Dictionary: CUS – CZ

• CUSER
n. 1589 obs. – an accuser

• CUSH
n. 1. 1950 Amer. dial. – loose, raw tobacco
n. 2. 1966 Amer. dial. – a hornless cow
n. 3. 1970 Amer. dial. – nonsense, rubbish

• CUSH FOOT
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – a big and clumsy foot
 
• CUSHION
n. 1. 1589 – an emblem of ease and luxury
n. 2. 1594 obs. – a drinking-vessel
n. 3. 1656 – the seat of a judge or ruler
n. 4. 1710 – in a horse, pig, etc.: the fleshy part of the buttock
n. 5. 1918 Amer. dial. – a railroad passenger car
n. 6. 1966 Amer. dial. – the buttocks
vb. 1818 – to suppress anything quietly; to take no notice of it
 
• CUSHION-CUFFER
n. 1683 obs. – a preacher who indulges in violent action
 
• CUSHIONED
adj. 1. 1909 – of the voice: soft and smooth, velvety
adj. 2. a1941 – comfortable; protected
 
• CUSHIONET
n. 1542 obs. – a little cushion; a pin-cushion
 
• CUSHION-LORD
n. 1847-78 obs. – a lord made by favour, and not for good service to the state; hence, an effeminate person
 
• CUSHION-THUMPER
n. a1643 – a preacher who indulges in violent action
 
• CUSHIONY
adj. 1908 – easy, comfortable
 
• CUSHTY
adj. 1929 Brit. sl. – good, wonderful; fine, brilliant
 
• CUSHY
adj. 1. 1887 colloq. – of a person: relaxed and pleasant; easygoing
adj. 2. 1895 colloq., orig. military usage – of a job situation, etc.: undemanding, easy; requiring little or no effort; later, involving little effort, but amp[le or disproportionate rewards
adj. 3. 1915 colloq. – comfortable, pleasant; esp. used of accommodation
adj. 4. 1915 colloq. – of a wound: serious enough to necessitate one’s withdrawal from active duty, but not life-threatening or likely to have permanent consequences, such as disability
adj. 5. 1940 chiefly North American – soft and spongy to the touch, esp. pleasantly or comfortably so
 
• CUSING
n. 1488 Sc. obs. – an act of accusing; an accusation
 
• CUSPIDATE
vb. 1623 obs. – to sharpen to a point
 
• CUSPIDOR
n. 1779 US – a spittoon

• CUSPITOON
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – a spittoon, a cuspidor
 
• CUSS
n. 1. 1771 colloq. – a curse or affliction, esp. one sent by God; a cause of ruin; a scourge, a blight
n. 2. 1775 colloq., orig. US, mildly derogatory – orig. a contemptible or worthless person, a good-for-nothing; later, a person of a specified character or type, as a ‘silly cuss’
n. 3. 1829 colloq. – an act of cursing or swearing, esp. at a person; an expletive; a profanity or swear word

• CUSSADANG!
int. 1966 Amer. dial. – an exclamation caused by sudden pain
 
• CUSSED
adj. 1. 1837 chiefly US – used as an intensifier; confounded, damned
adj. 2. 1853 rare – worthy of being cursed; detestable, hateful; unpleasant, horrible
adj. 3. 1858 – obstinate or stubborn, esp. to the point of causing annoyance or frustration; cantankerous, contrary
 
• CUSSEDNESS
n. 1852 colloq. – obstinacy, stubbornness; cantankerousness; contrariness

• CUSS-FIGHT
n. 1913 Amer. dial. – a loud and angry quarrel

• CUSS-FIRED FOOL
n. 1929 Amer. dial. – an exasperating person
 
• CUSS-PROVOKING
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – –unpleasant; disagreeable
 
• CUSS-WORTHY
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – unpleasant; disagreeable

• CUSSYWOP; CUZZYWOP
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – soft rolls of dust on the floor under beds, etc.
 
• CUST
n. 1. a1000 obs. rare – the act of choosing; choice
n. 2. a1000 obs. – that which is chosen or selected as the best of anything; an excellent or precious thing
n. 3. a1000 obs. – excellence of character, virtue; an excellent trait, a virtue
n. 4. a1000 obs. – generosity, munificence
n. 5. c1275 obs. – a trait or characteristic; a person’s natural disposition or character
n. 6. 1535 Sc. obs. – a term of contempt or abuse; a knave, a rogue
 
• CUSTARD
n. 1. c1450 obs. – an open pie, containing any of various ingredients such as meat, fish, fruit, or nuts, and filled with a sweetened and seasoned mixture of beaten eggs and milk, cream, or broth, which becomes stiff in consistency when the pie is baked; a ‘crustade’
n. 2. 1598 – a fearful or cowardly person
 
• CUSTARD COFFIN
n. 1581 obs. rare – a pie dish or pastry crust for a custard (open pie as in CUSTARD n. 1.)
 
• CUSTARD-PATE
n. 1639 obs. – a term of reproach or abuse for a person
 
• CUSTODIENT
adj. 1657 obs. rare – guarding, protecting
 
• CUSTOMER
n. 1589 sl., usually mildly derogatory – a person of the stated sort, as a ‘mean customer’
 
• CUSTOM’S-HOUSE OFFICER
n. Bk1903 sl. – the penis
 
• CUT
adj. 1. 1722 Amer. dial. – drunk
adj. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. – embarrassed
n. 1. 1821 Amer. dial. – a ravine, gully, or gorge; a mountain pass
n. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. – a sudden short dip in a road
vb. 1. 1902 Amer. dial. – to beat or whip eggs vigorously
vb. 2. 1938 Amer. dial. – to have sexual intercourse
vb. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to go fast
vb. 4. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to depart hurriedly
vb. 5. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to intoxicate; to make dead drunk
vb. 6. 1966 Amer. dial. – to understand
 
• CUT A BIG GUT
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to do something foolish
 
• A CUT ABOVE
adj. 1818 – surpassing all others
 
• CUT A CAPER
vb. 1601 – to dance in a frolicsome way, to act fantastically
 
• CUT A CAPER UPON NOTHING
vb. 1708 sl. – to be hanged
 
• CUT A CRAB
vb. L18 sl. – in rowing: to mull one’s stroke, esp. by jamming the oar in the water as if a crab had caught it

• CUT ACROSS
vb. 1970 Amer. dial. – to interrupt
 
• CUT A DASH
vb. Bk1893 sl. – to make a display; to live conspicuously and extravagantly
 
• CUT ADRIFT
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – dead

• CUT A DUEL
vb. 1942 Amer. dial. – to fight with knives

• CUT A FAT PIG IN THE HIP
vb. 1979 Amer. dial. – to do something clever or noteworthy
 
• CUT A FINGER
vb. L19 euphemism – to break wind
 
• CUT A FLASH
vb. Bk1893 sl. – to make a display; to live conspicuously and extravagantly

• CUT A GUT
vb. 1923 Amer. dial. – to make a mistake, esp. an embarrassing one; to do something silly or foolish; to fail in a task
 
• CUT A HOG
vb. 1. 1912 Amer. dial. – to undertake something beyond one’s ability
vb. 2. 1935 African-American sl. – to make an embarrassing mistake; to blunder, to make a mess of things
 
• CUT ALONG
vb. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to go fast  
vb. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to depart hurriedly
 
CUT A MELON
vb. 1. 1908 – to share profits; to announce an extra dividend
vb. 2. 1920 Amer. sl. – to offer generous hospitality
vb. 3. 1965 Amer. dial. – to break wind
 
CUT AND RUN
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to depart hurriedly

• CUT-AND-SPLIT
n. 1930 Amer. dial. – firewood sawed into lengths and split up

• CUT-AND-TRY
adv. 1969 Amer. dial. – by trial and error
 
CUT A PERSON DOWN TO SIZE
vb. 20C – to reduce in importance or decrease the conceit of
 
CUT A QUAVER
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to ‘cut a dash’; to make a show

• CUT AROUND
vb. 1. 1843 Amer. dial. – to flirt; to frisk about
vb. 2. 1906 Amer. dial. – to show anger in an unbecoming manner
 
• CUT A RUSTY
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to do something clever
 
• CUT A SHINE
vb. 1830 Amer. dial. – to behave in a comic, boisterous, or unruly manner; to play tricks on someone; to make a conspicuous display of oneself
 
• CUT A SKIVE
vb. 1919 Amer. dial. – of a fiery horse: to prance about considerably
 
• CUT A SPLASH 
vb. 19C sl. – to make an ostentatious display
 
• CUT A SPLURGE
vb. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – to make a display
 
• CUT A SWATH
vb. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – to make a display
 
• CUT AWAY
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – (as ‘cutaway’) a landslide
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to depart hurriedly
 
• CUT-BACK
n. 1. 1909 Amer. Western sl. – a term of contempt; a worthless person
n. 2. 1966 Amer. dial. – a sharp bend or loop in a river

• CUTBONES
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a doctor
 
• CUT BIG TIMBER
vb. c1960 Amer. dial. – to snore

• CUT-BUDDY
adj. 1970 Amer. dial. – friendly
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – a close friend

• CUT BUDDY SHORT
vb. 1953 Amer. dial. – to take a shortcut

• CUT BUTTONHOLES IN
vb. 1967 Amer. dial. – to use a whip with exceptional precision

• CUT CABBAGE
vb. 1938 Amer. dial. – to do something in a spectacular manner
 
• CUT CAKE
vb. 1964 US sl. – to make a difference, to matter
 
• CUT CAPERS
vb. 1691 – to dance in a frolicsome way, to act fantastically
 
• CUT CAPER SAUCE
vb. 1834 sl. – to be hanged

• CUT CORNERS
vb. 1965 Amer. dial. – to take a shortcut

• CUT CROSS-LOTS
vb. 1969 Amer. dial. – to get to the point
 
• CUT DIDOES
vb. 1. Bk1905 Amer. sl. – to be frolicsome
vb. 2. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to put on airs and graces
 
• CUT DINGDOES
vb. 1914 Amer. dial. – to put on airs and graces
 
• CUT DIRT
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to depart hurriedly

• CUT DOWN
adj. 1843 Amer. dial. – troubled, vexed, disconcerted, frustrated, dejected
n. 1. 1966 Amer. dial. – (as ‘cut-down’) an old automobile modified to increase speed; a hot rod or jalopy
n. 2. 1967 Amer. dial. – (as ‘cut-down’) a hand-me-down garment altered for a younger or smaller person
 
• CUT DOWN AN OAK, AND SET UP A STRAWBERRY
vb. Bk1904 sl. – to waste
 
• CUT DOWN ON
vb. 20C teen & high school sl. – to insult  
 
• CUTE
adj. 1. 1718 sl., now chiefly US , often derogatory – knowledgeable, clever, shrewd, sharp, keen
adj. 2. 1834 colloq., chiefly US  – sexually attractive
adj. 3. 1905 Amer. dial. euphemism – bow-legged
adj. 4. 1966 Amer. dial. – haughty, self-important
 
• CUTE AS A BUG’S EAR
adj. 1931 Amer. dial. – small and endearingly attractive
 
• CUTER
n. Bk1914 criminals’ sl. – a fool; a josh
 
• CUTESY
adj. 1968 colloq., chiefly US – affectedly cute or coy
 
• CUTEY
n. 1904 sl. – a person regarded as appealing or attractive, esp. a girl or woman

• CUT-EYE
adj. 1937 African-American – of someone’s glance or look: questioning; askance
n. 1976 African-American – a scornful gesture made with the eyes; a look of disgust

• CUT GLASS SLEDGEHAMMER
n. c1960 Amer. dial. – an imaginary object used as the basis for a practical joke
 
• CUT GOURDS
vb. 1965 Amer. dial. – to snore loudly
 
• CUTHBERT
n. 1917 Brit. sl., derogatory – a man who deliberately avoids military service, esp. (in World War I) one who did so by getting a job in a government office or the civil service
 
• CUTICULAR
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – undressed; nude
 
• CUTIE
n. 1904 sl. – a person regarded as appealing or attractive, esp. a girl or woman
 
• CUTIE-PIE
n. 1941 sl., orig. US – a sexually attractive woman
 
• CUT-IN
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an intrusion in a conversation
n. 2. 1977 US sl. – the initial contact with the intended victim in a confidence swindle
vb. 1. 1950 US sl. – (as ‘cut in’) to attempt a romantic relationship with someone already romantically involved
vb. 2. 1980 US sl. – (as ‘cut in’) to seize a share of a business or enterprise

• CUT IN THE CRAW
adj. 1963 Amer. dial. – drunk

• CUT IN THE EYE
adj. 1857 Amer. dial. – drunk
 
• CUT INTO
vb. 1940 US sl. – to approach someone and draw them into a swindle; to introduce someone to something
 
• CUT IT
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to depart hurriedly

• CUT IT DOWN
vb. 1940 Amer. dial. – to dance with flamboyant skill
 
• CUT IT FAT
vb. 1. 1836 – to make a display
vb. 2. 1838 Amer. dial. – to overdo something; to go too far
 
• CUTLASS CARPENTER
n. 2003 Trinidad and Tobago – an unskilled carpenter
 
• CUT LOGS
vb. 1965 Amer. dial. – to snore
 
• CUT LOOSE
vb. 1. 1809 Amer. dial. – to act energetically or suddenly, without restraint
vb. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to begin, to commence
vb. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to go fast
vb. 4. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to depart hurriedly
 
• CUT LUNCH
n. 1985 Aust. sl. – a circumcised penis as an object of oral sex
 
• CUT-LUNCH COMMANDO
n. 1952 Aust. sl. – a soldier who does not see active service, esp. a reservist; used contemptuously
 
• CUT MAN
n. 1975 US sl. – the member of a boxer’s entourage responsible for treating cuts between rounds

• CUT-ME-DOWN
n. 1939 Amer. dial. – a hand-me-down garment altered for a younger or smaller person

• CUT MUD
vb. 1936 Amer. dial. – to make haste
 
• CUT OFF
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – dead
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – (as ‘cutoff’) a sudden short dip in a road
vb. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to depart hurriedly
vb. 2. 1990 US sl. – to lay someone off due to lack of work
 
• CUT OFF ONE’S JIB
vb. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to keep one from talking
 
• CUT OFF THE JOINT
n. 1961 UK sl. – from the male perspective: an act of sexual intercourse
 
• THE CUT OF ONE’S JIB
n. 1825 colloq. – the peculiar or characteristic appearance of a person
 
• CUT ON
vb. 20C teen & high school sl. – to insult  
 
• CUT ONE
vb. 20C US colloq. – to release intestinal gas, perhaps loudly
 
• CUT ONE A NEW ASSHOLE
vb. 1972 Amer. sl. – to injure or rebuke someone

• CUT ONE DOWN
vb. 1966 Amer. dial. – to get a lower price by haggling aggressively

• CUT ONE LOOSE
vb. 1965 Amer. dial. – to break wind
 
• CUT ONE’S CABLE
vb. Bk1891 sl. – to die

• CUT ONE’S COMB
vb. 1741 Amer. dial. – to humble someone; to lower someone’s pride

• CUT ONE’S DOG LOOSE
vb. 1903 Amer. dial. – to act energetically or suddenly, without restraint
 
• CUT ONE’S EYE
vb. c1840 criminals’ sl. – to become suspicious

• CUT ONE’S EYE DOWN
vb. 1927 Amer. dial. – to blacken one’s eye

• CUT ONE’S EYES
vb. 1827 Amer. dial. – to glance out of the corners of one’s eyes; to look furtively
 
• CUT ONE’S FINGER
vb. 1899 US sl. – to break wind
 
• CUT ONE’S LEG
vb. 17C colloq. – to be drunk

• CUT ONE’S FOOT
vb. 1899 Amer. dial. euphemism – to step in dung
 
• CUT ONE’S OWN THROAT
vb. 20C –  to bring about one’s own ruin

• CUT ONE’S OWN WEEDS
vb. 1953 Amer. dial. – to mind one’s own business

• CUT ONE’S STRING
vb. 1913 Amer. dial. – to cease to restrain oneself, to let go

• CUT ONE’S SUSPENDERS
vb. 1944 Amer. dial. – to leave one place for another; to leave the country

• CUT ONE’S THROAT
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to ruin a person

• CUT ONE’S WATER OFF
vb. 1954 Amer. dial. – to stop someone from doing something

• CUT ONE’S WOLF LOOSE
vb. 1903 Amer. dial. – to act energetically or suddenly, without restraint
 
• CUTOR
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – in cards: the joker
 
• CUT-OUT
n. 1963 sl. – someone acting as a middle-man in espionage
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – (as ‘cut out’) to depart hurriedly
 
• CUT OUT TO BE A GENTLEMAN
adj. 20C Brit. sl. – circumcised

• CUTOUTS
n. 1979 Amer. dial. – summer sandals

• CUTOVER
n. 1947 Amer. dial. – a conversion or change to a different system
 
• CUT PUSS
n. 20C Caribbean sl. – an effeminate male
 
• CUTS
n. 1. 1915 Aust. & NZ sl. – corporal punishment, esp. of schoolchildren
n. 2. 20C US sl. – the testicles
 
• CUT SHINES
vb. 1848 Amer. dial. – to behave in a comic, boisterous, or unruly manner; to play tricks on someone; to make a conspicuous display of oneself

• CUTSHORT
n. 1981 Amer. dial. – a shortcut
 
• CUT SHORTER BY THE HEAD
vb. 1548 – to behead

• CUTSIE; KUTSIE
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – a twinge in the throat caused by swallowing something sour
 
• CUT SMOKE WITH A LEATHER HATCHET
vb. B1900 Eng. dial. – to attempt impossibilities

• CUT STICK
vb. 1832 Amer. dial. – to prepare to leave; to depart quickly, to run away

• CUT STRAW AND MOLASSES
n. 1857 Amer. dial. – poor food

• CUTTER
n. 1. 1911 Amer. dial. – a fine or good fellow
n. 2. 1913 Amer. sl. – a revolver
 
• CUT THE BED
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to divide one’s bed with another

• CUT THE BLOOD OUT OF
vb. 1953 Amer. dial. – to whip severely

• CUT THE BUCK
vb. 1. 1927 Amer. dial. – to dance vigorously and usually solo with much improvisation
vb. 2. 1927 Amer. dial. – to work efficiently; to perform rapidly or successfully; to accomplish any effort

• CUT-THE-BUCKLE
adj. 1835 Amer. dial. – of dancing: unrestrained, extremely vigorous
 
• CUT THE CACKLE
vb. L19 sl. – to come to the point, usually used as an imperative
 
• CUT THE CACKLE AND COME TO THE HORSES
vb. L19 sl. – to come to the point, usually used as an imperative
 
• CUT THE CACKLE AND GET TO THE HORSES
vb. L19 sl. – to come to the point, usually used as an imperative

• CUT THE CAKE
vb. 1970 Amer. dial. – to get married
 
• CUT THE CHEESE
vb. 1965 US sl. – to break wind
 
• CUT THE COMB OF
vb. 1814 – to lower the pride of; to take down a peg; to abash, to humiliate

• CUT THE CORD
vb. 1967 Amer. dial. – to be the ‘last straw’

• CUT THE FOOL
vb. 1933 Amer. dial. – to joke around; to behave mischievously, to act up
 
• CUT THE GUN
vb. World War II Amer. sl. – to turn off the motor of an aircraft
 
• CUT THE HAIR
vb. 1652 – to make fine or cavilling distinctions; to ‘split hairs’  
 
• CUT THE MELON
vb. 1908 sl. – to share large profits between a number of people
 
• CUT THE MUSTARD
vb. 1. Bk1913-17 sl. – to come up to expectations; to meet the requirements; to ‘fill the bill’
vb. 2. 20C US sl. – to break wind
 
• CUT THE PAINTER
vb. a1700 – to send a person or thing ‘adrift’ or away; to clear off; to sever a connection, effect a separation

• CUT THE PIGEON’S WING
vb. 1897 Amer. dial. – to execute intricate dance steps gracefully
 
• CUT THE RECORD
vb. Bk1903 sl. – to surpass all previous performances
 
• CUT THE SHORT DOG
vb. 1888 Amer. dial. – to caper and frisk around when tipsy

• CUT THE THROTTLE
vb. 1958 Amer. dial. – to coast, to take it easy
 
• CUT TIMBER
vb. 1965 Amer. dial. – to snore
 
• CUTTING A VIRGINNY FENCE
adj. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – drunk
 
• CUT TO THE BRAKES
vb. Bk1914 criminals’ sl. – to display only the essential
 
• CUT TWO WAYS
vb. 20C – to suggest or entail a necessary contrary; to have double and opposite application 
 
• CUTTY
adj. 19C Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – short, or cut short
n. 1. 19C Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – a short, thickset girl
n. 2. 19C Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – an immoral girl or woman
 
• CUTTY-GUN
n. 19C sl. – the penis

• CUTTY-PIPE
n. 1857 Amer. dial. arch. – a short-stemmed pipe
 
• CUT UNDER
vb. 1. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – to undersell in price
vb. 2. 1954 Amer. dial. – to insult
 
• CUT-UP
adj. 1844 sl. – annoyed, upset
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – anything or anyone stylish, stunning, or attractive
– verbs usually as ‘cut up’ –
vb. 1. 1968 Amer. dial. – to complain
vb. 2. 20C colloq. – to affect the feelings of deeply
vb. 3. 20C  colloq. – to subject to severe criticism
vb. 4. 20C colloq. – of a driver: to overtake or pull in front of another driver in a dangerous manner

• CUT UP A CURLICUE
vb. 1840 Amer. dial. – to act in a devious manner; to play a trick or prank
 
• CUT UP EXTRAS
vb. 1842 US sl. – to misbehave
 
• CUT UP JACK AND KILL JINNY
vb. 1930 Amer. dial. – to be noisy or rowdy; to cause a disturbance or commotion
 
• CUT UP MONKEY-SHINES
vb. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – to play tricks
 
• CUT UP ROUGH
vb. 20C Brit. colloq. – to become angry or bad-tempered
 
• CUT UP SAM
vb. 1945 Amer. dial. – to be noisy or rowdy; to cause a disturbance  
 
• CUT UP SHINES
vb. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – to play tricks
 
• CUT UP SHINNY
vb. 1952 Amer. dial. – to make a fuss or disturbance  
 
• CUT-UP WELL
adj. 19C Brit. sl. – looking good naked; having a good body

• CUT-WATER
n. 1942 Amer. dial. – the nose
 
• CUT WOOD
vb. 1965 Amer. dial. – to snore
 
• CUZ
n. 1. 19C Brit. sl. – defecation
n. 2. 19C Brit. sl. – the W.C.
n. 3. NZ colloq. – a term used by a Maori to refer to or address a family member
n. 4. Aust. colloq. – a term used by an Aboriginal person to refer to or address a family member
 
• CUZZIE
n. 20C NZ – a close friend or family member; often used in direct address
 
• CUZZIE-BRO
n. 20C NZ – a close friend or family member; often used in direct address
 
• CUZZY
n. 1. E20 US sl. – copulation
n. 2. E20 US sl. – the female genitals
 
• THE C-WORD
n. 20C – a euphemistic way of referring to the word ‘cunt’
 
• CYBERATHLETE
n. 21C – a professional player of computer games
 
• CYBERATTACK
n. 21C – an attempt to damage or disrupt a computer system, or obtain information stores on a computer system, by means of hacking
 
• CYBERBULLY
n. 21C – someone who uses electronic communication to hurt, persecute, or intimidate people
 
• CYBERCHONDRIA
n. 21C – unfounded anxiety concerning the state of one’s health brought on by visiting health and medical websites
 
• CYBERCRIME
n. 21C – the illegal use of computers and the internet; crime committed by means of computers or the internet 
 
• CYCLONE
n. M20 US drug culture sl. – a dose of the drug PCP
 
• CYLINDER
n. c1930 Aust. sl. – the vagina  
 
• CYNOPHILIST
n. 1890 – a lover of dogs
 
• CYPHER
n. 1990s African-American & teen sl. – a circle of Black friends; a group of people, as marijuana smokers, rap MC’s  
vb. M19 – to calculate; to think out  
 
• CYPRIAN
adj. 1. 1627 – belonging to Cyprus
adj. 2. 1599 – licentious, lewd; applied to prostitutes in 18-19th centuries
n. 1. 1843 – an inhabitant of Cyprus
n. 2. 1598 – licentious or profligate person; later, a lewd woman, a harlot, a prostitute, a courtesan
 
• CYPRIAN SCEPTRE
n. Urquhart usage – the penis
 
• CYRANO
n. 19C – a large nose
 
• CZEZSKI
n. 1964 US sl., derogatory – a nickname for a Czechoslovakian or Bohemian


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