Dictionary: EM – EMZ

• EM
n. 1910s drug culture sl. – morphine  
 
• EMACITY
n. 1656 rare – a fondness or desire for buying
 
• EMANCIPATED
adj. 1931-33 Amer. dial. malapropism – emaciated  
 
• EMBALMED
adj. 20C US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol  
 
• EMBALMING FLUID
n. E20 US sl. – inferior or strong liquor; any alcoholic liquor  
 
• EMBARRISHMENT
n. 1972 Amer. dial. – embarrassment  
 
• EMBELISE
vb. c1340 obs. – to embellish; to beautify
 
• EMBERLUCOCK
vb. 1653 obs. rare – to bewilder, to confuse
Etymology
– from French emburelucocquer, nonce-word of fanciful formation
 
• EMBLUSTRICATE
vb. a1693 obs. – to bewilder, to confuse, to perplex
 
• EMBRACE
vb. 1. 19C euphemism – to copulate  
vb. 2. 19C euphemism – to clasp a woman for copulation; to hold a woman while copulating  
 
• EMBRAID
vb. 1481 obs. – to upbraid, to taunt, to mock; also, to reproach one with
 
• EMBROGLIO
n. 1. 1750 – a confused heap  
n. 2. 1818 – a state of great confusion and entanglement; a complicated or difficult situation (esp. political or dramatic); a confused misunderstanding or disagreement  
 
• EMBROIDERY
vb. 1916 Amer. dial. – to embroider  
 
• EMBRUTE
vb. 1640 – to degrade to the level of a brute; to make bestial; to brutalize  
 
• EMBURSE
vb. 1721 obs. rare – to pay, to refund
 
• EMBUSS
vb. Amer. World War I sl. – to get in an omnibus  
 
• EME
n. 1. c1000 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – an uncle 
n. 2. 1674 Eng. dial. – a friend; an intimate acquaintance  
 
• EM-EFF
adj. 1950s euphemism, orig. US – ‘motherfucking’; a general intensifier  
n. 1960s euphemism, orig. US – ‘motherfucker’; a supreme insult  
 
• EMER
n. c1450 Eng. dial. obs. – one who rescues another from any danger or difficulty
 
• EMERANT
n. 1832 Sc. obs. – the emerald
 
• EMERGENCY GUN
n. 1930s drug culture sl. – any makeshift instrument used to inject when one does not have a syringe  
 
• EMERTEEN
n. 1881 Sc. – an ant  
 
• EMESKINS!
int. 1760 Eng. dial. obs. – by the mass!
 
• EMESS!
int. 1760 Eng. dial. obs. – by the mass!
 
• EMICATIOUS
adj. 1819 nonce word – that shines or glitters
 
• EMIGRATE
vb. M19 US sl. – to leave  
 
• EMILY POST
n. 1980s Aust. rhyming sl. for ‘ghost’ – a creditor  
 
• EMILY POSTERS
n. World War II Amer. sl. – naval cadets; they were given a condensed edition of an etiquette book by Emily Post  
 
• EMINOUSLY
adv. 1657 obs. rare – remotely, distantly
 
• EMISSITIOUS
adj. 1. 1620 obs. rare – prying, inquisitive, narrowly examining
adj. 2. 1731 obs. rare – cast out
 
• EMM
n. 1721 Sc. obs. – uncle; orig. used to refer to a mother’s brother only, later applied also to a father’s brother, and hence to a gossip or familiar friend
 
• EMMA
n. 1891 military sl. – the letter ‘e’ in telephone and code messages  
 
• EMMACK
n. 1773 Sc. – the ant  
 
• EMMA FREUDS
n. 1990s rhyming sl. – haemorrhoids  
 
• EMMA GEE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a machine gun  
 
• EMMAS
n. 1990s rhyming sl. (Emma Freuds) – haemorrhoids  
 
• EMM-EFF
adj. 1950s euphemism, orig. US – ‘motherfucking’; a general intensifier  
n. 1960s euphemism, orig. US – ‘motherfucker’; a supreme insult  
 
• EMMERDALE (FARM)
n. 1990s rhyming sl. – an arm  
 
• EMMET
n. 1. 1790 Eng. dial. – a newt, eft, lizard  
n. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a lively person  
n. 3. 1904 Amer. dial. – an industrious person  
 
• EMMET-BATCH
n. 1825 Eng. dial. – an ant-hill  
 
• EMMET-BUTT
n. 1882 Eng. dial. – an ant-hill  
 
• EMMET-CAST
n. 1884 Eng. dial. – an ant-hill  
 
• EMMET-HEAP
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – an ant-hill
 
• EMMET-HILL
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – an ant-hill
 
• EMMET-HUMP
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – an ant-hill
 
• EMMIES
n. 1912 Amer. dial. – molasses  
 
• EMMIS
adj. 1. Bk1900 Sc. – insecurely placed, unsteady, rickety  
adj. 2. Bk1900 Sc. – of the weather: changeable; dark, gloomy  
 
• EMMOCK
n. 19C Sc. – an ant  
 
• EMMOISED
adj. c1400 obs. rare – comforted, cheered
 
• EMMUT
n. 1810 Eng. dial. – of the wind: stroke, full force  
 
• EMOCK
n. 1862 Sc. – the ant  
 
• EMOK NYE
phr. L19 back-slang – come in  
 
• EMPARLEMENT
n. 1450-80 obs. rare – the act of speaking together upon a matter, esp. before taking action; conference, debate, discussion, parleying
 
• EMPARLING
n. 1450-80 obs. – conference, parleying
 
• EMPASSY
n. 1859 Sc. & Eng. dial. – the sign & (ampersand), formerly written at the end of the alphabet in schoolbooks  
 
• EMPERATRICE
n. c1460 obs. – an empress
 
• EMPOVER
vb. 1474 obs. rare – to impoverish, to make poor
 
• EMPS-PIECE
n. 1671 Eng. dial. obs. – the best, the choicest piece of food; a tidbit
 
• EMPT
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – empty  
vb. 1825 Eng. & Amer. dial. – to empty, to pour out  
 
• EMPTINGS
n. 1650 Amer. dial. – yeast  
 
• EMPTINS
n. 1867 Amer. dial. – yeast  
 
• EMPTITIOUS
adj. 1650 obs. rare – capable of being bought; open to a price; saleable
 
• EMPTY
adj. 1. 1940s US sl. – penniless, broke  
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – hungry  
n. 1. 1966 Amer. dial. – a cloud  
n. 2. 1980s Aust. sl. – an ejaculation of semen  
n. 3. 20C sl. – any container or vessel that has been emptied, esp. a bottle once containing alcohol  
vb. 1. L19 UK criminals’ sl. – to trick, to swindle  
vb. 2. 1980s Aust. prison sl. – to be transferred suddenly to another prison  
vb. 3. 1990s Aust. criminals’ sl. – to dismiss from a job  
 
• EMPTY BEAN
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a stupid person 
 
• EMPTY-BEANED
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – foolish; silly; witless
 
• EMPTY BOTTLE
n. E19 UK college sl. – at Cambridge University: a fellow-commoner, i.e. a rich or aristocratic undergraduate, with special privileges and a reputation for self-indulgent laziness  
 
• AN EMPTY HOUSE IS BETTER THAN A BAD TENANT
phr. 1930s NZ sl. – used after breaking wind in public  
 
• EMPTYINGS
n. 1891 Amer. dial. – yeast  
 
• EMPTY NESTER
n. 1962 – either member of a couple whose children have grown up and left home  
 
• EMPTY ONE’S TRASH
vb. 1970s African-American sl. – to have sexual intercourse; usually, to ejaculate  
 
• EMPTY SUIT
n. 1980s US sl. – a useless or insincere person  
 
• EMPTY THE ANACONDA
vb. 1990s sl. – to urinate  
 
• EMPTY THE BAG
vb. Bk1888 – to tell the whole story, to finish the discussion  
 
• EMPTY THE BUTTER-BOAT
vb. M19 sl. – to flatter lavishly (and insincerely)  
 
• EMPUS-AND
n. 1859 Sc. & Eng. dial. – the sign & (ampersand), formerly written at the end of the alphabet in schoolbooks  
 
• EMPY
adj. 1860 Eng. dial. – empty  
 
• EMSEL
n. 1950s US drug culture sl. – morphine  
 
• EMSHA
n. 20C Irish sl. – misfortune 
 
• EMU
n. 1960s Aust. sl. – a racecourse idler who picks up discarded tote tickets in the hope of finding one that has not been cashed  
 
• EMU-BOBBER
n. 1920s Aust. sl. – a man employed to pick up the remnants after clearing or burning off in the bush


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Updated: September 7, 2022