Dictionary: CRE – CRIZ

• CREABLE
adj. 1. 1480 obs. – easy to believe, credible
adj. 2. a1656 obs. – that may be created or produced

• CREACHY
adj. 1. 1715 Eng. dial. – broken-down, dilapidated
adj. 2. 1842 Eng. & Amer. dial. – infirm, ailing, ill, sickly

• CREAGH
n. 1. 1814 – an incursion for plunder in Ireland and the Highlands of Scotland; a raid, a foray
n. 2. 1818 – booty, prey
vb. 1883 – to raid, to plunder

• CREAGHTER
n. 1653 – a nomad

• CREAK
vb. 1. c1325 obs. – to utter a harsh cry; said of crows, rooks, etc.
vb. 2. c1440 obs. – to speak in a strident or querulous tone

• CREAKER
n. 1. 1855 Eng. dial. – a child’s rattle
n. 2. 1958 Amer. dial. – an aged or old person
 
• CREAM
n. 1. 1581 – the most excellent part; the best of its kind; the choice part
n. 2. 19C Brit. & US sl. & colloq. – semen
vb. 1. 1929 colloq., orig. & chiefly US – to hit, to beat,. to thrash thoroughly; to drub; to crush, to defeat as in sporting contexts; to ruin or wreck a motor vehicle
vb. 2. 20C sl. – to coit a woman; to impregnate a woman
vb. 3. 20C US sl. – to ejaculate semen
vb. 4. 20C US sl. – to kill someone
 
• THE CREAM
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent

• CREAM-AND-MOLASSES
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a horse of a dirty white colour
 
• CREAM CRACKERED
adj. 1983 Brit. rhyming sl. for ‘knackered’ – exhausted, extremely tired, worn out
 
• CREAM CRACKERS
n. 20C Brit. rhyming sl. for ‘knackers’ – the testicles 

• CREAM DAY
n. 1928 Amer. dial. – Saturday, the day when cream and eggs are taken to the store
 
• CREAMED
adj. M20 US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol
 
• CREAMED FORESKINS
n. World War II Amer. sl. – creamed chipped beef

• CREAMED POTATOES
n. 1930 Amer. dial. – mashed potatoes

• CREAMERY
n. 1858 – a shop where milk, cream, butter, etc. are sold, and light refreshments supplied

• CREAM ICE
n. 1849 – an ice-cream
 
• CREAM IN ONE’S COFFEE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a loved one; a sweetheart
 
• CREAM-JUG
n. 19C Brit. sl. – the female genitals; spec. the vagina
 
• CREAM-JUGS
n. 19C Brit. sl. – the breasts

• CREAM OF THE CROP
n. 1851 – the best of its kind

• CREAM OF THE POT
n. 1953 Amer. dial. – the best of its kind; the very best

• CREAM OF THE SOUP
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – the best of its kind; the very best

• CREAM OF THE VALLEY
n. 1858 – gin

• CREAM OF THE WILDERNESS
n. 1873 – gin
 
• CREAM ONE’S JEANS
vb. 20C US sl. – to ejaculate semen in one’s trousers
 
• CREAM PUFF
n. 1. 1915 US sl. – an easy target; easy prey
n. 2. 1918 military usage, obs. – an exploding shell
n. 3. 1920 – a weak or ineffectual person
n. 4. 1920 – a thing of small consequence or little impact
n. 5. Bk1942 Amer. boxing sl. – an easy-hitting boxer
n. 6. 1945 US sl. – an effeminate male; a homosexual man
n. 7. 1949 US sl. – in the used car business: a well-preserved car
n. 8. 1985 Sc. rhyming sl. – a huff; a fit of petty annoyance
n. 9. 20C US sl. – a woman
n. 10. 20C Brit. rhyming sl. – a person in a bad mood, or ‘huff’
 
• CREAMSTICK
n. 19C Brit. sl. – the penis
 
• CREAMY
adj. 1. a1640 – soft and rich, luscious
adj. 2. 1889 UK teen sl. – pleasing, excellent
adj. 3. 1912 Aust. sl. – quarter-caste Australian Aboriginal
adj. 4. 1947 US sl. – sexually attractive
n. 1912 Aust. sl. – a person of mixed European and Australian Aboriginal heritage

• CREANCE
n. 1. c1330 obs. rare – credit, reputation
n. 2. c1380 obs. – a believing; belief, trust, confidence, credence

• CREANCER
n. 1. a1382 obs. – a creditor
n. 2. 1478 – a person entrusted with the charge of another; a guardian, a tutor, esp. at school or college

• CREANT
adj. 1. 1833 – believing, orthodox
adj. 1844 rare – creating, creative
 
• CREASE
n. 1. c1440 obs. – an increase
n. 2. 1935 Amer. dial. – a part in one’s hair
n. 3. 1967 Amer. dial. – a mountain pass or gap
n. 4. 1991 US sl. – in sports betting: a distortion created when strong fan support for one team or contestant creates an imbalance in the odds which can be exploited by a clever bettor
n. 5. 20C US colloq. – the female genitals; spec. the vulva
vb. 1. c1380 obs. – to increase
vb. 2. 1909 sl., chiefly US – to stun a person; to kill deliberately
vb. 3. 1913 sl. – to exhaust physically
vb. 4. 1922 Brit colloq. – to laugh uncontrollably; to collapse with laughter 
 
• CREASED
adj. 1925 sl., chiefly US  – tired

• CREASEMENT
n. 1592 obs. rare – increase, augmentation
 
• CREASE UP
vb. 1977 sl. – to laugh uncontrollably; to collapse with laughter

• CREASING
adj. 1592 obs. – increasing
n. 1398 obs. – an increasing, increase, growth

• CREATAL
adj. 1857 rare – relating to creation
 
• CREATE
vb. 1919 colloq. – to make an angry scene; to make a fuss, to grumble, to complain; also, to shout
 
• CREATE FUCK
vb. 20C sl. – to display anger or annoyance; to create an angry scene or case others annoyance

• CREATIC
adj. 1851 obs. rare – relating to flesh

• CREATION!
int. 1843 Amer. dial. – a mild expletive

• CREATOPHAGOUS
adj. 1850 obs. rare – flesh-eating; carnivorous

• CREATRESS
n. 1590 – a female creator

• CREATRIX
n. 1595 – a female creator

• CREATURE
n. 1. c1300 – a person, an individual
n. 2. c1384 obs. – the created universe; creation
n. 3. c1450 – a reprehensible or despicable person
n. 4. 1587 – a person who owes their fortune and position and remains subservient to, a patron; a person who is ready to do another’s bidding; a puppet

• THE CREATURE
n. a1616 – liquor, esp. whisky

• CREATURE FEATURE
n. 1965 colloq. – a film or television show featuring fantastical or monstrous creatures

• CREATURE OF HABIT
n. 1741 – a person whose behaviour is guided by habit; one who follows an unvarying routine
 
• CREBRITUDE
n. 1730 obs. rare – frequency, oftenness

• CREBRITY
n. 1656 rare – frequency
 
• CREBROUS
adj. c1600 obs. rare – frequent; frequently occurring; near together
 
• CRED
adj. 1. 1987 sl. – credible
adj. 2. 1991 UK sl. – acceptable to your peers; hence, fashionable
n. 1. 1979 sl. – credit
n. 2. 1981 Brit. sl. – status among one’s peers; credibility

• CREDENCE
n. 1. a1450 obs. rare – a group of attendants at table
n. 2. a1475 obs. rare – the tasting of food or drink before serving, formerly practised in a royal or noble household as a precaution against poisoning
vb. a1529 – to believe, to give credence to
 
• CREDENCIVE
adj. 1864 rare – ready to believe

• CREDENCIVENESS
n. 1839 – readiness to believe

• CREDENCY
n. 1. 1620 obs. rare – a message with which a messenger is entrusted
n. 2. 1648 – belief in the truth of something; a belief

• CREDENDA
n. 1601 – things to be believed; matters of faith

• CREDENDS
n. 1641 rare – things to be believed; matters of faith

• CREDENT
adj. 1. a1579 rare – credible, believable
adj. 2. 1604 – believing, trustful
adj. 3. a1616 obs. rare – having credit or repute
n. 1616 – a person who believes; a believer
 
• CREDENTIALS
n. L19 Brit. sl. – the male genitals

• CREDENTLY
adv. a1579 rare – credibly, believably

• CREDIBILIZE
vb. 1866 – to make credible or more credible
 
• CREDIT
n. 1. 1569 obs. rare – something believed as true; a belief; a report
n. 2. 1949 US sl. – a reduction of a jail sentence due to good behaviour
n. 3. 1992 US sl. – an achievement or accomplishment
 
• CREDIT CARD
n. 1. 1981 UK sl. – a boyfriend
n. 2. 1985 US sl. – a favour owed

• CREDIT DRAPER
n. 1857 – a person who sells goods on credit, esp. from door to door

• CREDITEE
n. 1541 rare – a person who owes money; a person who has taken goods or used services on credit

• CREDITOR
n. 1609 obs. – a person who gives credence to something; a believer

• CREDITRESS
n. 1608 – a female creditor

• CREDITRICE
n. 1588 obs. rare – the credit side of an account

• CREDITRIX
n. 1611 – a female creditor

• CREDITWORTHY
adj. 1554 rare – deserving to be believed, credible, trustworthy
 
• CREDULIST
n. 1616 obs. rare – a credulous person

• CREDULENCE
n. 1650 rare – ready belief, credulity

• CREDULENCY
n. 1586 obs. rare – ready belief, credulity

• CREDULENT
adj. 1584 – inclined to believe, esp. on weak or insufficient grounds; credulous

• CREE
vb. a1400-50 obs. rare – to create

• CREED
n. 1819 rare – belief, faith
vb. 1596 obs. – to believe

• CREEK
n. 1. c1300 – the cleft between the buttocks
n. 2. c1405 obs. – a crooked device; a trick, artifice
n. 3. 1577 – a nook, a hidden or secret corner
n. 4. 1567 obs. exc. Sc. – the break of day; dawn
n. 5. 1596 obs. – a turn, a winding, as of a river or crooked way
vb. 1610 obs. – to bend, to turn, to wind

• CREEKBANK COFFEE
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – very strong coffee

• CREEKER
n. 1872 Amer. dial. – a backwoodsman, a rustic, a hick

• CREEKERS!
int. 1970 Amer. dial. euphemism – Christ!

• CREEKET
n. a1552 obs. rare – a small creek

• CREEKING
n. 1610 obs. – a bend, a turn

• CREEKLET
n. 1577 – a little creek

• CREEK WATER
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – very weak coffee

• CREEL
vb. 1917 Amer. dial. – to twist or wrench; to become twisted

• CREEM
n. 1847 Eng. dial. – a shiver proceeding from cold, indisposition, etc.
vb. 1. 1673 Eng. dial.– to place or deposit slyly or secretly
vb. 2. 1746 Eng. dial. – to squeeze, to hug
vb. 3. 1847 Eng. dial. – to shiver; to cause to shiver, to chill

• CREEN
vb. 1944 Amer. dial. – to stretch and turn the neck, to ‘crane’
 
• CREE-OWL STATE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – Louisiana
 
• CREEP
int. 1958 UK sl. – go away!
n. 1. 1818 – slow or stealthy motion
n. 2. 1889 Amer. dial. – a stool
n. 3. 1914 criminals’ sl. – a stealthy robber; a sneak thief; a prostitute who steals from her clients while they are asleep or unconscious
n. 4. Bk1914 criminals’ sl.  – amongst crooked pimps: one who searches the clothes of a victim while abed with the pimp’s prostitute
n. 5. 1886 sl., orig. US – an unpleasant or despicable person, a jerk, usually male; a worthless, stupid, or tiresome person
n. 6. 1928 criminals’ sl., orig. US – stealthy robbery; petty thieving, esp. in a brothel
n. 7. 1946 US sl. – a furtive arrival or departure
n. 8. 1951 US sl. – a prisoner who is neither respected nor liked
n. 9. 1960 African-American sl. – a clandestine meeting or mission
n. 10. 1971 US sl. – a drug addict who relies on the kindness of other addicts for small amounts of drugs
vb. 1. 1914 US criminals’ sl. – to work as a sneak-thief; to rob; to use stealth
vb. 2. 1950s sl. – to dance
vb. 3. 1967 US sl. – to escape
vb. 4. 1972 US sl. – to be sexually unfaithful
vb. 5. 1974 US prison sl. – to ambush someone with the intent of seriously injuring or killing them
vb. 6. 2001 US sl. – to attempt to have a secret sexual relationship with someone’s boyfriend or girlfriend
 
• CREEP-AND-CUSS
adj. 1964 US sl. – of car traffic: extremely congested

• CREEP-ABOUT
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a baby at the crawling stage
 
• CREEPER
n. 1. 1577 – a creeping insect or reptile; a louse
n. 2. 1824 sl., obs. – a person who furnishes the newspapers with paragraphs at so much a line
n. 3. 1848 – in cricket: a ball which keeps low after pitching
n. 4. 1877 Amer. dial. – a skillet or heavy frying pan with three legs
n. 5. 1883 – a child too young to walk
n. 6. 1893 – a pupil in the tea-planting trade, esp. in Ceylon
n. 7. 1906 sl., orig. US – a stealthy robber; a sneak thief; a prostitute who steals from her clients while they are asleep or unconscious
n. 8. 1911 African-American – an adulterer
n. 9. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a toady
n. 10. 1967 Amer. dial. – an earthworm
n. 11. 20C Brit. sl. – a burglar who specialises in robbing hotels or brothels
n. 12. M20 Brit. sl. – a soft-soled shoe of the 1950s, the blue suede type of the Teddy-boy
n. 13. M20 US drug culture sl. – marijuana of a slow-acting type
 
• CREEPERS
n. 1. 19C Brit. sl. – body lice, bedbugs, fleas, etc.; anything that makes your flesh creep when they creep over your flesh
n. 2. 1889 Amer. sl. – the feet
n. 3. 1904 Amer. sl. – soft-soled shoes
 
• CREEPERS JEEPERS!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – a mild oath
 
• CREEP-HOUSE
n. 1913 US sl. – a brothel or other place where prostitutes rob their clients

• CREEPIE-PEEPIE; CREEPY-PEEPY
n. 1952 colloq., television usage – a portable television camera used for close-up shots on location

• CREEPIE (STOOL); CREEPY STOOL
n. 1661 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a low stool

• CREEPIFIED
adj. 1942 Amer. dial. – frightened; frightening, eerie
 
• CREEPING CRUD
n. 1. World War II US military usage – a variety of skin diseases; any skin disorder  
n. 2. M20 US sl. – any kind of nastiness made even worse by implying that it is ambulatory
 
• CREEPING JESUS
int. 20C Aust. – an oath and an exclamation
n. c1818 sl. – a sycophantic or servile person, or one who is hypocritically pious

• CREEPING LUCY
n. 1965 Amer. dial., nickname – wine

• CREEPING PARALYSIS
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a general feeling of discomfort

• CREEPINGS
n. 1899 Amer. dial. – shivery sensations from dread or cold
 
• CREEP JOINT
n. 1921 US sl. – a brothel or other place where prostitutes rob their clients

• CREEP-MOUSE
adj. 1766 – creeping like a mouse so as to escape notice; furtive, timid, shy
n. 1540 obs. – a term of endearment
 
• CREEP OUT OF THE WOODWORK
vb. 1973 UK – of someone or something unpleasant: to appear; to arrive on the scene; to emerge
 
• THE CREEPS
n. 1879 sl. – a feeling of repugnance or fear; the unease felt in the presence of a ‘creepy’ person or in a spooky place; a feeling of horror caused by something uncanny
 
• CREEPSHOW
n. 20C Brit. sl. – horrible or grotesque; used to describe a situation or person that fits the bill
 
• CREEP UP SOMEONE’S ASS
vb. 1698 sl. – to demean oneself as a means of currying favour with someone
 
• CREEPY
adj. 1831 sl. – said of something producing an uncanny feeling of horror or repugnance
 
• CREEPY-CRAWLY
adj. 1890 – sneaking; servile; of feelings, etc.: full of eerie or uncanny suggestion
n. 1858 – any insect or similar small creeping creature considered as disagreeable or frightening

• CREESH
n. 1. a1400 Sc. – grease, fat
n. 2. 1773 Sc. – a stroke, a ‘lick’
vb. 1721 Sc. – to grease

• CREESHY
adj. 1535 Sc. – greasy

• CREIS
vb. 1553 Sc. obs. – to curl

• CREMAINS
n. 1950 – the ashes of a cremated person
 
• CREMATED
adj. 1. 20C Brit. sl. – badly beaten by an opponent; ruined by a bad business deal or stock-market collapse
adj. 2. 20C Brit. sl. – said of the effect of an overhot oven on a piece of meat  

• CREMATORIAL
adj. 1887 – pert. to cremation or to a crematory

• CREMATORY
adj. 1884 – pert. to cremation

• CRÈME DE LA CRÈME
n. 1848 – the elite; the very pick of society

• CREMELLO
n. 1944 – a horse having a pale, cream-coloured coat, light blue eyes, and pink skin
 
• CREMETOUS
adj. c1477 obs. rare  – fearful, timid

• CREMEUR
n. 1485 obs. – dread

• CREMEUSE
adj. 1477 obs. rare – fearful, timid

• CREMIFY
vb. 1638 obs. rare – to make creamy; to cause to form cream

• CREMNOPHOBIA
n. 1903 – a dread of precipices or steep places

• CREMOR
n. 1657 – a thick juice or decoction; a liquid of this consistency; a broth

• CREMP
vb. a1250 obs. rare – to contract, to restrain
 
• CREOLE STATE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – Louisiana
 
• CREOPHAGOUS
adj. 1881 – flesh-eating, carnivorous

• CREPATURE
n. 1582 obs. – a wound, crack, or chap in the skin

• CRÊPE
n. Bk1942 Amer. theatrical sl. – a short artificial beard
vb. 1818 – of hair: to frizz; to put up in curl-papers

• CREPIDARIAN
adj. 1819 – pert. to a shoemaker

• CRÊPING
n. 1889 – the crimping or frizzing of hair

• CREPITANT
adj. 1855 – making a crackling noise
 
• CREPITATE
vb. 1. 1623 obs. – to break wind, to fart
vb. 2. 1853 – to crackle, to make a crackling sound
vb. 3. 1852-9 – said of the sound made by a rattlesnake: to rattle

• CREPITATION
n. 1. 1656 – a crackling; a crackling or rattling noise
n. 2. 1822 rare – the breaking of wind

• CREPITUS (VENTRIS)
n. 1882 – the breaking of wind

• CREPUNDIAN
n. 1. 1589 obs. rare – a ‘rattler’, an empty talker
n. 2. 1655 obs. rare – a childish toy

• CREPUSCLE
n. 1665 – twilight

• CREPUSCULAR
adj. 1. 1668 – resembling twilight; dim, indistinct
adj. 2. 1755 – pert. to twilight

CREPUSCULE
n. c1400 rare – twilight

• CREPUSCULINE
adj. c1550 rare – pert. to twilight; illuminated by twilight; dim, dusky
n. c1550 obs. – the morning twilight
 
• CREPUSCULOUS
adj. 1646 – of the nature of twilight; in a state between light and darkness; dim, glimmering, dusky, indistinct, obscure

• CREPUSCULUM
n. 1398 – twilight, dusk

• CRESCENCE
n. 1602 obs. – growth, increase

• CRESCENT
adj. 1. 1568 – growing, increasing, developing
adj. 2. 1603 – shaped like the new or old moon
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a privy

• CRESCENT CITIZEN
n. 1851 – a native of New Orleans

• THE CRESCENT CITY
n. 1855 US – New Orleans

• CRESCENTIC
adj. 1835 – having the form of a crescent or new moon

• CRESCENTRIC
adj. 1851 rare – having the form of a crescent or new moon

• CRESCIVE
adj. 1566 – growing, in the growing stage

• CRESSER
n. 1656 obs. rare – a small ladle or scoop

• CREST
n. 1. c1400 rare – the most excellent, the crown
n. 2. a1513 – the tail of a comet
n. 3. 1569 obs. – the disease called piles or haemorrhoids

• CREST-FALL
vb. 1611 obs. rare – to make humbled, abashed, disheartened, dispirited, or dejected

• CRESTFALLEN
adj. 1589 – cast down in confident, spirits, or courage; humbled, abashed, disheartened, dispirited, dejected

• CREST-RISEN
adj. 1611 obs. – proud, self-confident, cocky

• CREST-SUNK
adj. 1618 obs. – crestfallen; humbled, abashed, disheartened, dispirited, dejected

• CRESTY
adj. 1569 obs. – affected with piles or haemorrhoids

• CRETE
n. 1. 1340 obs. – a cradle
n. 2. 1541 obs. rare – the septum or division between the nostrils

• CRETICISM
n. 1614 obs. – the art of coining or inventing lies

• CRETIN
n. 1884 – an extremely foolish or stupid person; an idiot, a moron

• CRETISM
n. 1656 obs. rare – the art of coining or inventing lies

• CRETIZE
vb. 1655 obs. – to play the Cretan, i.e. to lie, to tell lies

• CREUE
vb. c1450 obs. rare – to grow

• CREVE
vb. c1450 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to burst, to split

• CREVETTE
n. 1. 1878 – a shrimp a prawn, esp. one sold or served in its shell
n. 2. 1884 – a deep shade of pink, shrimp-pink
 
• CREVICE
n. 1. 19C Brit. sl. – the vagina
n. 2. 1967 Amer. dial. – a mountain pass
 
• CREW
n. 1. 1681 Eng. dial. – a pen, cote, etc. for animals, as pigs, sheep, fowls
n. 2. 1880 Eng. dial. – a hut, a cabin
n. 3. 20C teen & high school sl. – one’s circle of friends
 
• CREWBY
n. 20C teen & high school sl. – a rowing crew  

• CREWE
n. 1579 obs. rare – a pot

• CRIANT
adj. 1876 – garish, ‘loud’

• CRIARD
adj. 1. 1840 – garish, ‘loud’
adj. 1878 – shrill
 
• CRIB
n. 1. 1600 – a small habitation, cabin, hovel; a narrow room
n. 2. 1622 obs. – a close-fisted person, one who keeps a tight hold of what he has
n. 3. 1652 Eng. dial., Aust. & NZ – food, provisions; a light meal, a snack; a piece of bread, cake, etc.
n. 4. 1702 obs. – a child, a baby
n. 5. 1819 thieves’ sl. – a house or residence; a home; a shop, a public house, etc.
n. 6. 1823 sl., chiefly US – a disreputable drinking saloon
n. 7. 1834 colloq. – something taken without acknowledgement, as a passage from an author; a plagiarism
n. 8. 1847 – a jail, a lock-up
n. 9. 1855 rare – the act of ‘cribbing’; a petty theft
n. 10. 1856 Amer. dial. – a person who cheats in an examination; something used to cheat in an examination
n. 11. c1857 sl., chiefly US – a brothel
n. 12. 1862 NZ – a small house at the seaside or at a holiday resort
n. 13. 1943 colloq. – a complaint, a grumble
n. 14. 1945 Amer. dial. – a caboose
n. 15. 1966 Amer. dial. – an outside toilet
n. 16. 1968 Amer. dial. – a buoy
vb. 1. a1616 – to confine within a small space or narrow limits; to hamper
vb. 2. 1735 colloq. – to pilfer, to steal; to appropriate furtively
vb. 3. 1748 – to cheat on a school examination
vb. 4. 1778 colloq. – to take or copy with acknowledgement, and use as one’s own; to plagiarize
vb. 5. 1849 – to lock up, to imprison
vb. 6. 1925 colloq. – to grumble, to complain

• CRIBBAGE
n. 1. 1830 colloq., rare – a ‘cribbing’, that which is ‘cribbed’; plagiarism
n. 2. 1862 – something ‘cribbed’ or stolen
 
• CRIBBAGE PEG
n. 20C Brit. rhyming sl. – a leg

• CRIBBER
n. 1. 1701 obs. nonce usage – the occupant of a child’s crib; a young child
n. 2. 1892 colloq. – a person who ‘cribs’ or appropriates clandestinely

• CRIB-BITER
n. 1832 – an inveterate grumbler

• CRIBBLE
n. 1565-73 obs. – a sieve
vb. 1558-68 obs. – to pass through a sieve, to sift

• CRIB BURNER
n. 1954 Amer. dial. – a very dishonest person

• CRIBBY
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – an outside toilet

• CRIB-CRACKER
n. 1879 sl. – a burglar

• CRIBE
n. 1570 obs. – a sieve
vb. 1570 obs. – to pass through a sieve, to sift
 
• CRIB-HOUSE
n. c1857 sl., chiefly US – a brothel
 
• CRIB-JOINT
n. c1857 sl., chiefly US – a brothel

• CRIBRATE
vb. 1627 obs. – to sift

• CRIBRATION
n. 1617 obs. – a sifting
 
• CRICK
n. 1. c1424 – a painful muscle spasm or cramp, esp. in the neck or back 
n. 2. 1608 N. Amer. – a creek
n. 3. 1616 obs. rare – a cricket
n. 4. Bk1942 Amer. theatrical sl. – a drama critic
vb. 1. 1601 – to make a thin, sharp sound; of a cricket or other insect: to make a sharp chirping sound
vb. 2. 1850 colloq. – to twist or strain one’s neck or back, causing painful stiffness
 
• CRICK-CRACK
adj. 19C Eng. dial. – of words: not understood 
n. 1. 1565-73 – a noise of cracking; a representation of a repeated sharp sound 
n. 2. 1856 Sc. – a talk, a conversation, a chat 
n. 3. 1892 Eng. dial. – word not understood 
vb. 1850 rare – to emit a repeated sharp cracking sound

• CRICK-CRACKLE
vb. 1608 obs. rare – to emit a succession of sharp crackling sounds
 
• CRICKELTY
adj. 19C Eng. dial. – unsteady; liable to tilt or upset 

• CRICKET
n. 1. 1559 – a low wooden stool
n. 2. 1621 arch. – a lively or merry person
n. 3. 1969 Amer. dial. – a young deer
n. 4. 1970 Amer. dial. – a frying pan, a skillet

• CRICKETANA
n. 1. 1862 rare – writings or items of gossip about cricket; cricket talk
n. 2. 1950 – collectable objects associated with cricket; cricket memorabilia

• CRICKET-A-WICKET
adv. 1598 obs. rare – in relation to sexual intercourse: with a jigging or jogging motion

• CRICKETESS
n. 1886 rare – a female cricketer

• CRICKETING
n. 1668 obs. – a game of cricket; a cricket match

• CRICKETRESS
n. 1888 rare – a female cricketer

• CRICKETS!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. euphemism – Christ!

• CRICKET STOMPER
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a Mormon

• CRICKEY
int. 1884 Amer. dial. euphemism – Christ!
n. 1978 Amer. dial. – a dry creek bed

• CRICKLE
n. 1. 1680 obs. rare – a muscular ache or pain; a feeling of stiffness in the muscles
n. 2. 1914 – a thin, sharp crackling sound
vb. 1849 – to make a thin, sharp crackling sound

• CRICKLE-CRACKLE
n. 1637 – a repeated crackling sound

• CRICKLED
adj. 1906 Amer. dial. rare – disabled

• CRICKLING
n. 1. 1584 rare – a thin, sharp crackling sound
n. 2. a1644 obs. rare – a muscular ache or pain; a feeling of stiffness in the muscles

• CRICKS
n. Bk1942 Amer. theatrical sl. – critics

• CRICKSAND
n. 1921 Amer. dial. – quicksand

• CRI DE COEUR
n. 1897 – a passionate appeal, complaint, or protest, esp. one made in distress

• CRIED-DOWN
adj. 1669 obs. rare – belittled, disparaged

• CRIED-UP
adj. 1642 – well spoken of; much praised; extolled

• CRIER
n. 1. 1556 obs. – an agent who advertises or auctions another’s goods
n. 2. 1727 – a street trader who attracts attention to his or her goods by shouting
 
• CRIKEY!
int. 1838 Brit., euphemism for ‘Christ!’ – expression of surprise or astonishment

• CRIM
adj. 20C sl. – criminal 
n. 1909 sl. – a criminal 
vb. 1736 Eng. dial. – to crumble, to fall to pieces

• CRIMANETLY!; CRIMANETTY!; CRIMANIGHTIE!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – an exclamation of surprise or annoyance

• CRIMAST!
int. 1969 Amer. dial. euphemism – Christ!

• CRIMBLE
n. 1963 Brit. sl. – Christmas
vb. 1. 1757 – to go back on an undertaking, to be cowardly
vb. 2. a1825 Eng. dial. – to shrink, to cringe; to avoid being observed; to sneak, to creep about privily
 
• CRIMBO
n. 1928 Brit. sl. – Christmas 
 
• CRIME
n. 1. c1250 obs. – sin; sinfulness; wrongdoing
n. 2. c1384 obs. – a charge; an accusation
n. 3. 1636  – a shameful or regrettable act; an unfortunate situation; a bad thing
 
• CRIMEA
n. 20C Brit. rhyming sl. – beer

• CRIME BOSS
n. 1928 orig. US – a head of a criminal organization
 
• CRIME-BUSTER
n. 1943 colloq. – a law officer who specializes in fighting large-scale organized crime 

• CRIME FIGURE
n. 1934 – a well-known criminal

• CRIMEFUL
adj. 1594 – characterized by crime; criminal

• CRIME LORD
n. 1924 orig. US – a head of a criminal organization

• CRIMENY SAKES ALIVE
int. 1924 Amer. dial. – an exclamation of surprise or annoyance

• CRIME PASSIONNEL
n. 1892 – a crime committed in a fit of passion; a murder motivated by jealousy

• CRIMES!
int. 1874 rare – an exclamation of surprise

• CRIMINABLE
adj. c1500 chiefly Sc., obs. – indictable; capable of being accused of a crime

• CRIMINABLY
adv. 1507 Sc. obs. – as a criminal
 
• CRIMINAL
adj. 1. 1477 obs. – of beasts: savage, fierce, malignant
adj. 2. 1792 colloq. – senseless or deplorable; shocking
n. 1558 obs. – a person accused of a crime

• CRIMINAL CONVERSATION
n. 1716 – unlawful sexual intercourse with a married person; adultery

• CRIMINALDOM
n. 1887 rare – criminal society; the underworld; criminals collectively

• CRIMINALIST
n. 1. a1631 – an expert in criminal law
n. 2. 1947 – a person who collects and analyses forensic evidence; a forensic scientist

• CRIMINALISTICS
n. 1910 – the science of crime detection; forensic science

• CRIMINALIZE
vb. 1647 – to turn a person into a criminal, esp. by making his or her activities illegal

• CRIMINALOID
n. 1890 – a person with an inclination towards crime; an occasional rather than habitual criminal

• CRIMINALTY
n. 1630 rare – criminality; a being criminal

• CRIMINATE
adj. a1591 obs. – accused; charged with a crime
vb. 1. 1637 – to prove a person guilty of a crime; to incriminate
vb. 2. 1645 rare – to censure; to condemn
vb. 3. 1646 rare – to accuse of or charge with a crime; to denounce

• CRIMINATION
n. 1534 obs. – a charging with a crime or grave offense; severe accusation or censure

• CRIMINATIVE
adj. a1734 rare – charging someone with a crime or grave offense; incriminating; accusatory

• CRIMINATOR
n. a1425 obs. – a person who defames someone; an accuser

• CRIMINATORY
adj. 1576 – accusatory; incriminating

• CRIMINIES!; CRIMINY!
int. 1681 – an exclamation of surprise or annoyance

• CRIMINOGENIC
adj. 1918 – tending to cause criminal behaviour

• CRIMINOSE
adj. 1. c1475 obs. – ready to blame or accuse; reproachful, accusatory; defamatory
adj. 2. 1535 – guilty of a crime; criminal; accused of a crime

• CRIMINOSITY
n. 1. 1727 rare – reproach; ill report
n. 2. 1900 rare – criminality

• CRIMINOUS
adj. 1. a1460 – guilty of a crime; criminal; accused of a crime
adj. 2. c1485 obs. – reproachful, accusatory; defamatory

• CRIMINOUSLY
adv. 1. 1593 obs. – with reference to crime
adv. 2. 1640 rare – criminally

• CRIMINOUSNESS
n. 1645 – a being criminous; criminality

• CRIMINY CHRISTMAS!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – an exclamation of surprise or annoyance

• CRIMINY CRICKETS!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – an exclamation of surprise or annoyance

• CRIMINY SAKES!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – an exclamation of surprise or annoyance

• CRIMMY
adj. 1886 Amer. dial. – cold, chilly
 
• CRIMP
adj. 1587 obs. – firm in structure, but yielding to pressure; brittle; crisp
n. 1. 1638 obs. – a derisive or reproachful form of address
n. 2. 1684 – deceitful practice; a dishonest line of business; a scam
n. 3. 1718 – a person who procures seamen, soldiers, etc., esp. by entrapping or coercing them
n. 4. 1782 – a crease, fold, or corrugation
n. 5. 1966 Amer. dial. – a sudden sharp pain or cramp
vb. 1. 1690 obs. rare – to cheat, to deliberately lose a horse race or card game, etc., for profit
vb. 2. 1834 obs. rare – to make a crisp sound, as in the compression of snow under the feet
vb. 3. 1789 – to entrap or coerce a recruit for the army, navy, etc.
vb. 4. 1927 Amer. dial. – to double up in pain; to cramp
vb. 5. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to humiliate 
vb. 6. 1967 Amer. dial. – to castrate or sterilize an animal
vb. 7. 20C colloq., chiefly US – to hinder

• CRIMPAGE
n. 1815 – an entrapping or coercing men into services in the army or navy
 
• CRIMPER
n. 1. 1799 obs. – a person who procures seamen, soldiers, etc., without license, esp. by entrapping or coercing them; a person who keeps a lodging house for this purpose
n. 2. 1968 Brit. colloq. – a hairdresser 

• CRIMP-FILLED
adj. 1821 obs. – filled with folds or creases

• CRIMPING
adj. 1699 obs. rare – cheating; dishonest
n. 1795 – an entrapping or coercing men into services in the army or navy
 
• CRIMPLE
n. c1440 obs. exc. Eng. & Amer. dial. – a crease, wrinkle, or fold; a crinkle 
vb. 1. 1398 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to be incurved, or drawn together; hence, to stand or walk lame from this or similar cause; to hobble, to limp; to move with pain or stiffness 
vb. 2. c1440 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to wrinkle, crumple, crinkle, curl 
vb. 3. 1754 – to walk lamely, to hobble

• CRIMP MATCH
n. 1684 obs. – a horse race in which the result is fixed

• CRIMPS!
int. 1924 Amer. dial. – an exclamation of surprise or dismay
 
• CRIMPY
adj. 1905 Amer. dial. – of the weather: cold

• CRIMSON
adj. 1. 1560 – relating to blood
adj. 2. 1560 – blushing
 
• CRIMSON-CHITTERLING
n. Urquhart usage – the penis

• CRIMSONING
n. 1789 – a becoming crimson or red, esp. with embarrassment, rage, etc.

• CRIMSON RAMBLER
n. 1906 Amer. dial. – a bedbug

• CRIMULUS!; CRIMUS!; CRYMUS!
int. 1914 Amer. dial. – an exclamation of surprise or dismay

• CRIMUS TO FISHHOOKS!
int. 1967 Amer. dial. – an exclamation of surprise or dismay

• CRINAL
adj. 1656 rare – relating to hair, esp. of the head

• CRINANTHROPY
n. 1891 obs. rare – judgement or criticism of other people

• CRINATED
adj. 1731 rare – having long hair; hairy

• CRINCH
vb. 1808 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to crunch; to crush with the teeth
 
• CRINE
n. 1581 obs. – hair; head of hair
vb. 1553 chiefly Sc. – to shrivel or shrink, esp. with age or heat; to dry up

• CRINET
n. 1573 obs. – a hair
 
• CRINGE
n. 1. 1592 – a servile or sycophantic bow; an obsequious, deferential, or sycophantic act or attitude
n. 2. 1969 Amer. dial. – a sudden sharp pain, a cramp
n. 3. 1984 colloq. – acute embarrassment or awkwardness
vb. 1. c1660 – to behave obsequiously or submissively; to show servile deference to a person
vb. 2. 1868 colloq. 
– to wince in embarrassment or distaste 

• CRINGE-INDUCING
adj. 1972 colloq. – causing one to cringe with fear or acute embarrassment, awkwardness, disgust, etc.
 
• CRINGELING
adj. 1693 rare – cringing, servile 
n. 1798 – a cringing or servile person; a servile flatterer; a fawner; a sycophant; a coward 

• CRINGE-MAKING
adj. 1969 colloq. – causing one to cringe with fear or acute embarrassment, awkwardness, disgust, etc.

• CRINGE-MAKINGLY
adv. 1984 colloq. – so intensely embarrassing, shameful, sentimental, etc., that one might cringe
 
• CRINGEWORTHY
adj. 1977 Brit. colloq. – causing feelings of acute embarrassment or distaste 

• CRINGLE
n. 1808 Eng. dial. obs. – a twist, a bend; a wrinkle or crease on the surface of something
vb. 1. 1657 rare – of a stream: to twist, to wind
vb. 2. 1823 chiefly Sc. – to shrivel or shrink, esp. with age
vb. 3. 1880 chiefly Sc. – to twist; to crumple
vb. 4. 1929 Sc. – to snuggle, to nestle
 
• CRINGLE-CRANGLE
adj. 1606 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – winding in and out, having twists and turns 
adv. 1781 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – zigzag, in a meandering, crooked manner 
n. 1573 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a mass of twistings and turns; a zigzag 

• CRINGY
adj. 1. 1880 – servile; cringing; timid
adj. 2. 1967 – causing one to cringe with fear or acute embarrassment, awkwardness, disgust, etc.

• CRINICULTURAL
adj. 1873 rare – relating to the care for the condition or appearance of the hair
n. 1866 rare – a haircare product

• CRINIFEROUS
adj. 1706 rare – having hair, covered i hair, hairy

• CRINIGEROUS
adj. 1656 rare – having hair, covered i hair, hairy

• CRINIPAROUS
adj. 1798 obs. – producing hair

• CRINITAL STAR
n. 1580 obs. rare – a comet

• CRINITORY
adj. 1824 rare – made of hair, hairy; hair-like

• CRINK
n. 1. 1534 obs. – an intricate, esp. deceptive, turn or twist of thought, speech, etc.; an intricate deception or sleight
n. 2. 1567 – a twist, bend, or crook
n. 3. 1688 rare – a furrow, channel, or crevice, esp. a winding one
n. 4. 1965 Amer. dial. – a sudden sharp pain, a cramp
vb. 1. 1781 rare – to emit a sharp, thin sound, as a cricket
vb. 2. 1821 – to bend, to twist; to form into wrinkles or furrows; to crinkle
vb. 3. 1888 rare – to twist or strain one’s neck or back, causing painful stiffness

• CRINK-CRANK
adj. 1865 Eng. dial. – of a word: long and drawn from elevated or literary vocabulary
 
• CRINKIE-WINKIE
n. 1818 Sc. – a contention; a pother, disturbance, commotion, turmoil 
 
• CRINKLE
n. 1. 1596 – a twist, a bend; a wrinkle or crease on the surface of something
n. 2. 1702 obs. – a ring, a circle
n. 3. 20C Brit. sl. – banknotes; therefore, money 
vb. 1. c1430 – to make twisting, winding, or crumpled; to wrinkle; to crimp the hair
vb. 2. 1612 rare – to abandon or shrink from one’s purpose; to fail to fulfil a promise; to yield sneakingly

• CRINKLE-CRANKLE
adj. 1804 adj. – winding or twisting in and out, zigzag; intricate; convoluted
n. 1598 rare – a winding in and out; a zigzag; sinuosity; intricacy, complexity; convolution

• CRINKLEDUM CUM CRANKLEDUM
adv. 1660 obs. rare – circuitously; convolutedly

• CRINKLE IN THE HAMS
vb. 1607 obs. – to bend the body in a timorous or servile manner; to bow obsequiously or sycophantically

• CRINKLEPOUCH
n. 1593 sl., obs. – a sixpence

• CRINKLETY
adj. 1906 Amer. dial. – wrinkled, creased
 
• CRINKLETY-CRANKLETY
adj. 1. 19C Eng. dial. – very crooked; zigzag 
adj. 2. 1904 Amer. dial. – crinkled, roughly creased 
adv. 19C Eng. dial. – twisting in and out; zigzag 

• CRINKLING
n. a1825 Eng. dial. – a small apple
 
• CRINKLY
adj. 1750 – of the hair: tightly curled
n. 20C sl., derogatory – an old person 

• CRINKLY-CRANKLY
adj. 1. 1850 colloq. – crooked, twisted; rumpled
adj. 2. 1850 colloq. – winding in and out, zigzagging

• CRINKS AND CRANKS
n. 1865 Eng. dial. – twisting or contorting of the body, induced by pain; aches and pains

• CRINKUM-CRANKUM
adj. 1766 rare – twisting in and out, sinuous; intricate, convoluted
adv. 1656 obs. – intricately; sinuously
n. 1670 – a thing which is full of twists and turns; a winding way; something intricately or fancifully elaborated; a mechanical device or toy; a curio; also, sinuosity; intricateness
 
• CRINKUM-CRANKUMS
n. 1. 1846 Eng. dial. – odds and ends; knick-knacks; useless ornamental trifles 
n. 2. 19C Eng. dial. – syphilis 

• CRINKUMS
n. 1618 sl., obs. – venereal disease, esp. syphilis

• CRINOSE
adj. 1727 rare – having much or long hair; hairy; also, made of hair

CRINOSITY
n. 1656 rare – hairiness
 
CRIOUS
adj. a1382 obs. – noisy; clamorous 

CRIP
adj. 1923 Amer. dial. – easy
n. 1. 1918 US colloq. – a cripple
n. 2. 1923 Amer. dial. – a thing easily done, a snap, a cinch

• CRIP AROUND
vb. 1960 Amer. dial. – to walk or creep around like a cripple, usually from some injury or rheumatism
 
• CRIPES!
int. 1910 euphemism for ‘Christ!’ – an exclamation of surprise or astonishment
 
• CRIPPLE
n. 1. 1675 Amer. dial. – low swampy ground, usually covered with trees or underbrush
n. 2. 1785 sl. – sixpence
vb. c1220 – to move as if crippled, to walk lamely, to limp or hobble

• CRIPPLEDOM
n. 1861 – a being a cripple

• CRIPPLE DOWN
vb. 1. 1840 Amer. dial. – to walk lamely
vb. 2. 1909 Amer. dial. – to crouch

• CRIPPLETY-CRUMPLETY
adj. 1908 Amer. dial. – crumpled, wrinkled, creased

• CRIPPLY
adj. 1775 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – somewhat crippled

• CRIPS
vb. 1917 Amer. dial. – to crisp

• CRIPSY
adj. 1889 Amer. dial. – crispy; crisp

• CRISE
n. 1541 – a crisis
 
• CRISP
adj. 1. c900 – of the hair: curly
adj. 2. 1398 – having a surface curled into minute waves, ripples, folds, or wrinkles
adj. 3. 1814 – short, sharp, decided in manner; also, clean, neat; clearly defined
adj. 4. 1851 – stiff, firm, as opposed to limp
n. 1. 1638 obs. – a curl of hair; esp. a short or close curl
n. 2. 1675 obs. exc. Eng. dial.- the ‘crackling’ of roast pork
n. 3. a1889 sl. – a banknote; money 
vb. 1. c1340 – to curl into short, stiff, wavy folds or crinkles
vb. 2. 1583 – to curl in short stiff curls
vb. 3. 1815 – to make crisp or brittle

• CRISPATION
n. 1. 1626 – a curled condition; the formation of slight waves, fold, or crinkles; undulation
n. 2. 1871 – the formation of gooseflesh

• CRISPATURE
n. 1745 rare – crisped condition

• CRISPED
adj. c1400 – of hair: closely and stiffly curled

• CRISPEN
vb. 1761 – to make crisp

• CRISPHEAD
n. c1440 obs. rare – crispness

• CRISPIED
adj. 1969 Amer. dial. – slightly burnt around the edges

• CRISPIN
n. 1756 – a shoemaker

• CRISPING-CROOK
n. a1400 – an instrument for crisping or curling the hair

• CRISPING-IRON
n. a1640 – an instrument for crisping or curling the hair

• CRISPING-PIN
n. 1568 – an instrument for crisping or curling the hair

• CRISPING-TONGS
n. 1773 – an instrument for crisping or curling the hair

• CRISPISULCANT
adj. 1727 rare – of lightning: coming down wrinkled; undulating or serpentine

CRISPITUDE
n. 1656 obs. rare – curledness

CRISPLE
n. 1594 obs. rare – a minute curl or undulation
vb. 1594 obs. rare – to curl minutely; to ripple

CRISPY
adj. 1. 1398 – curly, wavy
adj. 2. 1611 – brittle
adj. 3. 1841 – pleasantly sharp, brisk

CRISS
adj. 1. 1952 chiefly Jamaican – stiff, not pliable
adj. 2. 1954 sl., chiefly Jamaican – attractive, fashionable, smart; good, nice
 
CRISS-CROSS
adv. 1. 1607 obs. rare – in a contrary or erroneous way; awry, askew
adv. 1843 – crosswise; so as to resemble cross lines
n. 1. 1848 Amer. dial. – tic-tac-toe
n. 2. 1877 obs. – a muddle or misunderstanding; a being at cross-purposes
n. 3. c1935 sl. – a crossword puzzle; crosswords in general 

CRISS-CROSS APPLESAUCE
adv. 1987 US – in a cross-legged position; sitting cross-legged

CRISS-CROSSEDNESS
n. 1898 Amer. dial. – contrariness
 
CRIT
adj. 20C teen & high school sl. – cool
n. 1. a1845 obs. – a critic
n. 2. 1908 colloq. – criticism

CRITERIE
n. 1660 obs. rare – criterion; a principle, rule, or standard by which anything is judged or estimated

CRITHOMANCY
n. 1652 – divination by meal strewed over animals sacrificed

CRITICABLE
adj. 1874 rare – that may be subject to criticism; capable of being criticized
 
CRITICAL
adj. 20C teen & high school sl. – cool

CRITICALITY
n. 1. 1758 obs. – a critical remark; a criticism
n. 2. 1763 – critical or judgemental nature; critical thought
n. 3. 1830 Ireland obs. – a critical moment

CRITICASTER
n. 1669 rare – an insignificant or mediocre critic

CRITICASTERISM
n. 1805 – worthless criticism

CRITICASTRY
n. 1887 – worthless criticism

CRITICIASIS
n. 1874 obs. – criticism regarded as a disease

CRITICIST
n. 1838 rare – a person who analyses, evaluates, and comments on a subject, etc.; a person who engages in critical analysis

CRITICKIN
n. 1834 rare – an insignificant or mediocre critic

CRITICLING
n. 1756 rare – an insignificant or mediocre critic
 
CRITICOPHOBIA
n. 1809 – a fear or horror of critics 
 
CRITICULAR
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – critical and particular 

CRITICULE
n. 1840 – an insignificant or mediocre critic

CRITISM
n. a1639 obs. rare – a critical remark or comment

CRITIST
n. 1602 obs. rare – a critic

CRITIZE
vb. 1631 obs. – to criticize a person or thing; to censure, to find fault with

CRITLINGS
n. 1611 obs. – the smaller apples or pears
 
CRITTER
n. 1. 1815 US sl., usually disparaging – a creature, esp. a horse or a cow; a person
n. 2. 1892 Amer. dial. euphemism – a bull

CRITTER-BACK
adv. 1890 Amer. dial. – on horseback

CRITTER-FLUNG
adj. 1937 Amer. dial. – thrown by a horse
 
CRIVENS!
int. 1917 UK – expression of surprise, shock, horror, or astonishment 
 
CRIX
n. Bk1942 Amer. theatrical sl. – critics

CRIZZLE
n. 1876 Eng. dial. – the rough sunburnt places on the face and hands in scorching weather
vb. 1. 1673 – to become rough on the surface, as water hen it begins to freeze
vb. 2. 1821 – to roughen or crumple the surface of

CRIZZLED UP
adj. 1877 Eng. dial. – twisted up as leaves are by cold


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Updated: September 23, 2022