Dictionary: DUM – DZ

• DUM!
int. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial  – damn! 
 
• DUMB
adj. 1823 sl. – foolish, slow-witted, unintelligent, stupid
 
• DUMB AS A BEETLE
adj. 1566 – dull, stupid 
 
• DUMB AS A DEEP SEA OYSTER
adj. Bk1913 Amer. dial. – very dull or stupid
 
• DUMB AS A MUD FENCE
adj. 2004 US sl. – very stupid
 
• DUMB AS AN OYSTER
adj. L19 US sl. – silent, secretive
 
• DUMB-ASS
adj. 1957 US sl. – stupid, foolish
n. 1. 1958 US sl. – (usually as ‘dumb ass’) a stupid person
n. 2. 1972 US sl. – (usually as ‘dumb ass’) stupidity
 
• DUMB-ASSED
adj. 1957 US sl. – stupid, foolish
 
• DUMB AS TWO SHORT PLANKS
adj. 1989 Can. sl. – said of someone who is very stupid
 
• DUMBBELL
n. 1918 US colloq. – an oaf; a stupid or unthinking person
 
• DUMB BLONDE
n. 1936 sl., orig. US – a conspicuously attractive but stupid blonde woman
 
• DUMB BOMB
n. 1991 US sl. – a bomb that must be dropped accurately
 
• DUMB BUNNY
n. 1921 sl., orig. US – a foolish person
 
• DUMB-BUTT
n. 1973 US sl. – a foolish person
 
• DUMB CAKE
n. 1998 Can. sl. – in Newfoundland: a cake baked and eaten by unmarried women in silence
 
• DUMB CLUCK
n. 1906 Aust. & US colloq. – a stupid oaf; a person as stupid as a chicken; a fool
 
• DUMB-COMPLAINING
adj. 1810 – showing sadness or grief in the face, but not expressing it in words
 
• DUMB COW
n. Bk1942 Amer. Western sl. – a term of contempt
vb. Bk1892 Anglo-Indian sl. – (as ‘dumb-cow’) to browbeat; to cow
 
• DUMB CROOKER
n. 1963 US sl. – a social misfit
 
• DUMB-DISCOURSIVE
adj. 1726 – speaking without words; pleading silently, or by looks
 
• DUMB DORA
n. 1922 sl., orig. US – a stupid woman; an empty-headed woman
 
• DUMB DOWN
vb. 1933 US sl. – to simplify the content of something so that it can be understood by the general uneducated public 
 
• DUMB-DUMB
n. 1937 sl., orig. US – a foolish person
 
• DUMB DUST
n. 1986 US drug culture sl. – cocaine or heroin 
 
• DUMBED
adj. L19 US euphemism – damned 
 
• DUMBELL
n1. E20 US colloq. – an oaf; a stupid or unthinking person 
 
• DUMB FARMER
n. 1965 Amer. dial., derogatory – a rustic hillbilly; an unmannerly or otherwise objectionable person 
 
• DUMB-FOGGED
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; confused; disconcerted 
 
• DUMBFOOZLED
adj. 1825 – puzzled, confounded, bewildered
 
• DUMBFOOZLEMENT
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewilderment; perplexity
 
• DUMBFOUNDERED
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; confused; disconcerted
 
• DUMBFUCK
n. 1950 US sl. – a despicable, stupid person
 
• DUMB-GLUTTON
n. L18 Brit. sl. – the female genitals
 
• DUMBHEAD
n. 1887 sl.,  chiefly US – a foolish person; a very silly or light-headed person
 
• DUMBJOHN
n. 1951 US sl. – a person of no importance, esp. a military cadet
 
• DUMBKOPF
n. 1809 sl., orig. US – a foolish person
 
• DUMBLEDORE
n. 1. 1777 Eng. dial. – a stupid fellow, a dolt, a blockhead
n. 2. 1787 Eng. dial. – a bumblebee
n. 3. 1790 Eng. dial. – the cockchafer, black-beetle
n. 4. 19C Eng. dial. – the bee-orchid, Ophrys apifera
 
• DUMBO
n. 1. 1932 US sl. – a dolt, a fool; a large and stupid oaf
n. 2. 1989 US sl. – during the Vietnam War: a C-123 US Air Force provider
n. 3. M20 US sl., derogatory – a person with large ears
 
• DUMB OTIG
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a gullible person; a dupe
 
• DUMB OX
n. 20C US colloq. – an oaf; a heavy dullard
 
• DUMB PLAY
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an error; a mistake; a blunder
 
• DUMBSHIT
adj. 1967 US sl. – stupid
n. 1961 US sl. – a stupid oaf; an imbecile
 
• DUMB SOCK
n. 1932 US sl. – a dolt
 
• DUMBSOCKS
n. 1. 20C US sl., derogatory – a nickname for a Scandinavian
n. 2. 20C US sl. – an oaf
 
• DUMB-SQUINT
n. 19C Brit. sl. – the female genitals
 
• DUMB TRICK
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an error; a mistake; a blunder
 
• DUMBWAD
n. 1978 US sl. – an imbecile
 
• DUMB WATCH
n. L18 Brit. sl. – a venereal bubo in the groin, causing a bulge in a man’s trousers like a pocket watch
 
• DUMBWILDERED
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; confused; disconcerted
 
• DUM-DUM
n. 1937 sl., orig. US – a foolish person 
 
• DUMDUMS
n. Bk2004 Amer. World War I sl. – beans 
 
• DUMKOPF
n. 1809 sl., orig. US  – a foolish person 
 
• DUMMERELL
n. 1592 obs. rare – a dumb person, a dummy, a dolt, a blockhead 
 
• DUMMET
n. 1746 Eng. dial. – dusk, evening twilight; often in plural 
 
• DUMMKOPF
n. 1809 sl., orig.US  – a foolish person 
 
• DUMMOCK
adj. 19C Eng. dial. – deaf
n. 1. 19C Eng. dial. – a blow or stroke 
n. 2. 19C Eng. dial. – a fool, a blockhead 
n. 3. 19C Eng. dial. – a stupid or mischievous child 
n. 4. 19C Eng. dial.-  the buttocks
n. 5. 19C Eng. dial. – a useless article 
n. 6. 19C Eng. dial. – an oatcake 
n. 7. 19C Eng. dial. – a small heap of soil or dirt 
vb. 19C Eng. dial.-  to knock about, bruise
 
• DUMMY
n. 1. 1796 sl. – a foolish person 
n. 2. 1874 – a deaf-mute
n. 3. 19C Brit. sl. – the female genitals 
n. 4. 1918 sl. – a beggar who pretends to be deaf and dumb.
n. 5. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an error; a mistake; a blunder 
n. 6. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something worthless 
n. 7. M20 US sl. – the penis 
 
• THE DUMMY
n. 1936 NZ sl. – the punishment cell in a prison
 
• DUMMY DUST
n. M20 US drug culture sl. – the drug PCP 
 
• DUMMY UP
vb. 1925 US sl. – to become quiet 
 
• DUMOSOUS
adj. 1623 rare – full of bushes 
 
• DUMP
n. 1. 1915 sl., orig. US – an unpleasant place 
n. 2. 1942 sl. – defecation 
vb. 1. 1929 sl., orig. and chiefly US – to defecate
vb. 2. M20 US sl. – to vomit 
 
• DUMP ALL OVER SOMEONE
vb. 1966 sl., chiefly US – to speak or write critically or disparagingly of; to criticize; to treat unfairly
 
• DUMPLINGS
n. E18 sl. – the female breasts 
 
• DUMPLING-SHOP
n. 1. 19C Brit. sl. – the breasts 
n. 2. 1920s sl. – the stomach 
 
• DUMP ON
vb. M20 US sl. – to defecate on 
 
• DUMP ON SOMEONE
vb. 1966 sl., chiefly US – to speak or write critically or disparagingly of; to criticize; to treat unfairly
 
• DUMPS
n. Bk1903 sl. – money
 
• THE DUMPS
n. 1. 16C  – a fit of melancholy; depression 
n. 2. c1835 sl. – money 
 
• DUMPY
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – somewhat ill; indisposed 
n. 1925 colloq. – a short, squat umbrella 
 
• DUN
n. c1628 – a creditor importunately asking for what is his 
vb. c1626 – to persist in trying to get what is due to one 
 
• DUNCICAL
adj. 1588 rare – like a dunce or blockhead; stupid, dull-witted, doltish 
 
• DUNCIFY
vb. 1594 – to make a dunce of; to make dull-witted, stupid or confused in intellect 
Etymology
– from dunce (n.) + fy
 
DUNDEFUNK
n. M19 US sl. – a mixture of powdered biscuit, molasses, and fat 
 
• DUNDERCLUNK
n. 19C Sc. – a big, stupid person 
 
• DUNDERHEAD
n. Bk1891 sl. – a fool; a soft-head 
 
• DUNDERFUNK
n. M19 US sl. – a mixture of powdered biscuit, molasses, and fat 
 
• DUNDER-HEADED
adj. 1825 – ponderously stupid, thick-headed
 
• DUNDERWHELP
n. 1621 obs. – a contemptible blockhead; a dunce
 
• DUNDIEFECKEN
n. 1825 Sc. obs. – a stroke on any part of the body; a slap; a stunning blow
 
• DUNDUCKITY
adj. 19C Eng. dial. – of an undecided, dull colour
 
• DUNE BUGGY
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – an automobile, esp. an old or broken-down car
 
• DUNG
adj. 1. 1766 Sc. – exhausted, overpowered by fatigue, infirmity ,etc.
adj. 2. Bk1900 Sc. – disconsolate, dejected
 
• DUNG-WET
adj. 1599 obs. – as wet as dung, thoroughly wet or soaked, having been out in dirty weather
 
• DUNKER
n. World War II Amer. sl. – a submarine
 
• DUNNEE;  DUNNY
n. 1933 Aust. & NZ sl. – a lavatory, orig. applied to an outdoor earth-closet
 
• DUNOP
vb. M19 back-slang – £1 sterling
 
• DUNSTICAL
adj. 1563 obs. – dull-witted, stupid, blockheaded, simple-minded
 
• D UP
vb. 20C Aust. – in basketball: to set up a defense; to mark up on the opposition
 
• DUPLE
adj. 1542-3 obs. – double, twofold
n. 1609 obs. – a double quantity; twice as much or many
vb. c1425 – to double; to make twice as much or many
 
• DUPLIFY
vb. 1509 obs. – to double, to make double
 
• DURDUM
n. 1724 Sc. & Eng. dial. – noise, uproar; tumultuous proceedings; a noisy quarrel 
 
• DUREFUL 
adj. 1594 obs. – of long continuance; lasting, enduring, continuing, durable 
 
• DURHAM
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – nonsense 
 
• DURN
adj. 1. 1780s – wretched, nasty; silly 
adj. 2. M19 euphemism – damn 
int. 1780s – an exclamation of disappointment, irritation, frustration, etc. 
 
• DURNATION!
int. L18 euphemism – damn!
 
• DURNED
adj. 1780s – wretched, nasty; silly 
 
• DURN IT!
int. 1780s – an exclamation of disappointment, irritation, frustration, etc. 
 
• DURN KATOOTIN’!
int. 1920s US sl. – an exclamation 
 
• DURRY
n. 1941 Aust. sl. – a cigarette 
 
• DURST NOT QUETCH
phr. a1300 obs. – implies fear or absolute submission  
 
• DUST
n. 1. 1607 sl., now chiefly African-American usage – money 
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a hasty or unceremonious departure 
vb. 1. 1803 sl. – to hit repeatedly; to assault by hitting 
vb. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to go fast 
vb. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to depart hurriedly  
vb. 4. 1972 sl., orig. US – to kill deliberately
vb. 5. 20C teen & high school sl. – to get rid of; to dump
 
• DUSTBIN
n. 1. 1934 Brit. sl. – the gun-turret of an aircraft, esp. one beneath the fuselage 
n. 2. 1959 sl. – a greedy and indiscriminate eater 
 
• DUST DISTURBER
n. Amer. World War I sl. – an infantryman 
 
• DUSTED
adj. 1. 1960s Amer. sl. – drunk, fully intoxicated
adj. 2. 1980s sl. – shamed, humiliated
 
• DUSTED PARSLEY
n. 1980s drug culture sl. – phencyclidine 
 
• DUSTER
n. 1. 1940s African-American sl. – the buttocks, the posterior
n. 2. 1960s sl. – a cigarette laced with heroin
n. 3. 1970s drug culture sl. – a user of phencyclidine
 
• DUSTERS
n. 1950s sl., orig. military  – the testicles
 
• DUST FEATHERS
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – soft rolls of dust that collect on the floor under beds or other furniture 
 
• DUSTIE
n. 1950s US drug culture sl. – a narcotics user
 
• DUSTING
n. 1. L18 sl. – a beating or thrashing
n. 2. 1970s drug culture sl. – adding phencyclidine, heroin or another drug to marijuana
 
• DUSTING THE DUVET
n. 1990s euphemism – masturbation
 
• DUST IT
vb. L19 US sl. – to leave quickly, to run off
 
• DUST JOINT
n. 1980s drug culture sl. – a cigarette made with phencyclidine
 
• DUSTMAN
n. 1. L18 sl. – a corpse
n. 2. M19 sl. – an energetic, fanatic preacher
n. 3. M19 sl. – sleep, personified
 
• THE DUSTMAN HAS ARRIVED
phr. B1900 – it is bedtime, for the children rub their eyes, as if dust or sand was in them
 
• DUSTMAN’S BELL
n. M19 nursery usage  – bedtime
 
• DUST OF ANGELS
n. 1980s drug culture sl. – phencyclidine
 
• DUST OFF
vb. 1. 1803 sl. – to hit repeatedly; to assault by hitting
vb. 2. 1940s US sl. – to kill
vb. 3. 1940s US sl. – to reject, to snub
vb. 4. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to depart hurriedly
 
• DUST OFF YOUR LINE!
int. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – say something new or original
 
• DUST ONE’S BACK
vb. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to wrestle, to throw a man
 
• DUST ONE’S JACKET
vb. 1845 sl. – to thrash, to beat
 
• DUST ONE’S THROAT
vb. L19 US sl. – to take a drink
 
• DUSTOOR
n. L17 Anglo-Indian – a bribe, a sweetener, a commission
 
• DUSTOORIE
n. L17 Anglo-Indian – a bribe, a sweetener, a commission
 
• DUST OUT
vb. 1. L19 US sl. – to overtake, to pass on the road
vb. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to depart hurriedly
 
• DUST SOMEONE’S COAT
vb. L17 sl. – to thrash, to beat someone up
 
• DUST SOMEONE’S JACKET
vb. L17 sl. – to thrash, to beat someone up
 
• DUST THE END-TABLE
vb. 1990s sl. – to masturbate
 
• DUST THE EYES OF
vb. E19 sl. – to befuddle, bamboozle
 
• DUST THE FAMILY JEWELS
vb. 1990s sl. – to masturbate
 
• DUST THE SIDEWALK WITH
vb. L19 sl. – to beat up thoroughly; to defeat comprehensively
 
• DUST-UP
n. 1. 1897 sl. – an argument, a row
n. 2. L19 sl., orig. military – a fight
 
• DUST-WORM
n. 1621 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a ‘worm of the dust’, a mean, despicable, or grovelling person; a term of reproach
 
• DUSTY
adj. 1. M19 US sl. – tough, dangerous
adj. 2. 1970s African-American sl. – unclear; unable to predict the future
adj. 3. 1980s US students’ sl. – tetchy, irritable, out of sorts
n. 1980s society usage – a very old person, 70 years old and older
 
• DUSTY BEHIND
n. 1980s African-American sl. – the buttocks, the posterior
 
• DUSTY BREAD
n. 1970s African-American sl. – a conventional, conservative woman
 
• DUSTY BUTT
n. 1. 1900s African-American sl. – a low-grade, unattractive prostitute
n. 2. 1900s African-American sl. – a short person
 
• DUSTYFOOT
n. a1400 Sc. obs. – a traveller, a wayfarer; a travelling peddler or merchant
 
• THE DUSTY MELDER
n. Bk1905 Sc. – the last child born in a family
 
• DUTCH
n. 1. 1889 Brit. sl. – a wife
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a hasty or unceremonious departure
n. 3. 20C Amer., World War I sl. – a German
 
• DUTCH BARGAIN
n. 1678 – one concluded by the parties drinking together
 
• DUTCH COURAGE
n. 1826 sl. – a drink taken to instil courage
 
• DUTCHEE
n. 1835 sl., orig. US, derogatory – a German
 
• DUTCH GALOSHES
n. a1687 obs. – skates
 
• DUTCH-HOUND
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a dachshund
 
• DUTCHIE
n. 1835 sl., orig. US, derogatory – a German
 
• DUTCHING
n. 1989 Brit. sl. – the practice of sending food destined for the UK market for irradiation abroad (usually in the Netherlands), to mask any bacterial contamination before it is put on sale
 
• DUTCHLAND
n. 20C Amer., World War I sl. – Germany
 
• DUTCHMAN
n. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – a German
 
• DUTCH-NIGHTINGALE
n. 1889 – a frog; from its melodious note in the spring
 
• DUTCHY
n. 1835 sl., orig. US, derogatory – a German
 
• DWEEB
n. 1968 US sl. – a contemptible person; a loser; a nerd
 
• DWEEBY
adj. 1987 US sl. – foolish, inept, out of touch with current trends
 
• DWEEDLE
vb. 1688 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to cajole, to wheedle
 
• DWELL THE BOX
vb. 1956 UK sl. – to be patient
 
• DWI
adj. 1997 US sl. – poorly dressed; Dressed Without Instructions
 
• DWID
n. 1988 US sl. – a social outcast
 
• DWIM
n. 1983 US sl. – in computing: a command meaning ‘do what I mean’
 
• DWINDLE OUT
vb. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to spend
 
• DWINDLES
n. 1981 US sl. – the condition of an older hospital patient who is fading away
 
• DWINGLE
vb. 1. 1805 Sc. – to linger, loiter, tarry
vb. 2. 19C Eng. dial. – to dwindle, shrivel up, shrink
 
• DYAM
adj. 1994 UK – used as an intensifier; ‘damn’
 
• DYDEES
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – diapers
 
• DYED IN THE WOOL
adj. 1. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – thoroughly bad
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate
adj. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – steadfast in principle
 
• DYE PARTY
n. 1994 US sl. – a gathering to tie-dye an assortment of clothes for person use or sale
 
• DYE-STUFFS
n. Bk1903 sl. – money
 
• DYING ON ITS ARSE
adj. 2001 UK sl. – failing
 
• DYKE
n. 1. 1923 sl. – a lavatory
n. 2. 1931 sl., chiefly derogatory – a lesbian; a lesbian with masculine tendencies
n. 3. 1996 UK sl. – dipipanone, an analgesic opiate used for recreational narcotic effect
 
• DYKE DADDY
n. 1991 US sl. – a male who prefers and seeks the friendship of lesbians
 
• DYKEY
adj. 1964 US sl. – overtly lesbian, mannish
n. 1964 sl. – lesbian
 
• DYKON
n. 1999 UK sl. – a person or image seen as inspirational to lesbians
 
• DYNAMITE
adj. 1922 US sl. – excitingly excellent
n. 1. 1904 sl., orig. US – a remarkable or exceptionable person or thing
n. 2. 1919 US sl. – powerful alcohol or drugs
n. 3. 1924 sl., orig. US – heroin
n. 4. 1951 US sl. – an illegal betting operation, money that one bookmaker bets with another bookmaker to cover bets that he does not want to hold
n. 5. 1959 US sl. – cocaine
n. 6. 1975 US sl. – nitroglycerine tablets prescribed to cardiac patients
n. 7. 1980 US sl. – any amphetamine, methamphetamine, or other central nervous system stimulant
n. 8. 1992 UK rhyming sl. – a fight
vb. 1977 US sl. – to stop a train suddenly
 
• DYNAMITE THE BREAKS
vb. 1951 US sl. – in trucking: to make a sudden, emergency stop
 
• DYNAMO
n. 1938 sl. – an energetic or lively person
 
• DYNAMO BUSTER
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. navy sl. – an electrician
 
• DYNAMO OF POWER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – Theodore Roosevelt, twenty-sixth US President
 
• DYN-NO-MITE!
int. 1978 US sl. – used for expressing strong approval
 
• DYNO
adj. 1962 US sl. – excellent
n. 1. 1918 US sl. – a tramp, a vagrant
n. 2. 1962 US sl. – alcohol
n. 3. 1969 US sl. – heroin
 
• DYNO-PURE
n. 2002 UK sl. – especially pure heroin
 
• DYSO
n. M20 sl. – a drunkard
 
• DYSON
n. 2001 UK sl. – an act of mutual oral-genital sex


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Updated: September 9, 2022