Dictionary: FAM – FAMZ

• FAM
n. 1. 1698 criminals’ sl. – a hand
n. 2. 1789 sl. – a gold ring  
n. 31970s US homosexual sl. – a large number  
n. 4. 1970s African-American, homosexual, & teen sl. – the family
vb. M18 sl. – to feel, to handle; to grope a woman  
 
• FAM A DONA
vb. L19 sl. – to take liberties with a woman  
 
• FAM A DONNA
vb. L19 sl. – to take liberties with a woman; to caress a woman intimately   
 
• FAMATION
n. c1325 obs. – defamation 
 
• FAMBLE
n. 1. 1567 sl. – a hand  
n. 2. 1673 sl. obs. – a villain that sells counterfeit rings, etc.
n. 3. 1688 sl. obs. – a ring
vb. 1. 1400 obs. – to speak imperfectly. to stammer, to stutter  
vb. 2. 1877 Eng. dial. – to eat without an appetite  
 
• FAMBLE-CHEAT
n. 1. 1692 sl. obs. – a glove  
n. 2. 1692 sl. obs. – a ring on the hand
 
• FAMBLER
n. 1. 1610 obs. – a glove
n. 2. 1725 sl. obs. – a villain that sells counterfeit rings, etc.  
 
• FAMBLING
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – eating without appetite  
 
• FAMBLING-CHEAT
n. 1. 1567 sl. obs. – a ring on the hand
n. 2. M16 UK criminals’ sl. – a glove
 
• FAM-CHEAT
n. 1. M16 UK criminals’ sl. – a glove
n. 2. M16 UK criminals’ sl. – a ring  
 
• FAM-CLOTH
n. L17 sl. – a handkerchief
 
• FAME
n. 1. c1325 obs. – evil repute; infamy 
n. 2. a1533 obs. rare  – want of food; hunger 
n. 3. Bk1900 Sc. – a rage, passion 
vb. 1. 1303 obs. – to tell or spread abroad; to report
vb. 2. c1330 obs. rare – to famish, to starve
vb. 3. 1388 rare – to make famous; to talk of  
vb. 4. Bk1900 Sc. – to be in a rage
 
• FAMEFUL
adj. 1591 – full of fame, famous, renowned  
 
• FAMEL
vb. 1875 Eng. dial. – to starve, to famish  
 
FAMELIC
adj. 1614 obs. – pert. to hunger
 
• FAMELICOSE
adj. 1730 obs. rare – often or very hungry 
 
FAMER
n. 1646 obs. – one who brands with infamy
 
• FAM-FAM
n. 1955 Amer. dial. – hunger  
 
• FAM FOR THE PLANT
vb. 19C sl. – to feel for the valuables  
 
• FAM-GRASP
n. L18 sl. – a hand-shaking  
vb. 1676 sl. – to shake hands, to make up a difference with; to agree  
 
• FAMICIDE
n. 1656 obs. – a destroyer of one’s reputation; a slanderer
 
• FAMIGERATE
vb. 1623 obs. – to report abroad
 
• FAMIGERATION
n. 1692 obs. – a reporting abroad, a divulging  
 
• FAMIGEROUS
adj. 1730 obs. – carrying news, tales, etc.
 
• FAMILARY
adj. c1450 – familiar, acquainted, intimate, friendly 
 
• FAMILIAR
adj. 1. c1386 rare – pert. to one’s family or household
adj. 2. 1529 obs. – homely, plain; hence, easily understood
n. 1460 obs. – a member of a person’s family or household  
 
• FAMILIARISE
vb. 1634 obs. – to domesticate; to tame an animal
 
• FAMILIARISM
n. 1765 – a mode of expression usual only in familiar language; a colloquialism  
 
• FAMILIARITY
n. a1483 obs. rare – the quality proper to the head of a household
 
• FAMILIARS
n. 19C sl. – lice  
 
• FAMILIAR-WAY
adj. 19C colloq. – pregnant  
 
• FAMILIARY
adj. 1643 obs. rare – pert. to the control of a family; domestic
 
• FAMILIC
adj. 1660 obs. – pert. to a family; also, domestic, familiar
 
• FAMILICAL
adj. 1660 obs. rare – belonging to a family
 
• FAMILIOUS
adj. 1. 1884 Amer. dial. – familiar  
adj. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – relating to a family  
 
• FAMILIST
n. 1. 1612 obs. – the head of a family; a family-man
n. 2. 1631 obs. – one of the same family or household  
 
• FAMILISTERY
n. 1865 rare – the abode of a community living together as one family  
 
• FAMILISTIC
adj. 1. 1646 obs. – pertaining to the Familists or Familism ( the sect called the Family of Love) 
adj. 2. 1660 obs. – pertaining to a family or household
 
• FAMILISTICAL
adj. 1660 obs. – pert. to a family or household
 
• FAMILOUS
adj. 19C Eng. dial. – relating to a family, domestic  
 
• FAMILY
adj. 1994 US sl. – homosexual  
n. 1. a1400 obs. – the servants of a house or establishment; the household
n. 2. 1749 sl. – the thieving fraternity  
n. 3. 1910s sl. – an intimate, whether related by blood or ties of friendship  
n. 4. 1940s US sl. – crab lice  
n. 5. 1950s sl. – the American Mafia
n. 6. 1969 US sl. – a group of prostitutes and their pimp
n. 7. 1970s US homosexual sl. – the world of homosexuality  
 
• THE FAMILY
n. L17 cant – the underworld of thieves  
 
• FAMILY DISTURBANCE
n. 19C US sl. – whisky or other strong alcoholic drink  
 
• FAMILY DUTY
n. 1928 Amer. dial. – sexual intercourse between married people  
 
• FAMILY HOTEL
n. c1840 colloq. – a prison 
 
• FAMILY JEWELS
n. 1. 1916 sl., orig. US – male genitals, often the testicles
n. 2. 1950s sl. – wealth; ready money
n. 3. 1960s sl. – something very valuable  
 
• FAMILY MAN
n. 1. 1749 sl. – a man who is a professional criminal or a trusted associate of criminals; a member of the criminal fraternity; a thief  
n. 2. E19 sl. – a receiver of stolen goods  
 
• FAMILY OF LOVE
n. M16 – prostitutes in general; whores; lewd women  
 
• FAMILY ORGAN
n. 1920s US sl. – the penis  
 
• FAMILY PEOPLE
n. L18 cant – the underworld of thieves, robbers  
 
• FAMILY-PLATE
n. c1850 colloq., jocular usage – silver coins 
 
• FAMILY POT
n. 1990 US sl. – in poker: a hand in which most of the players are still betting at the end of the hand  
 
• FAMILY POUND
n. c1870 sl. – a family grave 
 
• FAMILY PRAYERS
n. World War II British army usage – the daily staff conference at Headquarters  
 
• FAMILY RAM
n. 1990s W. Indies sl. – an incestuous male; a man who sleeps with two or more female members of the same family  
 
• FAMILY REUNION
n. 1971 US sl. – in trucking: a meeting of several drivers for one company at a truck stop  
 
• FAMILY STYLE
adj. 1955 US sl. – of parts in a manufacturing plant: stored together  
adv. 1970s US prison sl. – describing a style of anal intercourse, where the passive partner’s legs are thrown over the head
n. 1970s US prison sl. – anal intercourse in which the passive partner’s legs are thrown over the head
 
• THE FAMILY TREE
n. c1930 Brit. rhyming sl., chiefly Services’ usage – the lavatory 
 
• FAMILY WOMAN
n. 1. L18 sl. – a female member of the criminal fraternity; a thief  
n. 2. E19 sl. – a female receiver of stolen goods  
n. 3. 1929 Amer. dial. – a pregnant woman  
 
• FAMINE
n. 1. L19 Brit. school usage – lack of bread at meals  
n. 2. 1992 US drug culture sl. – a lack of availability of an addictive drug  
vb. 1553 obs. – to suffer or die of hunger; to starve
 
• FAMINED
adj. 1622 obs. rare – starving, starved
 
• FAMISH
adj. 1827 Sc. & Eng. dial. – excellent, splendid; used as an emphatic expression of approval  
vb. 1. 1530 obs. – to die of starvation, to perish from want of food
vb. 2. 1667 obs. rare – to deprive a person of anything necessary to life
 
• FAMISHED
adj. 1943 Amer. dial. – suffering for lack of something vital other than food  
 
• FAMISHMENT
n. c1470 rare – the state of being famished or starved; hungry appetite
 
• FAM-LAY
n. M18 criminals’ sl. – shop-lifting, esp. of jewellery by one with viscous hands  
 
• FAM-LAYER
n. 18C sl. – a shoplifter  
 
• FAMM
n. c1690 sl. – the hand 
 
• FAMMEL
vb. 1875 Eng. dial. – to starve, to famish  
 
• FAMMELLED
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – hungry, starved, famished  
 
• FAMOSE
adj. 1432-50 obs. – famous
vb. 1432-50 obs. – to make famous; to render celebrated  
 
• FAMOSITY
n. 1535 obs. rare  – celebrity, notoriety, renown
 
• FAMOSO
n. 1663 rare – a notorious person
 
• FAMOUS
adj. 1. 1543 obs. – of utterances, etc.: libellous, slanderous
adj. 2. 1798 colloq. – excellent, grand, magnificent, splendid; used as an emphatic expression of approval  
vb. 1590 obs. – to make famous; to render celebrated
 
• FAMOUS DIMES
n. 1994 US sl. – crack cocaine  
 
• FAMOUS LAST WORDS
n. 1940s Amer. sl. – something said that proves singularly wrong or inappropriate  
 
• FAMOUSLY
adv. c1600 colloq.-  excellently, very well, splendidly 
 
• FAMOUSNESS
n. 1. 1548 – celebrity, renown  
n. 2. 1605 obs. – the fact or state of being well-known
 
FAMP
vb. 1854 Eng. dial. – to tread heavily; to walk with a firm foot  
 
FAMPLE
vb. c1230 obs. rare – to put food into a child’s mouth
 
FAM-RUST
n. M19 UK criminals’ sl. – a lack of practice at thieving, esp. pickpocketing  
 
FAM-SNATCHER
n. 1828 sl. – a glove  
 
FAM-SQUEEZE
n. E19 sl. – throttling, strangulation  
 
FAM-STICKS
n. L18 UK criminals’ sl. – gloves  
 
FAM-STRINGS
n. 18C UK criminals’ sl. – gloves  
 
FAM-STRUCK
adj. 19C sl. – baffled in a search; handcuffed  
 
FAMULARY
adj. 1840 rare – belonging to servants
 
FAMULATE
vb. 1623 obs. – to serve
 
FAMULATIVE
adj. 1678 obs. rare – having the attribute of serving
 
FAMULOUS
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – relating to a family  
 
FAMULUS
n. 1837 – an attendant, esp. on a scholar or a magician  
 
FAMYLOUS
adj. c1475 obs. rare – famished, hungry, starved


Back to INDEX F

Back to DICTIONARY


Updated: September 8, 2022