Dictionary: FALLI – FALZ

• FALLIBILITY
n. 1634 – liability to err or to mislead  
 
• FALLIBLE
adj. 1. a1420 – rules, opinions, arguments, etc.: liable to be erroneous, unreliable 
adj. 2. 1430 – of persons or their faculties: liable to be deceived or mistaken; liable to err  
adj. 3. 1559 obs. rare – fallacious, delusive
adj. 4. 1664 obs. rare – not determinable with certainty
n. 1705 rare  – one who is fallible
 
• FALLIE
n. 1. 1915 Sc. – a fellow  
n. 2. 20C – a flower; usually used in the plural  
 
• FALL IN
vb. 1. 1606 obs. – to make up a quarrel; to become reconciled
vb. 2. 1667 obs. rare  – to give way, to yield
vb. 3. 1854 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to sink in, to become hollow, to shrink in person  
vb. 4. M19 sl., orig. African-American – to arrive, to go to, to visit  
vb. 5. M19 sl. – to find oneself in difficulties  
vb. 6. M19 – to become involved  
vb. 7. Bk1900 Sc. – of water: to subside  
vb. 8. c1900 sl. – to be quite wrong  
vb. 9. 1942 Amer. dial. – to go to bed  
vb. 10. 1952 US sl. – to join; to stay  
vb. 11. 1989 Aust. sl. – in horse racing: to barely hold off challengers and win a race  
 
• FALL IN AGE
vb. a1300 obs. – to become advanced in years
 
• FALLING
n. 1. 1382 – a fragment of a building, a ruin  
n. 2. 1555 – the setting of the sun  
n. 3. 1563 obs. – a depression in the soil; a hollow, declivity, slope  
n. 4. 1892 Eng. dial. – a downfall of snow, rain, or hail; a snowstorm; generally in plural  
n. 5. 2000s African-American sl. – acting insanely  
 
• FALLING APART
adj. 20C Amer. dial. – pregnant; getting ready to ‘drop’  
 
• FALLING-BAND
n. 1622 Eng. dial. – a necktie, an old-fashioned neck-band  
 
• FALLING DEN
n. 1911 African-American sl. – a bed
 
• FALLING-DISEASE
n. 1607 obs. – epilepsy
 
• FALLING DOWN
n. 1850 Amer. dial. – a dropping to the ground in uncontrollable ecstasy during a religious experience or conversion  
 
• FALLING-DOWN DRUNK
adj. 1968 Amer. dial. – thoroughly intoxicated  
 
• FALLING-EVIL
n. a1225 obs. – epilepsy
 
• FALLING EXERCISE
n. 1807 Amer. dial. – a dropping to the ground in uncontrollable ecstasy during a religious experience or conversion  
 
• FALLING-ILL
n. 1652 obs. – epilepsy
 
• FALLING-LUCK
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – bad luck  
 
• FALLING-OFF PLACE
n. 1. 1908 Amer. dial. – a deserted or uninhabited region  
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a small town  
 
• THE FALLING OF THE LEAF
n. 1503 – autumn  
 
• FALLING-OUT
n. 1539 – a disagreement 
 
• FALLINGS
n. 1. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – fallen fruit, windfall apples  
n. 2. 1980 Amer. dial. – refuse, leavings  
 
• FALLING-SICKNESS
n. 1. 1527 rare – epilepsy
n. 217C sl. – sexual intercourse  
 
• FALLING WEATHER
n. 1. 1732 Eng. & Amer. dial. – weather characterized by rain, snow, hail, or heavy fog; conditions likely to produce such weather  
n. 2. 1942 Amer. dial. – autumn, fall  
 
• FALL IN HELL WITH THE WICKED
vb. 1967 Amer. dial. – to be victimized  
 
• FALL IN ON
vb. 1891 Amer. dial. – to drop in on; to pay a visit to  
 
• FALL IN THE BUTTER TUB
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – to have a piece of good luck or fortune  
 
• FALL IN THE FURROW
vb. 19C Brit. sl. – to ejaculate, perhaps to ejaculate prematurely  
 
• FALL IN THE SHIT
vb. c1870 colloq. – to get into trouble; to find oneself in difficulties 
 
• FALL IN THE THICK
vb. L19 sl. – to become very drunk  
 
• FALL INTO
vb. 1. 1930s  – to come upon, to obtain  
vb. 2. 1940s US sl.-  to stay  
vb. 3. 1940s US sl. – to visit
 
• FALL INTO A CART OF SHIT AND COME OUT WITH A GOLD WATCH
phr. 20C Cockney usage – applied to a habitually lucky person, or to one who has been extraordinarily lucky on a specific occasion  
 
• FALL INTO A PERSON’S HEART
vb. c1340 obs. – to occur to him
 
• FALL INTO A PILE OF SHIT AND COME OUT WITH A GOLD WATCH
phr. 20C Cockney usage – applied to a habitually lucky person, or to one who has been extraordinarily lucky on a specific occasion
 
• FALL INTO A PILE OF SHIT AND COME UP SMELLING OF VIOLETS
phr. L19 Cockney usage – applied to a habitually lucky person, or to one who has been extraordinarily lucky on a specific occasion
 
• FALL INTO THE BOTTLE
vb. 1990 US sl. – to become a drunkard  
 
• FALL IN TWO
vb. 1788 Sc. obs. – to give birth to a child
 
• FALL MONEY
n. 1893 Amer. criminals’ sl. – funds saved by criminals to pay lawyers, secure cash bail, and to bribe officials  
 
• FALLOCH
adj. 1911 Sc. – thick, bulky 
n. 1. 1866 Sc. – a large portion of anything heavy or bulky, sometimes of eatables; generally used in a bad sense  
n. 2. Bk1900 Sc. – a lump, heap, large piece of anything; generally used of edibles  
 
• FALL-OFF
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – an out-of-the-way place, or a very unimportant place  
(verbs usually as ‘fall off’)
vb. 1. 1805 Amer. dial. – weight, usually as a result of illness  
vb. 2. 1948 Amer. euphemism – to begin a menstrual period  
vb. 3. 1954 Amer. dial. – to decline in health  
 
• FALL OFF A MANGO TREE
vb. 1991 Trinidad and Tobago sl. – to be extremely naive  
 
• FALL OFF ONE’S FEET
vb. 1889 Sc. – to tumble, to fall  
 
• FALL OFF THE CHRISTMAS TREE
vb. L19 US students’ sl. – to be amazed  
 
• FALL OFF THE MAP
vb. 1980s Amer. sl. – to disappear from view and attention; to drop out of sight  
 
• FALL OFF THE PERCH
vb. L18 sl. – to die
 
• FALL OFF THE ROOF
vb. 1. 1948 Amer. euphemism – to begin a menstrual period  
vb. 2. 1970s US homosexual sl. – to be in a nervous, irritable state  
 
• FALL OFF THE WAGON
vb. L19 sl. – to begin drinking liquor again after a period of abstinence; also, to breach abstinence or moderation in anything  
 
• FALL OFF THE WATER WAGON
vb. L19 sl. – to drink heavily; usually in the context of resuming drinking after a period of abstinence  
 
• FALL OFF THE TWIG
vb. 2000s sl. – to die  
 
• THE FALL OF THE LEAF
n. 1. 1545 obs. – autumn
n. 2. c1780 criminals’ sl. – a hanging 
n. 3. E18 sl. – death  
 
• FALL OF THE YEAR
n. 1844 Sc. & Eng. dial. – autumn  
 
• FALLOL
n. 1879 Eng. dial. – affectation in manner, fussy show of politeness  
 
• FALL ON
vb. 1976 UK sl. – to become pregnant  
 
• FALL ON IN
vb. M19 sl., orig. African-American – to arrive, to go to, to visit  
 
• FALL ON ONE’S ASS
vb. 1. 1940s Amer. sl. – to fail, esp. ignominiously and spectacularly  
vb. 2. 1970s Amer. airline usage – of weather conditions at an airport: to deteriorate beneath operational limits  
 
• FALL ON ONE’S FACE
vb. 1970s Amer. sl. – to make an embarrassing mistake, failed attempt, catastrophic decline, etc.  
 
• FALL ON ONE’S FEET
vb. 1950s sl. – to survive a difficult situation  
 
• FALL ON ONE’S SWORD
vb. 1990s Amer. sl. – to commit suicide, esp. after a defeat and for the good of the general cause  
 
• FALL ON SHORE
vb. 1590 obs. – to run aground
 
• FALL ON SLEEP
vb. 1947 Amer. dial. – to die  
 
• FALL ON THE BALL
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to begin, to commence  
 
• FALL ON THE DRAM
vb. 1870 Sc. – to take a fit of drinking  
 
• FALL ON THE GRENADE
vb. 2002 US sl. – in a social situation: to pay attention to the less attractive of a pair of friends in the hope that your friend will have success with the more attractive member of the pair  
 
• FALL ON THE NECK OF SOMETHING
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to follow it quickly  
 
• FALL ON THE WRONG SIDE OF THE HEDGE
vb. L19 sl. – to be thrown or fall from a coach  
 
• FALLOPS
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – rags hanging about a dress; an untidy dress  
 
• FALLOPY
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – untidy
 
• FALL-OUT
n. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a quarrel, a misunderstanding
n. 2. 1950s Amer. sl. – an accompanying or resultant effect of something; an aftermath  
n. 3. 1950s Amer. sl. – incidental products, esp. when copious and of little value  
n. 4. c1955 Aust. sl. – the threat of pieces falling from an old, unsafe automobile 
n. 5. c1960 Aust. sl. – the risk of breasts falling out of a scanty bra or a bikini 
n. 6. 1970 Amer. dial. – a fainting spell  
(verbs usually as ‘fall out’)
vb. 1. 1884 US sl. – to faint; to collapse; to fall asleep, often when overcome by drug consumption or excessive drinking  
vb. 2. M19 sl., orig. African-American – to arrive, to go to, to visit  
vb. 3. 1930s sl. – to leave  
vb. 4. 1930s sl. – to enthuse, to be delighted by
vb. 5. 1938 African-American sl. – to be surprised or overcome with emotion  
vb. 6. 1940s sl. – to lose control of a situation  
vb. 7. 1946 Amer. dial. – to burst out laughing; to be tickled by something funny  
vb. 8. 1950s sl. – to relax  
vb. 9. 1962 Amer. criminals’ sl. – to be arrested  
 
• FALL OUT LAUGHING
vb. 1959 Amer. sl. – to break up with mirth  
 
• FALL OUT OF FLESH
vb. 1530 obs. – to shrink; of an animal or a limb: to become lean
 
• FALL OUT OF ONE’S STANDING
vb. 1. 1990s Irish sl. – to be surprised or stunned
vb. 2. 1990s Irish sl. – to collapse from exhaustion  
 
• FALL OUT OF THE BOAT
vb. 20C Royal Navy usage – to become unpopular in a naval mess  
 
• FALL OUT OF THE PAN INTO THE FIRE
vb. 1596 – to escape from one evil only to fall into a greater one  
 
• FALLOVER
n. 1949 Amer. dial. – a waterfall  
(verbs usually as ‘fall over’)
vb. 1. 1595 obs. – to go over to the enemy
vb. 2. 1823 Sc. – to fall asleep  
vb. 3. M19 sl., orig. US – to arrive, to go to, to visit  
vb. 4. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to meet; to encounter
 
• FALL OVER ONESELF
vb. 1904 sl., orig. US – to go out of one’s way to do something; to be eager or enthusiastic  
 
• FALL OVER TO
vb. 1904 sl., orig. US – to visit without prior warning; to drop in  
 
• FALLOW
adj. 8C-11C obs. – of a pale brownish or reddish yellow colour, as withered grass or leaves
n. c1300 obs. – a piece of ploughed land; also, collectively, ploughed land in general, arable land
vb. 1. a1000 obs. – to become pale or yellow; hence, to fade, to wither
vb. 2. c1205 obs. – of the face, etc.: to blanch, to grow pale
 
• FALLOWFORTH
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a cascade, a waterfall  
 
• FALL PARTNER
n. 1950s US criminals’ sl. – one of two or more people who are arrested or sentenced to prison at the same time for the same crime; also, one of a pair of thieves working together  
 
• FALLS
n. 1882 Eng. dial. – cliff sides  
 
• FALL SCRATCH
n. 1969 US sl. – money set aside to cover expenses incurred in the event of an arrest; money that is held ready for use as bail, as by a pimp for one of his prostitutes  
 
• FALL THROUGH
vb. 1. 1766 Sc. – to bungle, to blunder; to spoil, to prevent by mismanagement  
vb. 2. Bk1900 Sc. – to lose, to come short of  
vb. 3. 1924 colloq. – to be unable to keep, or to go back on, an appointment  
 
• FALL THROUGH ONE’S (OWN) ASSHOLE
vb. 1960s US sl. – to be extremely surprised or utterly shocked  
 
• FALL TO
vb. 1. M19 – to become involved  
vb. 2. 1900s US criminals’ sl. – to notice  
vb. 3. 1904 Amer. sl. – to be deceived or taken in by something or someone  
vb. 4. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to begin, to commence  
 
• FALL TO FOOD
vb. a1400 obs. – to begin eating it
 
• FALL TOGETHER
vb. 1. a1300 obs. – of the eyes: to close 
vb. 2. 1654 obs. – to collapse, to contract, to shrink up
 
• FALL TOGETHER BY THE EARS
vb. 1539 obs. – said of animals fighting; hence of persons: to engage in a fight or scuffle; to fight and scratch each other; to contend in strife; to be at variance, to quarrel
 
• FALL TOGS
n. 1927 Amer. criminals’ sl. – good and respectable clothes to be worn when on trial so as to create a favourable impression  
 
• FALL TO LOGGERHEADS
vb. 1828 Amer. dial. – to come into conflict, to argue, to come to blows, to fight
 
• FALL TO PIECES
vb. 1781 Sc. obs. – to go into labour; to give birth to a child
 
• FALL TO WORK
vb. 1551 obs. – to being working
 
• FALL UP
vb. 1. 1777 Eng. dial. – to advance  
vb. 2. L19 African-American sl. – to come for a visit; to arrive, to turn up  
vb. 3. 1952 US sl. – to go to  
 
• FALL-WIND
n. 1867 nautical usage – a sudden gust
 
• FALL WITH BAIRN
vb. 1813 Sc. – to become pregnant  
 
• FALL-WOOD
n. 1528 obs. – wood that has fallen or been blown down
 
• FALLY
adj. 1802 obs. – full of falls or shallow rapids
n. 20C – a flower; usually used in the plural  
 
• FALLY-LIKE
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – untidy  
 
• FALOOSIE
n. 1936 Amer. dial. – a woman of loose morals  
 
• FALSAGE
n. a1400 obs. rare – deceit, falsehood
 
• FALSARY
n. 1. 1435 obs. – one who falsifies, or fraudulent alters a document, etc.; a falsifier
n. 2. 1573 obs. – a false or deceitful person
n. 3. 1579 obs. – one who forges a document; a forger
 
• FALSE
adj. 1. 1551 – of dice: loaded so as to fall unfairly  
adj. 2. 1590 obs. – of ground, a foundation, etc.: treacherous, insecure
adj. 3. 1791 – of shame, pride: arising from mistaken notions  
adj. 4. 1866 Eng. dial. – sharp, shrewd, clever, precocious; generally applied to children and animals  
adj. 5. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – of a horse: wanting in spirit; vicious  
adj. 6. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – of a man: lazy
adj. 7. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – proud, vain, boastful
adv. 1. 1591 obs. or arch. – of music: out of tune, incorrectly  
adv. 2. 1596 obs. or arch. – improperly, wrongly  
adv. 3. 1815 obs. or arch. – of an arrow’s flight: in the wrong direction; erringly  
int. 1989 US students’ sl. – no! impossible! that’s not true!  
n. 1. c1000 obs. – fraud, falsehood, treachery; in early use, counterfeiting of coin; forgery
n. 2. c1380 – what is false; a falsehood; a lie 
vb. 1. c1205 obs. – of a thing: to prove unreliable, to fail, to give way 
vb. 2. a1300 obs. – to counterfeit money; to forge a document
vb. 3. 1303 obs. – to break or violate one’s faith, worth, etc.
vb. 4. c1374 obs. – to play false to a person; to betray, to deceive
vb. 5. c1380 obs. – to falsify; to make untrue; to introduce falsehood into; to corrupt
vb. 6. 1873 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to cajole, to flatter, to coax, to wheedle  
vb. 7. 1930s Aust. sl. – to lie; to deceive  
 
• FALSE ALARM
n. 1. 1900s sl. – a braggart, a boaster  
n. 2. 1900 Amer. sl. – a person who bluffs or exaggerates or who does not fulfil expectations; hence, a worthless person  
n. 3. 1910s rhyming sl., orig. military usage – the arm  
 
• FALSE AS A BULLETIN
adj. c1795 colloq. – inaccurate, false 
 
• FALSE AS MY KNIFE
adj. 20C – ‘as with knives, so with false friends – they’ll cut me’  
 
• FALSE AS NEWGATE
adj. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – very false  
 
• FALSE AS WAGHORN
adj. 1721 Sc. – very false  
 
• FALSE-BACK
adj. 1633 obs. – ? treacherously retreating
 
• FALSE-BELLY
n. 1912 Amer. dial. – the opossum’s marsupial pouch  
 
• FALSE-BLOW
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – an unfair blow  
 
• FALSEDICT
n. 1579 obs. – an untrue deliverance or utterance
 
• FALSEDOM
n. 1297 obs. – treachery; untruth; a falsehood
.
• FALSE DOOR
n. 1627 obs. – a secret door
 
• FALSE FACE
n. 1. 1818 – a mask  
n. 2. Bk1900 Sc. – a hypocrite, a deceitful or insincere person  
n. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an unattractive person  
 
• FALSE FIRE
n. 1. 1633 obs. – a blank discharge of firearms
n. 2. 1711 – a fire made to deceive an enemy, or as a night-signal  
 
• FALSE FLAP
n. c1930 Aust. sl. – a bad cheque 
 
• FALSE GIG
vb. 1940s Aust. sl. – to pretend to be what one is not; to act under false pretenses  
 
• FALSE-HEART
adj. 1593 obs. – false-hearted; deceitful; unfaithful
 
• FALSE HEREAFTER
n. c1890 society sl. – a dress-improver or bustle  
 
• FALSEHOOD
n. 1. 1297 obs. – as an attribute of persons: falseness, deceitfulness, mendacity, faithlessness
n. 2. 1340 obs. or arch, – deception, falsification, imposture; a forgery, counterfeit  
 
• FALSE KEY
n. 1701 – a skeleton key, a picklock  
 
• FALSELEKE
n. a1310 obs. rare – falsehood
 
• FALSE-LOON
n. 1885 Eng. dial. – a traitor  
 
• FALSELY
adj. a1310 obs. rare – false, deceptive
 
• FALSEN
vb. 1888 rare – to make false or unreal
 
• FALSE NAIL
n. 1818 obs. – ? a hangnail
 
• FALSENESS
n. 1.  1552 obs. – the fact of failing or ‘giving way’
n. 2. 1882 Eng. dial. – flattery  
n. 3. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – cleverness  
 
• FALSE POINT
n. a1529 obs. – a stroke of deceit; a trick
 
• FALSER
n. 1. 1340 obs. – a falsifier, a forger, a counterfeiter  
n. 2. 1579 obs. – one who acts falsely; a deceiver
 
• FALSERY
n. 1594 obs. – deception, falsification, falsehood  
 
• FALSESHIP
n. c1230 obs. – untruthfulness; dishonesty, deceit
 
• FALSESOME
adj. 1533 obs. exc. Sc. rare – deceitful, untrue  
 
• FALSE-SWEAR
vb. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to swear falsely, to commit perjury  
 
• FALSET
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – falsehood, treachery, deceit, fraud
 
• FALSE-TASTEDLY
adv. 1803 Eng. dial. – with a false or bad taste  
 
• FALSE TRUST
n. 1649 obs. rare – a breach of trust
 
• FALSE WRITER
n. 1. a1300 obs. – one who writes incorrectly 
n. 2. 1580 obs. – a forger
 
• FALSIDICAL
adj. 1886 rare – suggesting as true what is really false; falsehood-telling
 
FALSIE
n. 1. 1940s Amer. sl. – a brassiere padded to give the appearance of large breasts; also, padding worn in other places to increase the generosity of a woman’s body  
n. 2. 1940s Amer. sl. – anything false or artificial; a prosthesis  
 
FALSIE BASKET
n. 1957 US sl. – crotch padding worn by males to project the image of a large penis  
 
FALSIES
n. 1. 1943 Amer. sl. – a pair of breast pads worn to give the appearance of large breasts  
n. 2. 1940s sl. – anything fake added to the body, as false eyelashes  
n. 3. 1950s sl. – padding inserted in the trousers to resemble large genitals  
n. 4. 1983 Amer. sl. – false teeth  
n. 5. E20 US colloq. – false buttocks or other body padding designed to make one’s body more sexually attractive  
 
FALSIFIC
adj. 1736 obs. – making false, falsifying
 
FALSIFY
vb. 1. 1532 obs. – to prove false; to break or violate one’s faith, word, etc.
vb. 2. 1629 obs. – to make a false representation or statement; to deal in falsehoods
vb. 3. 1875 Eng. dial. –  to sham illness, to pretend  
vb. 4. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to show signs of failing health  
 
• FALSILOQUENCE
n. 1710 obs. rare – false speaking; deceitful speech
 
FALSIMONY
n. 1736 obs. – falsity, falseness
 
FALSING
n. 1940s Aust. sl. – shamming, malingering  
 
FALSISH
adj. 1873 rare – somewhat false
 
FALSITUDE
n. 2001 US sl. – a lie  
 
FALSITY
n. 1. c1330 obs. – false or treacherous conduct; treachery, fraud 
n. 2. 1780 rare – a counterfeit, sham
 
FALSY
n. 1. 1940s Amer. sl. – a brassiere padded to give the appearance of large breasts; also, padding worn in other places to increase the generosity of a woman’s body  
n. 2. 1940s Amer. sl. – anything false or artificial; a prosthesis  
n. 3. 2003 Trinidad and Tobago sl.- a chipped marble  
vb. 1626 obs. – to break or violate one’s faith or word
 
• FALTER
vb. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to fail in health; to show signs of old age; to break up in constitution  
 
• FALTIVE
adj. 1722 Sc. obs. – faulty
 
FALUTIN
adj. 1966 Amer. dial. – putting on airs


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Updated: September 14, 2022