Dictionary: FAH – FAIRF

• FAH!
int. 1542 – an exclamation of abhorrence or disgust  

• FAHDOODLE
n. 1955 Amer. dial. – nonsense, rubbish, twaddle  

• FAHLIDAH
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a rigmarole  

• FAID
adj. 1888 Amer. dial. – afraid
n. 1887 Sc. obs. – a leader, a guide; applied to the chief or director in games, sports, etc.
vb. 1825 Sc. – to frown  

• FAIDLE
vb. 1808 Sc. obs. – to walk in a clumsy manner, to waddle

• FAIGER
n. 1866 Sc. – fishermen’s tabu-name for the sun; only used with def. article  

• FAIK
n. 1. 1710 Sc. – a fold of anything, as a ply of a garment  
n. 2. 1714 Sc. – a plaid  
n. 3. 1825 Sc. obs. – the neck of a sack, after it has been drawn together and tied
n. 4. 1907 Sc. – a strand of rope  
vb. 1. 1445 Sc. – to abate, to diminish, to lessen; to deduct  
vb. 2. 1513 Sc. obs. rare – to enfold, to clasp
vb. 3. 1768 Sc. – of the limbs: to fail from weariness; to cease moving  
vb. 4. 1768 Sc. – of a person: to fold, bend, or tuck a limb under one
vb. 5. 1789 Sc. – to excuse, to let go with impunity
vb. 6. 1823 Sc. – to abate the price  
vb. 7. 1880 Sc. obs. – to fondle, to caress
vb. 8. 1914 Sc. – to turn over the pages of a book  
vb. 9. 1950 Sc. – to rummage, as in a drawer  

• FAIKE
n. L19 UK criminals’ sl. – an experienced, senior criminal  

• FAIL
adj. 1825 Sc. obs. – delicate, in a frail state of health
n. 1. 1898 Sc. obs. – decline in strength
n. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – one that fails or disappoints
vb. 1. 1399 obs. – of a period of time or anything that has a finite duration: to come to an end; to expire
vb. 2. 1590 obs. nonce use – to deceive, to cheat  
vb. 3. 1613 obs. – to die
vb. 4. c1650 obs. rare – to cease to speak of
vb. 5. 1873 Sc. – to collapse from exhaustion  
vb. 6. 1980s US students’ sl. – to fail to understand, to be unable to understand  

FAILABLE
adj. 1561 obs. – liable to fail or give way; unreliable

• FAILANCE
n. 1612 obs. – the fact of failing; failure, neglect, omission

• FAILED
adj. 1490 – decayed, worn out; of a person: impaired in health or vigour; infirm  

• FAILERY
n. 1913 Amer. dial. – a failure  

• FAILING DISEASE
n. 1911 Amer. dial. – tuberculosis  

• FAIL IN THE FURROW
vb. 19C Brit. sl. – to become impotent while copulating  

• FAILLZENCY
n. 1710 Sc. obs. – default, failure

• FAIL OFF
vb. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to show signs of approaching dissolution; to grow weak  

• FAIL OUT
vb. 1910 Amer. dial. – to fail  

• FAIL UP
vb. 1. 1890 Amer. dial. – to become impoverished; to go bankrupt  
vb. 2. 1907 Amer. dial. – to stop doing something  
vb. 3. 1914 Amer. dial. – to decline in health; to fall ill  
• FAILURE TO FLOAT
n. 1994 US sl. – a drowning or near drowning  

• FAILURE TO FLY
n. 2002 UK medical sl. – a tag applied to failed suicides  

• FAILYIE
n. 1551 obs. Sc. – failure, non-performance  

• FAILZURE
n. 1726 Sc. obs. – failure

• FAIN
adj. 1. 8-11C Beowulf now chiefly poetic or Eng. dial. – glad, rejoiced, well-pleased  
adj. 2. c1205 obs. – well-disposed, favourable
adj. 3. c1205 arch. or Eng. dial. – disposed, inclined or willing; eager 
adj. 4. 1596 obs. – apt. wont
adj. 5. 1660 Sc. & Eng. dial. – fond, affectionate; in love  
adj. 6. 1721 Sc. – happy, content  
adv. c1175 obs. or arch. – gladly, willingly, with pleasure  
n. c1340 obs. – gladness, joy
vb. 1. c888 obs. – to be delighted or glad; to rejoice; also, to desire, to wish
vb. 2. a1225 obs. – to pretend kindness
vb. 3. c1250 obs. – to make glad; hence, to welcome a person; also, to congratulate
vb. 4. 1483 rare – to enjoy; also, to take to gladly, to show preference for
vb. 5. 1870 Eng. dial. – to forbid, to refuse; to claim a truce  

• FAINAIGING
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – cheating, deceiving  

• FAINAIGUE
vb. 1. 1854 Eng. dial. – to fail of a promise, to play truant, to shirk work  
vb. 2. 1888 Eng. dial. – to revoke at cards  
vb. 3. 1895 Eng. dial. – to deceive by flattery; to obtain by improper means, to cheat

• FAINAIGUER
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a cheat, a deceiver  

• FAINEANCE
n. 1853 rare – the quality or condition of being an idler or one who does nothing

• FAINEANCY
n. 1854 – the quality or condition of being an idler or one who does nothing

• FAINÉANT
adj. 1855 – that does nothing; indolent, idle  
n. 1619 – one who does nothing; an idler  

• FAINEANTISE
n. a1684 – ‘do-nothing-ness’ ; indisposition to do anything; indifference, inactivity 

• FAINFU’
adj. 1887 Sc. – affectionate, kind, amiable, likeable  

• FAINHEAD
n. a1300 obs. – gladness, joy

• FAIN I!
int. c1810 Brit. schoolboys’ sl. – a call for a playground truce; a statement of opposition 

• FAINING
adj. c1400 obs. – gladsome, affectionate; also, longing, wistful 

• FAIN IT!
int. c1810 Brit. schoolboys’ sl. – a call for a playground truce; a statement of opposition 

• FAINITES!
int. 1870 UK schoolchildren’s usage – used to call a playground truce  

• FAINITS!
int. c1810 Brit. schoolboys’ sl. – a call for a playground truce; a statement of opposition 

• FAINLESSLY
adv. 1652 obs. – without attempted evasion

• FAINLIGHTS!
int. M19 juvenile usage – a call for a truce during a game, or a statement that one is ineligible for a given duty or command

• FAINLY
adj. 1. 1897 Sc. – pleasant, welcome, gladsome  
adj. 2. Bk1900 Sc. – affectionate, kind, amiable  
adv. 1535 rare – gladly, eagerly, excitedly

• FAINNESS
n. 1. c1300 chiefly Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – eagerness, gladness 
n. 2. c1779 Sc. – liking, love, affection, fondness 

• FAINS
adv. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – of necessity; necessarily  
int. c1810 UK juvenile usage – a call for a truce during a game, or a statement that one is ineligible for a given duty or command 

• FAINS I!
int. M19 UK juvenile usage – a call for a truce during a game, or a statement that one is ineligible for a given duty or command

• FAINSOME
adj. Bk1900 N. Eng. dial. – fond  

• FAINT
adj. 1. a1300 obs. or arch. – wanting in courage, spiritless, cowardly 
adj. 2. a1300 obs. – feigned, pretended, simulated 
adj. 3. c1325 obs. – avoiding exertion, shirking, lazy, sluggish
adj. 4. c1350 obs. – of persons or animals: weak, feeble; sickly, out of condition
adj. 5. 1864 obs. – having a sickly smell
adj. 6. 1885 Eng. dial. – of the weather: close, sultry, oppressive  
adj. 7. M19 euphemism – drunk
n. a1300 – faintness 
vb. 1. c1350 now arch. – to lose heart or courage, to be afraid, to become depressed, to give way 
vb. 2. c1386 rare – to depress, to enfeeble, to weaken; to make faint or weak
vb. 3. c1400 obs. exc. poetic usage – to become faint; to grow weak or feeble, to decline 
vb. 4. 1430 rare – to lose colour or brightness; to fade, to die away
vb. 5. 1599 obs. rare – to make less, to diminish
vb. 6. 1623 obs. rare – to fall short
vb. 7. 1866 Sc. – to starve, to famish  

• FAINT-DRAW
vb. 1728 – to draw or delineate lightly  

• FAINTED
adj. 1. c1500 obs. – become weak or exhausted 
adj. 2. c1500 obs. – rendered cowardly or timid

• FAINTEN
vb. 1612-15 obs. rare – to make faint, to depress, to dispirit  

• FAINT-FIT
n. 1795 obs. – a fainting fit

• FAINTFUL
adj. 1589 obs. – ready to faint; causing or indicating faintness

• FAINT-HEART
adj. 1590 – faint-hearted; timid; spiritless; cowardly  
n. 1. 1580 obs. – the fact or having a faint heart; want of spirit
n. 2. 1870 – one who has a faint heart; a coward  

• FAINTIFIED
adj. 1933 Amer. dial. – weak, faint  

• FAINTING FITS
n. 1940s rhyming sl. for ‘tits’ – the female breasts  

• FAINTINGNESS
n. 1634-5 obs. – faintness

• FAINTINGS
n. c1950 rhyming sl. for ‘tits’ (Fainting Fits) – the female breasts 

• FAINTISE
n. 1. 1297 obs. – feebleness, weakness of body or mind; want of energy, cowardice
n. 2. 1340 obs. – deceit, dissimulation, hypocrisy, pretense

• FAINTISH
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – weak, faint  

• FAINTIVE
adj. 1790 rare exc. Sc. – inclined to faint, faintish, languid  

• FAINTLING
adj. 1712 obs. – faint-hearted, timid, cowardly, spiritless
n. 1614 obs. – one who is faint-hearted, timid, spiritless, or cowardly

• FAINTLY
adj. 1892 Sc. obs. – inclined to faint
adv. 1. 1297 obs. – in a spiritless manner, like a coward; timidly
adv. 2. c1330 obs. – feignedly, by way of feint or pretense, deceitfully
adv. 3. c1440 obs. – with hesitation, not actively or energetically, coldly, half-heartedly
adv. 4. 1529 obs. – hardly, scarcely

• FAINTNESS
n. 1. 1398 obs. – dejection, timorousness; inertness, sluggishness
n. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a sickly taste; excessive sweetness  

• FAINT-OUT
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a feeling of weakness or faintness  

• FAINT OVER
vb. 1954 Amer. dial. – to fall over in a faint  

• FAINTS
n. 1974 US sl. – in the illegal production of alcohol: low-proof distillate

• THE FAINTS
n. c1890 colloq. – a tendency to faint 

• FAINTY
adj. 1. 1530 obs. exc. poetic usage – faint, sickly, languid; later, inclined to swoon  
adj. 2. 1590 obs. exc. poetic usage – causing faintness; sickly 
adj. 3. 1696 – physically weak, faint  
adj. 4. 1849 Eng. dial. – of the weather: close, sultry, oppressive  
adj. 5. 1965 Amer. dial. – weak from fear; scared  

• FAINTY-BAG
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a lady’s fancy bag  

• FAINTY-SICK
adj. 1926 Amer. dial. – physically weak, faint  

• FAIPLE
n. 1. 1805 Sc. – of men or animals: a loose drooping underlip  
n. 2. 1825 Sc. obs. – anything loose and flaccid hanging from the nose
n. 3. 1825 Sc. obs. – the crest of a turkey when elated

• FAIR
adj. 1. a1000 obs. – of sounds, odours, etc.: agreeable, delightful
adj. 2. c1340 rare – of water: clean, pure 
adj. 3. c1380 obs. – desirable, reputable
adj. 4. c1380 obs. – of language, diction: elegant 
adj. 5. c1420 obs. – of things: clean, unsoiled, unstained; of paper: not written upon, unused
adj. 6. 1663 obs. – of colour: clear, not cloudy
adj. 7. c1680 obs. – of death: easy, ‘natural’; without violence
adj. 8. c1820 Amer. dial. obs. – original, genuine
adj. 9. 1838 Sc. – plausible, pleasant  
adj. 10. 1872 – undoubted, complete, thorough, absolute  
adj. 11. 1886 Eng. dial. – open to view, plainly to be seen, clear  
adj. 12. 1895 Sc. & Eng. dial. – clean, tidy, set in order; level, even  
adj. 13. Bk1900 Sc. – likely, having a good chance  
adj. 14. Bk1900 Eng. dial.  – soft; slow  
adj. 15. 1965 US sl. – of a gang fight: without weapons
adv. 1. a1000 obs. – civilly, courteously, kindly
adv. 2. a1000 obs. – gently, quietly, without haste or violence
adv. 3. a1000 – in a beautiful or comely manner; agreeably, beautifully, brightly, handsomely, nobly 
adv. 4. 1154 obs. – with good promise; promisingly, auspiciously, favourably, prosperously
adv. 5. 1297 obs. – in a proper or suitable manner; becomingly, befittingly
adv. 6. c1330 obs. exc. Eng. dial. obs. – completely, fully, quite
adv. 7. 1393 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – plainly, easily, clearly, distinctly; frankly, downright  
adv. 8. c1450 obs. – moderately, not excessively
adv. 9. 1865 Sc. & Eng. dial. – straight, exactly, evenly, just
adv. 10. 1870 Eng. dial. – truly, really, actually; used as an intensifier  
adv. 11. 1894 Amer. dial. – scarcely, barely  
adv. 12. M19 – very, absolutely, really  
adv. 13. 1908 Amer. dial. – squarely, fully  
n. 1. c888 obs. – beauty, fairness, good looks
n. 2. 1423 now arch. or poetic usage – one of the fair sex;’ a woman; a beloved woman; a man’s sweetheart  
n. 3. 1768 Sc. obs. – a gift bought at a fair
n. 4. 1771 obs. – a person with a fair complexion
n. 5. 1894 Sc. obs. – a boat, in fishermen’s tabu language
n. 6. 20C African-American sl. – a light-skinned Black person  
vb. 1. a1000 obs. – to appear or become fair or clean
vb. 2. c1175 obs. – to make fair; to make clean or good-looking; to beautify
vb. 3. 1842 rare exc. Eng. dial. – of the weather: to clear

• THE FAIR
n. c1810 criminals’ sl. – a set of subterraneous rooms in the Fleet Prison 

• FAIR AND BET
adj. 1865 Eng. dial. – completely beaten, exhausted  

• FAIR AND CLEAR
adv. 1860 Eng. dial. – plainly, clearly  

• FAIR AND EASILY
adv. 1523 obs. – gently, quietly, without haste or violence  

• FAIR AND EVENLY
adv. a1000 obs. – gently, quietly, without haste or violence

• FAIR AND MODERATE
adv. 1891 Sc. – fairly and moderately  

• FAIR AND SOFTLY
adv. c1374 obs. exc. Sc. – gently, quietly, without haste or violence

• FAIR AND SWEETLY
adv. 1483 obs. – in a proper or suitable manner; becomingly, befittingly  

• FAIR AND TIDY
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – fair and square; equitable  

• FAIR AND WELL
adv. c1386 obs. – in a proper or suitable manner; becomingly, befittingly

• FAIRATION
n. 1861 Eng. dial. – fair play, fair dealing; consideration, fairness  

• FAIR-AVISED
adj. 1929 Sc. – fair-complexioned  

• FAIR AWAY
vb. 1836 Amer. dial. – of the weather: to become clearer  

• FAIR AWNEY
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – fair play  

• FAIR BALLS
n. 1810 Sc. – fair play 

• FAIRBANK
vb. 1961 US sl. – in a gambling cheating scheme: to let a victim win at first, increasing his confidence before cheating him  

• FAIR BOLLIX
n. 2000 Ireland sl. – a fair deal; a just proportion  

• FAIR BREAK
n. 1926 US – a fair chance 

• FAIR BUCK
int. 1940s NZ sl. – be fair! give me a chance!  
n. 1. 1940s NZ sl. – a fair chance  
n. 2. 1998 NZ sl. – used as a plea for fair treatment  

• FAIR-CALLING
adj. 1814 Sc. – plausible, smooth-tongued, flattering, wheedling  

• FAIR CHARMER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an attractive young woman  

• THE FAIR CITY
n. 1827 Sc. – Perth, Scotland  

• FAIR COP
n. 1. L19 sl., orig. UK criminals’ usage – a justifiable arrest  
n. 2. L19 sl., orig. UK criminals’ usage – any situation seen as fair and about which there is no complaint 

• FAIR COW
n. 1. 1904 Aust. sl. – an annoying or objectionable person or circumstance  
n. 2. 20C NZ sl. – a call for fair treatment  

• FAIR CRACK OF THE WHIP
int. 1924 Aust. & NZ sl. – be fair! give one a chance!  
n. 1929 Aust. sl. – fair treatment; equal opportunity; a reasonable chance  

• FAIR CUSS
n. 1950s Aust. sl. – an unreasonable person  

• FAIRD
n. 1. 1513 Sc. obs. –  motion, rush, impetus; hence, impetuosity, ardour; a violent onset, a stir, a bustle
n. 2. 1728 Sc. obs. – a fuss, pother, to-do
vb. 1818 Sc. obs. – to bustle; to bandy ill words with

• FAIR DAY
n. 1698 Sc. – broad daylight  

• A FAIR DAY
n. 1548 obs. – success in battle  

• FAIR DAYLIGHT
n. 1698 Sc. – broad daylight  

• FAIR DEAL
n. 1876, orig. US – an honest transaction; a fair bargain; an honest and equitable usage

• FAIR DEATH
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a natural death  

• FAIRDIE
adj. 1. 1724 Sc. – clever, handy  
adj. 2. 1821 Sc. – passionate, irascible  

• FAIR DINK
int. L19 sl., chiefly Aust. – honest! really! on the level!  
adj. E20 Aust. & NZ colloq. – genuine, authentic, honest, straightforward  

• FAIR DINKS
adv. 1983 Aust. sl. – honestly  

• FAIR DINKUM
adj. 1. 1908 Aust. sl. – true, genuine  
adj. 2. 1934 Aust. sl. – serious, in earnest  
adj. 3. 1937 Aust. sl. – real, actual  
adj. 4. 1947 Aust. sl. – fair, honest, equitable  
adv. 1. 1894 Aust. sl. – honestly; really; seriously; truthfully  
adv. 2. 1918 Aust. sl. – totally; properly; well and truly adv. 3. 1947 Aust. sl. – fairly  
int. L19 sl., chiefly Aust. – honest! really! on the level!  
n. 1881 Eng. dial. & Aust. sl. – fair dealing; that which is just and equitable  

• FAIR DO
int. M19 Aust. & NZ – a general statement of agreement, acceptance
n. M19 Aust. & NZ – decent treatment  

• FAIR DOES
n. 1865 colloq. – a fair deal, justice

• FAIR DOOS
n. 1865 colloq. – a fair deal, justice  

• FAIR DO’S
int. M19 Aust. & NZ – a general statement of agreement, acceptance  
n. 1859 colloq. – a fair deal or treatment, justice, decent treatment  

• FAIR DO’S ALL ROUND
n. c1930 colloq. – a fair deal, justice 

• FAIR DOWN
adj. 1845 Eng. dial. – downright, thorough, real  
adv. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – thoroughly  
vb. 1939 Amer. dial. – of the wind: to decrease  

• FAIR DUES
int. M19 Aust. & NZ – a general statement of agreement, acceptance  
n. 1859 colloq. – a fair deal, justice, decent treatment  

• FAIRDY
adj. 1724 Sc. – clever, handy  

• FAIR ENOUGH
int. 1926 UK sl. – used for expressing agreement, acceptance  
n. 1992 UK rhyming sl. for ‘puff’ (a homosexual) – a homosexual  

• FAIRESS
n. 1674 obs. rare – a female fairy  

• FAIR-FA’
n. Bk1900 Sc. – a wrestling match
vb. Bk1900 Sc. – to wrestle  

• FAIR-FACED
adj. 1866 Sc. – superficially polite, suave, deceitful  

• FAIR-FARAND
adj. 1789 Sc. – beautiful to the eye but noxious, hurtful  

• FAIR-FARRAND
adj. 1789 Sc. – specious, plausible; flattering, superficially attractive  

• FAIR-FASHIONED
adj. 1816 Sc. obs. – specious, plausible; flattering, superficially attractive

• FAIR FASHIONS
n. 1870 Sc. – good manners, politeness  

• FAIR, FAT AND FARTY
phr. c1930 sl. – of a woman: in the prime years 

• A FAIR FEW
n. L19 Aust. colloq. – a considerable number  

A FAIR FIELD AND NO FAVOUR
n. 1883 – equal conditions in a contest, not unduly favouring or hindering either side  

FAIR FIGHT
int. 1942 Amer. dial. – cry of onlookers adjuring the use of fists only, no weapons  
n. 1908 Amer. sl. –  a fight without weapons  

FAIR FIST AND SKULL (FIGHT)
n. 1908 Amer. dial. – a fight without weapons  

FAIRFLE
n. 1825 Sc. obs. – a skin eruption; a state of itch  

FAIR-FOLK
n. 1808 Sc. – fairies  

FAIR-FOOR-DAYS
n. 1742 Sc. – broad daylight as contrasted with night  

FAIR FUCKS
n. 1992 Ireland sl. – credit, merit  

FAIR FUCKS TO
phr. 1980s Ireland – good luck to  

FAIR FURTH
adj. Bk1900 Sc. – straightforward, honest  

FAIR-FURTH-THE-GATE
adj. Bk1900 Sc. – straightforward, honest


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Updated: September 14, 2022