer. dial. – odd, eccentric
int. 1830 Amer. dial. – a mild oath

• CRACKY BENDERS
n. 1943 Amer. dial. – ice that will bend when you step on it, but not break; the game of running and sliding on thin ice

• CRADDEN; CRADDON
n. 1. 1513 obs. – a coward, a craven
n. 2. 1825 Sc. – a dwarf

• CRADDENLY
adj. 1674 obs. – cowardly

• CRADLE
n. 1497 obs. – the bed or carriage of a cannon

• CRADLE-HOOD
n. 1599 – babyhood, infancy

• CRADLE HOLE
n. 1854 Amer. dial. – a large hole or rut in a road

• CRADLE LEGS
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – noticeably bent or uneven legs
 
• CRADLE-ROBBER
n. 1926 sl. – a person who has a sexual affair with someone much younger
 
• CRADLE-SNATCHER
n. 1907 sl. – a person who has a sexual affair with someone much younger

• CRADLE-WITTED
adj. a1586 obs. – having the wits of an infant
 
• CRAFFLE
vb. 19C Eng. dial. – to hobble

• CRAFT
n. 1. a1000 obs. – strength, might, power (physical or otherwise
n. 2. a1000 obs. – scholarship; book learning
n. 3. a1000 obs. – magic; witchcraft; sorcery
n. 4. a1000 obs. – a supernatural practice; a spell; an enchantment
n. 5. c1275 – cunning; deception, guile; trickery
n. 6. 1829 sl. – a woman, a girl
n. 7. 1842 Sc. & N. Eng. dial., obs. – a practitioner of a craft; a craftsman
vb. 1530 obs. – to act craftily; to use cunning or deception; to scheme

• CRAFTEDNESS
n. 1887 obs. rare – a being skilled in a craft or other activity; craftmanship

• CRAFTER
n. a1529 obs. – a person who practices deceit or trickery

• CRAFTFUL
adj. 1. c1335 rare – skilful, expert
adj. 2. 1776 obs. – characterized by cunning or guile; crafty

• CRAFTFULLY
adv. c1335 obs. – in a cunning or crafty manner

• CRAFTIHOOD
n. 1777 obs. – craftiness, cunning

• CRAFTILY
adj. c1335 obs. rare – skilfully or ingeniously made or done

• CRAFTIMAN; CRAFTYMAN
n. 1. a1000 obs. – a person who is skilled at a craft; a skilled artisan, craftsman, etc.
n. 2. c1384 obs. – the creator or originator of something

• CRAFTINESS
n. a1425 obs. – skilfulness; a being skilful or clever at doing something; ingenuity or ability in a field

• CRAFTING
n. a1529 obs. – crafty or cunning behaviour; deception; trickery
 
• CRAFTIOUS
adj. 1. c1449 obs. rare – skilful, artistic
adj. 2. c1449 obs. rare – engaged in a handicraft

• CRAFTIOUSLY
adv. c1450 obs. rare – skilfully

• CRAFTLESS
adj. 1. a1000 obs. – ignorant
adj. 2. 1650 rare – lacking cunning or craftiness; artless, guileless; innocent

• CRAFTLY
adj. 1. a1000 – skilful, expert
adj. 2. 1526 obs. – displaying skill at deception or deviousness; crafty, cunning
adv. c1225 obs. – cunningly; craftily; in a devious, wily, or shrewd manner

• CRAFTMASTER
n. 1557 rare – a person who is expert and experienced in a craft or other skilled occupation; a master craftsman

• CRAFTSMASTER
n. 1. 1548 rare – a person who is expert and experienced in a craft or other skilled occupation
n. 2. 1717 obs. – a master of cunning, deception, or trickery

• CRAFTY
n. a1000 obs. – a person who is skilled in a particular occupation or activity; a craftsman
adj. 1. a1000 obs. – strong, powerful, mighty
adj. 2. a1000 rare – skilled, skilful; capable, ingenious, or expert in a specified field or activity

• THE CRAFTY
n. 1. 1558 – people who are cunning, deceitful, or wily considered as a class
n. 2. 1989 – people who practise handicrafts considered as a class

• CRAFTY-HEADED
adj. 1589 obs. – shrewd; cunning; scheming

• CRAFTY-SICK
adj. 1600 obs. – feigning illness for a particular reason

• CRAG
n. 1. 1488 obs. exc. Sc. & Eng. dial. – the neck
n. 2. 1542 obs. rare – a lean, scraggy person
n. 3. 1773 obs. exc. Sc. & Eng. dial. – the throat

• CRAGGED
adj. a1400 – rugged, rough

• CRAGGEDNESS
n. 1598 – ruggedness, roughness

• CRAGGILY
adv. 1598 rare – ruggedly

• CRAGGINESS
n. 1611 – ruggedness

• CRAGGLY
adj. 1886 – hard and rough or rugged in form

• CRAGGY
adj. 1. 1568 – hard and rough or rugged in form
adj. 2. 1582 obs. – hard to get through or deal with; rough, rugged, difficult; perilous
adj. 3. 1774 rare – of sound: rough, harsh
 
• CRAGMANS
n. 17C cant – a hedge

• CRAGMANSHIP
n. 1951 – expertise in rock climbing

• (THE) CRAIC
n. 1972 – fun, amusement; entertaining company or conversation

• CRAIGIE
n. 1724 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – the neck

• CRAINTE
n. 1477 obs. rare – fear
 
• CRAINTIVE
adj. 1490 obs. – fearful, timorous, timid
 
• CRAKE
n. 1. c1320 N. Eng. dial. – a crow or raven
n. 2. 17C obs. – a boast, brag or bluster
n. 3. 1838 Eng. dial. – a murmuring, a grumbling
n. 4. 19C Sc. – a child’s toy rattle
n. 5. 19C Eng. dial. – a complainer
n. 6. 19C Eng. dial. – a talk; gossip, tale-telling, generally of an ill-natured kind
vb. 1. c1386 – of a crow, quail, etc.: to utter a harsh, grating cry
vb. 2. 1621 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to boast, brag; to gossip
vb. 3. 1657 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to grate harshly; to creak. as the hinge of a door
vb. 4. 1871 Eng. dial. – to whimper, or plaintively ask for a thing over and over again; to murmur, to complain, to fret .
vb. 5. 19C Eng. dial. – to quaver hoarsely in singing; to speak hoarsely
vb. 6. 19C Eng. dial. – to divulge, to confess
vb. 7. 19C Eng. dial. – to shout or cry

• CRALL
vb. a1475 obs. – to bend, to curve, to twist, to curl
 
• CRAM
n. 1842 sl. – a lie
vb. 1. 1794 sl. – to make believe false or exaggerated tales
vb. 2. 1930 Amer. dial. – to cohabit
 
• CRAMBAZZLE
n. 19C Eng. dial. – a worn-out, dissipated old man; an old man exhausted more by vicious indulgences or habits than by age 

• CRAMBE
n. 1611 – repetition of words, or saying the same thing over again

• CRAMBLE
vb. 1. 1570 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to creep about with many turns and twists; said of roots, stems, etc.
vb. 2. 1607 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to crawl, to hobble, to walk lamely, stiffly, or feebly
vb. 3. 1883 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to squeeze into a small area
 
• CRAMBLE TOES
n. 19C Eng. dial. – a person walking as with sore feet

• CRAMBLY
adj. 1. 1876 Eng. dial. – in a cramped state
adj. 2. 1878 Eng. dial. – tottery, unsteady, shaky
adj. 3. 1884 Eng. dial. – lame

• CRAMBO
n. 1697 – rhyme, rhyming

• CRAME
n. 1. 1477 Sc. – a booth or stall where goods are sold in a market or fair
n. 2. 1560 Sc. obs. – a pack or bundle of goods carried about for sale; a peddler’s stock of wares

• CRAMER
n. 1491 obs. – a person who sells goods at a stall or booth; also, a peddler or hawker

• CRAMERY
n. a1500 obs. – merchandise, such goods as are usually sold by a peddler

• CRAM-FULL
adj. 1837 – very full, over-full

• CRAM-JAM
adv. 1903 – chock-full
vb. 1905 Amer. dial. – to fill to overflowing

• CRAM-JAM FULL
adj. 1903 Amer. dial. – as full as possible

• CRAM-MAID
n. 1622 obs. – a woman who crams or fattens fowls; a poultry-woman

• CRAMMEE
n. 1883 – a student who is ‘crammed’ for an examination, etc.

• CRAMMELLY
adj. 1. 1876 Eng. dial. – in a cramped state
adj. 2. 1878 Eng. dial. – tottery, unsteady, shaky

• CRAMMER
n. 1. 1814 colloq. – a person who ‘crams’ pupils for an examination, etc.; a student who crams a subject
n. 2. 1861 sl. – a lie
n. 3. 1968 Amer. dial. – a small space in a house where you can hide things or get them out of the way; a cubbyhole

• CRAMMIST
n. 1862 – a student who crams a subject for examination

• CRAMOCKE
n. 1518 obs. – a crooked stick

• CRAMOISY
adj. 1480 arch. – crimson

• CRAMP
adj. 1. 1674 – difficult to understand or decipher
adj. 2. 1786 – contracted, strait, narrow; cramping

• CRAMPAND
adj. a1500 Sc. obs. – curling, curly

• CRAMP-COLIC
n. 1857 Amer. dial. – abdominal spasms; appendicitis
 
• CRAMPER
n. 1986 US sl. – a small cage in which a prisoner of war is confined

• CRAMPERN
vb. 1577 obs. rare – to cramp, to confine
 
• CRAMP IN THE HAND
n. 19C colloq. – niggardliness

• CRAMPISH
vb. c1374 obs. – to cramp; to stiffen painfully, to paralyze

• CRAMPLE
vb. a1825 Eng. dial. – to crawl, to hobble, to walk lamely, stiffly, or feebly

• CRAMPLE-HAMMED
adj. a1825 Eng. dial. – stiffened in the lower joints

• CRAMP-RINGS
n. 1567 thieves’ cant, obs. – shackles, fetters
 
• CRAMP-WORD
n. 1687 – a word difficult to pronounce or understand; any long, scientific, or uncommon word

• CRAMSE; CRAMZE
vb. 1440 obs. – to claw, to scratch
 
• CRAN
n. 2003 UK sl. – a hiding place for stolen goods
 
• CRANBERRY EYE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a bloodshot eye

• CRANBERRY PUSHER
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – a small train that runs on a narrow track
 
• CRANE
adj. 1697 – long and lanky
n. 1. 1541 obs. – the skull
n. 2. 1976 US sl. – in skateboarding: a manoeuvre in which the rider crouches on one foot, extending the other leg outwards
n. 3. 1997 US police sl. – a superior with a great deal of influence
vb. 1823 colloq. – to look before one leaps; to hesitate at or shrink back from a danger, difficulty, etc.
 
• CRANE-GUTTED
adj. 19C Eng. dial. – very thin, ‘herring-gutted’

• CRANE-NECKED
adj. 1834 – having a long neck

• CRANER
n. 1863 – a person who hesitates at or shrinks back from a danger, difficulty, etc.

• CRANEW
n. 1555 obs. – the skull

• CRANEY
adj. 1899 Amer. dial. – tall and slender

• CRANG
n. 1. 1819 – the carcass of a whale after the blubber has been removed; the flesh of a dead whale
n. 2. 1876 Eng. dial. – a skeleton
n. 3. 1895 Amer. dial. – a scrawny animal

• CRANGLE
vb. 1608 – to twist, to writhe, to wriggle

• CRANION
n. 1611 obs. – the skull; the head

• CRANIUM
n. 1. 1647 – the head
n. 2. 1842 – the skull
 
• CRANK
adj. 1. 1398 obs. – lusty, vigorous, in good condition
adj. 2. 1499 – lively, brisk, in high spirits; lusty, sprightly, merry; aggressively high-spirited, disposed to exult or triumph, cocky
adj. 3. 1696 nautical usage – of a boat or ship: liable to tip or capsize; unsteady
adj. 4. a1745 obs. exc. Sc. – awkward or difficult to pronounce, understand, or execute
adj. 5. 1802 – infirm, weak, shaky in health
adj. 6. 1825 Sc. – crooked, distorted; angularly twisted or bent
adj. 7. 1995 Fiji  – insane
adv. 1579 obs. – boldly, briskly, lustily
n. 1. 1562 obs. – a tortuous or somewhat inaccessible hole or crevice; a cranny
n. 2. 1572 – a bend, winding, meandering; a winding or crooked path, course, or channel
n. 3. 1588 obs. – a crooked or deceitful way; a deceit, wile, sleight
n. 4. 1594 – a twist or fanciful turn of speech; a verbal trick or conceit formed by twisting or changing, in any manner, the form or meaning of a word
n. 5. 1786 Sc. – a harsh or grating sound
n. 6. 1833 US colloq. – a mentally unstable person; an unreliable, unpredictable person; a person who is obsessed by a single topic or hobby
n. 7. 1848 – an eccentric notion or action; a crotchet, whim, caprice
n. 8. 1958 US sl. – a prison bully
n. 9. 1968 US sl. – the penis
n. 10. 1969 US sl. – an amphetamine drug, esp. methamphetamine
n. 11. 1985 Aust. sl. – an act of masturbation
n. 12. 1981 US sl. – a prison guard who takes pleasure in making life difficult for prisoners
n. 13. 1966 Amer. dial. – a pain that strikes you suddenly in the neck
vb. 1. 1594 obs. – to twist and turn about; to move with a sharply winding course, to zigzag
vb. 2. 1660 obs. – to wrinkle minutely with parallel ridges and furrows, to crinkle
vb. 3. 1827 – to make a harsh, jarring, or grating sound
vb. 4. 1970 US sl. – to use amphetamines or methamphetamine, central nervous system stimulants
vb. 5. 1971 sl. – to inject oneself with an illegal drug
vb. 6. 1988 US sl. – to excel
vb. 7. 1988 US sl. – in a card game: to deal the cards
vb. 8. 1991 US sl. – in computing: to perform well
vb. 9. 1994 US sl. – to turn up the volume of music to very loud
 
• CRANK BUG
n. 1977 US sl. – an insect that is seen by someone under the influence of methamphetamine but not by others
 
• CRANKCASE
n. 1960 US sl. – the head
 
• CRANK COMMANDO
n. 1970 UK sl. – an amphetamine or methamphetamine addict

• CRANK DOCTOR
n. 1981 Amer. dial. – a quack
 
• CRANKED
adj. 1. 1699 obs. – crinkled, wrinkled
adj. 2. 1957 US sl. – excited
adj. 3. 1950s Amer. sl. – high
adj. 4. 1971 US sl. – stimulated by methamphetamine or amphetamines
 
• CRANKED OUT
adj. 1. 1957 US sl. – excited
adj. 2. 1971 US sl. – stimulated by methamphetamine or amphetamines
 
• CRANKED UP
adj. 1. 1957 US sl. – excited
adj. 2. 1971 US sl. – stimulated by methamphetamine or amphetamines
 
• CRANKER
n. 1987 US sl. – a bowler who in delivering the ball lifts it high over his head in the backswing

• CRANKERY
n. 1884 – enthusiastic eccentricity
 
• CRANKING
adj. 1. 1567 obs. – lively, brisk, in high spirits; lusty, sprightly, merry
adj. 2. 20C teen & high school sl. – excellent; esp. in music
 
• CRANKISM
n. 1882 Amer. – enthusiastic eccentricity

• CRANKLE
adj. 1847 Eng. dial. – weak; shattered
n. 1598 – a bend, twist, winding; a curve or angular prominence
vb. 1598 – to bend in and out; to wind, to twist; to run zigzag

• CRANKLING
adj. 1596 – twisting or winding in and out
n. 1598 – a twisting or winding in and out

• CRANKLY
adv. 1566 – lustily, briskly, boldly

• CRANKNESS
n. 1. 1727 obs. – lustiness, vigour, liveliness, briskness
n. 2. 1890 – a being cranky or crazy

• CRANKOUS
adj. 1786 Sc. – irritable, fretful, cranky

• CRANKPOT
n. 1. 1966 Amer. dial. – a mean, bad-tempered person
n. 2. 1966 Amer. dial. – a person having odd or peculiar ideas or notions
n. 3. 1966 Amer. dial. – an idle, worthless person

• CRANK-SIDED
adj. a1883 Amer. dial. – askew, lopsided
 
• CRANK TAIL
vb. 1971 Trinidad and Tobago – to physically assault someone

• CRANKUM
n. 1. 1661 obs. – venereal disease, esp. syphilis
n. 2. 1822 – a twist, eccentric turn, a perverse belief, conceit
 
• CRANK UP
vb. 1978 UK sl. – to inject a drug
 
• CRANKY
adj. 1. 1787 Eng. dial. – ailing, sickly, in weak health, infirm in body
adj. 2. 1811 Eng. & Amer. dial. – brisk, merry, lively, disposed to exult, high-spirited, cheerful
adj. 3. 1821 – of capricious temper; difficult to please; cross-tempered
adj. 4. 1836 – full of twists or windings; crooked
adj. 5. 1850 – eccentric, queer, peculiar in notions or behaviour; crotchety, whimsical
adj. 6. 1862 – out of order, working badly, in bad repair
adj. 7. 1965 Amer. dial. – overly fastidious, fussy, particular

• CRANKY ABOUT
adj. 1967 Amer. dial. – enamored of, infatuated with

• CRANNY
adj. 1. 1673 Eng. dial. – brisk, merry, jovial. lively, disposed to exult
adj. 2. 1847 Eng. dial. – giddy, thoughtless
adj. 3. 1887 Eng. dial. – simple, foolish
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a privy or toilet

• CRANREUCH
n. c1686 Sc. – hoar-frost, rime

• CRANTS
n. 1592 obs. – a garland, a wreath

• CRANY
n. 1525 obs. – the brain-pan, the skull
 
• CRAP
adj. 1936 sl. – bad, inferior, of poor quality; unpleasant, displeasing; of a person: lacking ability, incompetent; unwell
int. 1932 – an exclamation of disgust, frustration, disappointment, etc.
n. 1. 1520 obs. – a scrap of food; a morsel
n. 2. 1699 sl. obs. – money; financial means
n. 3. 1789 cant obs. – the gallows
n. 4. 1846 sl. – excrement; a piece of excrement
n. 5. 1898 – trivial, insincere or untruthful talk or writing; nonsense, lies
n. 6. Bk1914 criminals’ sl. – treachery
n. 7. 1916 sl., orig. US – something worthless or of inferior quality
n. 8. 1925 orig. US – an unpleasant substance; dirt, muck
n. 9. 1926 sl. – defecation
n. 10. 1932 orig. & chiefly US – trouble, difficulty; misfortune
n. 11. 1935 – harassment; abuse, insolence
vb. 1. 1773 cant obs. – to hang someone
vb. 2. 1846 sl. – to defecate
vb. 3. 1928 sl. – to be nervous or fearful
vb. 4. 1928 US sl.- to talk nonsense to a person
vb. 5. 1930 US sl. – to flatter; to deceive with insincere or flattering talk
vb. 6. 1940 sl., orig. US – to talk aimlessly, pointlessly, or at tedious length; to chatter, to drivel
 
• CRAP AROUND
vb. 1935 US sl. – to waste time; to behave foolishly or aimlessly

• CRAP ARTIST
n. 1935 sl. – a person who exaggerates or talks nonsense, esp. to bluff or impress

• CRAPAUD
n. 1. 1481 obs. – a toad
n. 2. c1834 sl., chiefly derogatory – a French person or a person of French descent

• CRAPE
vb. 1774 obs. – to make the hair wavy and curly; to crimp, to frizzle

• CRAPED
adj. 1728 – crisped, crimped, minutely curled or crinkled

• CRAPE-GOWN-MAN
n. 1628 obs. – a clergyman

• CRAPE-HANGER
n. 1921 US sl. – a killjoy; a pessimistic person

• CRAPE-MAN
n. 1826 obs. – a clergyman
 
• CRAP-HOUSE
n. 1939 US colloq. & sl. – a privy; an outhouse; a disgusting place
 
• CRAP-LIST
n. 20C colloq. – a ‘shit-list’

• CRAP OUT
vb. 1891 US sl. – to be unsuccessful, to lose out, to lose; to fail
 
• CRAPPER
n. 1. 1820 Ireland, rare – a half-glass of whisky
n. 2. 1901 Amer. dial. – a wealthy but stingy man
n. 3. 1927 sl. – a lavatory; a toilet, privy, or restroom
n. 4. M20 US sl. – a bragger; a teller of lies and nonsense
 
• CRAPPERY
n. 20C US sl. & colloq. – a privy, outhouse, or restroom

• CRAPPING
n. 1673 sl. – defecation
 
• CRAPPING CAN
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a toilet or outhouse
 
• CRAPPING-CASA
n. 19C sl. – a privy or outhouse
 
• CRAPPING-CASE
n. 19C sl. – a privy or outhouse
 
• CRAPPING-CASTLE
n. 19C sl. – a privy or outhouse
 
• CRAPPING-KEN
n. 19C sl. – a privy or outhouse
 
• CRAPPY
adj. 1. 1846 sl. – soiled with excrement
adj. 2. c1920 Sc. – afraid
adj. 3. 1928 sl., orig. US – of low quality; bad; inferior; unsatisfactory
adj. 4. 1956 – in poor health or spirits; unwell, poorly
 
• CRAPS
n. 20C US sl., euphemism for ‘the shits’ – diarrhoea

• CRAP SHOOT
n. 1958 – a situation or undertaking regarded as uncertain, risky, or unpredictable

• CRAPULA
n. a1687 obs. – the sickness or indisposition following a drunken or gluttonous debauch

• CRAPULE
n. a1687 – the sickness or indisposition following a drunken or gluttonous debauch

• CRAPULENCE
n. 1. 1727 – sickness from excess in drinking or eating
n. 2. 1825 – gross intemperance, esp. in drinking; debauchery

• CRAPULENCY
n. 1651 obs. rare – gross intemperance, esp. in drinking; debauchery

• CRAPULENT
adj. 1656 – suffering from an excess of drinking or eating

• CRAPULENTAL
adj. 1620 obs. rare – suffering from an excess of drinking or eating

• CRAPULOSITY
n. 1538 – inclination to drunkenness or to gluttony
 
• CRAPULOUS
adj. 1. 1536 – characterized by excess in drinking or eating; intemperate, debauched; drunk; given to gluttony
adj. 2. 1755 – suffering from the effects of intemperance in drinking; sick from excessive drinking

• CRAP UP
vb. 1941 sl., orig. US – to make a mess of, to bungle, to foul up; to mess up
 
• CRASH
n. 1. 1549 obs. – a bout of revelry, amusement, fighting, etc.
n. 2. World War II Amer. sl. – an omelet  
vb. 1. c1440 obs. – to strike the teeth together with noise; to gnash
vb. 2. 1563 obs. – to make a crackling noise
vb. 3. a1670 obs. rare – to discuss with violence and noise; to ‘thrash out’
vb. 4. 1943 sl. – to go to bed, often applied specifically to sleeping for a night in an improvised bed; often used with ‘out’
vb. 5. 1973 Amer. dial. – to court, to woo
 
• CRASH AND BURN
n. 1. 1985 colloq. – a complete or spectacular failure
n. 2. 1985 colloq. – a person who fails, often as a result of risky or reckless behaviour; a person who has impressive but brief success
vb. 1971 US sl. – to fail utterly; to meet with disaster, esp. due to reckless or self-destructive behaviour

• CRASHER
n. 1. 1863 – a loud harsh blow or percussion
n. 2. 1924 – a gatecrasher; one without an invite
 
• CRASH HAT
n. 20C Brit. sl. – a crash helmet

• CRASHING BORE
n. 1931 colloq. – an overwhelming bore
 
• CRASHING-CHEATS
n. 1. M16 sl. – the teeth
n. 2. M16 sl. – apples, pears, or any other fruits
 
• CRASH OUT
vb. 1943 sl. – to go to bed, often applied specifically to sleeping for a night in an improvised bed
 
• CRASH PAD
n. 1967 sl. – a place to sleep in an emergency or for a single night
 
• CRASH WAGON
n. World War II Amer. sl. – an ambulance

• CRASSID
adj. 1838 obs. rare – grossly ignorant or stupid

• CRASSITUDE
n. 1. c1420 obs. – thickness of dimension
n. 2. 1865 – gross ignorance or stupidity; excessive dullness of intellect

• CRASSITY
n. 1656 obs. rare – fatness, thickness

• CRASSOUS
adj. 1708 obs. rare – grossly stupid

• CRASSULENT
adj. 1656 obs. – very fat, grossly obese

• CRASSY
adj. 1. 1630 obs. – coarse, thick, dense
adj. 2. 1858 obs. – sordid, dirty, greasy

• CRASTINATE
vb. 1656 obs. – to delay from day to day, to prolong, to procrastinate

• CRASTINATION
n. 1727 obs. rare – a deferring or delaying; delay; procrastination

• CRASURE
n. 1413 obs. rare – a breaking or cracking, fracture

• CRATCH
n. 1. c1325 obs. – a small house; a cot
n. 2. 1965 Amer. dial. – a hobgoblin used to threaten children and make them behave
vb. 1. c1320 obs. – to scratch
vb. 2. 1377 – to seize or snatch as with claws; to scrape up greedily; to grab
 
• CRATE
n. 1928 Amer. sl. – an automobile; an old airplane
n. 2. 1969 Amer. dial. – a bony or poor-looking horse
 
• CRATER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – whisky

• CRATERKIN
n. 1888 – a little crater

• CRATERLET
n. 1881 – a small crater on the moon

• CRATHON
n. a1400-50 obs. – a term of depreciation for a person; a craven

• CRAUNCH
n. 1893 colloq. – apples or the like; food that can be crunched on
vb. 1. 1632 – to crunch, to chew or bite with a crushing noise
vb. 2. 1854 Amer. dial. – to crush under foot
vb. 3. 1967 Amer. dial. – to squeeze yourself into a small space

• CRAUNCHERS
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – teeth

• CRAVAT GOOSE
n. 1793 rare – the Canada goose, Branta canadensis, which has a band of white extending under the chin from ear to ear

• CRAVATTING
n. 1683 obs. rare – a hanging or strangling

• CRAVE
vb. c1025 obs. – to demand a thing, to ask with authority, or by right
 
• CRAVEN
adj. 1. a1225 obs. – vanquished, defeated
adj. 2. a1400 – cowardly, weak-hearted, pusillanimous
n. 1581 – a confessed coward

• CRAVEN-HEARTED
adj. 1615 – cowardly, weak-hearted

• CRAVENLY
adj. 1653 obs. rare – cowardly

• CRAVENT
vb. 1490 obs. rare – to vanquish, to overthrow

• CRAW
n. 1574 – one’s stomach
vb. a1658 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to caw; said of crows or rooks

• CRAW-CRAW
vb. 1871 Amer. dial. – to make the distinctive sound of a hen
 
• CRAWDAD
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a crawfish

• CRAWDAD EYE
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a protruding or prominent eye

• CRAWFISH
n. 1. 1860 US colloq. – a person who retreats from or backs out of a position; a political renegade or turncoat
n. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. – a person of French descent
vb. 1. 1844 Amer. dial. – to back out of an agreement; to yield or back down from a position; to be evasive
vb. 2. 1848 Amer. dial. – to move or crawl backwards; to back away

• CRAWK
n. 1915 – a hoarse sound, a squawk
vb. 1845 – to utter a hoarse sound, to squawk
 
• CRAWL
n. 1. 1867 – on the coast of African, a pen for slaves awaiting shipment
n. 2. 19C Brit. sl. – a sycophant; a toady
n. 3. E20 US sl. – a male who coits or ‘crawls’ a woman
vb. 1. 1548 obs. – to entangle
vb. 2. 1881 sl., orig. Aust. – to behave obsequiously towards
vb. 3. 1905 Amer. dial. – to admonish; to rebuke or reprove severely
vb. 4. World War I Amer. sl. – to buy favours
vb. 5. 1994 – to surf the internet
vb. 6. 20C US sl. – to copulate with a woman
vb. 7. 20C sl. – to grope and fondle a woman
 
• CRAWLER
n. 1. 1865 colloq. – a cab moving slowly along the streets in search of a fare
n. 2. 1847 – an obsequious person; a toady; a sycophant; a person who acts in a mean or servile way
n. 3. 1880 – a lazy person, a loiterer
n. 4. 1965 Amer. dial. – the common earthworm used as bait
n. 5. 1965 Amer. dial. – a louse
n. 6. 1967 Amer. dial. – a stroller for a small child, the kind it has to sit up in

• CRAWLING COMPANY
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a bedbug

• CRAWLING ELEPHANTS
n. 1936 Amer. dial. – bedbugs
 
• CRAWL ONE’S HUMP
vb. 1. 1905 US West. sl. – to attack or assault someone
vb. 2. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to kill one

• CRAWL-OUT
n. 1903 US – a back-out
 
• CRAWL OUT OF THE WOODWORK
vb. 1973 UK – of someone or something unpleasant: to appear; to arrive on the scene; to emerge

• CRAWLSOME
adj. 1904 – addicted to mean, worm-like behaviour

• CRAWL UNDER THE DOG’S BELLY
vb. 1935 Amer. dial. – to live in poverty

• CRAWLY
adj. 1857 Amer. dial. – covered with insects, or as if covered with insects; creepy; uncomfortable
 
• CRAWLY-MAWLY
adj. 1677 Eng. dial. – in a weak and ailing state; poorly, sickly; indifferently well

• CRAWM; KRAWM
n. 1890 Amer. dial. – rubbish, refuse; waste, esp. from food

• CRAWNEY-BONE
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a thing, bony, or poor-looking cow

• CRAW-THUMPER
n. 1. 1786 sl. – a person who beats his breast at confession; a Roman Catholic devotee
n. 2. 1845 Amer. dial. – a native of Maryland

• CRAY
n. 1. a1400 obs. – chalk
n. 2. 1906 chiefly Aust. & NZ – a crayfish

• CRAYFISH
vb. 1930 Aust. – to act in a cowardly or scheming manner

• CRAYFISHING
n. 1966 Aust. – acting in a cowardly or scheming manner

• CRAYON
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a piece of blackboard chalk

• CRAZE
n. 1. 1534 obs. – a flaw, defect, unsoundness; an infirmity of health or of brain
n. 2. 1587 obs. – a crack, cleft, flaw
n. 3. 1831 obs. rare – a crazy person; a foolish or irrational person
vb. 1. c1369 obs. – to break in pieces or asunder; to shatter
vb. 2. c1430 obs. – to batter with blows, to bruise, to crush, to damage
vb. 3. 1476 – to break down in health, to render infirm
vb. 4. 1573 obs. – to destroy the soundness of, to impair, to ruin; to ruin financially, to render bankrupt
vb. 5. 1874 – to produce minute cracks on the surface of pottery

• CRAZED
adj. 1. a1400-50 obs. – broken, cracked; flawed, damaged
adj. 2. 1555 obs. – broken down in health; diseased; infirm
adj. 3. 1600 obs. – impaired, damaged; ruined in estate, bankrupt; of cracked reputation

• CRAZED-HEADED
adj. 1678 – insane; mentally deranged

• CRAZEDNESS
n. 1593 obs. – infirmity of body or mind

• CRAZELING
n. 1859 – a person affected with a craze or mania

• CRAZEN
adj. 1596 obs. – broken, shattered

• CRAZIED
adj. 1. 1652 obs. – unsound, infirm
adj. 2. 1842 rare – made crazy, distracted
 
• CRAZIER THAN A PEACH-ORCHARD BOAR
adj. 1986 Amer. dial. – very crazy

• CRAZINESS
n. 1602 obs. – a being broken down in bodily health or constitution; indisposition, infirmity; shakiness
 
• CRAZY
adj. 1. 1576 obs. – indisposed, ailing; diseased, sickly, weakly; frail, infirm
adj. 2. 1583 – full of cracks or flaws; damaged, impaired, unsound; liable to break or fall to pieces; frail
adj. 3. 1700 obs. – bankrupt, ruined
adj. 4. 1899 Amer. dial. – askew, out of line; ramshackle
adj. 5. 1948 sl., orig. US jazz – excellent; good; hip
adj. 6. 20C US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol
adj. 7. M20 US drug culture sl. – drug intoxicated
adv. 1887 sl., chiefly US – extremely
n. 1867 sl., orig. US – a mad, eccentric, or insane person
 
• CRAZY ABOUT
adj. 1904 – fond of; enthusiastic about; liking; often implying sexual infatuation
 
• CRAZY AS ADAM’S OFF-OX
adj. 1975 Amer. dial. – extremely crazy
 
• CRAZY AS A HOOT OWL
adj. 1971 Amer. sl. – very crazy
 
• CRAZY AS A LAUGHING FARM
adj. 1965 Amer. sl. – completely crazy
 
• CRAZY AS A SHITEPOKE
adj. 1935 Amer. dial. – very crazy
 
• CRAZY AS A TWO-BOB WATCH
adj. 1940s Aust. sl. – extremely crazy

• CRAZY BONE
n. 1876 Amer. dial. – the funny bone

• CRAZY CLEAN
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – too particular or fussy

• CRAZY FLYING
n. 1922 – aerobatics performed near the ground
 
• CRAZY HOUSE
n. 1887 US sl. – a mental hospital
 
• CRAZY IKE
n. 1915 Amer. dial. – an uncouth, ignorant or rude fellow; a rustic

• CRAZY JANE
n. 1978 Amer. dial. – a person without good judgement, one lacking know-how
 
• CRAZY LIKE A FOX
adj. 1908 sl., orig. US – sly, artful, very cunning, shrewd

• CRAZY-PATE
adj. 1821 – insane, stupid
 
• CRAZY WATER
n. 20C US sl. – alcoholic beverages
 
• CRAZY WITH THE HEAT
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – foolish; silly; witless


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