Dictionary: FAN – FANG

• FAN
n. 1. 1640 poetic usage – a wing
n. 2. 1682 jocular usage, obs. – a fanatic
n. 3. 1839 criminals’ sl. – a waistcoat; a vest  
n. 4. 1863 Eng. dial. – a large basket  
n. 5. 1866 Sc. – a drift of snow
n. 6. 1889., orig. US – an enthusiast, orig. of sport
n. 7. M19 sl. – the vagina  
n. 8. c1916 Royal Air Force usage – an aircraft propeller 
n. 9. c1918 Royal Navy usage – a ship’s propeller
n. 10. 1958 US sl. – the preliminary touching of a targeted victim by a pickpocket  
n. 11. 1993 US sl. – crack cocaine  
vb. 1. c1400 obs. – of a bird: to flutter
vb. 2. 1671 rare – of the wind: to blow
vb. 3. 1785 sl. – to beat, to strike, esp. repeatedly or soundly; to deliver a blow to, esp. with a club; to hit, to spank  
vb. 4. L18 colloq. – to berate  
vb. 5. 1834 Amer. students’ sl. – to make a perfect recitation or do well in an examination  
vb. 6. 1847 Amer. criminals’ sl. – to feel or touch the pocket of a victim for the presence of money or valuables; broadly, to rob in this manner  
vb. 7. c1850 sl. – to search a person or his clothes
vb. 8. 1886 Amer. colloq. – in baseball, of a batter: to strike out
vb. 9. 1891 Amer. sl. – to strike the hammer of a revolver repeatedly and rapidly with the side of the free hand so as to fire several shots quickly; to fire a pistol in this manner
vb. 10. 1894 Eng. dial. – to tease, to banter; to vex, to annoy
vb. 11. 1899 US sl., esp. Western usage – to go about briskly; to ride or go fast, esp. on horseback
vb. 12. L19 US sl. – to move around quickly; to run; to escape  
vb. 13. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to stir as with a whisk
vb. 14. 1905 Amer. sl. – to converse, to chat
vb. 15. 1910s sl., orig. US – to conduct a search of a suspect’s clothes, possessions or premises
vb. 16. 1915 Amer. dial. – to strike a horse so as to urge it on, esp. by use of one’s hat
vb. 17. 1920s sl. – to pick pockets  
vb. 18. 1929 Sc. rare – of snow: to form drifts
vb. 19. 1953 Amer. dial. – to set a door open  
vb. 20. 1967 Amer. dial. – of an animal: to kick up the heels  
vb. 21. 1970 Amer. dial. – to flaunt one’s self  
vb. 22. 1970 Amer. sl. – in various sports: to fail to hit the ball, puck, etc.  
vb. 23. 1971 US sl. – to calm someone down; to mollify  
vb. 24. 1989 Amer. students’ sl. – to absent oneself from a class; to play truant  
vb. 25. 20C Caribbean usage – to coit a woman; to cool a woman’s ardour  
 
• FAN ABOUT
vb. 1899 Eng. & Amer. dial. – to move about quickly; to run  
 
• FANAC
n. 1978 US sl. – an activity for a serious fan  
 
• FANACLE
n. 1594 obs. rare – a small temple, shrine
 
• FANAD
n. 1920s army sl. – none, nothing  
 
• FANAL
n. 1. 1471 obs. exc. arch. – a beacon, a lighthouse  
n. 2. 1632 obs. exc. arch. – a ship’s lantern  
 
• FANANNY WHACKER
n. 1977 Aust. sl. – a person who cheats at marbles by encroaching over the shooting line  
 
• FANANNY WHACKING
n. 1985 Aust. sl. – cheating at marbles by edging your hand over the shooting line  
 
• FAN BELT INSPECTOR
n. 1971 US sl. – an agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigations  
 
• FANC
n. 1340 obs. rare – mud
 
• FANCICAL
adj. 1671 rare exc. Eng. dial. – fanciful; whimsical  
 
• FANCICLE
adj. 1895 Eng. dial. – fanciful, faddy, capricious, fickle  

• FANCIFY
vb. 1. 1656 obs. – to have a fancy for; to like
vb. 2. 1748 obs. – to fancy, to imagine
vb. 3. 1890 – to make fanciful  
 
• FANCINESS
n. 1990s W. Indies sl. – luxury items; jewellery; expensive clothing, etc.  
 
• FANCOM
n. 1976 US sl. – a convention put on by fans  
 
• FANCY
adj. 1. E19 sl. – pert. to boxing or prize-fighting  
adj. 2. 1954 Amer. dial. – highfalutin, pretentious, putting on airs  
adv. 1940s – fancily, affectedly  
int. 1813 UK sl. – an exclamation of surprise  
n. 1. 1559 obs. – amorous inclination, love
n. 2. M17 sl. – the vagina  
n. 3. 1712 – an alleged name for the pansy  
n. 4. 1836 Eng. dial. – a legend, a fanciful tale; a whim, an idea; delirious talk; general in plural  
n. 5. 1841 Amer. sl. – on the Stock Market: a fraudulent or worthless security  
n. 6. 1894 sl. – a girlfriend; a mistress; a man’s sweetheart  
n. 7. E19 sl. – a man who lives on the earnings of a prostitute  
n. 8. E19 sl. – a male lover, not always adulterous, but the relationship usually refers to a married or older woman  
n. 9. 1936 Amer. dial. – a favourable impression  
n. 10. 1986 US sl. – a man’s dress shirt with a coloured pattern  
vb. 1. 1566 obs. – to be the fancy of; to please
vb. 2. 1598 UK – to desire, to wish for, to want  
vb. 3. 1635 UK – to desire sexually, to find sexually attractive
vb. 4. 1896 Eng. dial. – to think, to believe  
vb. 5. 1920s sl. – of a gambler: to select as worthy of a bet, usually of a horse or dog  
 
• THE FANCY
n. 1. 1807 sl., orig. boxing usage – the world of professional boxers; followers of prizefighting; hence, rowdies or sporting and gaming enthusiasts collectively  
n. 2. M19 US sl. – the aristocracy, the wealthy and powerful
n. 3. M19 Aust. & US sl. – the underworld  
 
• FANCY A LOT
vb. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to fancy something is wrong; to feel hurt or neglected  
 
• FANCY-ASS
adj. 2000s sl. – showy, smart  
 
• FANCY BIT
n. 19C sl. – the vagina; thus, a young woman  
 
• FANCY BLOKE
n. 1. M19 sl. – a member of the sporting world  
n. 2. L19 sl. – a male lover, not always adulterous, but the relationship usually refers to a married or older woman  
 
• FANCY BOY
n. 1967 US sl. – in poker: a draw in the hope of completing a hand that is extremely unlikely  
 
• FANCY COVE
n. 1. 19C sl. – a pimp, a procurer
n. 2. 19C sl. – a thief  
 
• FANCY CRIB
n. 20C African-American sl. – a fashionable, chic, well-designed home  
 
• FANCY DAMN
n. 1930s sl., orig. US – anything showy  
 
• FANCY-DAN
adj. 1938 Amer. sl. – fancy; pretentious; affected
(nouns usually as ‘fancy dan’)
n. 1. 1927 Amer. sl. – a showy, usually ineffective, athlete  
n. 2. 1930s Amer. sl. – a dandy; an affected or pretentious fellow; a show-off; a flashily dressed man; a ladies’ man
n. 3. 1930s sl., orig. US – a lady’s man  
n. 4. 1930s sl., orig. US – anything showy
n. 5. 1949 Amer. sl. – in boxing: a boxer noted for cleverness rather than hitting ability
vb. 1955 Amer. sl., esp. sports usage – to show off
 
• FANCY DOO-DAD WOMAN
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a woman who is overly prim or conscious of decorum  
 
• FANCY DUDE
n. 1954 Amer. dial. – any person who acts superior  
 
• FANCYETTE
n. a1834 nonce word – a little fancy 
 
• FANCY-FACE
n. Bk1942 Amer. college sl. – an attractive girl  
 
• FANCY-FREE
adj. 1590 – free from the power of love  
 
• FANCY GIRL
n. 1. 1812 sl. – the woman with whom a married man is having an affair  
n. 2. 1812 sl. – a man’s girlfriend
n. 3. 1824 US sl. – a prostitute  
n. 4. 1990s W. Indies sl. – a materialistic woman  
 
• FANCY-HOUSE
n. 1864 sl. – a brothel  
 
• FANCY-JOSEPH
n. 1. 19C Brit. sl. – a prostitute’s pimp or ponce
n. 2. 19C sl. – a boy or young man who is a favourite of prostitutes, but not a customer or pimp  
 
• FANCY-LAY
n. 1. 19C sl. – the sport of boxing; prize-fighting
n. 2. 1910s UK criminals’ sl. – any form of swindling or robbery  
 
• FANCY-LOOSE
adj. 1850 – ready to roam at will  
 
• FANCY MAN
n. 1. 1811 sl. – the lover of a woman, esp. a man who lives on the earnings of a woman, usually a prostitute; broadly, a pimp
n. 2. 1818 Amer. nautical sl. – a member of a warship’s crew who does not stand watch; an idler; broadly, a person lacking practical experience  
n. 3. 1821 Amer. sl., esp. nautical usage – a favourite or favoured fellow; a best friend; hence, contemptuously, a sycophantic fellow who acts as an informer  
n. 4. a1835 – a man who is fancied; a sweetheart 
n. 5. 1852 Amer. sl. – a man who is a patron of gambling, boxing, horse racing, etc.  
n. 6. 1975 Amer. sl. – a male homosexual  
n. 7. 1975 Amer. sl. – a transvestite
 
• FANCY MEN
n. 1847-8 – patrons of the cock-pit and the ring
 
• FANCY MOUSE
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a chipmunk  
 
• FANCY ONE’S CHANCES
vb. 20C – to feel confident of success  
 
• FANCY ONESELF
vb. L19 sl. – to have a good opinion of oneself; to be conceited  
 
• FANCY-PANTS
adj. 1949 Amer. sl. – fancy or snobbish; smart, pretentious; used derisively  
n. 1. 1930s sl., orig. US – someone who puts on airs  
n. 2. 1930s sl., orig. US – the social elite, the aristocracy
n. 3. 1934 sl., orig. US – a showily dressed, conceited person, esp. a man; a dandy, a snob; a pretentious, superior, self-important person  
vb. 1. 1936 Amer. sl. – to act like a dandy or snob; to act in an arrogant, or supercilious manner
vb. 2. 1940s sl. – to play around, to ‘mess about’  
 
• FANCY PIECE
n. 1. E18 Brit. sl. – orig. a gaudily dressed prostitute; later, a mistress, a ‘bit on the side’  
n. 2. 1920s sl. – a  girlfriend, a ‘best girl’  
 
• FANCY SASH
vb. 20C Aust. rhyming sl. for ‘bash’ – to hit  

• FANCY-SCHMANCY
adj. 1935 colloq. – extremely fancy, esp. in a pretentious or ostentatious way
 
• FANCY-SICK
adj. 1590 – subject to disordered fancy; lovesick
 
• FANCY STROLL
n. 1980s African-American sl. – the main street on which the high life happens  
 
• FANCY THAT!
int. 1813 UK sl. – an exclamation of surprise  
 
• FANCY THE MUFF OFF
vb. 2000 UK sl. – to find a woman extremely desirable  
 
• FANCY THE PANTS OFF
vb. 2000 UK sl. – to find a woman extremely desirable  
 
• FANCY THE TITS OFF
vb. 2000 UK sl. – to find a woman extremely desirable
 
• FANCY WOMAN
n. 1. 1812 sl., esp. criminals’ usage – a man’s sweetheart or mistress  
n. 2. 1824 Amer. sl. – a demimondaine, esp. a prostitute
n. 3. E19 sl. – a man’s favourite girl or woman  
 
• FANCY-WORK
n. 1. 19C Brit. sl. – the male genitals and pubic area  
n. 2. L19 sl. – prostitution  
n. 3. L19 sl. – sexual intercourse  
 
• FANCY YOUR CHANCE(S)
vb. 1962 UK sl. – to presume that your charm or skill will suffice to achieve success  
 
• FANCY YOURSELF
vb. 1866 UK sl. – to have too high an opinion of yourself  
 
• FAND
n. 1. c1250 obs. – the act of trying; trial, proof, experience 
n. 2. a1300 obs. – the state of being tried; a trial, a temptation 
vb. 1. c893 obs. – to put to the proof, to try, to test a person or thing; to make trial of one’s strength or skill; to taste food, etc.
vb. 2. c1175 obs. – to endeavour to lead into evil; to tempt
vb. 3. a1225 obs. – to attempt, to try
vb. 4. c1225 obs. – to enquire; to seek, to look for; to enquire into a matter; to search a place, to examine a track
vb. 5. a1340 obs. – to go, to proceed
vb. 6. 1340-70 obs. – to ask
vb. 7. c1350 obs. – to busy oneself
 
• FANDABIDOZI!
int. 1978 UK sl. – wonderful!  
 
• FAN DANCER
n. 1936 US sl. – a sexual dancer or striptease performer who employs a large fan in her dance  
 
• FANDANGEE
adj. 2003 Trinidad and Tobago – overdressed or otherwise assuming an air of superiority  
 
• FANDANGLE
n. 1. 1880 colloq. – fantastic ornament; nonsense, tomfoolery  
n. 2. 1940s W. Indies sl. – stupidity, foolishness  
vb. 1892 Ireland – to hang about, to trifle, to waste time, to ‘fool’ around  
 
• FANDANGLEMENT
n. 1867 Eng. dial. – a whim, crotchet; a gewgaw  
 
• FANDANGLES
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – ornaments, trinkets; antics, capers, as in dancing about  
 
• FANDANGLING
adj. 1876 Amer. dial. – nonsensical  
 
• FANDANGO
n. 1. 1848 Amer. dial. – a rowdy or boisterous social gathering
n. 2. 1856 rare – fantastic ornament; nonsense, tomfoolery
n. 3. 1890 Amer. dial. – a dance hall or room for dancing  
 
• FANDANGO GIRL
n. M19 US sl. – a prostitute  
 
• FANDANGO HOUSE
n. 1928 Amer. dial. – a brothel  
 
• FANDANGOUS
adj. 1797 Eng. dial. – showy, pompous  
 
• FANDANGS
n. 1876 Eng. dial. – the fanciful adornments in personal attire; trinkets  
 
• FANDANGS AND FEATHERMENTS
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – trinkets, trifles, personal adornments  
 
• FANDER
n. c1340 obs. – a tempter
 
• FAND-GARTH
n. 1790 Eng. dial. – a farmyard  
 
• FANDING
n. 1. a1000 obs. – a trying to do or find out something; an attempt, an experiment
n. 2. c1000 obs. – temptation
n. 3. a1300 obs. – a testing or putting to the proof; a trial
 
• FAN DODGE
n. 1958 Amer. dial. – dysentery  
 
• FANE
adj. 1766 Eng. dial. – glad, happy, well-pleased  
n. 1. a1000 obs. – a flag, banner, pennant
n. 2. c1386 obs. – a weathercock
n. 3. a1400 obs. – a temple
n. 4. 1806 Sc. – an elf; a fairy  
 
• FANED
n. 1982 US sl. – the editor of a single-interest fan magazine  
 
• FANENT
adj. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. –  opposite  
 
• FANEREL
n. 1819 Sc. – a rag, a tatter, a flapping piece of cloth  
 
• FAN-FAN
n. 1834 – a pet dog  
 
• FANFARADE
n. 1883 rare – fanfare
 
• FANFARON
adj. 1670-98 – boastful, bragging
n. 1. 1622 – a bully, blusterer, swaggerer; an empty boaster or braggart; a vain pretender
n. 2. 1848 obs. – fanfare; noisy or boastful parade; ostentation
n. 3. 1857 – one who makes a parade of something; a trumpeter of  
 
• FANFARONADE
n. 1. 1652 – boisterous or arrogant language; boastful assertion, brag; ostentation; an instance of this  
n. 2. 1812 – fanfare  
vb. 1837 – to bluster, to swagger  
 
• FANFARRADO
n. 1824 nonce word – fanfare  
 
• FAN-FECKLED
adj. 1859 Eng. dial. – freckled, spotted with the sun  
 
• FANFERLUCHE
vb. 1653 obs. – to trifle; to act wantonly  
 
• FANFIC
n. 1998 US sl. – further stories and adventures for characters in familiar television programs and films written for pleasure by fans of the original, esp. widespread on the Internet  
 
• FANFOOT
n. 1942 Amer. dial. – a woman who openly seeks sexual relations; a promiscuous woman 
vb. 1935 Amer. dial. – to seek sexual favours; to ‘run around’
 
• FAN-FRECKLED
adj. 1859 Eng. dial. – freckled, spotted with the sun  
 
• FANFRELUCHE
vb. 1653 obs. – to trifle; to act wantonly
 
• FANFREUCHLER
n. a1800 Sc. – a fornicator 
 
• FAN FUCK
n. 2000 US sl. – a heterosexual pornographic film in which male fans of the female pornography star are selected to have sex with her  
 
• FANFUCKINGTASTIC
adj. 1980s sl. – absolutely amazing; often used ironically  
 
• FANG
n. 1. 1016 obs. exc. Sc. – that which is caught or taken; captured game; booty, plunder, spoils 
n. 2. a1400-50 obs. – a capture, a catch; also, a tight grasp, a grip
n. 3. 1535 obs. – a noose, a trap
n. 4. 1731 obs. – a claw or talon  
n. 5. 1742 Sc. – a slice, a large piece cut off from something, usually of food, and esp. of cheese; a chunk
n. 6. L18 sl. – a tooth  
n. 7. 1802 Sc. – a coil or bend of a rope
n. 8. 1818 Sc. – a great bargain  
n. 9. 1821 Sc. obs. – a fix, a predicament  
n. 10. 1871 Sc. – a lout, a scamp, a disagreeable person  
n. 11. 1900 Sc. – a burden, a heavy bundle, esp. when carried in the arms  
n. 12. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a finger  
n. 13. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a fin
n. 14. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – the prong of a fork of any kind
n. 15. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a fork or branch of a tree
n. 16. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a twang, an ill taste or flavour
n. 17. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – earnings, takings; that which is received
n. 18. Bk1900 Sc. – a thong, a strip of leather; a whip-thong  
n. 19. 1923 Sc. – something of little value or importance
n. 20. 1928 Sc. – a tall, thin person  
n. 21. 1950s sl. – the penis 
n. 22. 1951 Sc. – mental grasp, understanding; the ‘hang’ of a thing  
n. 23. 1957 Aust. sl. – eating  
n. 24. 1970 Aust. sl. – a drive taken at high speed  
n. 25. 1988 Aust. sl. – a bite  
vb. 1. c900 obs. exc. arch. obs. – to catch fish; to take in a snare
vb. 2. c1000 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to receive as a gift, or as one’s due; to earn as wages; also, to accept as one’s lot 
vb. 3. 1016 obs. – to seize upon booty; to catch, to apprehend, to get into one’s power; to capture a city; to seize lands or possessions
vb. 4. c1175 obs. – to promise, to resolve, to undertake
vb. 5. c1200 obs. – to lay hold of; to grasp; to hold; to seize; to clasp. to embrace
vb. 6. c1275 obs. – to receive as a guest; to welcome
vb. 7. 1340-70 obs. – to get, to obtain, to procure; also, to get together; to collect
vb. 8. c1400 obs. – to take one’s way; to go, to proceed
vb. 9. c1730 Eng. dial. obs. – to reach; to fetch
vb. 10. 1807 Sc. – to captivate  
vb. 11. 1825 Eng. dial. – to bind a limb so tightly as to stop the flow of blood  
vb. 12. 1842 Eng. dial. – to find  
vb. 13. 1888 Eng. dial. – to dam, to mop up water
vb. 14. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to bang  
vb. 15. 1910s Aust. sl. – to eat  
vb. 16. 1910s Aust. sl. – to demand money; to cadge, to beg for a loan  
vb. 17. 1960s Aust. sl. – to do something fast, to send something quickly
vb. 18. 1962 US sl. – to yell furiously  
vb. 19. 1969 Aust. sl. – to drive fast  
 
• FANG A-FIRE
vb. 1873 Eng. dial. – to catch fire  
 
• FANG ARTIST
n. 1. 1970s Aust. sl. – a glutton  
n. 2. 1970s Aust. sl. – a lecher; a womanizer
n. 3. 1970s Aust. sl. – one who is particularly adept at obtaining loans
 
• FANGAST
adj. c1660 Eng. dial. obs. – fit for marriage, marriageable
n. c1660 Eng. dial.. obs. – a marriageable maid
 
• FANG AWAY
vb. 1. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to attack violently, to fight  
vb. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to devour food eagerly and quickly, to snatch at one’s food
 
• FANG-BANDIT
n. 1950s Aust. sl. – a dentist  
 
• FANG-CARPENTER
n. 1950s Aust. sl. – a dentist
 
• FANG-CHOVEY
n. M19 sl. – a dental surgery  
 
• FANG DOWN
vb. 1996 Aust. sl. – to eat  
 
• FANGER
n. 1. a1300 obs. – one who catches or captures 
n. 2. 1981 medical sl. – a dentist or oral surgeon
 
• FANG FACTORY
n. 1970s sl. – a dental surgery  
 
• FANG-FAKER
n. 19C Brit. cant – a dentist  
 
• FANG-FARRIER
n. 20C nautical sl. – a dentist; a dental surgeon  
 
• FANG IN
vb. 1950 Sc. – to eat greedily and in great gulps
 
• FANGING FOR
adj. 1910s Aust. sl. – desperate for  
 
FANGINGS
n. 1846 Eng. dial. – wages, earnings, takings  
 
FANG JOB
n. 1960s sl. – criticism, esp. a critical article 
 
FANGLE
n. 1. 1583 obs. – a fantastic, foppish, or silly contrivance; a piece of finery; foppery, fuss  
n. 2. 1854 Eng. dial. – a conceit, a whim  
vb. 1. 1615 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to fashion, to fabricate; to trick out  
vb. 2. 1826 Sc. – to tangle, to ravel, to mix up
 
FANGLEMENT
n. 1. a1670 – something fashioned or made; an invention; a contrivance 
n. 2. c1861 Eng. dial. – a contrivance, a personal adornment 
 
FANGLER
n. 1859 Eng. dial. – a whim, conceit  
 
FANGLES
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – the prongs of a fork  
 
FANGLET
n. 1843 – a little fang or tooth  
 
FANG-LIFTER
n. 1930s US criminals’ sl. – a dentist  
 
FANG MAN
n. 1982 Aust. sl. – a man who is a hearty eater  
 
FANGOGGLING
n. 20C Brit. sl. – looking at naked women, either openly as in strip clubs, or secretly 
 
FANG ON
vb. 1893 Eng. dial. – to seize, to clutch  
 
FANGS
n. 1. 1950s jazz & African-American sl. – the lips  
n. 2. 1950s sl. – the mouth; the jaws  
n. 3. 1958 US sl. – musical ability  
vb. 1929 Sc. – of an animal: to forage, to search round for food
 
FANGSHAL
n. 1916 Sc. – a lout, a scamp, a disagreeable person  
 
FANGS-OUT
adj. 1983 military aviation usage – all-out; at full speed


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Updated: September 14, 2022