Dictionary: EXI – EXZ

• EXIGUOUS
adj. 1651 – scant in measure or number; extremely small, little, diminutive, minute, slender  
 
• EXIMIOUS
adj. 1547 rare or obs. – select, choice; hence, extraordinary, excellent, rare, distinguished, eminent, famous, renowned  

• EXIS
n. 1. 1861 back-slang – sixpence
n. 2. 1861 back-slang – the number six
n. 3. 1976 back-slang – six pounds sterling
n. 4. 1989 back-slang – a six-month prison sentence

• EXIS-EVIF YENEPS
n. 1859 back-slang – elevenpence

• EXIS-EWIF GENS
n. 1859 back-slang – 30 shillings

• EXIS GENS
n. 1859 back-slang – six shillings

• EXIS SITH-NOMS
n. 1859 back slang – six months, usually as a prison sentence

• EXIS YENEPS
n. 1859 back-slang – sixpence (2 1/2 p)
 
• EXITIABLE
adj. 1607 obs. rare – destructive, ruinous, hurtful
 
• EXITIOUS
adj. 1563 obs. – destructive to life, deadly, fatal, ruinous, hurtful, dangerous
 
• EXODUS OIL
n. 1947 Amer. dial. – a conjure or magic concoction, used to drive people away  
 
• EXODUST
vb. 1947 Amer. dial. – to leave quickly for a distant place  
 
• EXODUSTER
n. 1. 1880 Amer. dial. – a Black person who left the South in the mass migration to the Northwest, esp. Kansas, c1878-80  
n. 2. 1941 Amer. dial. – a refugee from a ‘dust bowl’  
 
• EXOLETE
adj. 1. 1611 obs. – that has gone out of use; disused, obsolete
adj. 2. 1657 obs. – that has lost its virtue; effete, insipid
adj. 3. 1730 obs. – of flowers, etc.: faded or withered
 
• EXOPT
vb. 1548 obs. rare – to wish or desire greatly
 
• EXOPTATE
vb. 1692 obs. – to desire earnestly
 
• EXORBITATE
vb. 1. 1600 obs. or arch. – to deviate from the usual path or course; to stray
vb. 2. 1693 obs. or arch. – of heavenly bodies: to deviate from the usual orbit; to follow an erratic course
 
• EXOSCULATE
vb. 1570 obs. – to kiss heartily or repeatedly and fondly
 
• EXPALPATE
vb. 1623 obs. – to get by flattery

• EXPAT
n. 1. 1962 – an expatriate, a citizen of one country living abroad
n. 2. 1974 W. Indies – an immigrant, esp. a White foreigner, working in a local job
 
• EXPECTING
adj. 1864 euphemism – pregnant  

• EXPENSE
n. 1944 African-American sl. – a baby
 
• EXPERGEFACTOR
n. 1823 – one who, or that which, awakens; an awakener
 
• EXPIRE
vb. 1. M15 – to die; to breathe out one’s last breath  
vb. 2. 1966 Amer. dial. – to perspire, to sweat  
 
• EXPISCATE
vb. 1. c1611 – to ‘fish out’; to find out by scrutiny or inquiry; to search out; to discover by laborious investigation or strict examination
vb. 2. 1858 nonce use – to exhaust of fish
 
• EXPLANIFY
vb. 1891 Amer. dial. – to explain  
 
• EXPLIFICATION
n. 1843 Amer. dial. – an explanation  
 
• EXPLODE
vb. 1. 1950 Amer. dial. – to suddenly burst forth in laughter  
vb. 2. 1979 Amer. dial. – to explore  
 
• EXPLORATE
adj. 1655 obs. rare – thoroughly examined; carefully prepared
vb. 1549 obs. – to explore
 
• EXPLORE
n. 1902 Amer. dial. – an explosion  
vb. 1902 Amer. dial. – to explode

• EXPLORE ME!
int. 1913 US sl. – an exclamation used to express lack of knowledge

• EXPLORERS’ CLUB
n. 1969 drug culture sl. – a group of LSD users
 
• EXPOLAGOLLUCIOUS
adj. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – splendid, very fine, elegant  
 
• EXPOSABLE
adj. 1968 Amer. dial. – disposable  
 
• EXPOSE
vb. 1895 Amer. dial. – to suppose  
 
• EXPRESS A SECRET VICE
vb. 19C Brit. euphemism – to masturbate  
 
• EXQUISITIVE
adj. 1818 obs. – eager to discover or learn; tending to search out, bent on searching out; curious 
 
• EX’S
n. 1864 sl. – expenses  

• EXSIE
adj. 2002 Aust. sl. – expensive
 
• EXSPUTORY
adj. 1784 rare – that is spit out or ejected
 
• EXSUPERATE
vb. 1. 1559 obs. – to overtop, to surmount, to surpass, to exceed, to excel; to overcome
vb. 2. 1625 obs. – to abound

• EXTENSIVE
adj. 1860 euphemism – showy, vulgar
adv. 1877 – to a great extent, unreservedly, ostentatiously
 
• EXTERMINE
vb. 1. 1539 obs. – to exterminate; to destroy utterly; to put an end to; to abolish
vb. 2. 1634 obs. – to force or person a thing from the boundaries or limits; to drive way; to banish; to put to flight 
 
• EXTERMISH
vb. 1903 Amer. dial. – to destroy completely, to exterminate, to abolish  
 
• EXTERRANEOUS
adj. 1656 – foreign, of another country; coming from abroad
 
• EXTINGUISHED FLAME
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a former sweetheart  
 
• EXTONIOUS
adj. 1548 obs. rare – astonishing

• EXTORTION
n. 1891 US sl. – the cost
 
• EXTRA
adj. 1848 Amer. dial. – excellent, unusually good; skilled, expert  
n. 1995 W. Indies – a show-off
 
• EXTRACIZE
vb. 1917 Amer. dial. – to extract  
 
• EXTRACT OF HAMMER HANDLE
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a nonexistent item used as the basis of a practical joke  

• EXTRACT THE MICHAEL
vb. 1963 – to take the mickey out of; to make fun of someone
 
• EXTRACT THE URINE FROM
vb. E20 Brit. military sl. – to take the piss out of someone; to deflate someone, to make someone perform with less boasting and bravado  
 
• EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES
n. 20C colloq. – adultery  
 
• EXTRA-SPECIAL
adj. 1889 colloq. – exceptionally good or fine  
 
• EXTRA SPOKE
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – a misfit; someone who doesn’t seem to ‘fit in’  
 
• EXTRAVAGATE
vb. 1. 1600 – to wander away, to stray
vb. 2. 1766 – to wander at large; to roam at will
vb. 3. 1829 – to go beyond bounds; to exceed what is proper or reasonable
vb. 4. 1871 nonce use – to go to extravagance in
 
• EXTRAVAGE
vb. c1690 obs. exc. Sc. – to deviate in discourse from the proper subject; to digress; to talk incoherently; to ramble 
 
• EXTURBMENT
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – a disturbance  
 
• EXTURBMENT-MAKER
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – a child who is always telling on other children; a telltale  
 
• EXUBERATE
adj. 1638 obs. – overflowing, superabundant
vb. 1623 – to be in great abundance; to be plentiful; to abound; to overflow
 
• EXULANT
adj. 1636 obs. – living in exile
n. Bk1955 obs. – a person living in exile
 
• EXUNDATE
vb. 1721 rare – to overflow
 
• EXUPERATE
vb. 1. 1559 obs. – to surpass, to excel; to overcome, to surmount
vb. 2. 1623 obs. – to abound
 
• EXWANTIDGE
n. 1922 Amer. dial. – advantage  
 
• EXWICE
n. 1922 Amer. dial. – advice
 
• EXWISE
vb. 1922 Amer. dial. – to advise


Back to INDEX E

Back to DICTIONARY