Dictionary: CU – CUQ

• CUADRILLA
n. 1838 – a group or company; the troupe or following of a matador

• CUB
n. 1. 1530 – orig. a young fox
n. 2. 1548 chiefly Eng. dial. – a stall, pen, or shed for cattle
n. 3. 1600 – the young of the bear and of other wild beasts
n. 4. c1600 – an awkward, silly, uncouth, uncultured, or unpoised youth
n. 5. c1690 Brit. sl. – a surgeon’s assistant
n. 6. L17 sl. – a tyro gamester
n. 7. 1875 orig. US – an apprentice or beginner; an apprentice pilot on a steamboat

• CUBAL
adj. 1657 obs. rare – of the form of a cube; cubical

• CUBATION
n. 1727 obs. rare – a lying down

• CUBATORY
adj. 1755 rare – recumbent
n. 1727 rare – a dormitory

• CUBBIDGE
adj. 1930 African-American – miserly, stingy, tight-fisted

• CUBBISH
adj. 1819 – resembling a cub; awkward, uncouth, unpolished

• CUBBITCH
adj. 1930 African-American – miserly, stingy, tight-fisted
 
• CUBE
n. 1957 sl., orig. US – an extremely conventional or conservative person

• CUBE FARM
n. 1997 – an office divided into cubicles
 
• CUBESVILLE
n. 1959 sl., orig. US – a conventional place or institution

• CUBICALLY
adv. a1560 – to the third power or cube; in the form of a cube

• CUBICITY
n. 1881 rare – a being cubic

• CUBICLE
n. 1483 obs. – a bedchamber

• CUBICLY
adv. 1556 obs. rare – to the third power or cube; in the form of a cube

• CUBICULAR
adj. 1611 – belonging to a bedchamber
n. c1425 chiefly Sc., obs. – an attendant in a bedchamber; a groom of the bedchamber; a chamberlain

• CUBICULARY
adj. 1646 obs. – belonging to a bedchamber
n. a1382 chiefly Sc., obs. – an attendant in a bedchamber; a groom of the bedchamber; a chamberlain

• CUBICULE
n. 1887 – a bedchamber

• CUBICULO
n. a1616 obs. rare – a bedchamber

• CUBICULOUS
adj. 1715 obs. rare – pert. to a bedchamber

• CUBICULUM
n. 1832 – a sleeping chamber

• CUBIT
n. 14C obs. – the part of the arm from the elbow downward; the forearm

• CUBITURE
n. 1656 obs. rare – a lying down

• CUCHIL
n. a1522 Sc. obs. rare – a grove
 
• CUCK
n. 1. E15 – excrement
n. 2. 1706 obs. – a cuckold; the husband of an unfaithful wife
vb. 1. 1599 rare – of a cuckoo: to make its characteristic call
vb. 2. a1605 obs. – to defecate, to void excrement
vb. 3. 1611 obs. – to punish by setting in the cucking-stool
vb. 4. 1787 Eng. dial. – to throw, to cast, to chuck

• CUCKALLY
adj. 1589 obs. – having the character of a cuckold
 
• CUCKING-STOOL
n. 1308 obs. – an instrument of punishment formerly in use for scolds, disorderly women, fraudulent tradespeople, etc., consisting of a chair (sometimes in the form of a close-stool), in which the offender was fastened and exposed to the jeers of the bystanders, or conveyed to a pond or river and ducked
n. 2. 14C – a chamber-pot
 
• CUCKLE
vb. 17C Brit. & Amer. dial. – to commit adultery

• CUCKLE-STOOL
n. 1592 – a cucking-stool

• CUCKOLD
n. 1. a1250 – the husband of an unfaithful wife
n. 2. a1757 obs. – a cockle (shellfish)
vb. 1644 obs. – to cheat, to trick

• CUCKOLDAGE
n. 1676 obs. – the position of a cuckold

• CUCKOLDIZE
vb. 1682 obs. rare – to make a cuckold

• CUCKOLDLY
adj. 1594 obs. – having the character of a cuckold

• CUCKOLD-MAKER
n. 1574 – a person who makes a practice of corrupting wives; a man who seduces another’s wife

• CUCKOLDOM
n. 1681 obs. – a dishonouring of a husband by adultery with or on the part of his wife

• CUCKOLDRY
n. 1. 1529 – a dishonouring of a husband by adultery with or on the part of his wife
n. 2. 1548 obs. – a company of cuckolds

• CUCKOLD’S CHORISTER
n. 1592 obs. – the cuckoo

• CUCKOLDSHIRE
n. 1562 humorous usage, obs. – cuckoldom

• CUCKOLD’S-ROW
n. a1500 humorous usage, obs. – cuckoldom

• CUCKOLDY
adj. 1618 obs. – having the character of a cuckold
 
• CUCKOO
adj. 1906 Amer. colloq. – foolish; silly; witless; slightly mad
n. 1. 1581 – a fool; a silly person
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a ‘yes-man’; a sycophant, a toady
vb. 1648 – to repeat incessantly and without variation
 
• CUCKOOED
adj. 1918 sl., orig. US – crazy, eccentric
 
• CUCKOO HOUSE
n. 1930 US sl. – a mental hospital

• CUCKOO-LAND
n. 1916 – a fanciful or ideal realm or domain
 
• CUCKOOS
n. Bk1903 sl. – money .
 
• CUCKOO’S NEST
n. 1962 US sl. – a mental hospital
 
• CUCKQUEAN
n. 1546 obs. – a woman whose husband is unfaithful to her; a female cuckold
vb. 1592 obs. – to make a cuckquean of
 
• CUCKY
adj. 15C – of children and animals: dirty
 
• CUCUBATE
vb. 1623 obs. – to cry like an owl, to hoot

• CUCULLE
n. c1420 obs. – the hood or cowl of a monk

• CUCUMBER FLOOR
n. 1949 Amer. dial. – parquet
 
• THE CUCUMBERS
n. 2003 UK rhyming sl. for ‘numbers’ – in prison: Rule 43, which allows a prisoner to be kept apart from the main prison community for ‘safety of self or others’
 
• CUCURIATE
vb. 1623 obs. – to crow like a cock

• CUD
n. a1000 obs. – the throat or gullet
 
• CUDA
n. 1. 1949 US sl. – a barracuda
n. 2. 1965 US sl. – a Plymouth Barracuda car

• CUDDEN
n. 1673 obs. – a born fool; a dolt
 
• CUDDIE
n. 1. 19C Sc. & Eng. dial. – a donkey; a horse
n. 2. 19C Sc. & Eng. dial. – a stupid person
 
• CUDDLE
n. 1992 UK rhyming sl. for ‘piss’ (Cuddle and Kiss) – an act of urination
vb. 1. 1903 Amer. dial. – to tickle
vb. 2. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally
 
• CUDDLE AND KISS
n. 1. 1938 UK rhyming sl. for ‘miss’ – a girl, a girlfriend  
n. 2. 1992 UK rhyming sl. for ‘piss’ – an act of urination
vb. 1992 UK rhyming sl. – to make a fool of, to ‘take the piss’
 
• CUDDLE BUNNY
n. 1946 US sl. – an attractive girl
 
CUDDLE-ME-BUFF
n. 1867 Eng. dial. – an intoxicating liquor
 
CUDDLE-MUDDLE
n. 1866 Sc. – a secret conversation, often, with evil intent
vb. 1866 Sc. – to speak in a secret, muttering voice
Etymology
– of unknown origin

CUDDLE OUT OF
vb. 1808 – to coax or wheedle out of
 
• CUDDY
n. 1. 1641 nautical usage – a room or cabin in a large ship abaft and under the round-house, in which the officers and cabin passengers take their meals
n. 2. a1641 – a small room, closet or cupboard
n. 3. 1714 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a donkey
n. 4. 1840 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a stupid person
n. 5. 1917 nautical usage – the captain’s cabin
n. 6. c1930 Aust. & Eng. dial. – a horse; a small horse

• CUDDY-HOLE
n. 1848 Amer. dial. – a small room, closet or cupboard

• CUDDY-LEGS
n. 1880 – a large herring

• CUDDY WIFTER
n. 1929 Eng. dial. – a left-handed person

• CUE
n. 1. 1440 obs. – the sum of half a farthing, formerly denoted in College accounts by the letter ‘q’, originally for ‘quadrans’
n. 2. 1603 University usage, obs. – a small quantity of bread
n. 3. 1647 obs. – a hint of what is coming, a premonition
n. 4. 1654 obs. – a little, a little bit
n. 5. 1731 – a long plait of hair worn hanging down behind like a tail, from the head or from a wig; a pigtail
n. 6. 1862 humorous usage – the tail of an animal
n. 7. 1908 Amer. dial. – a barbecue; barbecued food
n. 8. 1935 colloq. – a cucumber
n. 9. 1968 Amer. dial. – a sharp, sudden pain

• CUE-BALL
adj. 1869 rare – piebald, as a horse; skewbald

• CUEIST
n. 1870 – a person skilled in the use of a billiard cue

• CUES
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – little flourishes on handwriting or a signature to make it look fancy
 
• CUE SOMEONE IN
vb. 20C sl., orig. US  – to inform someone

• CUE-WHIFFS
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – little flourishes on handwriting or a signature to make it look fancy
 
• CUFF
n. 1. 1362 obs. a mitten or glove
n. 2. 1570 – a blow with the fist, or with the open hand; a buffet
n. 3. 1610 – a blow or stroke of any kind
n. 4. c1616 sl., contemptuous usage – an old man; esp. a miserly old fellow
n. 5. 1755 US offensive – a Black person
n. 6. 1811 US – a black bear
n. 7. 1965 Amer. dial. – the green leaves at the top of a strawberry
vb. 1. 1530 – to strike with the fist, or with the open hand; to beat, to buffet
vb. 2. a1657 obs. – to vanquish in fight, to defeat
vb. 3. 1693 police sl. – to put handcuffs on
vb. 4. 1746 Eng. dial. – to discuss, to talk over; also, to tell a tale

• CUFF-CHEATING
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – cheating in school examinations
 
• CUFFEE
n. 1. 1713 US colloq., offensive – a Black person  
n. 2. 1824 US colloq. – a black bear

• CUFFEY; CUFFY
n. 1713 US colloq. – a Black man
 
• CUFFER
n. 1. 1662 – one who cuffs; a boxer, fighter
n. 2. 1694 obs. – the fist
n. 3. 1859 Amer. thieves’ sl. – a man
n. 4. 1891 Eng. dial. – a lie; a tale; an exaggerated and improbable story
 
• CUFFIN
n. 1567 criminals’ sl. – a man, a fellow, a chap

• CUFFING
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – cheating in school examinations

• CUFF OF THE NECK
n. 1740 orig. Sc. – the fleshy part of the back of the neck
 
• CUFFS
n. 1. 17C sl. – wrist fetters
n. 2. 1861 sl. – handcuffs

• CUFF UP
vb. 1940 Amer. dial. – to strike, to hit, to beat up
 
• CUGGER-MUGGER
n. 1862 Ireland  – a confabulation, a secret conversation; a whispering, a gossiping in a low voice

• CUGINE
n. 1. 1988 US sl., usually depreciative – a young Italian-American man
n. 2. 1996 US sl., usually depreciative – a young man seeking initiation into the Mafia

• CUITER
vb. 1795 Sc. – to attend to with kindly assiduity; to minister to; to coddle

• CUITTLE
vb. 1. c1565 Sc. – to wheedle, to coax
vb. 2. a1790 Sc. – to tickle
 
• CUJETTE
n. 20C teen & high school sl. – a female cousin; a female friend in an Italian neighbourhood
 
• CUJINE
n. 20C teen & high school sl. – a cousin; a friend in an Italian neighbourhood

• CUKE
n. 1903 colloq. – a cucumber

• CULB; CULBE
n. 1683 obs. rare – a retort

• CULBUT
vb. 1693 rare – to overturn backwards, to throw anyone on his back; to drive back in disorder
 
• CULCH
n. 1. 1736 Eng. & Amer. dial. – rubbish, refuse
n. 2. 1891 Amer. dial. – a person held in low esteem; a rude ignorant person

• CULCHA
n. 1872 humorous or ironic usage – culture or cultural pursuits, variously regarded as pretentious, exotic, alien, worthless, etc.

• CULCHAD
adj. 1878 humorous or ironic usage – cultured, esp. in an affected or pretentious way
 
• CULCHIE
n. 1958 Irish colloq., derogatory – a rustic; a country labourer

• CUL-DE-SAC
n. 19C – an inconclusive argument

• CULE
n. c1220 obs. – the rump; a buttock

• CULES
n. c1220 obs. – the buttocks

• CULEUVRE
n. 1481 obs. rare – a snake

• CULEX
n. 1483 – a gnat or mosquito

• CULICIFUGAL
adj. 1900 – that which repels mosquitoes or gnats

• CULICIFUGE
n. 1894 – a substance applied to the body or clothing in order to keep mosquitoes and gnats away

• CULINARIAN
adj. 1615 rare – pert. to a kitchen

• CULINARILY
adv. 1837 rare – with regard to cookery
 
• CULINARIOUS
adj. 1838 rare – pertaining to cookery
 
• CULL
n. 1698 Eng. dial. & sl. – a dupe, a gullible person; a silly fellow, a simpleton, a fool; a man, a fellow, a chap
vb. a1564 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to hug, to fondle in the arms

• CULLIBILITY
n. 1728 obs. – gullibility
 
• CULLIBLE
adj. 1811 obs. – easily made a fool of or deceived; gullible

• CULLICE
vb. 1639 obs. – to beat severely

• CULLING
n. 1490 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – an embracing, a cuddling
 
• CULLION
n. 1. c1386 obs. – a testicle
n. 2. 1575 obs. – a term of great contempt; a base, despicable, or vile fellow; a bad fellow; a mean wretch; a scoundrel, a rascal 
n. 3. 1589 obs. – in Fortifications, ‘..a great eare, but properly that part of a bulwake which enginers call the pome, the gard,  the shoulder or eares to couer the casamats’ (Florio 1611, definition of Orecchione)

• CULLION-LIKE
adj. 1591 obs. – base, despicable, vile

• CULLIONLY
adj. 1608 obs. – rascally, base, despicable; like a cullion

• CULLIONRY
n. 1611 obs. – base rascally conduct; the behaviour of a cullion

• CULLIS
n. 1580 obs. – a sound beating
vb. 1639 obs. rare – to ‘beat to a jelly’; to beat severely

• CULL-ME-TO-YOU
n. 1597 rural usage – the pansy

• CULLY
n. 1. 1664 colloq., rare – a person who is cheated or imposed upon, as by a sharper, strumpet etc.; a dupe, a gull; one who is easily deceived or take in; a silly fellow; a simpleton
n. 2. 1676 colloq. rare – a pal, a mate; a man generally
vb. 1. 1576 obs. rare – to fondle in the arms, to hug
vb. 2. 1676 obs. – to make a fool of, to deceive, to cheat, to take in
 
• CULLYFLOWER
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a cauliflower

• CULM
n. 1. c1440 obs. exc. Sc. – soot, smut
n. 2. 1587 obs. rare – the highest point, the summit
n. 3. 1603 – coal-dust; small or refuse coal

• CULMEN
n. 1646 – the top or summit; fig., the height, acme, culminating point

• CULMINAL
adj. 1889 rare – pert. to the summit

• CULMINANT
adj. 1849 – reaching the greatest height, forming the summit or highest point, topmost

• CULMY
adj. a1300 obs. – blackened or begrimed with soot

• CULORUM
n. 1362 obs. – the conclusion, or ‘moral’

• CULOTTE
n. 1. 1842 rare – knee breeches
n. 2. 1928 – the soft hair or feather on the back of the forelegs of a dog

• CULOTTIC
adj. 1837 – wearing breeches, respectable, as opposed to ‘sansculottic’

• CULPABLE
adj. 1. 1303 obs. – guilty, criminal; deserving punishment or condemnation
adj. 2. 1604 – deserving blame or censure; blameworthy
n. 1483 obs. – a guilty person, a culprit

• CULPATE
vb. 1548 obs. rare – to blame, to find fault with

• CULPATION
n. 1727 obs. – a blaming, a finding fault

• CULPATORY
adj. 1786 rare – tending to blame, expressing blame

• CULPE
n. 1377 obs. – guilt, sin, fault, blame
vb. c1430 obs. rare – to cut, to slice

• CULPON
n. c1400 obs. – a piece cut off, a cutting; a portion, a strip,. a slice, a shred, a bit
vb. 1. a1400 obs. – to cut into pieces; to cut up, to slice
vb. 2. 1587 obs. – to ornament or trim with strips or patches of a different-coloured material

• CULROUN; CULRUN
n. 1540 Sc. obs. – a base fellow, a rascal

• CULT
adj. 1598 obs. – of a person: refined, cultured
n. 1613 rare – a paying reverential homage to a divine being; religious worship

• CULTELLATION
n. 1685 obs. – the solution of a problem by dealing with it piecemeal; in surveying: a measuring of heights or distances by piecemeal, i.e. by instruments, which give such heights and distances by parts, and not all at one operation

• CULTIC
adj. 1877 – relating to religious worship, esp. as expressed in ceremony or ritual directed towards a particular figure or object; relating to a cult

• CULTICALLY
adv. 1877 – with regard to religious ritual or worship

• CULTISTIC
adj. 1912 – relating to a cult

• CULTIVABLE
adj. 1682 – able to be cultivated

• CULTIVABILITY
n. 1815 – the ability to be cultivated

• CULTIVAGE
n. 1632 obs. rare – a cultivating the land; cultivation

• CULTIVATE
vb. 1791 – to grow the hair, nails, etc., esp. to a particular length or to form a certain style

• CULTIVATIBILITY
n. 1886 rare – the ability to be cultivated

• CULTIVATIBLE
adj. 1803 – able to be cultivated

• CULTIVATORY
adj. 1815 – engaging in or relating to cultivation, esp. of the land

• CULTIVE
adj. 1611 obs. rare – cultivated; under tillage
vb. 1483 obs. – to cultivate the land or plants

• CULTIVING
n. 1483 obs. – cultivation; tillage

• CULTRIVOROUS
adj. 1833 rare – designating a knife-swallower or sword-swallower

• CULTUAL
adj. 1886 – relating to religious worship, esp. as expressed in ceremony or ritual directed towards a particular figure or object; relating to a cult

• CULTURAL CRINGE
n. 1950 orig. Aust. – a national attitude characterized by deference to the cultural achievements of other societies

• CULTURAL DESERT
n. 1921 depreciative usage – a place or situation regarded as devoid of culture or intellectual interest

• CULTURALIST
n. 1. 1866 – a person who cultivates or rears plants, fish, etc.
n. 2. 1953 – a person who advocates the interests of his or her own culture, esp. to the exclusion or detriment of the interests of other cultures

• CULTURATE
vb. 1631 obs. rare – to cultivate

• CULTURATI
n. 1892 orig. US – cultured people considered as a class; members of a cultural elite

CULTURATION
n. 1606 rare – cultivation

• CULTURE
n. 1. a1475 obs. – a piece of tilled land; a cultivated field
n. 2. 1483 obs. rare – worship; reverential homage
vb. 1. 1510 – to cultivate the soil, plants
vb. 2. 1677 – to refine or improve the mind, a person, etc., by education or training; to cultivate

• CULTURELESS
adj. 1824 obs. – of a plant, the soil, etc.: uncultivated, wild
 
• CULTURE VULTURE
n. 1947 sl., orig. US, derogatory – someone eager to acquire culture

• CULTURE WAR
n. 1. 1879 rare – a political struggle for control of cultural and educational institutions
n. 2. 1917 – a conflict between groups with different ideals, beliefs, philosophies, etc.

• CULTURE WARRIOR
n. 1982 orig. & chiefly US – a person actively involved in protecting or promoting a particular culture or set of values regarded as being under threat; later, an activist advocating a conservative political agenda

• CULTUS
adj. 1851 Amer. dial. – bad, worthless
n. 1617 – religious worship or veneration; an organized system of religious worship or ceremony

• CULVER
n. 1. c825 – a dove, a pigeon
n. 2. c1225 – a term of tender affection
 
• CULVER-HEADED
adj. 1. 19C Eng. dial. – thick-headed, stupid
adj. 2. 19C Eng. dial. – thatched with straw or stubble

• CULVER-HOLE
n. 1565-73 obs. – pigeon-hole, a dove-cote

• CULVER-HOUSE
n. 1340 obs. – a pigeon-house, a dove-cote

• CULVERT
adj. c1225 obs. – infamous, villainous, treacherous

• CULVERTSHIP
n. a1250 obs. rare – villainy, treachery, perfidy

• CULYE
vb. 1513 Sc. obs. – to cherish, to coax, to draw forth by coaxing or flattery
 
• CUM
n. 1. 1923 sl. – ejaculated semen
n. 2. 1967 US sl. – an orgasm
 
• CUM ANNEXES
n. Bk1892 W. Indian sl. – the members of one’s family
 
• CUM-ANNEXIS
n. Bk1892 W. Indian sl. – one’s belongings, esp. applied to one’s wife and children

• CUMATIC
adj. 1623 obs. – blue; of a sky colour
 
• CUMATICAL
adj. 1623 obs. – blue; of a sky colour

• CUMBENT
adj. c1660 – lying down, in a reclining position

• CUMBER
n. 1. 1303 obs. – overthrow, destruction
n. 2. c1425 – that which hinders; a hindrance, obstruction, encumbrance, burden
n. 3. a1513 obs. – trouble, distress, embarrassment, inconvenience
n. 4. 1968 Amer. dial. – a cucumber
vb. 1. 1303 obs. – to overwhelm, to overthrow, to destroy
vb. 2. c1325 obs. – to benumb, to stiffen with cold, etc.
vb. 3. a1375 obs. – to confound or trouble the mind or senses; to perplex, to puzzle
vb. 4. a1400 obs. – to harass, to distress, to trouble
vb. 5. 1487 – to hamper, to embarrass, to hinder, to get in t he way of

• CUMBERED
adj. 1. c1430 obs. – benumbed
adj. 2. 1590 – encumbered; hindered, hampered, occupied obstructively
 
• CUMBER-GROUND
n. 1657 – anything utterly worthless and in people’s way; something that out to be destroyed or buried out of sight; a useless thing; a thing or person of no value; a useless tree; a useless or unprofitable occupant of a position; one that is good-for-nothing

• CUMBER-HOUSE
n. 1541 obs. – a person who cumbers or inconveniently occupies a house

• CUMBERING
n. 1. 1303 obs. – trouble, distress
n. 2. a1340 – hindrance, encumbrance, embarrassment

• CUMBERMENT
n. 1. c1300 obs. – trouble, distress
n. 2. 1595 obs. – perplexity, confusion
n. 3. 1599 rare – hindrance, embarrassment, entanglement
n. 4. 1840 rare – an encumbrance

• CUMBERSOME
adj. 1. 1487 obs. – of places or ways: obstructing and impeding motion or progress; troublesome to pass or get through
adj. 2. 1535 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – causing trouble, annoyance, or inconvenience; troublesome, wearisome, oppressive

• CUMBER-WORLD
n. c1374 obs. – a person or thing that uselessly encumbers the world

• CUMBLE
n. 1. 1640 obs. – highest point; apex, culmination
n. 2. 1694 obs. rare – heap, accumulation
vb. a1425 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to oppress, to deprive of power; to stiffen or benumb with cold

• CUMBLY; CUMLY
n. 1696 – a blanket a coarse woollen cloth

• CUMBRANCE
n. 1. 1377 obs. – a troubling or harassing; trouble; distress, annoyance
n. 2. c1460 obs. – trouble of mind; perplexity
n. 3. 1535 obs. – a hindering, encumbering, or burdening; hindrance, burden, encumbrance

• CUMBROUS
adj. 1. c1400 obs. – causing trouble, distress, or annoyance; full of trouble or care; troublesome; harassing; wearisome, oppressive
adj. 2. 1487 obs. – presenting obstruction; difficult of passages or access

• CUMBROUSNESS
n. 1557 – a being troublesome, burdensome, or unwieldy

• CUMFLUTTERED
adj. 1928 Amer. dial. – flustered, excited

• CUMMER
n. 1. 1303 Sc. – a godmother, in her relationship to the other godparents and the parents of the child
n. 2. a1513 Sc. – a female companion or intimate
n. 3. a1700 Sc. – a woman, a female
n. 4. 1968 Amer. dial. – a cucumber
 
• CUMMOCK
n. 1786 Sc. – a crooked stick; a short staff with a crooked head; any kind of walking stick

• CUMOLDICTION
n. 1944 Amer. dial. – a curiosity; something unusual

• CUMOLDICTIOUS
adj. 1944 Amer. dial. – curious, unusual
 
• CUMPUFFLED
adj. 1854 Eng. dial. – confused, bewildered

• CUMRAY
vb. c1425 Sc. obs. – to overwhelm, to overthrow, to destroy
 
• CUMSHAW
n. US Civil War usage – a bonus, referring to a bribe rather than a reward or present
 
• CUM-TWANG
n. 1599 obs. – a term of abuse, reproach, or contempt; apparently, a miser

• CUMULAR
adj. 1892 – heap-like; of the nature of cumulus clouds

• CUMULATE
adj. 1535 – formed into a heap; heaped up
vb. 1534 – to gather in a heap; to heap up; to pile up, to collect, to amass, to accumulate

• CUMULATIST
n. a1846 rare – a person who accumulates

• CUMULATOR
n. 1799 obs. – a person who accumulates

• CUMULESCENT
adj. 1818 – of a cloud: forming into cumulus

• CUMULOSE
adj. 1727 obs. – full of heaps

• CUMULOUS
adj. 1851 – heap-like; of the nature of cumulus clouds

• CUMULUS
n. 1659 – a heap, a pile; an accumulation, a gathering; the conical top of a heaped measure

• CUN
vb. 1. a1000 obs. – to have experience of; to test, to try, to make trial of
vb. 2. c1175 – to taste

• CUNABLES
n. a1549 obs. rare – a cradle

• CUNABULA
n. 1774 – a cradle; fig., the place where anything is nurtured in its beginnings, the earliest abode

• CUNCTATION
n. 1585 – a delaying; delay, tardy action
 
• CUNCTATIOUS
adj. 1865 rare – prone to delay; addicted to delaying
 
• CUNCTATIVE
adj. 1617 rare – cautiously slow, tardy, dilatory, prone to or causing delay

• CUNCTATOR
n. 1654 – a person who acts tardily; a delayer
 
CUNCTATORY
adj. 1824 rare – disposed to delay or linger; procrastinating

• CUNCTIPOTENT
adj. c1485 rare – all-powerful, omnipotent

• CUNCTITENENT
adj. 1727 obs. rare – holding or possessing all things
 
• CUND
vb. M19 nautical colloq. – to say or determine which way a shoal of fish is going
 
• CUNDY
n. L19 Aust. sl. – a small stone

• CUNICLE
n. 1657 obs. rare – a hole, cave, or passage under ground

• CUNICULAR
adj. 1. 1676 obs. – pert. to the cradle or to infancy
adj. 2. 1759 obs. – rabbit-like, living in burrows under ground
adj. 3. 1890 – pert. to underground passages

• CUNICULOSE
adj. 1727 obs. – full of holes and windings, like a rabbit warren; also, full of rabbits

• CUNICULOUS
adj. 1634 obs. – full of holes and windings, like a rabbit warren; also, full of rabbits

• CUNJURUM
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a condom
 
• CUNNAMULLA CARTWHEEL
n. c1920 Aust. sl. – a big broad-rimmed hat
 
• CUNNEL
n. 18C sl. – a potato

• CUNNIGAR
n. 1. 1424 rare – a rabbit warren
n. 2. 1550 obs. – the vagina, the ‘coney burrow’

• CUNNILINGUE
n. 1884 rare – a person who performs cunnilingus
vb. 1941 – to perform cunnilingus on a woman
 
• CUNNING
adj. 1. c1325 obs. – possessing knowledge or learning; learned
adj. 2. 1843 sl. orig. US – quaintly interesting; pretty, attractive  
adj. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate
n. 1. 1340 obs. – knowledge; learning, erudition
n. 2. 1340 obs. – the faculty of knowing; wit, wisdom, intelligence
n. 3. 1340-70 obs. – a branch of knowledge or of skilled work; a science or art, a craft; in early times: occult art, magic
 
• CUNNING AS A DEAD PIG
adj. 1705 colloq. – stupid
 
• CUNNING AS A MAORI DOG
adj. c1925 NZ sl. – very cunning dead
 
• CUNNING AS A SHIT-HOUSE RAT
adj. 1957 Aust. sl. – very cunning indeed
 
• CUNNING AS A WAGON-LOAD OF MONKEYS
adj. 20C colloq. – very cunning, with a considerable admixture of mischievousness to go with it
 
• CUNNING AS A WHOLE WAGON-LOAD OF MONKEYS
adj. 20C colloq. – very cunning, with a considerable admixture of mischievousness to go with it
 
• CUNNINGBERRY;  CUNNINGBURY
n. c1820 colloq. – a simple fellow
 
• CUNNINGHAM
n. M18 colloq. – ironically, a simple fellow

• CUNNINGHEAD
n. c1475 obs. rare – knowingness; skilfulness, skill, cleverness

• CUNNINGLY
adv. c1385 obs. – with skill, knowledge, or wisdom; wisely, cleverly, knowingly
 
• CUNNING MAN
n. 1. 1712 obs. – a fortune-teller, a conjuror; a wizard
n. 2. 1788 sl. – a cheat, who pretends by his skill in astrology to assist persons in recovering stolen goods

• CUNNINGNESS
n. a1400 obs. – knowingness; skilfulness, skill, cleverness
 
• CUNNING SHAVER
n. M17 colloq. obs. – a sharp fellow

• CUNNINGSHIP
n. a1400 obs. – knowledge

• CUNNING WOMAN
n. 1616 obs. – a fortune-teller, a conjuror, a witch
 
• CUNNUCK
n. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – a Canadian
 
• CUNNY
n. 1. a1593 sl. – the female genitals
n. 2. 1611 sl. – a woman as a source of sexual gratification; sexual intercourse with a woman
 
• THE CUNNY
n. 20C UK colloq. – the countryside
 
• CUNNY-CATCHING
n. L16 sl. – trickery, cheating, swindling

• CUNNY-FINGERED
adj. 1931 Amer. dial. – clumsy, unable to hold things, butter-fingered
 
• CUNNY-HAUNTED 
adj. 18C colloq. – lecherous; sex-obsessed
 
• CUNNY-HUNTER
n. 17C sl. – a whoremonger
 
• CUNNY-THUMBED
adj. 1. L18 colloq. – given to closing the fist, as a woman does, with the thumb turned inwards under the first three fingers
adj. 2. 19C schoolboys’ usage  – given to shooting marbles as a girl does  
 
• CUNNY-WARREN
n. 1785 sl. obs. – a brothel

• CUNOPIC
adj. 1838 – dog-faced, shameless

• CUNSTER
n. 1535 Sc. obs. – an ale-conner, one who tries, tests or examines; an inspector
 
• CUNT
n. 1. c1230 sl. – female genitals
n. 2. 1663 sl. – a female viewed as a sex object; a promiscuous woman; also, a term of abuse for a woman
n. 3. c1664 sl. – intercourse with a woman; sexual intercourse
n. 4. 1860 sl. – a disliked person; an objectionable fellow; an unpleasant or despicable person
n. 5. 1922 sl. – an awkward thing; a despised, unpleasant, or annoying place, thing, or task

• CUNT-BEATEN
adj. c1440 sl., rare – of a man: sexually impotent

• CUNT-BITTEN
adj. a1513 rare, orig. Sc. – of a man: infected with venereal disease

• CUNTED
adj. 1996 UK sl. – intoxicated with alcohol or drugs; extremely drunk

• CUNTERMAN
n. 1981 Amer. dial. – a dirty, sloppy, often poor person; a slob
 
• CUNT FACE
n. 19C sl. – a term of address to an ugly person
 
• CUNT HAT
n. 1923 sl. – a trilby, or other felt hat
 
• CUNT-HOOKS
n. 1. L18 Brit. cant  – the fingers
n. 2. 20C sl. – the insulting gesture that consists of jerking up the first two fingers, the back of the hand towards the person insulted
 
• CUNT-HOUND
n. M20 US sl. – a lecher; a male who is a notorious whoremonger or woman-chaser

• CUNTISH
adj. 1962 sl., chiefly Brit. – nasty, highly unpleasant, extremely annoying
 
• CUNT-ITCH
n. 18C Brit. sl. – sexual arousal in the woman
 
• CUNT-JUICE
n. 19C sl. – natural vaginal lubrication and ejaculated semen
 
• CUNT-LAPPER
n. 1. 1916 sl. – a cunnilinguist
n. 2. 1934 sl. – a lesbian
n. 3. 1939 sl. – a despicable or highly annoying person; any disliked person
 
• CUNT-PENSIONER
n. 19C colloq. – a kept man; a pimp; a man living on a woman’s harlotry or concubinage
 
• CUNT-RAMMER
n. L17 sl. – the penis
 
• CUNT-SHOP
n. Bk1902 sl. – a brothel
 
• CUNT-STAND
n. 19C sl. – active physical desire in women
 
• CUNT-STRUCK
adj. c1866 sl. – infatuated with women

• CUNT-SUCKER
n. 1. 1868 sl. – a person who performs cunnilingus
n. 2. c1930 sl. – a despicable person
n. 3. 1967 sl. – a lesbian

• CUNTY
adj. 1943 – despicable, highly unpleasant; extremely annoying
n. 1986 – an annoying or unpleasant person

• CUNYE
vb. 1. c1425 Sc. obs. – to coin
vb. 2. c1480 Sc. – coin, money
vb. 3. 1489 Sc. obs. – a coining-house; a mint

• CUNYOUR
n. 1455 Sc. obs. – a coiner; one who coins money; a minter

• CUNZIE
vb. c1480 Sc. – coin, money

• CUP
n. 1719 – drink; that which one drinks
vb. 1. a1616 obs. rare – to supply with cups, i.e. with liquor; to make drunk
vb. 2. 1940 orig. US – to judge the quality of coffee by tasting it
 
• CUPACOFFEE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a cup of coffee
 
• CUP AND CAN
n. c1540 – constant associates

• CUPAR JUSTICE
n. 1681 chiefly Sc., rare – execution of a person before trial; summary justice, arbitrary punishment

• CUPBOARD
n. c1380 obs. – a ‘board’ or table to place cups and other vessels, etc. on; a piece of furniture for the display of plate; a sideboard, a buffet
 
• THE CUPBOARD
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – the ocean

• CUPBOARD LOVE
n. 1757 – love insincerely professed or displayed for the sake of what one can get by it

• CUPID
n. 1. c1381 – a beautiful young boy
n. 2. c1420 obs. rare – love, desire
 
• CUPIDINOUS
adj. 1. 1656 rare  – full of desire or cupidity, covetous, desirous, greedy
adj. 2. 1859 nonce use  – lustful, libidinous, amorous

• CUPIDITY
n. 1. 1436 – an inordinate desire to appropriate wealth or possession; greed of gain
n. 2. 1547 – ardent desire, inordinate longing or lust; covetousness

• CUPIDON
n. 1824 – a beau or Adonis

• CUPIDOUS
adj. 1656 rare – covetous, desirous, greedy

• CUPID’S CRAMP
n. 1961 Amer. dial. – amorous infatuation
 
• CUPID’S ITCH
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – venereal disease

• CUPID-STRUCK
adj. 1653 obs. – smitten with love

• CUPISCENCE
n. 1647 obs. – eager or vehement desire

• CUP-LEECH
n. 1593 obs. – a person addicted to his cups; a drunkard

• CUPLET
n. 1885 – a little cup
 
• CUP-MAN
n. c1830 – a toper; a man addicted to cups, a reveller
 
• CUPMEAL
adv. 1362 obs. rare – cup by cup; a cupful at a time
 
• CUP OF COMFORT
n. L17 sl. – strong liquor
 
• CUP OF J.
n. World War II Amer. sl. – a cup of coffee
 
• CUP OF JAVA
n. World War II Amer. sl. – a cup of coffee
 
• CUP OF MISERY
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a cup of poor coffee
 
• CUP OF MUD
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a cup of coffee
 
• CUP OF MURK
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a cup of coffee
 
• CUP OF TEA
n. 1. 1932 sl. – that which one favours or prefers
n. 2. 20C – a consolation
 
• CUP OF THE CREATURE
n. L17 sl. – strong liquor

• CUPOLA KEY
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – an imaginary item used as the basis for a practical joke

• CUPOLA WRENCH
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – an imaginary item used as the basis for a practical joke
 
• CUPPA
n. 1934 Brit. colloq. – a cup of tea
 
• CUPPER
n. 1. a1400 obs. – one who carries a cup; an officer of a king’s or nobleman’s household who served his master with wine
n. 2. 1900 Oxford University sl. – a series of intercollegiate matches played in competition for a cup
 
• CUPREOUS
adj. 1. 1666 – of the nature of copper; containing copper
adj. 2. 1804 – resembling copper; copper coloured

• CUP-RITE
n. 1582 obs. – a libation
 
• CUPROUS
adj. 1669 – of the nature of copper; containing copper

• CUPS AND SAUCERS
n. 1899 Amer. dial. – acorns and the cups that hold them
 
• CUP-SHOT
adj. a1593 obs. – overcome with liquor, intoxicated
 
• CUP-SHOTTEN
adj. c1330 obs. – overcome with liquor, intoxicated
 
• CUPSTANTIAL
adj. 1583 obs. nonce word – a humorous perversion of ‘substantial’ intended to suggest drunken

• CUP UP
vb. 1906 Amer. dial. – to become uneven, to draw up unevenly

• CUP-WAITER
n. 1611 obs. – a person who serves liquor at a meal or feast


Back to INDEX C

Back to DICTIONARY


Updated: September 9, 2022