Dictionary: F – FAC

F
int. 1920s euphemism – fuck!  
n. 1. 1920s euphemism – an act of copulation
n. 2. 1980s US sl. – a $50 bill
n. 3. 1988 US sl. – in poker: the sixth player to the left of the dealer  
n. 4. 1990s African-American sl. – a felony  
 
F-40
n. 1977 US sl. – an orange-coloured 100 mg capsule of secobarbital sodium (Seconal™), a central nervous system depressant  
 
F.A.
n. 1914 euphemism for ‘fuck-all’ – nothing, anything meaningless, nonsense, rubbish
 
FA
n. 1941 Amer. sl. – father
 
FAA
n. Bk1900 Sc. – the intestines of an animal  
 
FAAN
n. 1950 Sc. – a weather-vane  
 
FAANG
n. Bk1900 Sc. – a person of disagreeable disposition  
 
FAAP
n. 1907 Sc. – a cowardly, hulking fellow  
 
FAAR
n. Bk1900 Sc. – an epidemic occurring among men or animals  
 
FAAS
n. 1930s W. Indies sl. – impudence, cheek
vb. 1930s W. Indies sl. – to be nosy or inquisitive
 
FAASTIE
adj. 1950s W. Indies & Jamaica usage – rude, impertinent, impudent
 
FAASTINESS
n. 1950s W. Indies usage – rudeness, impudence
 
FAB
adj. 1957 Amer. sl. – delightful, wonderful, fine, very good, excellent, fabulous  
int. 1960s sl. – an exclamation of approbation; wonderful!
n. 1. 1811 Sc. – a fob, a small pocket; a tobacco pouch  
n. 2. 1916 Sc. – a truant  
n. 3. 2000s African-American sl., derogatory – a woman (Fat-Ass Bitch)
vb. 1. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to cheat, to deceive, esp. by flattery
vb. 2. 1916 Sc. – to play truant  
 
FABALA
n. c1800 Sc. obs. – a flounce, trimming, furbelow
 
FABBER
n. 1916 Sc. – a truant  
 
FABBO
adj. 1984 sl. – fabulous, wonderful, excellent  
 
FABBY
adj. 197 colloq. – fabulous, wonderful, excellent
 
FABE
adj. 1967 UK sl. – very good, excellent  
 
FABEL
adj. 2002 UK sl. – very good, excellent, lovely  

FABELLATOR
n. 1656 obs. – a person who feigns or invents tales
 
FABLE
vb. 1. c1380 obs. – to tell fictitious tales
vb. 2. 1382 obs. rare – to speak, to talk, to converse
vb. 3. 1530 obs. exc. arch. – to speak falsely; to talk falsehoods, to lie
 
FABLER
n. 1362 obs. – one who speaks falsely; a liar
 
FABOO
adj. 1990s US homosexual sl. – fabulous, excellent
 
• FABOR  • FABOUR
n. c1470 obs. – a suburb of a city
 
FABREFACTION
n. 1652 obs. rare – the act or process of fashioning or making a work of art
 
FABRIC
n. 1. 1483 – an edifice, a building  
n. 2. 1866 Sc. – a large, clumsy, ugly thing, animal, or person
n. 3. 1972 US sl. – clothes; clothing in general
vb. 1623 obs. – to construct, fashion, frame, make
 
FABRICANT
n. 1757 rare – one who fabricates, constructs, or fashions anything; a maker or manufacturer
 
FABRICATOR
n. 1795 – one who frames a false statement or forges a document; a forger
 
FABRICATURE
n. 1600 obs. – the act of fabricating; construction
 
FABU
adj. 1990s US sl. – excellent  
 
FABULAR
adj. 1684 – pert. to a fable
n. 1565 obs. – a narrator or recorder of tales or fictions
 
FABULATE
vb. 1. 1616 obs. – to relate as a tale or myth; to talk or narrate in fables
vb. 2. 1856 – to invent, concoct, fabricate
 
FABULATION
n. 1727 obs. – the act of fabulating; the moralizing of fables
 
FABULATOR
n. 1604 – one who fabulates or relates fables; a story-teller
 
FABULICIOUS
adj. 1997 US sl. – good; good-tasting; often used of a sexually appealing man  
 
FABULIST
n. 1. 1593 – one who relates fables or legends
n. 2. 1605 obs. – a professional story-teller
n. 3. 1625 – one who invents falsehoods
 
FABULISTIC
adj. 1630 obs. rare – devoted to the composition of fables or apologues  
 
FABULIZE
vb. 1. 1612 obs. – to invent fables; to relate as legend
vb. 2. 1633 obs. – to concoct, to invent  
 
FABULOSA
adj. 1967 UK sl. – wonderful
 
FABULOSE
adj. 1677 obs. – fond of fables, myths, or enigmas
 
FABULOSITY
n. 1. 1599 – fondness for narrating or inventing fables
n. 2. 1601 obs. – a fable
n. 3. 1603 – of a composition or narrative: fabulous or mythical character; fictitiousness
 
FABULOSO
adj. 1990s sl., orig. homosexual usage – wonderful, excellent
 
FABULOUS
adj. 1959 sl. – excellent
 
FABULOUS DROP
n. 1940s Aust. sl. – an attractive young woman
 
FABURRIFIC
adj. 2000s US sl. – excellent  
 
FACE
int. 1979 US students’ sl. – an exclamation delivered to a person whom one has just insulted or humiliated
n. 1. 1537 – audacity, impudence, cheek
n. 2. 16C sl. – a coin
n. 3. L16 sl. – a grimace
n. 4. M18 sl. – credit at a public house
n. 5. 1875 sl. – a general term of greeting, e.g. ‘Hello, face’
n. 6. 1876 UK sl. – reputation, standing
n. 7. 19C US sl. – interference, nosiness
n. 8. M19 US sl. – the mouth, as the source of speech
n. 9. L19 US sl. – the mouth, as used for eating and drinking
n. 10. L19 rhyming sl. – a boat race. esp. the Oxford and Cambridge  
n. 11. Bk1900 Sc. – the edge of a knife or sharp instrument  
n. 12. 1920s US sl. – fellatio or cunnilingus, usually as ‘give (or get) face’
n. 13. 1925 Aust. sl. – one’s personal appearance
n. 14. 1930s US criminals’ sl. – a respectable image, a ‘front’
n. 15. 1930s African-American sl. – a stranger, esp. a White stranger
n. 16. 1940s African-American sl. – a White person
n. 17. 1944 sl. – a person; in police use: a known criminal
n. 18. 1946 US sl. – a cosmetic kit, make-up
n. 19. 1959 Amer. sl. – a clock; a watch
n. 20. 1960s Brit. sl. – a top person, a leader  
n. 21. 1960s UK criminals’ sl. – a professional criminal, usually an armed robber with no territorial ambitions
n. 22. 1960s sl. – a fellow member of a mod gang, esp. one who is considered particularly fashionable
n. 23. 1960s Amer. sl. – a well-known person; a recognizable person; a celebrity, esp. a show-business notable  
n. 24. 1979 Amer. students’ sl. – an instance of successfully humbling or embarrassing someone  
n. 25. 1990 US sl. – a professional pool player who is well known and recognized making it impossible for him to make a living betting with unsuspecting amateurs  
n. 26. 1990 US sl. – in professional wrestling: a wrestler who is designed by the promoters to be seen by the audience as a hero  
n. 27. 1991 UK sl. – in betting: the odds of 5-2  
n. 28. 2001 UK bookmakers’ usage – in racecourse gambling: a bettor who is believed to have useful information regarding the likely outcome of a race  
vb. 1. c1815 boxing sl. – to punch in the face
vb. 2. 1920s Irish sl. – of man: to pay court to a woman
vb. 3. 1950s US students’ sl. – to outperform, to show up, to humiliate, to insult
vb. 4. 1984 Amer. sl. – to be beaten miserably in any competition   
 
FACEABLE
adj. 1894 Sc. – fit to be seen, pretty, fitting  
adv. 1854 Eng. dial. – visibly, face to face  
 
FACE-ACHE
n. 1. 1937 Brit. sl. – a term of address, used disparagingly
n. 2. 1937 Brit. sl. – an unpleasant, undesirable, or despicable person  
n. 3. 1937 sl. – a dreary-looking person  
n. 4. 1970s sl. – a beating up  
n. 5. 20C Brit. sl. – an ugly or miserable-looking person 
 
FACE AND BRACE
vb. 16C sl. – to bluster, to defy, to bully verbally; to domineer, to be defiant   
 
FACE AND HOOD
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – the pansy  
 
FACE ARTIST
n. 1927 Amer. homosexual & prostitute sl. – a fellator or fellatrix
 
A FACE AS LONG AS A WET SUNDAY
phr. 1984 Can. sl. – used for describing an expression of depression or sadness  
 
THE FACE AT THE WINDOW
n. L19 – someone looking through or even merely appearing at a window  
 
FACE-BONE
n. 1801 obs. – cheek-bone
 
FACE BOWL
n. 1900s African-American sl. – a small bowl in which to wash the face
 
FACE BUBBLE
n. 1973 US sl. – in motorcycling: a plastic shield attached to the helmet to cover the face  
 
FACE CARD
n. 1. 1970s Amer. sl. – an important person  
n. 2. 1990s African-American sl. – $100 bill  
 
FACE CREAM
n. 1970s US homosexual sl. – semen, esp. as when ejaculated onto a fellator’s face
 
FACED
adj. 1. 1968 Amer. sl., esp. students’ usage – intoxicated, drunk
adj. 2. 1980s US students’ sl. – humiliated, embarrassed
adj. 3. 1980s drug culture sl. – stunned by the potency of a drug, usually cannabis
adj. 4. 1998 US sl. – under the influence of MDMA (ecstasy)  
 
FACE DOWN
vb. 1530 – to disconcert in a direct confrontation  
 
FACE-ENTRY
n. 1874 theatrical usage obs. – freedom of access to a theatre
 
FACE FANNIES
n. 1990s sl. – sideburns
 
FACE FART
n. 1. 2000s NZ sl. – a belch, a burp  
n. 2. 2000s NZ sl. – a general term of abuse  
vb. 1982 NZ sl. – (usually as ‘face-fart’) to burp  
 
FACE FINS
n. 19C sl., orig. nautical usage – a moustache, presumably a large one that protrudes on either side of the cheeks
 
• FACE-FITTINGS
n. 1904 Aust. sl. – a beard and/or moustache
 
FACE-FUCK
vb. 1970s sl. – to place one’s penis in a passive person’s mouth in order to ‘actively’ receive fellatio
 
FACE-FUCKED
adj. 1990s drug culture sl. – so intoxicated by drugs that one is incapable of controlling one’s facial movements  
 
FACE-FUCKING
n. 1970s sl. – fellatio where the person being fellated is the active partner and the other person is passive, with an open mouth  
 
FACE-FUNGUS
n. 1. 1907 sl. – male facial hair, i.e. a beard and/or moustache
n. 2. 1910s sl. – a term of address  
 
FACE FURNITURE
n. 20C Brit. sl. – glasses  
 
FACE IT OUT WITH A CARD OF TEN
vb. 1542 obs. – to brag, to put on a bold front
 
FACE JOB
n. 1. L19 US sl. – cunnilingus
n. 2. 1980 Amer. sl. – in basketball: a play or game which humiliates the opposition; a one-sided victory
n. 3. 1982 US sl. – cosmetic surgery designed to alter your appearance  
 
• FACE-LACE
n. 1. 1927 Amer. jocular usage – whiskers, a beard
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. theatrical sl. – a false beard  
 
FACELESS
adj. 1. 1596 obs. – of persons: lacking courage; cowardly
adj. 2. 1985 Amer. students’ sl. – drunk
 
FACELIFT
n. 1997 US sl. – in the used car business: the procedure of turning back the miles on the odometer (mileometer)  
 
FACE-LIFTER
n. c1925 boxing sl. – an uppercut to the jaw 
 
FACE-LIFTING
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a hard blow to the face  
 
A FACE LIKE A BAG OF ARSES
n. 2003 UK sl. – an ugly face  
 
A FACE LIKE A BAG OF SPANNERS
n. 1975 UK sl. – a hard and rough face; mostly used when describing a woman  
 
A FACE LIKE A BAGFUL OF SPANNERS
n. 1975 sl. – a face hard and rough; applied mostly to women  
 
A FACE LIKE A BULLDOG
n. 2003 UK sl. – an ugly face; chiefly applied to a girl or woman  
 
A FACE LIKE A BULLDOG CHEWING A WASP
n. 2003 UK sl. – an ugly face; chiefly applied to a girl or woman  
 
A FACE LIKE A BULLDOG LICKING PISS OFF A NETTLE
n. 2003 UK sl. – an ugly face; chiefly applied to a girl or woman
 
A FACE LIKE A BULL’S BUM
n. 2000s NZ sl. – a very ugly face  
 
A FACE LIKE A DYIN’ CALF
n. 1988 Can. sl. – a morose, sorrowful look  
 
A FACE LIKE A FESTERING PICKLE
n. 2000s NZ sl. – a face that is covered in severe acne  
 
A FACE LIKE A LEPER LICKING PISS OFF A THISTLE
n. 2003 UK sl. – an ugly face; chiefly applied to a girl or woman  
 
A FACE LIKE A MILKMAN’S ROUND
n. c1950 sl. – a long face 
 
A FACE LIKE AN ABANDONED QUARRY
n. 2000s NZ sl. – a very ugly face  
 
A FACE LIKE A SCRUBBED HAMMOCK
n. c1920 Royal Navy usage – a pale, sour-looking face 
 
A FACE LIKE A SEA-BOOT
n. c1930 sl. – a long-drawn ‘fathom of misery’; a miserable or glum face 
 
A FACE LIKE A SLAPPED ARSE
n. 1999 UK sl. – a very miserable-looking countenance 
 
A FACE LIKE A SMACKED ARSE
phr. 2000s sl. – used to describe someone who looks very depressed  
 
FACE LIKE A STOPPED CLOCK
phr. 1980s Aust. sl. – describing a very unattractive face, usually female; also, used of one who is momentarily stunned
 
FACE LIKE A STRIPPER’S CLIT
phr. 1990s sl., derogatory – describing the face of an unattractive woman 
 
A FACE LIKE A TWISTED SANDSHOE
phr. 2000s NZ sl. – used to describe someone who is exhibiting great disgust  
 
A FACE LIKE A YARD OF PUMP-WATER
n. 20C colloq. – a ‘long’ face; a miserable or glum face  
 
A FACE LIKE A YARD OF TRIPE
phr. 2000s NZ sl. – used to describe someone looking very depressed  
 
FACE LIKE YESTERDAY
phr. 1900s sl. – describing a very miserable-looking face
 
FACE-MAKER
n. E19 sl. – a father of an illegitimate child  
 
FACE-MAKING
n. 1. 1623 obs. – portrait-painting
n. 2. M18 sl. – sexual intercourse  
 
FACE MAN
n. 1. 1958 Amer. sl. – a person, usually a man, who influences or beguiles others through his appearance or demeanour; a socially adept person; a good-looking man with an exceptionally handsome face
n. 2. 1970 Amer. sl. – a prostitute’s client who seeks oral satisfaction
 
FACE MUFFLER
n. World War II Amer. sl. – a gas mask  
 
FACEN
vb. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to face  
 
THE FACE OF CLAY
n. 1. 1828 Sc. & Eng. dial. – any living person  
n. 2. 1895 Eng. dial. – a solid, immovable countenance  
 
FACE-OFF
n. 1. 1896 Amer. sl. – a confrontation, esp. one before action
n. 2. 2003 US sl. – an ejaculation of semen onto a lover’s face  
THE FACE ON THE CUTTING ROOM FLOOR
n. c1920 film industry usage – an actor or actress cut out of a picture because, after the picture has been completed, it is found that the role is superfluous 
 
FACE OUT
vb. 1533 – to overcome someone with coolness, effrontery, or impudence; to face down
 
FACE-PAINT
vb. 20C teen & high school sl. – to fall off a skateboard onto one’s face  
 
• FACE-PAINTER 
n. 1. 1697 – a painter of portraits
n. 2. 1847 – one who applies paint to the face
 
FACE-PAINTING
n. 1990s sl. – the ejaculation of semen over one’s partner’s face
 
FACE-PIECE
n. 1950 Sc. – a scolding  
 
FACE-PLANT
n. 1984 US sl. – a face-first fall; in snowboarding: a face-first fall into the snow  
 
FACE-PLASTER
n. 1940s Aust. sl. – an alcoholic drink
 
FACE-PRICKLE
n. 1990s Aust. sl. – facial hair  
 
FACE PROP
n. 1920 Amer. jocular usage – a tooth
 
FACE PUSSY
n. 1980s US homosexual sl. – fellatio  
 
FACE QUEEN
n. 1972 Amer. homosexual sl. – a male homosexual who is extremely attracted to the male face
 
FACER
n. 1. c1515 obs. – one who puts on a bold face; one who boasts or swaggers; a braggart, a bully
n. 2. 1527 obs. – a large cup or tankard; a cup or glass filled to the brim  
n. 3. 1810 sl. – a blow in the face
n. 4. c1820 sl. – an unexpected problem or obstacle; anything to which one must face up
n. 5. 1859 Amer. sl. – a staller; one who places himself in the way of persons who are in hot pursuit of his accomplices
n. 6. M19 US criminals’ sl. – a criminal who stalls those in pursuit of their accomplices
n. 7. M19 sl. – a glass of whisky punch
n. 8. M19 sl. – a glass that holds a single dram of spirits
vb. E19 sl. – to hit in the face  
 
FACERAG
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a washcloth, face cloth  
 
FACE RAPE
vb. 1980s US students’ sl. – to kiss passionately
 
FACES AND SPACES
n. 1986 US military usage – joint consideration of equipment and personnel for the field and non-field positions  
 
FACE SHOOTING
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – boasting  
 
FACE-SHOT
n. 1991 US sl. – an air-to-air guided missile  
 
FACE STRETCHER
n. 1920s US sl. – an old woman who attempts to look young  
 
• FACETE
adj. 1. 1603 arch. – facetious, witty, humorous, pleasant, cheerful, gay  
adj. 2. a1635 obs. – elegant, graceful, polished
 
FACETELY
adv. 1619 obs. – in a witty or humorous manner; pleasantly
 
FACETENESS
n. a1656 obs. – the quality of being witty or humorous
 
A FACE THAT WOULD STOP A CLOCK
n. 1891 Amer. sl. – a very ugly face  
 
FACE THE BREEZE
vb. 1997 US sl. – in horse racing: to be in the position immediately behind and outside the leader  
 
FACE-THE-CLARTS
n. 1868 Sc. obs. – a low, plausible sneak; a mean, grovelling fellow
 
FACE THE ENEMY
vb. World War II Amer. sl. – to meet one’s wife after being out drinking  
 
FACE THE KNOCKER
vb. c1875 tailors’ sl. – to go begging 
 
FACE THE MUSIC
vb. 1. 1850 sl. – to receive blame courageously; to confront the consequences of one’s actions; to take one’s punishment; to go through an ordeal; to face the possibility of a severe reprimand or other punishment  
vb. 2. c1880 colloq. – to cope bravely with an unexpected emergency 
 
FACE THE NATION
vb. 1970s African-American sl. – to perform cunnilingus  
 
FACETIAE
n. 1529 – humorous sayings or writings; witticisms
 
FACE TIME
n. 1991 US sl. – time spent in a meeting or conversation with an important or influential person; time spent on television  
 
FACETIOSITY
n. 1822 rare – the quality of being facetious
 
FACE-TO-FACE
n. 1986 Amer. sl. – a face-to-face meeting, esp. a frank private conversation between two persons  
 
FACE TRAIN
n. 2001 US sl. – serial oral sex, from the point of view of the provider  
 
FACETY
adj. 1928 W. Indies & Black British sl. – cheeky, impudent, rude, arrogant; excessively bold or feisty
 
FACETYNESS
n. 1940s W. Indies & Black British sl. – impudence  
 
FACE-UP
n. 1950s US sl. – a gang-fight, including single-person combat  
vb. 1970 Amer. dial. – (usually as ‘face up’) to keep one’s chin up, to be brave or cheerful  
 
FACE-UP MASSAGE
n. 2002 Can. sl. – an erotic massage  
 
FACE-WASHIN
n. 1950 Sc. – a scolding  
 
FACE-WELLY
n. 2002 UK Royal Air Force usage – a gas mask  
 
FACE-WIND
n. a1722 obs. – a wind blowing against one’s face
 
FACEY
adj. 1. 1929 – cheeky, rude, impudent, impertinent; bold  
adj. 2. 2000 UK sl. – indicating criminal qualities  
n. c1870 tailors’ sl. – a workman facing another as he works 
 
FACEY ON THE BIAS
n. c1870 tailors’ sl. – a workman not directly in front of another as he words 
 
FACEY ON THE TWO THICK
n. c1870 tailors’ sl. – a workman just behind one’s vis-a-vis 
 
FÂCHÉ
adj. 1850 Amer. dial. – angry  
 
FACHIVA
n. 2003 UK sl. – heroin  
 
FACIAL
n. 1. 1970s sl. – a prostitute’s client who likes the woman to sit on his face, sometimes after she has inserted a suppository or even she is having intercourse with another man  
n. 2. 1970s sl. – ejaculation in one’s partner’s face  
n. 3. 1978 Amer. sl. – an instance of humiliation; an insult; a rebuff  
n. 4. 1998 NZ sl. – in rugby: an aggressive rubbing of the face of a tackled opponent  
 
FACIAL AREA
n. 17C US sl. – audacity, impudence
 
FACIALIST
n. 1990s W. Indies sl. – a woman who likes fellatio  

FACIATE
adj. 1648 obs. – the facade or front of a building
 
FACIE
adj. 1. 1825 Sc. – bold, ready to face danger  
adj. 2. 1825 Sc. – impudent, cheeky
 
FACIENT
n. a1670 obs. – one who does anything; an actor or doer
 
FACIES
n. 1611 humorous usage, obs. – the face, countenance  
 
FACILITE
vb. 1585 obs. – to facilitate, to make easy or easier; to assist in bringing about
 
FACILIZE
vb. 1607 rare – to make easy or easier; to facilitate
 
FACING
adj. 1566 obs. – bold, audacious
n. 1. c1400 obs. – the act of defacing or disfiguring; defacement, disfigurement
n. 2. 1523 obs. – the act of boasting, swaggering, or browbeating; a defiance
n. 3. 1674 – the act of turning a card face upwards
 
FACING-CARD
n. a1624 obs. – an imposing allegation or argument  
 
FACING-TOOLS
n. 1721 Sc. obs. – drinking vessels
 
FACINORIOUS
adj. 1601 obs. – extremely wicked, grossly criminal, atrocious, infamous, vile
 
• FACINOROUS
adj. 1548 obs. exc. arch. – extremely wicked, grossly criminal, villainous, atrocious, vile, infamous, detestably bad  
 
FACK
adv. 1843 Sc. – indeed, truly, really  
int. 1724 Eng. dial. – an exclamation or mild expletive  
n. 1. 1836 Sc. – fact, truth, reality  
n. 2. 1863 Ireland – a long-handled spade  
n. 3. Bk1900 Ireland – a quantity, a load  
n. 4. 1914 Sc. – make, shape, form  
vb. 1940s African-American usage – to tell the truth; to utter facts  
 
• FACKET
n. 19C Eng. dial. – a term of contempt or reproach applied to women and children; a slattern; a worthless woman  
 
FACKING
adj. 2001 UK sl. – an intensifier; ‘fucking’  
 
FACKS!
int. 1724 Eng. dial. – an exclamation or mild expletive  
 
FACOCKTA
adj. 1990s Amer. sl. – accursed; wretched  
 
FACRERE
n. 1393 obs. – the art of ‘make-believe’, deception  
 
FACT
n. 1. 1539 obs. – an evil deed, a crime
n. 2. 1543 obs. – a noble or brave deed, an exploit; a feat of valour or skill
n. 3. 1631 obs. – actual guilt, as opposed to suspicion
vb. 1942 African-American sl. – to speak frankly and truthfully  
 
FACT AS DEATH
adj. 1891 Sc. – as certain as death  

FACTIBLE
adj. 1. 1562 obs. – able to be worked or wrought
adj. 2. 1585 – able to be made, done, or put into action; practicable, feasible

FACTICITY
n. 1. 1869 – a being a fact; factualness
n. 2. 1964 – an unchangeable fact, a given
 
FACTION
n. 1. 1559 obs. – manner of acting or behaving; an action, proceeding, course of conduct
n. 2. 1593 obs. – a factious quarrel or intrigue
n. 3. 1612 obs. – the act of doing or making something
vb. 1609 obs. – to act in a factious or rebellious spirit; to intrigue; to mutiny
 
FACTIONARY
adj. 1607 obs. – taking part in a quarrel or dissension; active as a partisan
n. 1555 – a member of a faction; a partisan
 
FACTIONATE
vb. 1. 1611 obs. – to join together in a faction; to band together
vb. 2. 1642 obs. – to form factions
 
FACTIONEER
n. c1710 – a member of a faction; a party-man
vb. 1881 rare – to busy oneself in factions
 
FACTIONER
n. 1587 obs. – one who makes or joins a faction; a partisan
 
FACTIONIST
n. 1609 – one who promotes or leads a faction; a member of a faction, a partisan
 
FACTIOSE
adj. 1727 obs. rare – given or inclinable to faction, seditious  
 
FACTIST
n. 1775 obs. – a poet or play-maker  
 
FACTITATE
vb. 1617 obs. rare – ? to work busily
 
FACTITIOUS
adj. 1646 obs. – made by or resulting from art; artificial
 
FACTIVE
adj. 1612 obs. – tending or having the power to make; concerned with making
 
FACTIVITY
n. a1643 obs. – power to do something, capacity; range of activity
 
FACTOID
n. 1970s Amer. sl. – a presumed fact of dubious validity; a popular assumption or belief  
 
FACTOR
n. 1. 1485 rare – one who acts for another; an agent, deputy, or representative
n. 2. 1502 obs. – a partisan. adherent, approver
n. 3. 1561 obs. exc. Sc. – one who has the charge and manages the affairs of an estate; a bailiff, a land-steward
n. 4  1563 obs. or arch. – one who makes or does anything; a doer, maker, performer, perpetrator; an author of a literary work
n. 5. 16C UK criminals’ sl. – a cheat or impostor; a fraudulent fortune-teller  
n. 6. 1960 US sl. – in horse racing: a horse who is contending for the lead in a race  
vb. 1611 rare – to act as a factor or agent
 
FACTORAGE
n. 1. 1670 – the action or professional service of a factor; the act of buying or selling goods on commission
n. 2. 1679 obs. – the place of business of a factor; an agency  
 
FACTORDOM
n. 1888 rare – the system of management by factors
 
FACTORESS
n. 1608-77 obs. – a female factor or agent
 
FACTORIAL
adj. 1. 1864 rare – pert. to a factory; consisting in a factory
adj. 2. 1881 – pert. to a factor
 
FACTORY
n. 1. 1582 – an establishment for traders carrying on business in a foreign country; a merchant company’s trading station
n. 2. 1640-1 – a document investing another with the authority of a factor or agent
n. 3. 1664 obs. – the act or process of making anything
n. 4. 1702 obs. – the body of factors in any one place
n. 5. 1806 Aust. sl. – a prison; a women’s prison
n. 6. 1891 sl. – a police station
n. 7. M19 UK criminals’ sl. – a large, forbidding Victorian police station in the London Metropolitan area  
n. 8. Bk1900 Eng. dial. obs. – the parish workhouse
n. 9. 1930s drug culture sl. – a place where drugs are packaged, diluted or manufactured  
n. 10. 1930s drug culture sl. – the kit used by a narcotics addict for injections  
 
THE FACTORY
n. 1. 1447 obs. rare  – a large Metropolitan police station of severe appearance; generally, any police station
n. 2. 1952 UK actors usage – the theatre  
 
FACTORY DRIVER
n. 1980 US sl. – in motor racing: a driver officially representing a car manufacturer  
 
FACTORY SMOKER
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a cheap cigar  
 
FACTOTUM
n. 1. 1618 obs. – one who meddles with everything; a busybody
n. 2. 1863 – a man of all-work; also, a servant who has the entire management of his master’s affairs
n. 3. 19C Brit. sl. – the female genitals, ‘that which controls everything’  
 
FACTRIX
n. 1870 rare – a female factor or agent
 
FACTURE
n. 1. 1580 rare – the act or process of making a thing
n. 2. 1647 rare – the thing made, creation
 
FACTY
adj. 1871 – full of facts; highly factual
 
FACULATE
vb. 1889 Amer. dial. – to arrange, to put in order  
 
FACULENCE
n. 1727-36 obs. – brightness, clearness  
 
• FACULENT
adj. 1575 obs. rare – bright, clear; giving forth light like a torch
 
FACULIZED
adj. 1816 Amer. dial. – versatile; endowed with many faculties or abilities  
 
FACULTATE
vb. 1648 rare – to invest with authority; to empower; to authorize  
 
FACULTIES OF THE HEAD
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – the brain, the intellectual faculties  
 
FACULTISED
adj. 1871 Amer. dial. – versatile; endowed with many faculties or abilities  
 
FACULTY
n. 1. 1382 obs. – pecuniary ability, means, resources; possessions, property
n. 2. c1384 obs. – a branch or department of knowledge
n. 3. c1386 obs. exc. arch. – that in which anyone is skilled; an art, trade, occupation, profession
n. 4. c1565 obs. – a personal quality; disposition
vb. 1934 Amer. dial. – to understand, to comprehend  
 
FACULTY STRUCKEN
adj. 1884 Eng. dial. – deprived of the use of one’s senses, weakened in intellect  
 
• FACUND
adj. 1. c1381 arch. or obs. – inspiring or promoting eloquence; eloquent; also fig., said of beauty, etc. 
adj. 2. 1501 obs. – inspiring or promoting eloquence
n. a1340 obs. – eloquence
 
• FACUNDATE
vb. 1656 obs. – to make eloquent
 
FACUNDIE
n. 1447 obs. rare – eloquence
 
• FACUNDIOUS
adj. 1430 obs. – of persons: gifted with fluent speech; eloquent, glib; of speech: copious, fluent  
 
FACUNDIOUSLY
adv. 1509 obs. – eloquently
 
FACUNDITY
n. 1530 obs. – eloquence
 
FACY
adj. 1. 1605 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – insolent, impudent, cheeky, rude
adj. 2. 1825 Sc. – bold, possessed of courage to ‘face’ an enemy  
 
FACY-GATE
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – impudent, brazen-faced
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a brazen-faced, impudent person


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Updated: September 14, 2022