Dictionary: FAD – FAG

• FA’D
n. c1870 Brit. sl. – a farthing 

• FAD
n. 1. 1877 Eng. dial. – a fussy, over-particular person; a milksop, an indecisive, cowardly person  
n. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a coloured ball  
n. 3. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a game, a joke
vb. 1. 1856 Eng. dial. – to deceive, to ‘take in’ by flattery  
vb. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to busy oneself about trifles; to look after affairs in a quiet way  

• FADAHAL
adj. 1929 Sc. – astute, wide-awake  

• FADANGLE
vb. 2000s African-American sl. – to cheat, to do wrong  

• FAD-CATTLE
n. 19C sl. – a generic term for sexually available women; easily accessible women  

• FADDABROD
n. 1908 Sc. – an old, cracked, or dilapidated bowl, box, or other household utensil  

• FADDERLESS-STEW
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – potatoes stewed without meat  

• FADDISH
adj. 1961 Amer. sl. – whimsical  

• FADDIST
n. c1880 colloq. – one devoted to a public or private fad 

• FADDLE
n. 1. 1850 colloq. & Eng. dial. – nonsense, trifling
n. 2. 1885 Eng. dial. – fussiness, fastidiousness  
n. 3. 19C colloq. & Eng. dial. – a fanciful person, either fastidious in trifles or devoted to some particular hobby; one full of whims and fancies; a busybody
n. 4. 19C – an affected and very effeminate male; a homosexual man  
n. 5. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a slow pace in walking  
vb. 1. 1688 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to make much of a child; to spoil
vb. 2. 1755 Eng. dial. obs. – to trifle, to toy, to play
vb. 3. 1841 Eng. dial. – to make sport of  
vb. 4. 1876 Eng. dial. – to waste time; to dawdle, to walk slowly  

• FADDLE-DE-DEE!
int. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – nonsense! rubbish!  

• FADDLEMENTS
n. 1891 Eng. dial. – trifles, novelties  

• FADDLER
n. 1888 Eng. dial. – one who trifles

• FADDLING
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – trifling, over-particular, fastidious  

• FADDY
adj. 1. c1820 colloq. – full of fads 
adj. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – fastidious, fidgety, over-particular; full of crotchets or whims  
adj. 3. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – frivolous
n. 1905 Amer. dial. – one’s father  

• FADDYWADDY
n. 1843 Amer. dial. – one’s father  

• FADE
adj. 1. c1290 obs. exc. arch. – of colour, etc.: dull, pale, wan, sombre
adj. 2. 1303 obs. – faded, feeble, languishing, withered  
adj. 3. c1320 obs. – strong, doughty, brave, powerful  
adj. 4. c1400 obs. – of a thing: great, large
adj. 5. 1715 obs. – that has lost taste; insipid, commonplace, uninteresting
n. 1. 1513 obs. – a company of hunters
n. 2. 1884 Eng. dial. – mould on cheese
n. 3. 1887 Sc. – a leader, a guide; applied to the chief or director in games, sports, etc.  
n. 4. c1893 Amer. sl. – a worthless fellow 
n. 5. L19 US sl. – a former dandy, now fallen on hard times and thus less resplendent  
n. 6. 1942 Amer. sl. – a disappearance, departure or escape  
n. 7. 1970s sl. – a Black person who becomes immersed in the White world and thus ‘fades away’; one who tries to lose his identity as a Black person and to assume an identity more pleasing to the dominant White society  
n. 8. 1989 US sl., esp. African-American – a hairstyle in which the sides of the head are close-cropped and the top hair is shaped into an upright block  
n. 9. 1990s US students’ sl. – a badly dressed person  
n. 10. 20C African-American sl., derogatory – a White person
vb. 1. 1388 obs. – to grow small or weak; to decline, decay, fail, or faint; to shrink
vb. 2. c1400 obs. – to deprive of freshness or vigour; to corrupt, to taint
vb. 3. 1848 sl. – to depart; to disappear; to run away; to leave; to vanish  
vb. 4. 1890 US sl. – in craps: to take one’s bet; to cover one’s offered bet  
vb. 5. 1890 US sl. – in gambling: to bet against another gambler (usually the shooter in craps); also, to match another’s wager in full or in part  
vb. 6. 1894 Amer. sl. – to surpass, to defeat, to overcome, to outdo, to overshadow  
vb. 7. L19 US sl. – to put at a disadvantage, to cause problems for someone  
vb. 8. L19 gambling sl. – in dice and card games: to bet against the player holding the dice, or in poker, to match the previous bet  
vb. 9. 1915 Amer. sl. – to make unhappy  
vb. 10. 1920s US criminals’ sl. – to hold up with a gun  
vb. 11. 1920s sl. – to respond, to counter  
vb. 12. 1940 Amer. jocular euphemism – to die  
vb. 13. 1940s African-American & students’ sl. – to stop talking  
vb. 14. 1960s US students’ sl. – to miss a class; to waste time rather than work  
vb. 15. 1960s US criminals’ sl. – to obtain a verdict of not guilty  
vb. 16. 1960s US criminals’ sl. – to withstand interrogation  
vb. 17. 1962 US sl. – to deal with; to handle; to put up with; to manage something  
vb. 18. 1967 Amer. dial. – to take a nap  
vb. 19. 1968 US sl. – to idle; to waste time  
vb. 20. 1980s US students’ sl. – to become tired, to feel increasingly exhausted  
vb. 21. 1980s African-American sl. – to drop a topic of conversation, to change an unpalatable subject  
vb. 22. 1980s African-American sl. – to remain sufficiently silent not to be noticed  
vb. 23. 1990s African-American teen sl. – to fool around or tinker with something or someone  
vb. 24. 1990s African-American sl. – to ignore, to erase, to get rid of  
vb. 25. 1990s US sl. – to let down, to renege  
vb. 26. 1990s African-American sl. – to shoot dead  
vb. 27. 1991 Amer. students’ sl. – to take advantage of vb. 28. 2004 US sl. – to buy part of something  

• FADE A BEEF
vb. 1976 US sl. – to cause a complaint or criminal charge to be removed  

• FADEAWAY
int. 1913 sl. – (usually as ‘fade away’) go away!  
n. 1. 1900 Amer. sl. – a departure or escape  
n. 2. 1908 Amer. sl. – in baseball: a pitch that moves away from the batter so that he would have to reach out for it  
n. 3. 1954 US sl. – in hot rodding: a design feature that blends the front fender back into the car body  
(verbs usually as ‘fade away’)
vb. 1. 1820 sl. – to depart, esp. gradually; to run away; to leave; to vanish   
vb. 2. 1947 US sl. – to become quiet  

• FADED
adj. 1. 1891 Eng. dial. – of cheese: tainted, mouldy  
adj. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – delicate-looking  
adj. 3. 1980s US sl. – drug-intoxicated  
adj. 4. 1980s US sl. – drunk  
adj. 5. 1980s African-American & students’ sl. – unfashionable  
adj. 6. 1980s African-American & students’ sl. – used to excess

• FADED BOGEY
n. 1. 1920s African-American sl. – a Black informer  
n. 2. 1920s African-American sl. – a Black who apes Whites and loses his own ethnicity
n. 3. 1920s African-American sl. – a White person who imitates Blacks

• FADED BOOGIE
n. 1. 1920s African-American sl. – a Black informer  
n. 2. 1920s African-American sl. – a Black who apes Whites and loses his own ethnicity; one who has taken on (undesirable) Caucasian characteristics
n. 3. 1920s African-American sl. – a White person who imitates Blacks

• FA-DEE
n. c1870  Brit. sl. – a farthing 

• FADE-OUT
n. 1. 1918 Amer. sl. – a disappearance, departure, or escape
n. 2. 1920s US sl. – death  
(verbs usually as ‘fade out’)
vb. 1. 1820 Amer. sl. – to depart, esp. gradually; to run away; to leave  
vb. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to clean out, to clear out  
vb. 3. 1920s sl., orig. US – to die  

• FADERIL
n. Bk1900 Sc. – an odd or loose end of anything  

• FADERILS
n. 1844 Sc. – paraphernalia, apparatus  

• FADESOME
adj. 1869 Eng. dial. – apt to fade  

• FADEY
adj. 1928 Amer. dial. – dull, faded  

• FADGE
n. 1. a1609 Sc. – a large flat loaf or bannock 
n. 2. 1750 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a short, thickset person; a fat, clumsy woman  
n. 3. 1777 Eng. dial. – a bundle, a burden; a part of a horse’s load; a heap, a quantity of anything  
n. 4. 1789 sl. – a farthing  
n. 5. 1873 Eng. dial. – a slow regular motion; a jog-trot n. 6. M19 UK criminals’ sl. – a trick  
n. 7. Bk1900 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a bundle of sticks, a faggot  
n. 8. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a person jaded in appearance n. 9. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – one who trots slowly, a child who toddles along
n. 10. 1923 Sc. – a vexatious person  
vb. 1. 1573 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to fit in with or suit the surroundings; hence, to get on, to succeed, to thrive
vb. 2. 1578 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – of things: to fit, to suit, to be suitable; to agree, to go down with a person  
vb. 3. 1592 obs. – of persons: to do with; to put up with a thing
vb. 4. 1592 obs. – to be content or willing; to agree; to make up one’s mind to do something
vb. 5. 1658 rare exc. Eng. dial. – to make one’s way; to go at a pace between walking and trotting; to jog along; to trudge  
vb. 6. 1674 Eng. dial. obs. – to fit the parts of together
vb. 7. 1863 Eng. dial. – to eat together, partake of hospitality given at the season of the New Year  
vb. 8. 1864 Eng. dial. – to trot gently; to go at a pace between walking and trotting; to walk with difficulty owing to corpulency  
vb. 9. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to beat, to thrash  
vb. 10. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to do a piece of work ‘anyhow’; to repair temporarily’ to ‘fudge’

• FADGE OUT
vb. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to ascertain, to discover  

• FADGER
n. L19 Cockneys’ usage – a farthing

• FADGE WITH
vb. 17C – to tolerate a thing; to agree with a person  

• FADGING
adj. c1611 obs. – that fits, suits, etc.; well-matched
n. 1879 Eng. dial. – hospitality given at the season of the New Year  

• FADGY
adj. 1. 1895 Eng. dial. – faded, soiled  
adj. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – corpulent, fat, unwieldy, short and thickset in person  
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a stout, thickset little person

• FADIE
n. 1989 US sl. – a haircut style in which the sides of the head are closely cut and the top of the head is not  

• FADLE
vb. 1989 US sl. – to walk in a clumsy manner, to waddle  

• FADMONGER
n. 1989 US sl. – one devoted to a public or private fad 

• FADOODLE
n. a1670 obs. rare – something foolish or ridiculous; nonsense; a mere nothing; a useless trifle

• FADOODLING
n. 17C euphemism – sexual intercourse  

• FADY
adj. 1. 1730-6 – dull, faded; tending to fade; shading off by degrees into a paler hue  
adj. 2. 1790 Eng. dial. – damp, musty; covered with perspiration  
adj. 3. 1790 Eng. dial. – of the weather: damp, sultry, close
adj. 4. 1892 Eng. dial. – of meat: tainted, stale, ‘high’  
adj. 5. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – flabby, as the flesh of a drooping child  
vb. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to decay from damp; to mildew

• FAECALITY
n. 1653 obs. – faecal matter

• FAECICAL
adj. 1594 – faecal  

• FAFA
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – one’s father  

• FAFF
n. 1. 1880 Eng. dial. – swagger, pretense; show, useless adornments  
n. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a young, frisky child  
n. 3. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – one who uses more breath in talking than is necessary
n. 4. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a puff; a breath of air, smoke, etc.
n. 5. 2000s sl. – a nuisance  
vb. 1. 1788 Eng. dial. – to blow in sudden gusts; to puff; to move gently, to fluctuate  
vb. 2. c1930 – to mess about, restlessly and ineffectually, wasting time, often while something quite urgent needs attention; to play or fool around, to waste time 

• FAFF ABOUT
vb. 1874 Eng. dial. – to mess about; to waste time on matters of no importance; to be indecisive or fussy

• FAFF AROUND
vb. 1874 UK sl. – to mess about; to waste time on matters of no importance; to play or fool around

• FAFFLE
n. 1. c1900 Sc. – a stammerer, one who is unable to articulate distinctly 
n. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a light intermittent wind, blowing in gentle puffs  
vb. 1. 1573 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to stutter or stammer; to utter incoherent sounds  
vb. 2. 1796 Eng. dial. – to flap gently in the wind  
vb. 3. Bk1900 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to saunter, to trifle; to fumble, to work dilatorily  

• FAFFLED
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – entangled; bothered  

• FAFFLEMENT
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – trifling and unnecessary work

• FAFFMENT
n. 19C Eng. dial. – nonsense, balderdash  

• FAFFY
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – gusty, apt to blow about  

• FAG
adj. 1. 1930s – homosexual; pert. to homosexuality  
adj. 2. 1950s sl. – effeminate; also used of objects i.e. lacking power  
n. 1. 1486 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – something that hangs loose; a flap  
n. 2. c1580 – the last part or remnant of anything, after the best has been used; the extreme end 
n. 3. 1775 – the fringe at the end of a rope  
n. 4. 1780 colloq. – a bore; a chore; an unpleasant, tedious task; anything that causes weariness, hard work, toil, drudgery, fatigue; a wearisome thing
n. 5. 1785 – in English public schools: a junior who performs certain duties for a senior; also, a drudge; a lower-classman, typically a freshman, who is compelled to perform  various duties for an upperclassman  
n. 6. 1796 Eng. dial. – dried peat; turf cut for fuel  
n. 7. L18 sl. – a young female fish seller  
n. 8. c1800 Brit. school sl. – eatables 
n. 9. 1813 – a drudge; an errand boy or clerk  
n. 10. 1856 Amer. sl. – an over-diligent student  
n. 11. 1888 UK sl. – any cigarette; a cigarette butt
n. 12. M19 sl. – a hard worker
n. 13. M19 sl. – a pickpocket
n. 14. M19 US & Aust. sl. – a lawyer’s clerk  
n. 15. L19 sl. – a cheap cigarette, usually as issued to troops in World War I  
n. 16. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – long, coarse grass; tufts of old grass  
n. 17. 1920 US sl. – a male homosexual  
n. 18. 1932 Amer. sl. – an effeminate fellow; generally used derisively  
n. 19. 1963 Amer. juvenile & students’ sl. – an offensive person  
n. 20. 1982 US sl. – a despicable, unlikeable person  
n. 21. 1992 UK rhyming sl. (Fag Packet) – a jacket  
n. 22. 20C US sl. – a pimp  
n. 23. 20C US sl.-  the penis  
n. 24. E20 sl. – a catamite  
vb. 1. 1530 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to flag, to droop, to decline; to fall off, to swerve from  
vb. 2. L17 sl. obs. – to beat; to thrash; to strike
vb. 3. 1772 – to do something that wearies one; to work hard; to labour, to strain, to toil  
vb. 4. 1795 students’ usage – to toil diligently at one’s studies  
vb. 5. 1806 – in public schools: to do menial jobs for a schoolfellow higher up in the school; to perform certain services for another  
vb. 6. 1826 – to make one fatigued; to tire, to weary; to exhaust  
vb. 7. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to pursue, to hunt  
vb. 8. 1920 US sl. – to move quickly; to leave or depart in a hurry  
vb. 9. 1926 Amer. sl. – to supply with a cigarette  
vb. 10. 1940 Amer. sl. – to smoke a cigarette  
vb. 11. 1968 Amer. sl. – to subject to homosexual copulation or make a homosexual of; used derisively
vb. 12. 1968 Amer. sl. – to behave in a manner reminiscent of a homosexual  
• FAG ALONG
vb. 1. 1942 Amer. dial. – to move quickly; to depart or leave hurriedly  
vb. 2. 1960 Amer. cowboy usage – to ride fast  
vb. 3. 20C US sl. – to move when it requires an effort  

• FAGAN
n. 1940s sl. – the penis  

• FAG AROUND
vb. 1. 1960s US sl. – of heterosexual men: to play at acting in a ‘homosexual’ manner  
vb. 2. 1997 US sl. – of presumptively heterosexual male friends: to joke around or engage in horseplay  

• FAG-ASH
n. L19 sl. – cigarette ash  

• FAG-ASH LIL
n. L19 Brit. sl. – a woman who smokes heavily  

• FAG BAG
n. 1. 1960s Amer. homosexual usage – a woman married to a homosexual  
n. 2. M20 US sl. – a woman who consorts with a homosexual male  
vb. 1977 US sl. – to beat up and rob a homosexual

• FAG-BAGGING
n. 1977 Amer. sl. – a robbing or extorting money from homosexuals

• FAG-BAIT
n. 1974 Amer. sl. – an effeminate boy or man; used derisively

• FAG BANGLE
n. 2002 UK sl. – a homosexual man who accompanies a heterosexual woman  

• FAG-BASHER
n. 1. 1980s sl., orig. US homosexual usage – an ostensibly heterosexual man who specializes in beating and terrorizing gay men  
n. 2. 1980s sl., orig. US homosexual usage – any anti-gay spokesperson  

• FAG-BASHING
n. 1980s sl. – the homophobic beating up of male homosexuals  

• FAG-BUTT
n. 1930s sl. – a cigarette end  

• FAG-CARD
n. L19 sl. – a cigarette card  

• FAGE
n. 1. 1420 obs. – the act of coaxing or deceiving; a deceit, fiction
n. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a flatterer  
vb. 1. c1340 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to coax, to flatter; to toady; to beguile, to soothe 
vb. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to scratch, as a dog does  
vb. 3. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to sell bad meat

• FAGEING
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – deceiving, flattering

• FAG END
n. 1. 1613 – the past part or remnant of anything after the best has been used; the extreme end, as of a portion of time, a collection of persons, a written composition, etc.  
n. 2. 1721-1800 – the last part of a piece of cloth; the part that hangs loose, often of coarser texture than the rest  
n. 3. 1775 – of a rope: an untwisted end  
n. 4. 1853 – the butt of a cigarette or cigar  
n. 5. E19 – a fragmentary part of a speech or conversation that one might overhear, just as it tails off  
n. 6. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an exhausted condition  
vb. c1955 sl. – to have only a partial or muddled understanding of something that has been said 

• FAG-END OFF!
int. 20C sl. – stop listening!  

• FAG-END MAN
n. 1910s sl. – a man who collects cigarette ends from the pavement  

• FAG-ENDS
n. 20C sl. – eavesdropping  

• FAG-ENDS OF CONVERSATIONS
n. 20C – little bits and pieces of talk not fully understood by someone overhearing them  

• FAGER
n. 1435 obs. – a flatterer  

• FAGERRY
n. 1892 Ireland – a vagary, a whimsical notion, a fancy  

• FAGEY
adj. 1. 1883 Eng. dial. – deceiving, flattering  
adj. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – thin, poor, ill-nourished  
n. 1. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a puny child
n. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – an over-sharp, cunning person

• FAG FACTORY
n. 1. 1949 US sl. – a place where homosexuals gather  
n. 2. 1992 US sl. – a prison, esp. one with a large homosexual population  

• FAGGALD
n. 1824 Sc. obs. – a faggot, a bundle of twigs or heath tied with straw ropes  

• FAGGAMUFFIN
n. 1980s African-American sl. – a homosexual Black person, usually male  

• FAGGART
n. E20 US sl. – a homosexual male  

• FAGGED
adj. 1. 1578 obs. – flaccid, drooping
adj. 2. 1780 – out, excessively tired or fatigued  
adj. 3. 1900s sl. – shocked, mentally destroyed  

• FAGGED OUT
adj. 1. 1785 colloq. – exhausted, tired, fatigued  
adj. 2. 1900s sl. – shocked, mentally destroyed

• FAGGER
n. 1. 17C sl. – a boy thief that, entering by a window, opens the door to his confederates or even hands the booty out to them  
n. 2. 1885 – one who works hard  
n. 3. 1920s sl. – a person who smokes  

• FAGGERY
n. 1. 1853 – the system of fagging at public schools  
n. 2. 1970s Amer. sl. – male homosexuality  

• FAGGIE
adj. Bk1900 Sc. – fatiguing, tiresome, wearisome  

• FAGGING
adj. L19 sl. – exhausting  
n. 1. 1775 sl. – a beating, a thrashing, a thumping  
n. 2. 1777 – the act of working hard or wearying oneself at something; hard work; an exhausting experience  
n. 3. c1850 Brit. schoolboys’ sl. – serving as a ‘fag’ in a school 
n. 4. 1996 US sl. – male homosexual anal intercourse  

• FAGGING ABOUT
n. 1850 – the act of working hard or wearying oneself at something; hard work  

• FAGGISH
adj. 1958 US sl. – effeminate, blatantly homosexual  

• FAGGOT
adj. 1. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – useless, contemptible
adj. 2. 1940s US sl. – pert. to homosexuality or homosexuals  
adj. 3. 1960s sl. – weak, ineffectual  
n. 1. a1300 – a bundle of sticks, twigs, or small branches of trees bound together, for use as fuel 
n. 2. 1489 – a bundle or bunch, as of herbs, rushes, etc.; a collection of things  
n. 3. 1591 – a general term of abuse, usually of women or children; a shrewish, bad-tempered, or offensive woman; an old or dissipated woman; an unpleasant, miserable woman  
n. 4. L17 obs. military sl. – a man mustered for duty in the army (and thus ‘bound’ for service) but not yet formally enlisted; one temporarily hired to supply a deficiency at the muster, or on the roll of a company or regiment  
n. 5. L18 sl. – a prostitute  
n. 6. c1850 colloq. – a rissole  
n. 7. 1859 colloq. – butcher’s oddments or ‘stickings’
n. 8. 1873 sl. – a term of reproof or abuse directed at a child  
n. 9. 1880 Eng. dial. – a secret and unworthy compromise  
n. 10. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – in wrestling: a man who bargains not to win  
n. 11. 1914 Amer. sl. – an effeminate, weak, or cowardly fellow; generally used contemptuously
n. 12. 1914 sl., orig. US – a homosexual man; in general use the term covers any gay man, in gay use the implication is of overt effeminacy
n. 13. 1929 Amer. sl. – a cigarette  
n. 14. 1950s US sl. – a general term of abuse, irrespective of sex
n. 15. c1953 Amer. sl. – a homosexual of either sex; generally used contemptuously
n. 16. 1968 Amer. sl. – a very unattractive woman  
n. 17. 1970s sl. – a coward, a weakling  
n. 18. 1970s US homosexual sl. – a heterosexual woman who associates with male homosexual men  
n. 19. 20C US sl. – a derisive term of contempt for a non-homosexual male  
vb. 1. 1598 – to make into a faggot; to bind or tie up in or as in a faggot  
vb. 2. 1607 obs. – to bind (persons) in couples; also, to bind hand and foot  
vb. 3. 1862 Eng. dial. – in wrestling: to ‘sell one’s back’, to bargain not to win
vb. 4. 1893 Eng. dial. – to suppose, to conclude  
vb. 5. 19C Brit. sl. – to womanize; to consort with sexually loose woman  
vb. 6. 19C Brit. sl. – to copulate with a woman  
vb. 7. L19 sl. – to strangle or throttle

• FAGGOT AND STALL
n. 1. E18 UK criminals’ sl. – a burglar who enters a house, ties up the residents and then robs them
n. 2. E18 UK criminals’ sl. – the act of breaking into a house, tying up the residents and robbing them  

• FAGGOT AND STORM
n. 1. E18 UK criminals’ sl. – a burglar who enters a house, ties up the residents and then robs them
n. 2. E18 UK criminals’ sl. – the act of breaking into a house, tying up the residents and robbing them  

• FAGGOTEER
n. c1825 sl. – a lecher; a whoremonger; a pimp 

• FAGGOTER
n. 1960s African-American sl. – a pimp who specializes in selling the services of male homosexual prostitutes  

• FAGGOTINA
n. 1970s US homosexual sl. – a heterosexual woman who associates with male homosexual men  

• FAGGOT-LOVER
n. 1960s Aust. & NZ sl. – one who has no feelings of homophobia  

• FAGGOT-MASTER
n. c1825 sl. – a lecher; a whoremonger; a pimp 

• FAGGOT MOLL
n. 1969 Amer. sl. – a woman who regularly seeks the company of homosexual men; used derisively

• FAGGOT ROAD
n. 1956 Can. – a road topped with sapling bundles  

• FAGGOTRY
n. 1970 Amer. sl., usually offensive – male homosexual practices; homosexuality

• FAGGOT’S LUNCH BOX
n. 1964 US sl. – a jock strap; an athletic supporter  

• FAGGOT’S MOLL
n. 1969 Amer. sl. – a woman who regularly seeks the company of homosexual men; used derisively  

• FAGGOT TUNNEL
n. 20C Brit. sl. – the mouth 

• FAGGOTTY
adj. 1928 Amer. dial. – effeminate; homosexual  

• FAGGOT-WAISTED
adj. 1581 obs. – arranged in pleats like a bundle of sticks 

• FAGGOTY
adj. 1. 1927 Amer. sl. – effeminate; homosexual, esp. in an overt way; used derisively  
adj. 2. 1960s sl. – cowardly, useless, second-rate  

• FAGGOTY-ASSED
adj. 1920s sl. – effeminate, homosexual  

• FAGGOTY-MINDED
adj. 1856 – disposed to use faggots, inclined to burn opponents  

• FAGGY
adj. 1949 Amer. sl., derogatory – effeminate; homosexual
n. 1965 Amer. dial., often derogatory  – an effeminate or homosexual male

• FAG HAG
n. 1. 1944 Amer. students’ sl. – a young woman who is a smoker
n. 2. 1969 sl., orig. & chiefly US, derogatory – a woman who habitually consorts with homosexual men; one who prefers the company of homosexual men
n. 3. 1960s sl., orig. US – a heterosexual man who prefers the company of homosexuals to that of his heterosexual peers  
vb. 1960s sl. – of a woman: to associate with and choose one’s close friends from homosexual men  

• FAG-HATER
n. 1979 US sl. – a person with a pathological dislike for homosexuals  

• FAG HOLE
n. c1945 sl. – the mouth 

• FAG HOTS
n. 1960s homosexual sl. – cheap pornography aimed at the male homosexual readership  

• FAGIN
n. 1. 1905 sl. – a person who trains young boys to be thieves
n. 2. 1940s sl. – the penis  
n. 3. 1976 US sl. – a leader of thieves  
n. 4. 1990 US sl. – in pool: a person who backs a player financially in his bets  

• FAGINGY-FAGADE
n. 1920s African-American sl. – a White person  

• FAG-JOINT
n. E20 US sl. – a meeting place for homosexual males  
• FAGLISH
n. 1980s US homosexual sl. – gay slang  

FAG LOOP
n. 2001 US sl. – a loop on the back of a man’s shirt  

• FAG-MA-FUFF
n. 1825 Sc. – a garrulous old woman  

FAG MAG
n. M20 US sl. – a magazine or other publication featuring male nudity for homosexual males  

FAGMASTER
n. 1818 – a senior pupil for whom a junior pupil acts as fag; esp. used in some British independent boarding schools for boys

• FAG MOLL
n. 1966 Amer. sl. – a woman who regularly seeks the company of homosexual men; used derisively  

• FAGOCITE
n. 1930s Amer. sl. – an effeminate boy or man  

• FAGOGHE
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. obs. – a faggot  

• FAGOLA
n. 1961 Amer. sl. – a male homosexual; an effeminate male; used derisively  

• FAGOT
n. 1. a1300 – a bundle of sticks, twigs, or small branches of trees bound together, for use as fuel 
n. 2. 1489 – a bundle or bunch, as of herbs, rushes, etc.; a collection of things  
n. 3. L16 Brit. – a term of contempt for a woman, esp. an old or dissipated woman  
n. 4. L17 sl. – a man mustered as a soldier, but not yet formally enlisted  
n. 5. c1850 colloq. – a rissole 
n. 6. 1859 colloq. – butcher’s oddments or ‘stickings’  
n. 7. 19C sl. – a prostitute  
n. 8. 20C US sl. – a derisive term of contempt for a non-homosexual male  
n. 9. E20 US sl., derogatory – a male homosexual
n. 10. M20 US sl. – an unattractive young woman  
vb. 1. 17C colloq. – to bind or truss, as sticks in a faggot
vb. 2. 19C Brit. sl. – to womanize; to consort with sexually loose woman  
vb. 3. 19C Brit. sl. – to copulate with a woman  
vb. 4. L19 sl. – to strangle or throttle  

• A FAGOT ABOVE A LOAD
phr. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – too much of a good thing  

• FAGOTEER
n. c1825 sl. – a whoremonger 

• FAGOT-MASTER
n. c1825 sl. – a whoremonger

• FAGOTTIST
n. 1886 – a performer on the bassoon  

• FAGOTTO
n. 1724 – a bassoon  

• FAG OUT
vb. 1. c1840 Brit. schoolboys’ sl. – to serve as a ‘fag’ 
vb. 2. c1840 Brit. schoolboys’ sl. – in cricket: to field
vb. 3. 1930 Amer. sl. – to fatigue, to exhaust  
vb. 4. 1968 US sl. – to go to bed  

• FAG PACKET
n. 1. 1992 UK rhyming sl. – a jacket  
n. 2. 20C Brit. sl. – a racket (tennis, exorbitant prices, and noise)  

• FAG-PAPER
n. 1910s sl. – a cigarette paper  

• FAG RAGS
n. 1980s African-American sl. – smart casual clothing  
• FAG-ROLLER
n. 1962 Amer. sl. – a robber of homosexuals

• FAGS!
int. M17- a mild exclamation  

• FAG SHOW
n. 1940s US sl. – in the circus or carnival: a performance by female impersonators  

• FAG STAG
n. 1990s US sl. – a heterosexual male who enjoys the company of homosexual men  

• FAGSUM
adj. 1825 Sc. obs. – fatiguing, tiresome, wearisome

• FAGSUMNESS
n. 1825 Sc. obs. – tiresomeness

• FAG TAG
n. 1980 Amer. sl. – a loop on the back of a man’s shirt

• FAG THE BLOSS
vb. L17 UK criminals’ sl. – to hit the wench  

• FAG THE FEN
vb. L17 UK criminals’ sl. – to drub the prostitute  

• FAG-TOPPER
n. 1900s sl. – a cigarette end  

• FAGUEN
n. M19 UK criminals’ sl. – a villain, a depraved character  

• FAG WATER
n. 1980s US sl. – cologne


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Updated: September 14, 2022