Dictionary: CRO -CT

• CRO
n. 1950 Aust. sl. – a prostitute 
 
• CROACK
n. 1993 US sl. – a mixture of crack and an amphetamine 
 
• CROAGIES
n. 1985 US sl. – the testicles 
 
• CROAK
n. 1. 1879 UK sl. – a doctor, esp. a company doctor 
n. 2. 1965 Amer. dial. – a frog
n. 3. 1998 UK sl. – a combination of crack cocaine and mephamphetamine 
vb. 1. a1500 obs. – to groan or cry
vb. 2. 1547 obs. – of the stomach or bowels: to make a rumbling noise
vb. 3. 1812 sl. – to die 
vb. 4. 1823 UK sl. – to kill someone; to murder; to hang
vb. 5. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – to forebode evil 
vb. 6. 1964 US sl. – to inform on someone; to betray someone 
vb. 7. 1988 Can. pool sl. – to miscue
vb. 8. 1980s African-American basketball sl. – to slam dunk despite being well guarded 
 
• CROAKED
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – dead 
 
• CROAKER
n. 1. 1637 – a person who talks dismally or despondingly; one who forebodes or prophesies evil
n. 2. 1651 – a frog
n. 3. 1859 sl., now chiefly US – a doctor, esp. a prison doctor
n. 4. 1868 – a cricket, a cicada
n. 5. 1873 UK sl. – a dying person, or one who has just died 
n. 6. 1882 sl. – a habitual complainer 
n. 7. Bk1903 sl. – sixpence 
n. 8. 1905 Amer. dial. – a person who backs out of an undertaking
n. 9. 1912 Amer. dial. – a person who talks loudly and too much
n. 10. 1978 US sl. – a doctor who provides narcotics for an addict

• CROAK ON  SOMEONE
vb. 1980s African-American basketball sl. – to slam dunk despite being well guarded  
 
• CROAKY
adj. Bk1896 Amer. sl. – hoarse 
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a cheap marble

• CROAPE
vb. 1508 obs. – to croak as a raven
 
• CROATAN
n. 1880s African-American usage – a native of North Carolina or South Carolina whose ancestry consists of Black, Indian, and White

• CROB
vb. c1350 obs. – to croak, as a frog or raven
 
• CROBATE
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a poor stiff person or horse 
 
• CROC
n. 1884 Aust. sl. – a crocodile 

• CROCATION
n. 1656 obs. – the cawing of crows or ravens

• CROCHE
n. a1400 – a stick having a head to lean on; a lame man’s staff, a crutch

• CROCHED
adj. c1300 obs. – crooked, twisted

• CROCHETOLATRY
n. 1859 – excessive devotion to crocheting

• CROCITATE
vb. 1623 obs. rare – to croak or caw, as a crow or raven

• CROCITATION
n. 1656 obs. – the cawing of crows or ravens
 
• C ROCK
n. 2001 UK sl. – crack cocaine 
 
• CROCK
adj. 1957 Aust. sl. – broken; no good; worthless 
n. 1. 1528 chiefly Sc. – an old ewe, or one that has ceased bearing
n. 2. 1657 obs. exc. Eng. & Amer. dial. – soot or dirt, esp. from something burned or charred
n. 3. 1876 colloq. – a physically debilitated person; an invalid; a hypochondriac
n. 4. 1879 – an old broken-down horse
n. 5. 1889 UK sl. – an old and worn-out person or thing; an old decrepit car 
n. 6. L19 sl. – an unpleasant or worthless person, object, or experience; a waste of time 
n. 7. 1939 US sl. – a drunkard 
n. 8. 1962 US sl. – nonsense
n. 9. 1967 Amer. dial. – an insane person 
n. 10. 1978 US sl. – a person with medical problems which are the result of abusive living 
n. 11. 1983 US sl. – a computer program that normally functions, but fails if modified at all 
n. 12. 20C Brit. colloq. – a chamber-pot 
vb. 1. 1642 obs. exc. Eng. & Amer. dial. – to soil with soot; to defile
vb. 2. 1846 colloq. – to become feeble; to collapse; to break down; also, to injure or disable
vb. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to intoxicate; to make dead drunk 
vb. 4. 1960 Amer. dial. – to knock out
vb. 5. 1966 Amer. dial. – to cheat
vb. 6. 1969 Amer. dial. – to steal, to swipe
 
• CROCK CUT
n. 1947 US sl. – a haircut which gives the appearance of having been achieved by placing a bowl over the subject’s head 
 
• CROCKED
adj. 1. 1917 sl., orig. US – drunk
adj. 2. 1970 Amer. dial. – insane, crazy
adj. 3. 20C Brit. sl. – injured 
adj. 4. 2000 UK sl. – wrong; awry 

• CROCKER
n. c1315 obs. – a potter

• CROCKET
n. a1657 obs. rare – an earthen pot, jar, or other vessel
 
• CROCKETTS
n. 1. 19C obs. – locks of hair 
n. 2. 1859 Eng. dial. sl. – at Winchester School: cricket (game) 

• CROCKLING
n. 1573 obs. rare – the noise made by cranes

• CROCKMAN
n. 1851 – a seller of crockery
 
• CROCKO
adj. 20C US sl. – drunk 
 
• CROCK OF SHIT
n. 1. 1945 US sl. – a mass of lies; bragging; nonsense; ‘bullshit’ 
n. 2. 1951 US sl. – an unpleasant or worthless person, object, or experience; a waste of time 
 
• CROCKY
adj. 1. a1825 Eng. dial. – smutty, sooty
adj. 2. 1880 – broken-down, physically enfeebled
n. 1943 Aust. sl., chiefly juvenile usage – a crocodile
 
• CROCODILE
n. 1. 1595 – a person who weeps or makes a show of sorrow hypocritically or with a malicious purpose
n. 2. a1870 colloq. – a line of people, esp. schoolchildren, walking two by two
n. 3. 1897 Aust. sl. – a horse, probably a broken-down hose
n. 4. 1992 UK rhyming sl. – a smile
 
• CROCODILIAN
adj. 1. 1632 obs. – making a hypocritical show of grief; cruel and treacherous; deceitful
adj. 2. 1836 – of the nature of a crocodile; belonging to the crocodile family of reptiles
n. 1837 – an animal of the crocodile family

• CROCODILINE
adj. 1727 obs. rare – pert. to a crocodile; also sophistical

• CROCODILING
n. 1889 – a walking two and two in a long file

• CROCODILITY
n. 1848 – a captious or sophistical mode of arguing
 
• CROCUS
n. 1. 1785 UK sl. – a quack doctor
n. 2. 1979 UK sl. – a fair-weather trader who appears for a while when winter is over

• CROESUS
n. 1390 – a very rich person

• CROFT
n. 1. a1000 rare – an underground vault, a crypt; also, a cave, a cavern
n. 2. 1852 – a carafe, a glass water bottle
 
• CROG
vb. 1979 Eng. dial. – to ride on a bicycle as a passenger 
 
• CROGGY
n. 1979 Eng. dial. – a ride on a bicycle as a passenger, in which the recipient sits on the crossbar, handlebars, or behind the person pedalling

• CROH
n. a700 obs. – a pitcher, a water-pot

• CROISARD
n. 1766 obs. – a crusader

• CROISE
vb. 1. c1225 obs. – to mark with the sign of the cross
vb. 2. a1400 obs. – to crucify

• CROISEE; CROISIE; CROISY
n. 1482 obs. – a crusade

• CROISERIE
n. c1290 obs. – crusading; a crusade

• CROISES
n. 1656 obs. – crusaders

• CROISETTE
n. 1688 – a small cross
 
• CROKE
n. c1450 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – core of a fruit; refuse; dross
vb. Bk1914 criminals’ sl. – to die; to murder
 
• CROKER
n. Bk1914 criminals’ sl. – a physician
 
• CROKERS
n. 19C – potatoes 

• CROMB; CROME
n. a1400 obs. rare – a claw or talon
vb. 1922 Amer. dial. – to catch or kill something by hitting it with a stick or implement; to overpower, to subdue

• CROMULENT
adj. 1996 – acceptable, adequate, satisfactory
 
• CROMWELL
n. 1981 UK citizen’s band radio sl. – a Vauxhall Cavalier car 

• CRONE
n. 1. c1386 – a withered old woman
n. 2. 1552 – an old ewe; a sheep whose teeth are broken off

• CRONGE
n. 1577 obs. rare – a hilt or handle

• CRONICLE
n. 1569 obs. rare – a coronet
 
• CRONK
adj. 1. 1889 Aust. sl. – obtained by fraud; dishonest, corrupt
adj. 2. 1891 Aust. – of a horse: unfit to run in a race; said also of the race
adj. 3. 1900 Aust. – liable to collapse, unsound, unfit
adj. 4. 1900 Aust. sl. – sick, or feigned to be sick  
n. 1. 1790 Eng. dial. – the cry or note of a raven
n. 2. 1790 Eng. dial. – a croaking; a prating
vb. 1. 1790 Eng. dial. – to prate, to gossip in a malicious way
vb. 2. 1847 Eng. dial. – to crouch, to squat down; to sit huddled up in a slinking or crouching way
vb. 3. 1870 Eng. dial. – to lounge, to sit about gossiping
vb. 4. 19C Eng. dial. – to croak; to make the harsh note of a raven or frog
vb. 5. 19C Eng. dial. – to grumble
vb. 6. 19C Eng. dial. – to perch, to sit
vb. 7. 19C Eng. dial. – to exult over with insult
 
• CRONKY
adj. 1. 1961 UK sl. – inferior; ‘wonky’
adj. 2. 1971 Aust. sl. – fraudulent, dishonest
adj. 3. 1983 UK schoolchildren’s sl. – used as a disdainful descriptor  

• CRONY
n. 1665 – an intimate friend or associate

• CRONYISM
n. 1840 – friendship; the ability or desire to make friends

• CROO
n. 1. 1570 Sc. – a hovel, hut, or cabin
n. 2. 1795 Sc. – a pen for sheep, a fold
n. 3. 1825 Sc. – a pigsty
vb. 1611 obs. – to make the murmuring sound of a dove or pigeon, to coo

• CROOD
vb. 1. a1522 Sc. – the make the murmuring sound of a dove
vb. 2. 1710 Sc. – to croak as a frog
 
• CROODLE
vb. 1. a1700 Sc. – to make a continued soft low murmuring sound; to coo as a dove
vb. 2. 1788 Eng. dial. – to cower or crouch down; to cuddle together for warmth; to nestle
 
• CROOK
adj. 1. 1895 Aust. sl. – of a racehorse: not being run to win; of a jockey: not riding to win
adj. 2. 1898 Aust. & NZ sl. – dishonest, corrupt, unscrupulous  
adj. 3. 1898 Aust. & NZ – of a thing or situation: bad; unpleasant; unsatisfactory
adj. 4. 1900 criminals’ sl. – stolen, ‘bent’
adj. 5. 1908 Aust. & NZ colloq. – ill, unwell, injured
adj. 6. 1910 Aust. & NZ sl. – angry; annoyed; irritable, bad-tempered (followed by ‘on’, ‘at’)
adj. 7. 1916 Aust. & NZ – out of sorts, ailing, injured, disabled
adv. 1959 Aust. sl. – badly
n. 1. c1175 obs. – a crooked piece of conduct; a trick, artifice, wile; deceit, guile, trickery
n. 2. 1877 colloq. – a professional criminal; a swindler or dishonest person; a thief
n. 3. Bk1903 sl. – sixpence
n. 4. 1965 Amer. dial. – a sudden sharp pain, a cramp
n. 5. 1969 Amer. dial. – a cucumber
vb. 1. c1175 – to bend into an angular form; to curve
vb. 2. 1340 obs. rare – to curl hair
vb. 3. a1400 obs. – to croak
vb. 4. 1586 obs. – to coo as a dove
vb. 5. 1841 US sl. – to cheat; to steal
 
• CROOK AS A DOG
adj. 1955 Aust. sl. – very unwell
 
• CROOK AS ROOKWOOD
adj. 1971 Aust. sl. – very unwell
 
• CROOKBACK
n. 1. 1507 obs. – a crooked back; a hunchback
n. 2. a1513 – a person who has a crooked back; a hunchback
n. Bk1903 sl. – sixpence

• CROOK-BACKED
adj. 1477 – having a crooked back; hunchbacked
 
• CROOK BOOK
n. 1959 UK sl. – a piece of crime fiction

• CROOKDOM
n. 1921 – the realm of crooks
 
• CROOKED
adj. 1. 1859 colloq. – dishonestly come by; stolen; dishonest, corrupt
adj. 2. 1942 Aust. sl. – annoyed
 
• CROOKED AS A BARREL OF SNAKES
adj. 1967 Amer. dial. – said of a person who sets out to cheat others while pretending to be honest 
 
• CROOKED AS AN IZZARD
adj. 1856 Eng. dial. – deformed in person; perverse in disposition 
 
• CROOKED AS DICK’S HATBAND
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – very crooked 

• CROOKED BRUSH
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a thicket
 
• CROOKED ON
adj. 1942 Aust. & NZ sl. – annoyed, angry; hostile or averse to 
 
• CROOKED RIB
n. Bk1903 sl. – a cross-grained wife 

• CROOKED-RIG
n. 1382 obs. – a crooked back; one who has a crooked back; a hunchback
 
• CROOKED SHOES
n. US Civil War usage – footwear cut for right and left feet; such shoes were provided to Union soldiers, many of whom, prior to enlisting, had only worn two shoes cut identically
 
• CROOKED STICK
n. 1828 – a cantankerous, cross-grained, and perverse person; a dishonest person; a worthless, undependable person

• CROOKEDY; CROOKETY
adj. 1. 1907 rare – crooked, misshapen
adj. 2. 1922 Amer. dial. – tricky, unreliable

• CROOKEN
adj. 1589 obs. rare – crooked
vb. 1. 1552 obs. – to make crooked
vb. 2. 1603 obs. – to be crooked; to bend
 
• CROOKERY
n. 1. 1927 – the dealings or behaviour of crooks; the world of crooks
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – dishonesty 
 
• CROOK IN ONE’S LOT
n. a1732 Sc. – something untoward or distressing; a trial, an affliction 

• CROOKLE
vb. 1. 1574 obs. rare – to coo as a pigeon
vb. 2. 1577 obs. rare – to crook or bend in a curve
 
• CROOKLYN
n. 1990s African-American sl. – Brooklyn, New York City

• CROOK NOSE
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a hooked nose
 
• CROOK ONE’S ELBOW
vb. 1825 sl. – to drink alcohol, esp. to excess 
 
• CROOK ONE’S LITTLE FINGER
vb. 1836 sl. – to drink alcohol, esp. to excess 

• CROOKS
n. 1641 obs. – parentheses, [ ]
 
• CROOKSHANKS
n. 17C sl. – a knock-kneed or a bow-legged person 
 
• CROOK SOMEONE’S PITCH
vb. 20C Aust. sl. – to spoil an opportunity for someone 
 
• CROOK THE LITTLE FINGER
vb. 1836 sl., orig. US – to drink, esp. with the implication of excess
 
• CROOL
vb. 1. 1574 rare – to mutter or speak softly to oneself
vb. 2. 1899 Aust. sl. – to spoil something, esp. to spoil a person’s chances 

• CROON
n. a1522 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – a loud, deep sound, as the bellow of a bull, or the boom of a large bell
vb. 1. a1522 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – to bellow as a bull, to roar; to boom as a bell
vb. 2. 1823 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – to make murmuring lament or moan

• CROOSE
vb. 1567 obs. – to crush

• CROOT
n. 1. 1825 Sc. obs. rare – a puny feeble child
n. 2. 1825 Sc. obs. rare – the smallest pig in a litter
n. 3. 1825 Sc. obs. rare – a dwarf; something curbed in its growth

• CROOTSED UP
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – wrinkled, crushed
 
• CROP
n. 1. a1300 obs. – the ‘head’ or top of a tree
n. 2. c1325 – the stomach; the throat
n. 3. a1522 Sc. – the top of anything material
n. 4. 1457 – the entire skin or hide of an animal tanned
n. 5. 1689 obs. – a crop-eared animal
n. 6. 1699 obs. – a person who wears his hair cropped
n. 7. 1795 – a closely cropped head of hair
n. 8. Bk1903 sl. – money
n. 9. 1968 Amer. dial. – a horse with its tail cut short
vb. 1. c1225 – to cut off or remove the ‘crop’ or head of a plant, tree, etc.; to lop off the branches of a tree
vb. 2. 1377 obs. – to feed on, to eat
vb. 3. 1549 – to cut off, to lop off
vb. 4. 1796 – to cut the hair of a person close

• CROP AND ROOT
adv. a1350 – completely, thoroughly

• CROP-EAR
n. 1598 obs. – an ear that has been cropped; hence, a crop-eared animal or person

• CROP-EARED
adj. 1. 1530 – having the ears cropped; esp. in dogs, horses, etc., as a means of identification, and in persons as a punishment
adj. 2. 1680 – having the hair cut short, so that the ears are conspicuous
 
• CROPIN’
adj. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – stingy, niggardly, mean 
 
• CROPPER
n. 1. 1858 colloq. – a heavy fall 
n. 2. M19 colloq. – a severe misfortune, personal failure, etc. 
n. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an error; a mistake; a blunder 
n. 4. 1968 Amer. dial. – a horse with its tail cut short
n. 5. 1969 Amer. dial. – men’s jockey shorts

• CROPPERCROWN
n. 1899 Amer. dial. – a top-knot on a fowl’s head

• CROPPIE; CROPPY
n. 1. 1798 – a person who has his hair cropped short
n. 2. 1800 Aust. – a convict
n. 3. 1930 Amer. dial. – a bob-haired girl

• CROPPING
n. 1737 Sc. – the stomach

• CROP-SICK
adj. a1625 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – sick in the stomach esp. from excessive eating and drinking

• CROP THE CAUSEY
vb. c1650 Sc. – to walk boldly in the centre or most conspicuous part of the street
 
• CROP UP
vb. 1844 colloq. – to occur or appear, esp. unexpectedly 

• CROQUIS
n. 1805 – a rough draft; a sketch
 
• CROSHABELL
n. a1598 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a courtesan, a harlot, a prostitute 
 
• CROSS
adj. 1819 sl. – dishonest; dishonestly come by 
n. 1. 1573 – a trouble, vexation, annoyance; misfortune, adversity; anything that thwarts or crosses
n. 2. 1577 – a marketplace, a market
n. 3. 1802 sl. – dishonest or fraudulent practices, a swindle, criminal activities; also ‘the cross’ 
vb. 1. a1400 obs. – to crucify
vb. 2. 1823 sl. – to act dishonestly towards a person or in a matter 
vb. 3. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally 
vb. 4. 1930 euphemism – to die

• CROSS AND PILE
n. 1. 1393 arch. – the obverse and reverse side of a coin; head or tail
n. 2. c1450 obs. – the two sides of anything; one thing and its opposite

• CROSS-ANGLE
adv. 1966 Amer. dial. – diagonally

• CROSS-ARROW
n. 1619 obs. – an arrow shot from a crossbow
 
• CROSS AS SAM PATCH
adj. 1892 Amer. dial. – very cross 
 
• CROSS ASSHOLES
vb. 1975 Amer. sl. – to fight; to argue 
 
• CROSS AS TWO STICKS
adj. c1830 colloq. – very peevish or annoyed

• CROSS-BACK
n. 1964 Amer. dial., usually derogatory – a Roman Catholic

• CROSSBAR
n. 1582 obs. – an impediment, hindrance, obstruction; an untoward circumstance, misfortune
vb. 1680 obs. – to obstruct, to bar the way of
 
• CROSSBAR HOTEL
n. 1941 Amer. sl. – a jail or guardhouse

• CROSSBAR INN
n. 1966 Amer. sl. – a jail or guardhouse

• CROSSBAR MOTEL
n. 1966 Amer. sl. – a jail or guardhouse

• CROSSBITE
n. 1591 obs. – a cheat, trick, swindle, deception
vb. 1. c1555 obs. – to bite the biter; to cheat in return; to cheat by outwitting; to ‘take in’, to gull, to deceive
vb. 2. 1571 obs. – to attack or censure bitingly or bitterly

• CROSSBITER
n. 1592 obs. – a cheat, a swindler

• CROSS-BLOW
n. 1590 obs. – a counter-blow; also, a blow indirectly dealt

• CROSSBONE
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – the wishbone

• CROSSBONES
n. 1949 Amer. dial. – the pelvic bones

• CROSSBOWER
n. 1590 obs. – a crossbowman

• CROSSBUCK
n. 1. 1966 Amer. dial. – an X-shaped railroad crossing sign
n. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. – a $10 bill

• CROSS CAUSE
n. 1696 obs. rare – a hindrance

• CROSS-CORNERS
adj. 1968 Amer. dial. – diagonal
adv. 1968 Amer. dial. – diagonally, catercorner

• CROSS-COURSE
adj. 1632 obs. – running athwart the straight course of things

• CROSS-COUSIN
n. 1889 – one of two cousins who are the children of a brother and a sister respectively

• CROSSCUT
n. 1879 Amer. dial. – a direct route, a shortcut
vb. 1903 Amer. dial. – to take a shortcut

• CROSSER
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a Roman Catholic

• CROSSET
n. 1656 obs. – a small cross

• CROSSFUL
adj. c1680 obs. – given to crossing or thwarting

• CROSS-GRAINED
adj. 1647 – given to opposition, contrarious; intractable; perverse, refractory

• CROSS-HACKLE
vb. 1826 – to cross-question vexatiously or persistently

• CROSS-HAP
n. 1881 – adverse fortune or occurrence

• CROSSHAUL
vb. 1958 Amer. dial. – to work at cross purposes

• CROSS-HOBBLED; CROSS-HOPPLED
adj. 1951 Amer. dial. – uneven, twisted, askew

• CROSS IN THE HANDS
n. 1762 obs. – a finger-post, a signpost

• CROSSISH
adj. 1740 colloq., rare – rather cross or peevish

• CROSS-JAW
vb. 1946 Amer. dial. – to chatter; to palaver; used chiefly of women

• CROSS-JOSTLE
n. 1899 Amer. dial. – a wrangle
vb. 1899 Amer. dial. – to wrangle

• CROSS-LEGS
n. 1823 sl. obs. – a tailor
 
• CROSS LOTS
adv. 1825 US sl. – via a shortcut
vb. 1967 Amer. dial. – to take a short cut; to go by the most direct route

• CROSS MARRIAGE
n. 1539 – the marriage of a man to the sister of his sister’s husband

• CROSS-MOUTHED
adj. 1966 Amer. dial. – having a jaw slanting aside
 
• CROSS MY HEART
phr. 1908 sl. – used as an assertion that one is telling the truth
 
• CROSS MY HEART AND HOPE TO DIE
phr. 1908 sl. – used as an assertion that one is telling the truth
 
• CROSS ONE’S TRACK
vb. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – to oppose one’s plans

• CROSS OUT
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – tic-tac-toe

• CROSS OVER JORDAN
vb. 1967 Amer. dial. – to die
 
• CROSS OVER THE RANGE
vb. 1936 Amer. dial. – to die

• CROSS OVER TO THE OTHER SIDE
vb. 1967 Amer. dial. – to die

• CROSS-PATCH
n. 1699 colloq. – a cross, ill-tempered person; a peevish person
 
• CROSSQUOBBLE
vb. Bk1920 Eng. dial. – to pester with questions, to confuse  

• CROSS-REFER
vb. 1879 – to make a cross-reference

• CROSSROADS
n. 1. 1795 – a point at which two or more courses of action diverse; a critical turning-point
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a small town
 
• CROSS ROADS OF THE WORLD
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – Panama  

• CROSS-ROW
n. a1529 obs. – the alphabet

• CROSS-SECTION
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – an intersection

• CROSS-TALK
n. 1909 – altercation, repartee, back-chat; conversation
vb. 1963 Amer. dial. – to interrupt a speaker or contradict him before he has finished
 
• CROSS THE DAMP-POT
vb. B1900 sailors’ sl. – to cross the Atlantic  
 
• CROSS THE HASSAYAMPA RIVER
vb. 1927 Amer. dial. – to become unable to tell the truth

• CROSS THE RIVER
vb. 1943 Amer. dial. – to die

• CROSS THE TIES
vb. 1948 Amer. tramps’ sl. – to die

• CROSS THE VEIL
vb. 1950 Amer. dial. – to die
 
• CROSS-TIE TICKET
n. 1904 Amer. dial. – an imaginary ticket entitling one to walk along a railroad track

• CROSSWAYS
adj. 1. 1906 Amer. dial. – ill-tempered, cross; in a bad humour; obstinate
adj. 2. 1965 Amer. dial. – in disagreement; quarrelling; at cross purposes

• CROSSWISE
adj. 1. 1906 Amer. dial. – ill-tempered, cross; in a bad humour; obstinate
adj. 2. 1965 Amer. dial. – in disagreement; quarrelling; at cross purposes
adv. 1594 – in a way opposed to the direct or right; perversely, wrongly

• CROSS-WOUNDED
adj. 1582 obs. – pierced through with a wound

• CROT
n. c1330 obs. – a particle, bit, atom, individual piece

• CROTCH
n. 1. 1622 obs. – a dilemma
n. 2. 1752 Amer. dial. – a fork in a road

• CROTCH BEETLE
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a louse

• CROTCHETEER
n. 1815 – a person with a crotchet; esp. one who pushes or obtrudes his crotchets in politics, etc.

• CROTCHET-HERO
n. 1807 humorous usage – a musician

• CROTCHETLY
adj. 1702 obs. – crotchety, bad-tempered

• CROTCHET-MONGER
n. 1874 – a person having crotchets on political and other questions and obtrusively advocates them

• CROTCHETY
adj. 1825 sl. – bad-tempered

• CROTCH PHEASANT
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a louse
 
• CROTEY
n. a1425 obs. – the globular dung or excrement of hares, etc.
vb. a1425 obs. – of hares, etc.: to evacuate their excrement

• CROTISING; CROTIZING
n. 1598 obs. – the excrement of a hare or deer

• CROTT
n. 1657 obs. rare – dirt

• CROTTELS
n. 1598 – the globular dung or excrement of hares, etc.

• CROUCH
vb. a1225 obs. – to cross; to sign with a cross

• CROUCHANT
adj. a1593 – crouching

• CROUCHBACK
n. 1. c1491 obs. – a crooked or hunched back
n. 2. c1491 obs. – a person who has a crooked back; a hunchback

• CROUCH-BACKED
adj. 1606 obs. – hunchbacked

• CROUCHIE; CROUCHY
adj. 1786 Sc. – hunchbacked

• CROUK
vb. c1394 obs. rare – to bow, to make obeisance

• CROUKE; CROWKE
n. a700 obs. – a pitcher, a jug

• CROUP
n. c1475 humorous usage – the buttocks, the posteriors
vb. 1. 1513 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to cry hoarsely; to croak as a raven, frog, crane, etc.
vb. 2. 1825 Sc. – to speak hoarsely, as one does under the effects of a cold

• CROUPON
n. c1400 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – the buttocks or posteriors; the hinder part of a thing

• CROUSE
adj. 1. a1400 obs. Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – angry, irate, cross, crabbed
adj. 2. a1400 obs. Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – bold, audacious, daring, hardy, forward, cocky, full of defiant confidence
adj. 3. a1400 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – in somewhat high or lively spirits; vivacious; pert, brisk, lively, jolly

• CROUSE AROUND
vb. 1952 Amer. dial. – to walk stealthily

• CROUSELY
adv. 1787 Sc. – boldly, confidently, briskly, pertly

• CROUT
vb. c1550 Sc. – to make abrupt croaking or murmuring noises; to coo as a dove
 
• CROW
adj. Bk1914 criminals’ sl. – poor; mean; trivial; insignificant; worthless
n. 1. 1823 Amer. dial. – a Black person
n. 2. 1862 thieves’ sl. – a person who keeps watch while another steals
n. 3. 1866 sl. orig. US – an unattractive old woman
n. 4. Bk1896 sl. – a short crowbar, used by housebreakers
n. 5. Bk1913-17 Amer. navy sl. – the eagle on petty officers’ sleeves
n. 6. WW I US Navy usage – a US Navy chief or captain who wears the eagle in various insignia
n. 7. WWII Armed Forces usage – a chicken
n. 8. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – the American eagle
n. 9. 1950 Aust. sl. – a prostitute
n. 10. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – an unpopular woman or girl
vb. 1. a1529 – to speak in exultation; to exult loudly; to boast, to swagger
vb. 2. 1853 S. Afr. – to dig
 
• CROW-BAIT
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl.- insignificant; trivial; worthless
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. Western sl. – (usually as ‘crowbait’) a term of contempt; a worthless person; an ugly, repulsive person
n. 2. Bk1974 US Western usage – (usually as ‘crowbait’) an old, useless, mean or ugly horse

• CROWBAR HOTEL
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a county or city jail

• CROW-BIDDY
n. 1907 Amer. dial. – a rooster

• CROWBONES
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a thin, bony, or poor-looking cow or horse

• CROWD
n. 1. 1399 obs. – an underground vault, a crypt
n. 2. a1627 obs., exc. Eng. dial. – a fiddle
vb. 1. a1000 obs. exc. Amer. dial. – to put pressure on
vb. 2. 1589 obs. – to play the ‘crowd’; to fiddle
vb. 3. 1753 obs. – to crow, as a cock
vb. 4. 1775 Amer. dial. – to embarrass financially; to press to pay a debt
vb. 5. 1838 Amer. dial. – to rush or hurry someone
vb. 6. c1871 Amer. dial. – to pursue closely
vb. 7. 1969 Amer. dial. – to study very hard the last minute before an exam; to cram

• CROWD-BARROW
n. c1440 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a wheelbarrow

• CROWDER
n. c1450 Eng. dial. – a person who plays a ‘crowd’; a fiddler

• CROWDIE
n. 1668 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – meal and water stirred together to form a thick gruel; porridge

• CROWDING THE MOURNERS
phr. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – putting some further embarrassment upon a person already labouring under difficulties
 
• CROWD THE MOURNERS
vb. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. political sl. – to add some further embarrassment to politicians labouring under difficulties
vb. 2. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to be premature or forward
vb. 3. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to push or hurry in an unseemly manner

• CROWD-WAIN
n. c1330 obs. – a wheelbarrow, a hand cart

• CROWDY-MOWDY
n. a1513 Sc. – a term of endearment
  
• CROW-EATER
n. Bk1892 Aust. sl. – a lazy fellow who will live on anything rather than work

• CROWED
adj. 1851 rare – marked with crow’s feet about the eyes

• CROWER
n. 1891 Amer. dial. euphemism – a rooster, a cock

• CROW-FLIGHT
n. 1875 – a direct course, a straight line

• CROW-FLOWER
n. 1597 – the buttercup

• CROWFOOT
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a crowbar

• CROW-FOOTED
adj. 1. 1834 – marked with crow’s feet about the eyes
adj. 2. 1935 Amer. dial. – tangled
 
• CROW-GAPER
n. 19C Eng. dial. – a very hot day

• CROW-HOP
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a short distance
vb. 1. 1897 Amer. dial. – to back out of an agreement, commitment, etc.
vb. 2. 1935 Amer. dial. – of a horse: to buck mildly
vb. 3. 1965 Amer. dial. – to move lamely, to limp
 
• CROW JIMISM
n. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – said in reference to Whites: a strong psychological attraction to Black people

• CROW-KEEPER
n. 1597 obs. – a scarecrow

• CROWL
n. 1621 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a dwarf; a stunted or frail person or animal; the smallest and weakest animal or bird in a litter or brood
vb. 1519 obs. – to rumble or make a sound in the stomach and bowels

• CROWLING
n. 1609 – a little or young crow
 
• CROWN
n. 1. c1275 – the top of the head
n. 2. c1330 rare – a person’s head; the hair on a person’s head
n. 3. 1563 rare – a circle or halo of light seen around the sun, the moon, a shadow, etc.
n. 4. 1582 – the rounded summit of a mountain, hill, or other elevation
n. 5. 1588 – the roof of a building
n. 6. 1596 rare – a group of people or objects in a ring or circle
vb. 1746 sl. – to hit someone on the head

• CROWNAL
adj. 1836 – relating to a royal crown or a coronation
n. c1443 arch. – a coronet, garland, or wreath for the head

• CROWNATION
n. a1533 hist. – a coronation

• CROWN BIRTHDAY
n. 2003 S. Afr. – the birthday on which the numeral of one’s age matches that of the day of the month

• CROWN-CROACHER
n. 1587 obs. – a person who has wrongfully acquired or seized the crown of a kingdom

• CROWN DAY
n. 1609 obs. – a coronation day

• CROWNED
adj. 1. c1405 rare – unfailingly effective, perfect; also, completed, consummated
adj. 2. 1603 rare – abundant, bounteous

• CROWNER
n. 1. 1327 – a coroner
n. 2. 1815 colloq. – the thing or event in a series which outdoes or is a climax to all those preceding; a finishing touch; the culmination; a clinching argument etc.
n. 3. 1850 colloq. – a heavy fall; one in which the person lands on his or her head

• CROWNET
n. 1578 obs. rare – a cluster of flowers; the leafy head of a tree

• CROWN HEAD
n. 1700 – a king or queen

• CROWNING GLORY
n. 1. 1780 – the best or most notable feature of something; the greatest achievement
n. 2. 1893 – a person’s hair

• CROWNING JEWEL
n. 1829 – the best or most notable feature of something; the most impressive or important part

• CROWN JEWELS
n. 1. 1646 – particularly fine or precious things; the best
n. 2. 1851 obs. rare – sparkles of light
n. 3. 1970 sl. – the male genitals, often the testicles

• CROWNLET
n. 1530 – a small or insignificant royal crown

• CROWNLING
n. 1884 obs. rare – a scion of the Crown, a prince

• CROWNMENT
n. 1. c1300 obs. – the period of a monarch’s reign, following the coronation
n. 2. c1325 obs. – a coronation
 
• CROWN ON THE CONK
vb. World War II Amer. sl. – to strike on the head
 
• CROWN SHEET
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – the seat of the trousers
 
• CROWN WITH A MAROTTE
vb. 1630 obs. – to make a fool of

• CROW OVER
vb. 1588 – to triumph over

• CROW SCRATCHING
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – handwriting that is hard to read

• CROW’S-FEET
n. 1. 1967 Amer. dial. – handwriting that is hard to read
n. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. – men’s sharp-pointed shoes

• CROW’S FLY
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a short distance

• CROW’S MARKS
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – handwriting that is hard to read

• CROW’S NEST
n. 1. 1950 Amer. dial. – a female’s hairstyle with the hair up on the head in a bunch
n. 2. 1965 Amer. dial. – the upper balcony of a theatre

• CROW’S ROOST
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – the upper balcony of a theatre

• CROW-SPIKE
n. 1692 obs. – a crowbar
 
• CROW TRACKS
n. 1. 1874 Amer. dial. – handwriting that is hard to read
n. 2. 20C US army usage – chevrons  

• CROW-TREAD
vb. 1593 obs. – to subject to humiliating or degrading treatment; to abuse; to debase
 
• CROZIERED ABBOT
n. Bk1909 sl. – the bully of a brothel

• CROZZLE
n. 1829 Eng. dial. – a cinder
vb. 1876 Eng. dial. – to huddle together; to curl up

• CRUBEEN
n. 1847 Ireland – the foot of an animal; a cooked pig’s foot

• CRUCHE
n. a1685 obs. – a small curl lying flat on the forehead

• CRUCIABLE
adj. 1578 obs. rare – excruciating, racking

• CRUCIADE
n. 1429 – a crusade
 
• CRUCIAL
adj. 1987 Brit. sl. – excellent

• CRUCIATE
adj. 1504 obs. – tortured, tormented
vb. 1. 1532 arch. – to afflict with grievous pain or distress; to torture, to torment
vb. 2. 1575 obs. rare – to crucify
vb. 3. 1877 – to mark with crosses, to cross

• CRUCIATION
n. 1496 obs. – torture, torment
 
• CRUCIATORY
adj. 1660 obs. rare – torturing, tormenting

• CRUCIBLE
n. 1647 – a severe test or trial

• CRUCIFEROUS
adj. 1656 – bearing or wearing a cross

• CRUCIFICIAL
adj. 1849 rare – pert. to making a cross

• CRUCIFIXION
n. 1648 obs. – torture, severe pain or anguish

• CRUCIFY
vb. 1633 obs. rare – to cross, to place cross-wise

• CRUCIGERAN
adj. 1607 obs. rare – bearing or marked with a cross

• CRUCIGEROUS
adj. 1658 obs. rare – bearing or marked with a cross

• CRUCIVERBALIST
n. 1971 – a person who compiles or solves crossword puzzles

• CRUCK
n. 1688 obs. – a pail or can

• CRUCKLE
vb. 1691 obs. – to coo as a pigeon
 
• CRUD
adj. 1968 Amer. dial. – annoyed
int. 1945 – a substitute for a swear word, esp. expressing disgust, annoyance, disappointment, etc.
n. 1. a1508 – disgusting material
n. 2. 1930 sl., orig. US – an unpleasant or despicable person, usually male
n. 3. 1932 sl. – any disease or illness
n. 4. 1940 rare, orig. & chiefly US Army sl. – a habitually dirty or slovenly person
n. 5. 1943 Amer. sl. – anything inferior, worthless, or ugly; rubbish, trash, junk
n. 6. 1943 sl. – trivial, insincere, or untruthful talk or writing; nonsense; lies
n. 7. 1948 sl., orig. US – dirt; dirty material; filth
n. 8. 1961 sl. – in skiing and snowboarding: wet or heavy snow on which it is difficult to ski

• CRUDBALL
n. 1968 sl. – an unpleasant or despicable person

• CRUDDLE
vb. 1901 Amer. dial. – to curdle

• CRUDDLY
adj. 1949 Amer. dial. – of clouds: thick
 
• CRUDDY
adj. 1. 1877 sl. – dirty, filthy, mucky, unpleasant, disgusting
adj. 2. 1877 sl. – of a person: objectionable, contemptible, despicable, unpleasant
adj. 3. 1935 sl. – bad, second-rate, of poor quality; crummy, lousy

• CRUDE
adj. 1542 obs. – of food: raw, uncooked

• CRUDEFACTION
n. 1660 obs. rare – a becoming unripe
 
• CRUDELITY
n. 1483 obs. – cruelty

• CRUDIFICATION
n. 1910 – a making something crude

• CRUDIFY
vb. 1899 rare – to make crude
 
• CRUDZINE
n. 1976 US sl. – a poorly written and/or poorly produced fan magazine
 
• CRUEL
adj. 1985 US sl. – very
adv. 1937 UK sl. – severely; extremely hard
vb. 1899 Aust. sl. – to spoil something, esp. to spoil a person’s chances

• CRUELIZE
vb. 1847 Amer. dial. – to treat cruelly or brutally, to torture

• CRUELLIE
n. 1959 colloq. – a cruel joke, remark, comment, etc.
 
• CRUELLY
adv. 1937 UK sl. – severely; extremely hard
 
• CRUEL THE PITCH
vb. 1915 Aust. sl. – to spoil someone’s chances; to ruin an opportunity
 
• CRUENT
adj. 1524 obs. rare – bloody; figuratively, cruel
 
• CRUENTATE
adj. 1665 obs. rare – blood-stained; smeared with blood; bloody
 
• CRUENTOUS
adj. 1648 obs. rare – smeared with blood, bloody
 
• CRUET
n. 1941 Aust. sl. – the head
 
• CRUFT
adj. 1983 US sl. – any unpleasant, unidentified substance
 
• CRUFTY
adj. 1981 US sl. – in computing: poorly designed, or poorly built

• CRUG
n. 1820 sl. – food
 
• CRUGGY
adj. 19C Brit. sl. – hungry
 
• CRUISE
n. 1950 US sl. – a male homosexual who picks up multiple short-term sexual partners
vb. 1. 1674 sl. – of prostitutes: to solicit for customers while walking the streets
vb. 2. 1903 US sl. – to search for a casual sex partner, usually homosexual; to pursue a person as a sexual sex partner, esp. by eye contact
vb. 3. 1928 – of an infant: to walk while holding on to furniture or other stationary objects for stability
vb. 4. 1946 US sl. – to take someone, to lead someone
vb. 5. 1957 US sl. – to drive, with a suggestion of carefree spirit or enthusiasm
vb. 6. 1957 US sl. – to join others in driving slowly down chosen downtown streets, usually on a weekend night, seeing others and being seen
 
• CRUISER
n. 1. 1903 chiefly US – a person who ‘cruises’ in search of a casual sexual partner
n. 2. 1929 US – a police car that patrols the streets
n. 3. World War II Amer. sl. – a prostitute, esp. a streetwalker
 
• CRUISIN’ FOR A BRUISE
adj. 1960 US sl. – heading for trouble; inviting a beating
 
• CRUISIN’ FOR A BRUISIN’
adj. 1947 US sl. – heading for trouble, esp. a physically beating
 
• CRUISING
n. 1927 teen & high school sl. – searching for a date

• CRUIVE
n. 1. a1500 Sc. – a hovel, a cabin
n. 2. c1575 Sc. – a pigsty

• CRULL
adj. c1300 obs. – curly
 
• CRULLER
n. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – a failure; an unsuccessful performance or entertainment
 
• CRUM-A-GRACKLE
n. 19C Eng. dial. – a mess, a difficulty, a bother, a perplexity
 
• CRUMB
adj. a1100 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – crooked
n. 1. a1387 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a grain of dust
n. 2. 1843 sl. – plumpness
n. 3. 1863 Amer. sl. – a louse; a bedbug
n. 4. 1918 sl., orig. US – a dirty, slovenly, repulsive person; an unpleasant or despicable person  
n. 5. Bk1913-17 Amer. navy sl. – a dirty sailor
n. 6. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a hobo’s pack of blankets
n. 7. c1920 Amer. sl. – an untrustworthy, loathsome, or objectionable person; an insignificant, despicable person
vb. 1. c1490 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to make crooked or curved; to crook, to bend
vb. 2. 1941 Amer. dial. – to infringe upon the work or rights of others
 
• CRUMB BOSS
n. 1. 1926 Amer. hobo and logger use – a construction camp bunkhouse janitor or porter; one who makes up beds
n. 2. 1958 Amer. dial. – a conductor on a log train
 
• CRUMB BOX
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a bedroom
n. 2. 1945 Amer. dial. – a caboose
 
• CRUMB-BUM
n. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – a worthless person

• CRUMB CASTLE
n. 1942 Amer. sl. – a wagon carrying provisions and equipment for cooking on a ranch or in a lumber cap

• CRUMB CATCHER
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – a sparrow

• CRUMB CHASER
n. 1958 Amer. dial. – a cook’s helper in a logging camp

• CRUMB CRUNCHER
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – a small child

• CRUMB CRUNCHERS
n. 1. 1970 Amer. dial. – the teeth

• CRUMB CRUSHER
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a small child

• CRUMB CRUSHERS
n. 1. 1970 Amer. dial. – the teeth
n. 2. 1972 Amer. dial. – the lips
 
• CRUMB GOB
n. World War II Amer. sl. – a dirty sailor
 
• CRUMB HOUSE
n. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – a flop-house infested with lice
 
• CRUMB JOINT
n. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – a flop-house infested with lice

• CRUMBLABLE
adj. 1611 obs. rare – able to be crumbled; friable

• CRUMBLE
n. 1. 1577 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a particle of dust, etc.
n. 2. 1903 Amer. dial. – a crumb

• CRUMBLEMENT
n. 1868 rare – a crumbling; a crumbled condition

• CRUMBLET; CRUMLET
n. 1634 rare – a little crumb

• CRUMBLIE; CRUMBLY
n. 1976 sl. – an elderly person, older than a ‘wrinkly’; a person considered to be old or senile

• CRUMBLINGS
n. 1660 – crumbled particles, debris; very small crumbs
 
• CRUM BOX
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a bedroom

• CRUMB PICKER
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a small child
 
• CRUMB-ROLL
n. c1915 Amer. hobo, ranch, & logger use – a bed or blanket roll; a bed
 
• CRUMBS
int. 1892 Brit. – an exclamation of surprise or astonishment
n. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – a few pieces of change or silver money; a few dollars; a small amount of money

• CRUMB SNATCHER
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a small child

• CRUMB SNATCHERS
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – hands
 
• CRUMB THE DEAL
vb. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – to spoil a plan or plot
 
• CRUM-BUM
n. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – a worthless person
 
• CRUMB UP
vb. 1. 1926 Amer. sl. – to clean clothes thoroughly, esp. by boiling, so as to rid them of lice; to clean a place
vb. 2. World War II Amer. sl. – to get a haircut, shoeshine, freshly pressed shirt. etc., in preparation for an inspection
 
• CRUMBY
adj. 1. 1859 sl. – of low quality; bad; inferior; unsatisfactory; dirty, filthy, untidy; distasteful
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – lousy, infested with lice

• CRUMENICALLY
adv. 1825 humorous usage – ‘in relation to the purse’

• CRUMMABLE
adj. 1611 rare – able to be crumbled; friable

• CRUMMET
adj. 1789 Sc. – crooked; having crooked horns

• CRUMMIE
adj. 1878 Sc. – having crooked horns
n. 1724 Sc. – a cow with ‘crumpled’ or crooked horns

• CRUMMOCK
n. 1725 Sc. – a cow with ‘crumpled’ or crooked horns
 
• CRUMMY
adj. 1. 1567 obs. – crumbly, friable
adj. 2. 1718 sl. – plump, full-figured; generally said of women
adj. 3. 1735 sl. – rich, having well-filled pockets
adj. 4. 1859 sl. – of low quality; bad; inferior; unsatisfactory
adj. 5. 1918 Amer. sl. – lousy, infested with lice
adj. 6. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – dirty; soiled
n. 1. 1926 Amer. dial. – a caboose or bunk car
n. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. – a bed in the bunkhouse
 
• CRUMP
adj. 1. a800 obs. – crooked; said mainly of the body or limbs from deformity, old age, or disease
adj. 2. 1786 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – easily breaking under the teeth, brittle
n. 1. a1500 obs. – a cramp
n. 2. 1659 obs. rare – a bunch or hump on the back
n. 3. 1698 obs. – a crooked person; a hunchback
n. 4. 1850 colloq. – a hard hit, a smart blow, given with brisk or abrupt effect; a fall
vb. 1. 1480 obs. – to bend into a curve, to curl up
vb. 2. 1656 obs. – to disturb, to ruffle
vb. 3. 1850 Sc. – to strike with a brisk or abrupt effect; to smack
vb. 4. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – to lose consciousness from the combination of drinking and fatigue; to pass out

• CRUMP-BACK
n. 1661 obs. – a hunchback

• CRUMP-BACKED
adj. a1661 obs. – hunchbacked

• CRUMPED
adj. 1480 obs. – curved, crooked
 
• CRUMPED OUT
adj. 1. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – drunk
adj. 2. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – fatigued; asleep
 
• CRUMPELTY
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – crumpled

• CRUMPER
n. 1855 colloq. – something that is extremely large; a big lie
 
• CRUMPET
n. 1. 1891 sl. – the head
n. 2. 1900 – a term of endearment
n. 3. 1936 Brit. sl. – a woman considered as an object of sexual desire or availability

• CRUMPLE-BACK
n. 1845 obs. – a hunchback

• CRUMPLE-HORNED
adj. 1. 1908 Amer. dial. – having irregular or twisted horns
adj. 2. 1965 Amer. dial. – of a cow: dehorned

• CRUMPLETY-HORNED
adj. 1908 Amer. dial. – having irregular or twisted horns

• CRUMPLING
n. 1. 1658 obs. – a small shrivelled apple or cucumber
n. 2. a1825 obs. – a diminutive crooked or deformed person
 
• CRUMP OUT
vb. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – to lose consciousness from the combination of drinking and fatigue; to pass out
 
• CRUMPSY
adj. 19C Eng. dial. – cross, grumpy, ill-tempered

• CRUMPY
adj. 1808 Eng. dial. – brittle, easily breaking under the teeth; crisp, said of bread
n. 1. 1877 Eng. dial. – the crisp crust of a loaf
n. 2. 1877 Eng. dial. – a small shrivelled apple

• CRUNCH
n. 1939 – a crisis, a decisive point, event, etc.; a show-down

• CRUNCHER
n. 1947 colloq. – a critical or vital point; a difficult or decisive question or problem

• CRUNCHERS
n. 1859 colloq. – teeth

• CRUNCH TIME
n. 1933 – a crucial or decisive stage in a process or undertaking
 
• CRUNCHY
adj. 20C teen & high school sl. – said of someone who is overly earth-loving

• CRUNCHY-GRANOLA
adj. 1984 US – characterized by ecological awareness, liberal political views, and an interest in natural products and health foods

• CRUNGE
vb. 1966 Amer. dial. – of a bullfrog: to make its characteristic sound

• CRUNK
adj. 1995 US sl. – extremely energized or excited
n. 1868 Eng. dial. – a hoarse cry or croak of the raven or carrion crow
vb. 1565-73 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to utter a hoarse harsh cry, as a crane, raven, carrion crow

• CRUNKLE
vb. 1. c1400 chiefly Eng. dial. – to wrinkle, to rumple, to crinkle
vb. 2. 1611 obs. – to cry like a crane
vb. 3. 1900 – to make a harsh dry sound, as by grinding the jaws

• CRUNT
n. 1786 Sc. – a blow on the head with a cudgel

• CRUP
adj. 1736 Eng. dial. – pettish, peevish, snappish, surly

• CRUPPER
n. 1594 – the buttocks

• CRUPPERED
adj. 1959 Amer. dial. – finished

• CRUP-SHOULDERED
adj. 1599 obs. – having shoulders deformed by age, disease, etc.; hunchbacked

• CRUP-SHOULDERS
n. 1590 obs. – shoulders deformed by a deformity, age, or disease

• CRURE
n. 1610 obs. rare – a side of a triangle

• CRUSADO
n. 1575 obs. – a crusader

• CRUSARD
n. 1753 obs. rare – a crusader
 
• CRUSH
n. 1. 1832 colloq., orig. US – a group or crowd of people; a reception, dance, party, or other large social gathering
n. 2. 1895 Amer. sl. – an infatuation, esp. a one-sided one; a strong liking for a person, esp. one of the opposite sex
n. 3. 1904 sl., orig. US – a group of gang of persons
n. 4. Bk1914 criminals’ sl. – a forcible entry or exit  
n. 5. 1916 military sl. – a body of troops or a unit of a regiment
n. 6. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a loved one; a sweetheart
vb. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – to escape from prison

• CRUSH A CUP OF WINE
vb. 1597 – to drink, quaff, ‘discuss’ it
 
• CRUSH A FLY ON A WHEEL
vb. B1859 colloq. – to make much fuss about very little

• CRUSH A POT OF ALE
vb. 1592 – to drink, quaff, ‘discuss’ it
 
• CRUSHEE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a loved one; a sweetheart
 
• CRUSHER
n. 1. 1835 sl. – a policeman
n. 2. 1841 colloq. – something which overpowers or overwhelms; also, a crushing blow
n. 3. 1908 navy usage – a ship’s corporal or policeman; a regulating petty officer
n. 4. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something heavy
n. 5. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent
n. 6. 1965 Amer. dial. – a boorish intruder
n. 7. 1967 Amer. dial. – a man who makes unwelcome advances to women; a rude flirt
n. 8. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – a boy who is popular with girls and women; an attractive youth whom many girls have a crush on
 
• CRUSH’N
n. 20C teen & high school sl. – that which looks good, esp. clothes
 
• CRUSH-ON
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an infatuation
 
• CRUSH-OUT
n. Bk1974 Amer. criminals’ sl. – an escape from prison  
vb. Bk1974 Amer. criminals’ sl. – (usually as ‘crush out’) to escape from prison  

• CRUSH-ROOM
n. 1806 – a room or hall in a theatre, opera-house, etc., in which the audience may promenade during the intervals of the entertainment

• CRUSOE
n. 1907 – a person who is shipwrecked on a desert island
 
• CRUST
n. 1. 1594 obs. – a short-tempered or curt person; a crusty person
n. 2. c1900 Amer. sl. – gall, audacity, nerve, impudence, insensitive aggressiveness
n. 3. 1915 Amer. dial. – one’s head
n. 4. 1916 Aust. & NZ sl. – a livelihood, a living
n. 5. 1940 Amer. dial. – a meal

• CRUSTED
adj. 1833 – antiquated, ‘venerable’

• CRUSTER
n. 1880 – a person who ‘crust-hunts’

• CRUST-HUNT
vb. 1889 US & Can. – to hunt deer or other large game on the snow, when covered with a frozen crust strong enough to bear the hunter, but not to support the game, which sink in and are easily run down

• CRUSTIE
n. 1990 – a member of a group of homeless or vagrant young people, generally living by begging in cities, and characterized by rough clothes, matted, often dreadlocked hair, and an unkempt appearance

• CRUSTINESS
n. 1727 – crabbed curtness of manner or temper

• CRUSTOUS
adj. c1400 obs. – of the nature of a scab or crust
 
• CRUSTY
adj. 1. c1570 – short-tempered, harshly curt in manner or speech
adj. 2. 1651 – stubborn, hardened
adj. 3. c1900 Amer. sl. – audacious, nervy
adj. 4. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – dirty, mean, contemptible
adj. 5. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – worthless; worn out
n. 1990 – a member of a group of homeless or vagrant young people, generally living by begging in cities, and characterized by rough clothes, matted, often dreadlocked hair, and an unkempt appearance

• CRUSY
adj. 1625 obs. rare – concave
 
• CRUT
n. 1. 1925 US sl. – an unpleasant or despicable person, usually male
n. 2. 1940 Amer. dial. – a frog
n. 3. 1968 Amer. dial. – a horse with its tail cut short

• CRUTCHET
n. 1611 obs. – a crutch
 
• CRUTCH FOR A LAME DUCK
phr. 1965 Amer. dial. – said to a child when he asks “What are you making?”

• CRUTTING
adj. 1925 – dirty, mucky, filthy; unpleasant, disgusting

• CRUTTY
adj. 1950 Amer. dial. – very dirty, so that the dirt almost forms a crust

• CRY
n. 1. 1600 – a pack of hounds
n. 2. 1604 obs. – a ‘pack’ of people

• CRYBULLY
n. 1999 sl., derogatory – a person who intimidates, harasses, or abuses others, yet, esp. following resistance or disagreement, claims to be a victim of ill-treatment

• CRY CALF-ROPE
vb. 1942 Amer. dial. – to give in; to surrender; to capitulate, esp. in children’s games
 
• CRY CAPIVVY
vb. 1843 sl. – to be persecuted to the death, or very near it

• CRY DOWN
vb. 1616 – to condemn, depreciate, or disparage loudly, vehemently, or publicly
 
• CRY HARROW
vb. c1386 obs. – to denounce a person’s doings

• CRYING COLD
n. 1843 – a cold that makes the eyes run

• CRYING PEWS
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – the seats in the back of a church for children

• CRYING WILLY
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a Baptist

• CRYOBANK
n. 1973 – a store or stock of biological material kept at extremely low temperatures; esp. a sperm bank

• CRY OFF
vb. 1723 Amer. dial. – to sell at auction

• CRYONAUT
n. 1968 – a person who is cryogenically preserved with a view to being revived in the distant future

• CRY ONE’S WIFE DOWN
vb. 1980 Amer. dial. – to publish a disclaimer of financial responsibility

• CRYPT
n. a1475 rare – a cave, cavern, or grotto

• CRYPTARCH
n. 1800 rare – a secret ruler

• CRYPTARCHY
n. 1798 rare – secret government

• CRYPTIC
adj. 1. 1617 obs. rare – relating to a cave or grotto
adj. 2. 1620 – enigmatic, mysterious
adj. 3. a1638 – secret, concealed, occult, mystical
n. 1. 1605 obs. rare – communication of knowledge by secret methods
n. 2. 1663 – something enigmatic or hidden; a secret, a mystery

• CRYPTICAL
adj. 1588 – enigmatic, mysterious

• CRYPTICITY
n. 1892 rare – a being enigmatic or mysterious

• CRYPTISH
adj. 1866 obs. rare – situated or occurring in an enclosed space as opposed to the open air

• CRYPTO
n. 1946 colloq. – a person who secretly belongs to or supports a particular political group

• CRYPTOLECT
n. 1982 – a secret or arcane language used by a particular group or section of a community

• CRYPTOLOGICAL
adj. 1653 rare – relating to secret communication; enigmatic, cryptic

• CRYPTOLOGY
n. 1. 1645 rare – secret communication; coded or enigmatic language or writing
n. 2. 1844 – the study of encrypting and decrypting information
 
• CRYPTONYM
n. 1862 rare – a private, secret, or hidden name; a name by which a person is known only to the initiated
 
• CRYPTONYMOUS
adj. 1814 rare – having the real name concealed; anonymous
 
• CRY QUARTER
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to surrender
 
• CRY ROAST MEAT
vb. 1638 rare or obs. – to announce to others a piece of private luck or good fortune; to boast about one’s situation
 
• CRY SHAME ON
vb. 20C – to express vigorous disapproval of
 
• CRY SHAME UPON
vb. 20C  – to express vigorous disapproval of

• CRYSTAL
n. 1. a1000 obs. – ice
n. 2. a1450 poetic usage – water that is clear or transparent
n. 3. 1592 obs. – an eye
n. 4. 1964 sl. – a narcotic drug in crystalline or powdered form

• CRYSTAL-CLEAR
adj. a1439 – extremely clear; highly obvious
 
• CRY STALE FISH
vb. 1826 Eng. dial. – to tell stale or old news

• CRYSTAL GAZER
n. 1889 – a person who predicts what will happen in the future

• CRYSTALLOMANCY
n. 1613 – divination by means of crystals or glass; crystal-gazing

• CRYSTAL PALACE
n. 1848 – a large building constructed with a high proportion of glass

• CRY STINKING FISH
vb. 1660 – to disparage or undermine one’s own efforts or products; to put oneself down
 
• CRY UNCLE
vb. 1918 US sl. – to admit defeat, to beg for mercy
 
• C.T.A
n. c1860 circus & showmen’s usage – the police


Back to INDEX C

Back to DICTIONARY