Dictionary: DAO – DARK

• DAP
adj. 1. 1790 Eng. dial. – of birds: fledged, feathered
adj. 2. 1950s African-American sl. – alert, aware, knowledgeable, sophisticated, up-to-date
adj. 3. 1956 African-American sl. – dapper; well-dressed; stylish, fashionable
adj. 4. 1956 African-American sl. – of a person: pleasant; generous
adj. 5. 1970 Amer. sl. – good-looking; attractive
adj. 6. 2000 US golfers’ sl. – Dead-Ass Perfect
adv. 1895 Eng. dial. – quickly, suddenly, at one swoop
n. 1. 1825 Eng. dial. – the bounce of a ball
n. 2. 1825 Eng. dial. – the skip of a stone on water
n. 3. c1850 Sc. obs. – a small piece of anything
n. 4. 1867 Eng. dial. – a touch, a tap; a slight blow or knock
n. 5. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a trick, ruse, artifice
n. 6. 1938 US students’ sl. – a White person
n. 7. 1970s African-American sl. – credit, acknowledgement, respect, self-awareness
n. 8. 1972 African-American sl. – a ritualistic handshake, differing from area to area, involving much slapping of palms, snapping of fingers, etc., to express solidarity or enthusiasm 
n. 9. 1985 African-American sl. – a warm welcome; hence, affection or respect from peers
n. 10. E20 sl. – a rubber-soled shoe; a sports shoe; a plimsoll
vb. 1. 1790 Eng. dial. – to hit or strike lightly; to make a ball rebound on the ground, etc.
vb. 2. 1851 – to rebound; to bounce; to hop or skip, as a stone along the surface of water
vb. 3. 1892 Eng. dial. – to move quickly and lightly; to trip along
vb. 4. L19 – to dip lightly or suddenly into water
vb. 5. c1935 Royal Air Force sl. – to go; to potter
vb. 6. 1973 US sl. – to greet another with a ritualistic handshake; to show respect in greeting
vb. 7. 20C sl. – to pick up; to steal, esp. luggage
 
• DAPATICAL
adj. 1623 obs. – sumptuous, as in feasting; costly  
 
• DAP DADDY
n. 1950s African-American sl. – a handsomely dressed male
 
• DAP DOWN
vb. 1. 1842 Eng. dial. – to stoop down suddenly; to dip, to dive, to duck
vb. 2. 1892 Eng. dial. – to deposit or put down temporarily
vb. 3. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to jot down
vb. 4. 1980 US sl. – to dress nicely
 
• DAPE IT!
int. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – an imprecation
 
• DAPHNE
adj. 2000s S. Afr. homosexual sl. – deaf
n. 1. 1980s Aust. sl. – a foolish woman
n. 2. 2000s S. Afr. homosexual sl. – a deaf person
 
• DAPHNOMANCY
n. 1656 obs. – divination by a laurel tree  
 
• DAPIFER
n. 1636 – one who brings meat to table ; hence, the official title of the steward of a king’s or nobleman’s household
 
DAPINATE
vb. 1623 obs. – ‘to provide daintie meates’; to serve up food  
 
DAPOCAGINOUS 
adj. 1674 obs. – that has a little or narrow heart; mean-spirited; of little worth  
Etymology
– from Italian dappocaggine (lack of intelligence or ability); from dappoco (of a person: lacking intelligence or ability); from da (of ) + poco (adv. a little, slightly) + -ous
 
DAP ON
vb. 1879 Eng. dial. – to pounce on, to take unawares
 
• DAPP
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – to walk clumsily or awkwardly
 
• DAPPED DOWN
adj. 1950s African-American sl. – dressed in a sharp, flashy manner
 
• DAPPED TO A T; DAPPED TO A TEE
adj. 1950s African-American sl. – dressed in a sharp, flashy manner
 
• DAPPEN
adv. 1894 Eng. dial. – perhaps, in the event of, by the time that
 
• DAPPER
adj. 1. LME – neat, trim, smart in dress or appearance
adj. 2. E17 – of a small person, esp. a man: smart in movements, etc.; active, sprightly
adj. 3. 1960s African-American sl. – admirable, excellent; perfect
n. 1. 1709 obs. – a person who is spruce in dress or appearance
n. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – anything of superior quality or appearance
n. 3. 1990s Black British sl. – a general term of congratulation, an admirable person
vb. 1854 Eng. dial. – to fade, to droop, to wither; to soil
 
• DAPPER DAN
n. 1967 Amer. sl. – a flashily dressed man; a lady’s man; one who is fond of being with women and tries to attract their attention
 
• DAPPERLING
n. 1611 – a little dapper fellow
 
• DAPPERPYE
adj. 1802 Sc. – variegated, many-coloured
 
• DAPPERWIT
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a lively, active, spruce little man
 
• DAPPING
adj. 1892 Eng. dial. – of superior quality or appearance
 
• DAPPLE
n. a1635 – an animal with a mottled coat, as a horse or ass
 
• DAPPLEDY
adj. 1886 Eng. & Amer. dial. – dappled, having mixed colours, esp. of a horse
 
• DAPPLY
adj. 1966 Amer. dial. – of a horse: having mixed colours
 
• DAPPYS
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – deserts, deservings
 
• DAPS
n. 1. 1583 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – ways, modes of action; hence, likeness, image, in ways and appearance, resemblance
n. 2. 1825 Eng. dial. – habits, ways, peculiarities
n. 3. L19 army sl. – slippers
n. 4. 1924 UK sl. – gym shoes, plimsolls, tennis shoes, trainers
n. 5. 1997 US sl. – proper respect
 
• DAPSE
vb. 1. 1826 Sc. obs. – to hold to a bargain  
vb. 2. 1870 Sc. – to choose, to fix upon
 
• DAPSTUCK
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – prim, proper; dapper
 
• DAPT
adj. 1967 African-American sl. – physically appealing; attractive, dapper; well-dressed; stylish; broadly, pleasant
 
• DAPTO
n. 1970s Aust. teen sl. – a general insult
 
• DAP TO A T; DAP TO A TEE
adj. 1950s African-American sl. – very well-dressed
 
• DAPTO DOG
n. 1970s Aust. rhyming sl. for ‘wog’, derogatory – a Black or Asian person
 
• D.A.R.
n. 1930s US students’ usage – an academically successful student (Damned Average Raiser and Daughters of the American Revolution)
 
• DAR
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a small, hasty wash
 
• DARB
adj. 1930 US sl. – highly competent; unusually skilled or able; excellent, great
n. 1. 1904 US criminals’ sl. – cash; money, usually stolen
n. 21915 US sl. – a person or thing that is superior, remarkable, excellent, first-rate or attractive
n. 3. 1920s sl. – a fool
 
•  THE DARB
n. 20C sl. – ‘the thing’; a person or thing that is superior, remarkable, or attractive
 
• DARBEROO
n. 1930s sl. – a good thing
 
• DARBIES
n. 1. 1665 UK sl.. orig. criminals’ usage – a set of handcuffs or fetters; shackles
n. 219C sl. – sausages
n. 3. 1950 UK sl. – fingerprints
n. 4. 20C Brit. sl. – hands
 
• DARBIES AND JOANS
n. c1735 sl. – fetters coupling two persons
 
• DARBLE
n. c1850 colloq. – the devil
 
• DARB OF A LOOKER
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an attractive young woman
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something beautiful or attractive
 
• DAR BON!
int. 1890 Eng. dial. – an expletive
 
• DARBS
n. L19 sl. – playing cards
 
•  THE DARBS
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate
n. 1922 US sl. – a person or thing that is superior, remarkable, or attractive
 
• DARBY
adj. 1918 US sl. – excellent; wonderful, first-rate; great; good; fine
n. 1. 1682 criminals’ sl. obs. – cash; ready money  
n. 2. 19C Irish sl. – a glass of whisky
n. 3. M19 UK criminals’ sl. – a haul of stolen goods
n. 4. 1920s US sl. – a wealthy person who will usually pay the bill in a restaurant, bar, etc.
vb. L19 Aust. prison sl. – to handcuff; to shackle
 
• DARBY AND JOAN
adj. 1940s rhyming sl. – alone
n. 1. 1773 – a jocose name for an attached husband and wife who are ‘all in all to each other’, esp. in advanced years and in humble life
n. 2. Bk1896 sl. – fetters coupling two persons
n. 3. L19 rhyming sl. – a telephone
n. 4. 1940s Aust. rhyming sl. – a loan
vb. 1992 UK rhyming sl. – to moan
 
• DARBY BANDS
n. 1992 UK rhyming sl. – the hands
 
• DARBY COVE
n. 20C Amer. sl. – a blacksmith
 
• DARBY CRIB
n. L17 sl. – a blacksmith’s
 
• DARBY KEL
n. 20C rhyming sl. (Darby Kelly) – the belly
 
• DARBY KELLY
n. 1925 rhyming sl. – the belly
 
• DARBY KEN
n. L17 sl. – a blacksmith’s
 
• DARBY-RINGER
n. 1. L17 sl. – a villain
n. 2. c1795 sl. – a scamp; a petty crook
 
• DARBY-ROLL
n. c1820 sl. – a style of walking that betrays an individual’s experience of fetters and thus time spent in prison
 
• DARBY’S DYKE
n. 19C sl. – the grave; death
 
• DARBY’S FAIR
n. M19 sl. – the day on which a prisoner is moved from one prison to another and must thus be fettered
 
• DARD
n. 17C Brit. sl. – the penis
 
• DARDLEDUMDUE
n. 1893 Eng. dial. – a person without energy or knack
 
• DARE
n. 1. 1595 obs. – daring, boldness
n. 2. 1691 Eng. dial. – harm, pain
n. 3. Bk1900 Sc. – a feeling of awe or fear
n. 4. 1907 Amer. dial. – permission
vb. 1. c1220 obs. – to lie motionless (generally with the sense of fear), to lie appalled; to crouch
vb. 2. a1225 obs. – to gaze fixedly or stupidly; to stare as one terrified, amazed, or fascinated
vb. 3. a1225 obs. – to lie hid, to be hid; to lurk
vb. 4. c1300 obs. – to be in dismay, to tremble with fear, to lose heart, to dread
vb. 5. 1547 obs. – to daze, to paralyze, to render helpless with the sight of something; to dazzle and fascinate
vb. 6. 1611 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to daunt, to terrify, to paralyze with fear; to stupefy .
vb. 7. 1684 Eng. dial. – to pain, to grieve, to hurt
vb. 8. 1805 Sc. – to keep under, to abash, to intimidate
vb. 9. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to deter by threatening; to forbid
 
• DARE-ALL
n. 1. 1840 – a covering that braves all weather
n. 2. 1840 – one who dares all
 
• DARE-DEVILTRY
n. 1886 Sc. – a daredevil spirit
 
• DAREDNESS
n. 1874 Eng. dial. – boldness, audacity
 
• DAREFUL
adj. 1605 obs. rare – full of daring or defiance; adventurous
 
• DARE NOT QUETCH
phr. a1300 obs. – implies fear or absolute submission
 
• DARESOME
adj. 1. 1864 Eng. dial. – venturesome, foolhardy
adj. 2. 1938 Amer. dial. – afraid
 
• DARE-THE-DEIL
n. 1814 Sc. obs. – one who fears nothing, and who will attempt anything
 
• DARE UP
vb. 1873 Eng. dial. – to wake or rouse up a person that is asleep or dying
 
• DARE UP TO
vb. 1986 Amer. dial. – to confront
 
• DARG
adj. 1866 Sc. – contemptible
n. 1. c1425 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – a day’s work; the task of a day; a defined quantity or amount of work done in a certain time or at a certain rate of payment; a task
n. 2. 1908 Sc. – a big piece; a large portion of anything; used ironically to denote something of little value, or when one has received less than was expected
vb. 1866 Sc. – to work by the day; to toil; generally applied to agricultural labour, as opening drains, trenching, etc.
 
• DARG-DAYS
n. 19C Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – days of work done in lieu of rent or due to the feudal lord
 
• DARGER
n. 1802 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a day labourer; one who works by the day
 
• DARGING
n. 1788 Sc. – the work of a day labourer, esp. hard, plodding toil
 
• DARGSMAN
n. 1723 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. obs. – a workman, a labourer
 
• DARGUE
n. 1737 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a day’s work; the amount of work done in a day  
 
• DARING
adj. 1333 obs. – staring, trembling, or crouching with fear, etc.
 
• DARING-HARDY
adj. 1593 obs. – foolhardy, presumptuous, audacious
 
• DARK
adj. 1. 1382 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – not able to see; partially or totally blind; sightless
adj. 2. a1660 sl. – stupid, slow-witted, ignorant
adj. 3. 1877 Aust. sl. – secret
adj. 4. 1897 Eng. dial. – gloomy, morose
adj. 5. L19 sl., derogatory – pert. to Black people
adj. 6. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – doubtful, uncertain; unknown
adj. 7. 1916 Amer. theatre sl. – closed; not in operation
adj. 8. 1926 Amer. dial. – severe
adj. 9. 1980s Aust. prison sl. – angry with
adj. 10. 1980s Black British sl. – aggressive; very serious
adj. 11. 1980s UK sl. – bad, inferior, unpleasant, second-rate, nasty
adj. 12. 1998 UK sl. – good
adj. 13. 2000 UK sl. – evil
adj. 14. 2000 US sl. – untelevised
adj. 15. 2004 US sl. – unreachable by telephone; a condition often resulting from a failure to pay the bill
n. 1. 1862 US sl., now considered offensive – a Black person
n. 2. M19 Aust. sl. – Australian-distilled, dark, very strong brandy
n. 3. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – the moonless period of the month
n. 4. 1900s Aust. prison sl. – solitary confinement in a dark cell
n. 5. 1910s Aust. sl. – a nickname for those with dark hair or complexion
n. 6. 1950s Aust. sl. – cheap red wine
n. 7. 1960s US students’ sl. – a fool; a dullard  
n. 8. 1980s Aust. prison sl. – tobacco
vb. 1. a1300 obs. – to lie in the dark; to lie hid or unseen
vb. 2. c1340 obs. – to become dark
vb. 3. c1340 obs. – of the sun or moon: to suffer eclipse
vb. 4. c1374 arch. – to obscure, to cloud, to dim, to sully
vb. 5. c1374 obs. – to darken the eyes or vision; to blind
vb. 6. c1380 obs. – to cloud, to dim, to obscure, to hide something luminous
vb. 7. 1781 Eng. dial. – to listen eagerly or take mental notes of what is said with the object of making use of the information obtained
vb. 8. 1796 Eng. dial. – to eavesdrop; to obtain information in underhand ways
vb. 9. 1818 Sc. – to grow dark; to darken; to cloud with something evil
vb. 10. 1889 Eng. dial. – to skulk, to prowl or lurk about
vb. 11. 1897 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to hide, to take shelter
vb. 12. 1897 Eng. dial. – to rush suddenly to or from a hiding-place
vb. 13. 1990s UK sl. – to spoil, esp. by behaving aggressively
 
• DARK AND DIM
n. 20C Aust. rhyming sl. – a swim
vb. 20C Aust. rhyming sl. – to swim
 
• DARK AND DIRTY
n. 1979 UK sl., orig. Royal Marines – rum and coke (Coca-Cola)
 
• DARK AS A BAG
adj. 19C colloq. – extremely dark
 
• DARK AS A BOOT
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – very dark indeed
 
• DARK AS AN ABO’S ARSEHOLE
adj. 1960s Aust. sl. – very dark
 
• DARK AS A NIGGER’S POCKET 
adj. M19 Aust. sl., now offensive – very dark
 
• DARK AS A POCKET
adj. 19C nautical sl. – extremely dark
 
• DARK AS BELLOWS
adj. 1889 Eng. dial. – completely dark
 
• DARK AS BLACK HOGS
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – very dark indeed
 
• DARK AS DUNGEON
adj. 1892 Eng. dial. – very dark indeed
 
• DARK AS NEWGATE KNOCKER
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – very dark indeed
 
• DARK AS THE INSIDE OF A COW
adj. 1. 1871 US sl. – exceptionally dark
adj. 2. c1880 nautical sl. – of a night: pitch-black; very dark 
 
• DARK AS THE INSIDE OF A COW, TAIL DOWN AND EYES SHUT
adj. 20C Can. sl. – of a night: pitch-black
 
• DARK AS THREE FEET UP A BULL’S ASS
adj. 1984 Amer. dial. – completely dark
 
• DARK-AVISED
adj. 1918 Sc. – having dark hair and eyes; also, dark-complexioned
 
• DARK BLACK
n. 1930s African-American sl. – any very Back person
 
• DARK BROWN
adj. 1946 UK sl. – of a voice: low, well-modulated and sexually attractive; orig. said of a female voice
 
• DARK BROWN SHIT
n. 1950s African-American sl. – inferior heroin
 
• DARK BROWN VOICE
n. c1950 sl. – a voice that is low, well-modulated, and sexually attractive
 
• DARK BUSINESS
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a very wicked action
 
• DARK CELL
n. 20C US criminals’ sl. – a prison punishment cell
 
• DARK CHEATERS
n. 1949 US sl. – sunglasses
 
• DARK CITY
n. 1950s S. Afr. sl. – the township of Alexandra, near Johannesburg
 
• DARK CLOUD
n. 1. 1909 US sl., derogatory – a Black person
n. 2. 1945 Aust. sl., derogatory – an Australian aboriginal
 
• DARK CONTINENT
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – Africa
 
• DARK CULL
n. 18C criminals’ sl. – a married man with a mistress that he visits only at night
 
• DARK CULLY
n. L18 UK criminals’ sl. – a married man with a mistress whom he sees only at night
 
• DARK DAYS
n. 1957 US sl. – a type of bet in an illegal numbers game lottery
 
• DARK DESTROYER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – prizefighter Joe Louis
 
• DARK DIDDLER
n. 1930 Amer. dial. – a married man with a secret mistress
 
• DARK DYNAMITER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – prizefighter Joe Louis
 
• DARKEE
n. 1. L18 – a Black person; an Australian aborigine; any person having very dark skin as a racial trait
n. 2. 19C sl. – a ‘dark’ lantern, i.e. a shuttered lantern
n. 3. E19 US criminals’ sl. – a cloudy sky
n. 4M18 sl. – night time
n. 5. M19 sl. – twilight
n. 6. L19 sl. – a night watchman
 
• DARKEN
vb. 1. c1420 obs. – to lie dark; to lie concealed; to lurk privily after
vb. 2. 1606 obs. – to deprive a person of lustre or renown; to eclipse
vb. 3. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to listen, to hearken
 
• DARKENED
adj. E19 boxing sl. – of an eye: closed
 
• DARK ENGINEER
n. L17 sl. – a villain
 
• DARKEN HIS DAYLIGHTS
vb. 1785 sl. – in boxing: to close up a man’s eyes; to give him a black eye
 
• DARKEN IN
vb. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to grow dark or dusk in the evening
 
• DARKENING
n. 1814 Sc. & Eng. dial. – twilight, dusk, evening
 
• DARKER
n. 1807 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – a day labourer
 
• DARKERS
n. 1950s W. Indies Rasta usage – sunglasses
 
• DARKER THAN THE INSIDE OF A BLACK COW’S ASS
adj. 1964 US sl. – exceptionally dark
 
• DARKET
adj. Bk1900 Sc. – dull, down-hearted
 
• DARKEY
adj. M19 US sl., derogatory – pert. to Black people or culture
n. 1. 1753 criminals’ sl. – night; evening; twilight
n. 2. 1775 sl., now offensive and derogatory – a Black person; also used ironically by Blacks as a self-description
n. 3. L18 – an Australian aborigine; any person having very dark skin as a racial trait
n. 4. 1807 Eng. dial. – a blind man
n. 5. 1851 sl. – a beggar that pretends to be blind
n. 6. c1880 sl. – a nickname for a White man with a dark skin
n. 7. 19C sl. – a ‘dark’ lantern, i.e. a shuttered lantern  
n. 8. E19 US criminals’ sl. – a cloudy sky
n. 9. L19 sl. – a night watchman
n. 10. 1930s sl. – a person with dark hair
n. 11. 20C Aust. sl. – excrement; a stool; a turd
 
• DARK EYES
n. 1965 Barbados sl. – dizziness
 
• DARK FELT
n. 20C Aust. rhyming sl. – a belt
 
• DARK FROST
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a frost that kills plants
 
• DARKFUL
adj. a1050 rare – full of darkness, dark
 
• DARK GABLE
n. 1959 US sl. – a suave, handsome Black man; a ladies’ man
 
• DARK GLIM
n. M18 UK criminals’ sl. – a dark lanthorn
 
• DARK-GREEN
adj. 1. 1954 US sl. – excellent
adj. 2. 1991 US Vietnam usage – black
 
• DARKHEDE
n. 1297 obs. – darkness
 
• DARK-HOLE
n. 1. L19 sl. – the vagina
n. 2. 1903 Amer. dial. – an unlighted storage space in a house; a dark closet or corner under the stairs or around the chimney
 
• DARK HORSE
adj. 20C Amer. sl. – previously unknown
n. 1. c1830 turf sl. – a horse whose form is unknown to the backers but which is supposed to have a good chance
n. 2. 1842 sl. – a person or team, esp. in sports or politics, that seems very unlikely to win but might nevertheless do so
n. 3. 1877 Aust. sl. – a racehorse that has been trained in secret  
n. 4. 1917 Aust. sl. – a person who keeps things about themselves secret
 
• DARK HOUR
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – the evening twilight, gloaming
 
• DARK HOUSE
n. 1. 1600 obs. – a place of confinement for a madman; a room used to confine the insane
n. 2. L17 sl. – a tavern offering bedrooms for the night  
 
• DARKIE
adj. 1. M19 US sl., derogatory – pert. to Black people or culture
adj. 2. 1920s US sl., derogatory – in a stereotypically Black manner
n. 1. 1775 sl., now derogatory or offensive – a Black person; an Australian aborigine; any person having very dark skin as a racial trait
n. 2. 1863 NZ – a Polynesian person  
n. 3. M19 UK criminals’ sl. – a beggar who feigns blindness
n. 4. c1925 Aust. sl. – a night shift
n. 5. 1930s sl. – a person with dark hair
n. 6. 1972 Aust. sl. – a piece of excrement
n. 7. 1990 Trinidad and Tobago sl. – a flattering and affectionate term of address for an attractive, dark-skinned woman
 
• DARKIES
n. M19 sl. – a variety of late-night music-halls and bars on or near the Strand, London, usually situated below ground level
 
• DARKING
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. obs. – eavesdropping, prying
 
• DARKING DOG
n. 1896 Eng. dial. – a man who listens attentively to everything said with great eagerness, but at the same time as if it were a subject of little interest to him, whilst in reality he is slyly storing up in hi mind the whole of the conversation, without joining in it himself
 
• DARKING-HOLE
n. 1859 Eng. dial. – a hiding-place; a place of shelter
 
• DARKISON
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a sneak, an eavesdropper
 
• DARK IT
int. L19 sl. – be quiet! keep quiet!
vb. c1880 sl. – to say nothing
 
• DARK LANTERN
n. 1. 1679 sl. – a servant or agent who takes and transmits a bribe offered to his master
n. 2. M19 sl. – a thief’s candle or light, made so it is possible to shut out the light when not needed
 
• DARK LANTHORN
n. L17 sl. – a servant or agent who takes and transmits a bribe offered to his master
 
• DARKLE
vb. 1. 1800 – of the face, etc.: to become dark with anger, scorn, etc.
vb. 2. 1823 – to grow dark
vb. 3. 1864 – to lie in the dark; to conceal oneself
vb. 4. 1884 – to render dark or obscure
 
• DARK-LIKE
adj. 1867 Sc. – gloomy, morose
 
• DARKLIN(G)
adj. 1. 1739 – lying in darkness; showing itself darkly; darksome, obscure
adj. 2. a1763 – happening in the dark
adj. 3. 1873 Sc. – dark, gloomy
adv. a1450 – in the dark, darkly
n. 1773 nonce word – a child of darkness; one dark in nature or character
 
• DARKLINGS
adv. a1656 rare – in the dark
 
• DARKLINS
adv. 1786 Sc. – in the dark
n. 1846 Sc. & Eng. dial. obs. – twilight, dusk, the gloaming
 
• DARKLONG
adv. 1561 obs. – in the dark
 
• DARK-LOOKING
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – dark-complexioned
 
• DARKLY
adj. 1821 Eng. dial. – dark, gloomy
 
• DARKMAN
n. 1. M16 criminals’ sl. – the night
n. 2. E18 cant – a night-watchman
n. 3. 1874 Eng. dial. – (usually as ‘dark man’) the devil
n. 4. 1970s Aust. sl., derogatory – an Aborigine
 
• DARKMANS
n. 1. 1567 thieves’ cant – the night, evening; also, twilight
n. 2. E19 UK criminals’ sl. – a covered ‘dark’ lantern
 
• DARKMAN’S BUDGE
n. L17 UK criminals’ sl. – a thief’s accomplice, who climbs into a house through a window and opens a door to admit the rest of the gang
 
• DARK MEAT
n. 1. 1888 Amer. sl., usually derogatory – a Black person, esp. a woman regarded solely as a sex partner .
n. 2. 1888 US sl., usually derogatory – copulation with a Black person
n. 3. 1920s US sl., usually derogatory – the genitals of a Black person
n. 4. 1940s sl. – the ‘black sheep’
 
• DARK MONEY
n. 1970 UK railwaymen’s sl. – extra wages paid for night work
 
• DARK MOON
n. 1. 1859 Amer. dial. – the interval between the old moon and the new moon
n. 2. 1867 Eng. dial. – a woman’s secret savings
 
• DARKNESS AT NOON
n. 1970s US students’ sl. – the slide shows that form the basis of lectures in Art History
 
• DARK NIGHT
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – nightfall
 
• DARK NUGGETS
n. 1990s US drug culture sl. – the very best marijuana
 
• DARK O’CLOCK
n. 1995 UK sl. – night
 
• DARK OF THE MOON
n. 1. 1871 Amer. dial. – the period of the waning moon, esp. the last quarter
n. 2. 1949 Amer. dial. – the latter of its period when it is growing fuller
 
• DARK-OF-THE-MOON FROST
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a frost that kills plants  
 
• THE DARK OF TIME
n. 1901 Sc. – the remote past; the beginnings of time
 
• DARK OUT
vb. 1990s Black British sl. – to kill
 
• DARK ROOM
n. 1590 obs. – a place of confinement for a madman
 
• DARKS
n. 1. 1888 Eng. dial. – the nights when the moon does not appear
n. 2. 1985 Bermuda sl. – dark glasses
 
• THE DARKS
n. 1. M18 sl. – the night; occasionally also twilight
n. 2. M19 UK prison sl. – the punishment cell, solitary confinement
n. 3. 2000s sl. – depression
 
• DARK-SAMBO
n. 1950s W. Indies sl. – a person of mixed race, with one-quarter White to three-quarters Black
 
• DARK-SELVIDGED
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – heathenish in appearance
 
• DARK-SETTING
n. 20C Amer. prison sl. – necking or petting in complete seclusion at night
 
• DARK SHADOW
n. 1999 UK sl. – a tightly-cropped hair cut that stops short of absolute baldness
 
• DARK SHANKS
n. L19 sl. – Black people, esp. as sex objects
 
• DARKSHIP
n. 1707 obs. nonce word – the personality of one who is dark
 
• DARKSIDE
n. 2002 UK sl. – a category of rave music
 
• DARK SIDE OF THE MOON
n. 20C US sl. – the House of Representatives
 
• DARK-SKINNED MEAT
n. L19 sl. – Black people, esp. as sex objects
 
• DARKSMAN
n. 1795 Sc. obs. – a workman, a labourer  
 
• DARKSOME
adj. 1. 1530 – characterized by darkness; somewhat dark or gloomy
adj. 2. 1574 – characterized by obscurity of meaning
adj. 3. 1615 – somewhat dark in shade or colour
adj. 4. 1649 – characterized by gloom, sadness, or cheerlessness; melancholy, dismal
adj. 5. 1781 Sc. & Eng. dial. – dark, obscure; ill-lighted
adj. 6. 1880 – morally of dark character
 
• DARKSOMENESS
n. 1571 – darkness, obscurity
 
• DARK STUFF
n. 1960s US sl. – a Black person, usually a woman, in a sexual context
 
• DARK THIRTY
n. 1985 military jocular usage – late at night; a time shortly before dawn
 
• DARK TIME
n. 1. 1970 UK railwaymen’s sl. – extra wages paid for night work
n. 2. 1976 US sl. – night
 
• DARKTOWN
n. 1884 Amer. sl., now considered offensive – a Black neighbourhood or town; used especially in titles
 
• DARK TRICK
n. 1870 Eng. dial. – an evil action
 
• DARKUM
n. M16 criminals’ sl. – the night
 
• DARK ‘UN
n. 1. c1860 sl. – a candidate or competitor of whom little is known
n. 2. 1930s Aust. sl. – of dock-workers: a 24-hour shift
 
• DARK WHITE PAINT
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a non-existent item used as a prank errand for a beginner or inexperienced person
 
• DARK-WISE
adj. 1896 Sc. – rather dark
 
• DARKY
adj. 1. 1807 US criminals’ sl. – cloudy
adj. 2. M19 US sl., derogatory – pert. to Black people or culture
n. 1. 1753 criminals’ sl. – night; evening; twilight
n. 2. 1775 sl., now derogatory or offensive – a Black person; a person of colour
n. 3. L18 – an Australian aborigine; any person having very dark skin as a racial trait
n. 4. 1807 Eng. dial. – a blind man
n. 5. 1851 sl. – a beggar that pretends to be blind
n. 6. 1863 NZ – a Polynesian person
n. 7. c1880 sl. – a nickname for a White man with a dark skin
n. 8. 19C sl. – a ‘dark’ lantern, i.e. a shuttered lantern
n. 9. E19 US criminals’ sl. – a cloudy sky
n. 10. L19 sl. – a night watchman
n. 11. 1930s sl. – a person with dark hair
n. 12. c1970 Amer. dial. – a dark-coloured marble
n. 13. 20C Aust. sl. – excrement; a stool; a turd
 
• DARKY COX
n. 1961 UK rhyming sl. – a box in a theatre auditorium; the seating area in a theatre 
 
• DARKYTOWN
n. L19 US sl. – a neighbourhood with a large population of Black people


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Updated: September 9, 2022