Dictionary: FAIS – FAK

• FAISE
vb. 1892 Ireland – to take effect on; to show or make an impression on; to injure  

• FAIST
n. 1850 Amer. dial. – a small dog of mixed breed  

• FAIT
vb. 1. c1320 obs. – to act or speak falsely, to use false pretenses; to beg on false pretenses
vb. 2. c1430 obs. – to deceive, to lead astray
vb. 3. 1635-6 obs. – to arrange; to construct; to fit

• FAITEROUS
adj. 1600 obs. rare – characterized by deceit; treacherous  

• FAITERY
n. 1377 obs. – fraud, deception, hypocrisy

• FAITH
int. 1746 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a mild exclamation; indeed, truly, really  
vb. 1951 Amer. dial. – to put credence in  

• FAITH AND TROTH!
int. 1746 Eng. dial. – an exclamation  

• FAITHED
adj. 1553 obs. – of a promise: given on one’s faith or word of honour  

• FAITHFUL
adj. 1611 obs. – of things: reliable
adv. 1891 Amer. dial. – thoroughly  
n. 1609 sl. – a drunkard  

• FAITHFULLIST
n. 1653 obs. nonce word – a believer  

• FAITH, HOPE AND CHARITY
n. 1. 1905 Amer. dial. – a party game: some of the men are sent from the room; three girls named Faith, Hope, Charity stand behind chairs which conceal a man, preferably one with a beard; the men are brought in one by one and told that if they will choose one of the girls they will get a kiss; no matter which one they choose, they are seated in the middle chair, are blindfolded, and the man in the rear kisses them  
n. 2. 1919 – the three World War I campaign medals  

• THE FAITHLESS
n. 1577 rare – unbelievers

• FAITHLY
adv. c1325 obs. – with fidelity; faithfully, loyally, steadfastly, truthfully 

• FAITHWARD
adv. 1886 rare – towards the Christian faith

• FAITHWORTHINESS
n. 1846 – the quality of being trustworthy  

• FAITHWORTHY
adv. a1535 – worthy of belief or trust; trustworthy 

• FAITH YOU!
int. 1907 Amer. dial. arch. – indeed! yes!  

• FAITING
n. 1377 obs. – deceit, pretense  

• FAITOUR
n. a1340 obs. exc. arch. – an impostor, a cheat; a vagrant who shams illness or pretends to tell fortunes 

• FAIX!
int. 1. 1724 Sc. & Eng. dial. – an exclamation or mild expletive  
int. 2. M19 juvenile usage – a call for a truce during a game, or a statement that one is ineligible for a given duty or command  

• FAIZARD
n. 1597 Sc. obs. – a coward, a dastard  

• FAIZART
n. 1. 1721 Sc. – a puny, effeminate man; a weakling, a coward; an impudent fellow; a shameless person  
n. 2. 1825 Sc. – a hermaphrodite fowl  

• FAIZE
n. 1866 Sc. – inconvenience, annoyance  
vb. 1. 1866 Sc. – to annoy, to inconvenience, to disturb, to ruffle
vb. 2. 1892 Ireland – to take effect on; to show or make an impression on; to injure  

• FAIZLE
vb. Bk1900 Sc. – to coax, to flatter  

• FAKE
adj. 1. 1775 – fraudulent; spurious; counterfeit; false; pretended  
adj. 2. 1890 Amer. sl. – worthless; useless  
adj. 3. 1909 – made in imitation without fraudulent intent; artificial  
adj. 4. 1990s US students’ sl. – bad, disappointing, negative
int. 1. 1724 Eng. dial. – an exclamation or mild expletive  
int. 2. 1980s US students’ sl. – expression used by the trickster to underline that someone has been tricked or duped
n. 1. 1787 Eng. dial. – play, amusement; a joke  
n. 2. 1829 sl. – a dodge, a sham, a swindle, some form of fraudulent money-making scheme; a dishonest stratagem or action  
n. 3. 1851 sl., orig. criminals’ usage – a spurious or counterfeit document; later, anything of a spurious, counterfeit, or fraudulent nature; a false rumour or false story of any kind; an invented newspaper story 
n. 4. c1870 showmen’s usage – stuff used in patent medicines; a patent medicine; a so-called cure 
n. 5. c1875 theatrical usage – make-up 
n. 6. 1881 Amer. sl. – a thief; a swindler; a charlatan; a confidence trickster  
n. 7. 1885 Amer. sl. – in the carnival and theatre: a performance 
n. 8. 1886 Amer. sl. – an impostor; broadly, an affected or insincere person  
n. 9. 1889 sl. – among peddlers and street hawkers: any odd item to be sold on the street or door to door, esp. if worthless or deceptive  
n. 10. 1889 theatrical usage – any unused or worn-out and worthless piece of property  
n. 11. 1889 sl. – among performing magicians: any contrivance or device used to impart the illusion of magic; a piece of equipment that as been altered for use in a trick  
n. 12. 1897 sl. – an object, gadget, device, or contrivance of any kind; a gimcrack  
n. 13. L19 US sl. – cheap, esp. worthless, merchandise sold by street vendors
n. 14. Bk1900 Sc. – the strand of a rope  
n. 15. 1930s US drug culture sl. – any form of substitute for a hypodermic syringe  
n. 16. 1938 US drug culture sl. – a medicine dropper used by an intravenous drug user to inject the drug
n. 17. 20C Ulster – cancer  
n. 18. 2002 UK sl. – an erection  
vb. 1. 1797 sl. – to dress the hair; to make up the face or dress up  
vb. 2. 1812 thieves’ sl. – to steal or rob  
vb. 3. 1812 sl., orig. criminals’ usage – to counterfeit or forge; hence, to make or shape for a fraudulent or deceptive purpose  
vb. 4. 1812 Eng. dial. – to hurt, to cause intense pain to  
vb. 5. c1830 sl. – to tamper with; to dope a horse 
vb. 6. 1859 sl. – to trick, to fool; to cheat; to swindle; to deceive  
vb. 7. 1881 Amer. sl. – to feign illness, injury, or disability; to malinger  
vb. 8. 1887 theatrical usage – to adapt for the theatre  
vb. 9. 1889 sl. – to feign or simulate; to pretend  
vb. 10. 1889 sl., orig. theatrical usage – to improvise words or music; to ad-lib  
vb. 11. 1889 sl. – to concoct or devise, esp. for a deceptive purpose  
vb. 12. 1892 colloq. – to misrepresent  
vb. 13. E19 sl. – to shoot, to wound, to hit or cut; to poison  
vb. 14. E19 sl. – to make, to do anything
vb. 15. L19 sl. – to receive a gratuity illegally; to knowingly accept a bribe  
vb. 16. Bk1900 Sc. – to give heed to; to believe, to credit  
vb. 17. 1903 Amer. sl. – among peddlers and street hawkers: to sell 
vb. 18. c1920 Can. dance-bands’ usage – to improvise, to play music by ear 
vb. 19. 1933 UK sl. – to hit  
vb. 20. 1990s sl. – to fail to meet someone  

• FAKE A BOSH
vb. Bk1890 sl. – to play the fiddle  

• FAKE ABOUT
vb. Bk1900 Ireland – to ‘knock about’; to waste time, to idle  

• FAKE A CLY
vb. c1810 obs. sl. – to pick a pocket 

• FAKE A LINE
vb. c1860 theatrical usage – to improvise a speech 

• FAKEALOO
n. 1. 1930 Amer. dial. – any thing or scheme for which a better name is lacking  
n. 2. 1930s US drug culture sl. – (usually as ‘fake-a-loo’) any form of substitute for a hypodermic syringe  n. 3. 1938 Amer. drug culture sl. – (usually as ‘fake-a-loo’) a drug addict’s medicine dropper  

• FAKE AND BAKE
vb. 1980s US students’ sl. – to get a tan in a tanning booth  

• FAKE A PICTURE
vb. c1860 artistic usage – to obtain an effect by some adroit, unorthodox means 

• FAKE A PIN
vb. 1812 sl. – to create a sore leg, or to cut it, as if accidentally, with an axe, etc., in hopes to obtain a discharge from the army or navy, to get into the doctor’s list, etc.  

• FAKE A POKE
vb. L19 UK criminals’ sl. – to pick a pocket  

• FAKE A SCREEVE
vb. 1812 thieves’ sl. – to write any letter or other paper  

• FAKE A SCREW
vb. 1812 thieves’ sl. – to shape a skeleton or false key  

• FAKE-ASS
adj. 1990s US sl. – fraudulent  

• FAKE AWAY!
int. c1810 sl. – splendid, don’t stop! go it! 

• FAKE AWAY THERE’S NO DOWN!
int. 19C sl. – carry on! don’t stop!  

• FAKE-BAKE
n. 1980s US sl. – a suntan acquired in an indoor tanning booth  
vb. 1980s US students’ sl. – to get a tan in a tanning booth  

• FAKE BANDAGER
n. 1900s US criminals’ sl. – a beggar who poses as a cripple to elicit sympathy  

• FAKE BOODLE
n. 1890 Amer. thieves’ sl. – a roll of paper over which a dollar bill is pasted, and another bill being loosely wrapped round this so it looks as if the whole roll is made up of a large sum of money in bills  

• FAKE BOOK
n. 1970 US sl. – a book of chords used by musicians who improvise off the basic chords  

• FAKE CRIP
n. 1948 Amer. criminals’ sl. – a beggar who pretends to be crippled  

• FAKED
adj. 1850s colloq. – spurious; counterfeit  

• FAKE DOWN
vb. M19 NZ sl. – to carry out a crime  

• FAKED-UP
adj. 1. 1850s colloq. – spurious; counterfeit 
adj. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – (as ‘faked up’) dressed up, made up  

• FAKE FOR CAKE
vb. 1958 Amer. dial. – to work for a living  

• FAKE IT
vb. 1. 1889 sl. – to feign or simulate; to pretend  
vb. 2. 1889 sl., orig. theatrical usage – to improvise words or music; to ad-lib  
vb. 3. 1989 US sl. – to pretend to experience an orgasm during sexual intercourse; generally used of a woman  

• FAKE IT TILL YOU MAKE IT
phr. 1998 US sl. – in twelve-step recovery programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous, used as a slogan to encourage recovering addicts to modify their behaviour immediately, with their emotional recovery to follow  

• FAKELOO
n. 1. 1926 Amer. sl. – a false rumour or false story; a yarn intended to deceive  
n. 2. 1958 Amer. sl. – an object, device or contrivance of any kind  

• FAKE-MAN
n. 1900s Aust. sl. – a confidence trickster  

• FAKEMAN CHARLEY
n. E19 sl. – a private sign or mark  

• FAKEMENT
n. 1. 1811 sl. – a counterfeit or forged signature  
n. 2. 1826 sl. – any letter; a note  
n. 3. 1838 sl. – a dishonest practice  
n. 4. 1839 sl. – a forgery; a begging letter; a petition  
n. 5. c1870 theatrical usage – paint for the face 
n. 6. c1875 theatrical usage – small properties, accessories
n. 7. 1892 Eng. dial. – a muddle, confusion  
n. 8. 19C sl. – any act of robbery or swindling  
n. 9. M19 sl. – any form of printed material  
n. 10. M19 sl. – scraps
n. 11. M19 sl. – any object, whether or not uncommon; a thing; used of something the name of which escapes you
n. 12. L19 sl. – any action or problem  
n. 13. L19 sl. – a trimming, a superfluous thing
n. 14. L19 sl. – activity
n. 15. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – pain, uneasiness, distress  
n. 16. 1910s US criminals’ sl. – burglar’s tools  
n. 17. 2002 UK sl. – personal adornment such as jewellery or makeup  

• FAKEMENT CHARLEY
n. E19 sl. – a private sign or mark  

• FAKEMENT CHORLEY
n. E19 sl. – a private sign or mark  

• FAKEMENT DODGE
n. M19 sl. – the writing of spurious begging letters  

• FAKEMENT DODGER
n. M19 criminals’ sl. – the beggar or impostor who employs the ‘fakement-dodge’  

• FAKEMS
n. 1. 20C sl. – cosmetics
n. 2. 20C sl. – counterfeit goods
n. 3. 20C sl. – disguised trash
n. 4. 20C sl. – quack medicines
n. 5. 20C sl. – pinchbeck (a form of brass, an alloy of copper and zinc, mixed in proportions so that it closely resembles gold in appearance)

• FAKEN
adj. c1000 obs. – deceitful,. fraudulent
n. c924 obs. – fraud, guile; wickedness, crime

• FAKENLICHE
adv. c1000 obs. – craftily

• FAKE OFF
vb. 1950s Amer. sl. – to loaf, to idle  

• FAKE ONESELF
vb. 19C sl. – to inflict wounds or others disfigure oneself for a criminal purpose  

• FAKE ONE’S PIN
vb. 19C criminals’ sl. – to ‘create’ a sore or wounded leg  

• FAKE ONE’S SLANGS
vb. 19C sl. – to cut off one’s chains or irons to make an escape from prison  

• FAKE ON SOMEONE
vb. 1. 1970s African-American sl. – to humiliate; to deceive  
vb. 2. 1970s African-American sl. – to ignore

• FAKE-OUT
n. 1959 Amer. sl. – a feint or bluff; deception; broadly, an unpleasant surprise  
(verbs usually as ‘fake out’)
vb. 1. 1949 Amer. sl., orig. football & basketball usage – to fool an opponent with a feint; hence, generally, to bluff, to fool; to get the better of; to dupe, to deceive  
vb. 2. 1956 Amer. students’ sl. – to sneak away  
vb. 3. 1990s African-American sl. –  to humiliate; to deceive  
vb. 4. 1990s African-American sl. – to ignore

• FAKE OUT AND OUT
vb. E19 sl. – to kill; to murder  

• FAKE PIE
n. 1880 UK society usage – a pie made up of leftovers  

• FAKER
n. 1. 1612 sl. – a counterfeiter; a forger  
n. 2. 1688 – a maker of anything  
n. 3. 1841 sl. – a thief  
n. 4. 1857 sl. – a jeweller  
n. 5. 1859 sl. – an itinerant artisan, mechanic, or tradesman; hence, a peddler, street vendor, pitchman, or travelling showman  
n. 6. c1875 circus usage – a circus performer, esp. a rider 
n. 7. 1881 sl. – a swindler; a charlatan; broadly, a crook  
n. 8. 1891 sl. obs. – a harlot’s fancy man
n. 9. 1892 sl. – a hoaxer  
n. 10. M19 sl. – a confidence trickster; a fraudster  
n. 11. M19 sl. – a street salesman of cheap goods
n. 12. L19 sl. – a pimp  
n. 13. 1910 colloq. – a person who feigns illness, injury, or disability; a malingerer  
n. 14. 1990s US students’ sl. – one who poses falsely to gain status  
n. 15. 20C criminals’ sl. – a pickpocket

• FAKE RIAH
n. 2002 UK sl. – a wig  

• FAKER OF LOGES
n. 17C sl. – a beggar, esp. one who backs up his fraudulent tales with especially created fake documents  

• FAKES
int. 1724 Sc. – an exclamation or mild expletive  
n. 1997 US sl. – breast implants  

• FAKES AND SLUMBOES
n. c1880 theatrical usage obs. – properties; accessories

• FAKE THE BROADS
vb. 1. c1840 criminals’ sl. – to ‘stack’ the cards; to cheat, to work a three-card trick 
vb. 2. 1923 criminals’ sl. – to issue counterfeit coin  

• FAKE THE DUCK
vb. c1830 criminals’ sl. – to adulterate drink; to swindle, to cheat 

• FAKE THE FATCHA
vb. 20C sl. – to shave; to put on makeup  

FAKE THE FUNK
vb. 1970s African-American sl. – to pose as more sophisticated than one actually is  

FAKE THE RUBBER
vb. c1850 criminals’ sl. – to stand treat 

FAKE THE SWEETENER(S)
vb. c1840 criminals’ sl. – to kiss 

FAKE UP
vb. 1. 1812 Eng. dial. – to hurt, to cause intense pain to  
vb. 2. 1812 sl. – to tamper with, to alter, to arrange in any manner for advantage or profit  
vb. 3. 1851 sl., orig. criminals’ usage – to counterfeit or forge; hence, to make or shape for a fraudulent or deceptive purpose; to falsify  
vb. 4. c1870 theatrical usage – to paint one’s face 
vb. 5. 1885 sl. – to dress the hair; to make up or dress up  
vb. 6. 1887 theatrical usage – to adapt for the theatre
vb. 7. 1889 sl. – to concoct or devise, esp. for a deceptive purpose
vb. 8. 1892 Eng. dial. – to patch, to alter  

FAKEY
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – out of condition; of food: inferior, bad; putrid, rotten

FAKI
n. 1872 – a title given in Africa to schoolmasters  

FAKIE
n. 1996 UK sl. – in skateboarding: a travelling-backwards manoeuvre  

FAKING
n. 1. M19 UK criminals’ sl. – thieving  
n. 2. M19 UK criminals’ sl. – cheating, as at a card game
n. 3. M19 UK prison sl. – counterfeiting illness  

FAKING-BOY
n. M19 UK criminals’ sl. – a thief  

FAKING KID
n. M19 UK criminals’ sl. – a thief  

FAKIR
n. 1. c1875 circus usage – a circus performer, esp. a rider 
n. 2. 1893 sl. – an itinerant artisan, mechanic, or tradesman; hence, a peddler, street vendor, pitchman, or travelling showman  
n. 3. L19 US sl. – an actor  
n. 4. 1900s sl. – a street card-sharp  

FAKISH
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – dressed up, made up

FAKUS
n. 1. 1905 Amer. dial. – a thing, the name of which is not readily recalled
n. 2. 1910s Aust. sl. – something without a specific name, that has been ‘thrown together’ or ‘knocked up’
n. 3. 1960s sl. – deceptive acts that contribute to a confidence trick  
n. 4. 1973 US drug culture sl. – a medicine dropper used by an intravenous drug user to inject the drug


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Updated: September 14, 2022