Dictionary: FAT – FATZ

• FAT
adj. 1. 1387 obs. – of water: thick, turbid
adj. 2. 1398 obs. – of the voice: full
adj. 3. 1563 – of things: abundant, plentiful; also, well-stocked  
adj. 4. 1588 – slow-witted, indolent, self-complacent  
adj. 5. 1596 obs. – of a room: full of dense air
adj. 6. 1609 obs. – of wine or ale: fruity, full-bodied, sugary
adj. 7. 1611 obs. exc. Amer. dial. – of a person: affluent, wealthy, well-to-do, rich
adj. 8. 1659 rare – of air, mist, etc.: charged with moisture or odours
adj. 9. 1950s African-American sl. – pregnant  
adj. 10. 1960s sl. – first-rate, excellent  
adj. 11. 1970s sl. – well supplied with drugs  
adj. 12. 1977 US Vietnam war usage – of a military unit: over-staffed
adj. 13. 1980 UK sl. – out of fashion, old-fashioned  
adj. 14. 20C teen & high school sl. – nice; good  
adj. 15. 20C sl. – self-obsessed, smug  
adj. 16. 2001 US bikers’ usage – of a fuel mixture: too rich  
adv. 1. L19 US college sl. – successfully  
adv. 2. 1900s sl. – comfortably  
adv. 3. 1960s sl. – very, extremely  
n. 1. c950 obs. – in general, a vessel
n. 2. c1400 obs. – a vessel of large size for liquids; a tub, a dyer’s or brewer’s vat; a wine cask
n. 3. 1540 obs. – a cask or barrel to contain dry things
n. 4. 1570-6 obs. – plenty, superabundance
n. 5. 1883 theatrical usage – a part with good lines and telling situations, which gives the player an opportunity of appearing to advantage  
n. 6. 1888 Aust. sl. – a fattened cow or bull ready for market  
n. 7. 1890 newspaper usage – a good piece of exclusive news  
n. 8. L19 Aust. & NZ sl. – the business elite; the wealthiest members of the community  
n. 9. Bk1903 sl. – money
n. 10. 1940s sl., chiefly homosexual usage – a fat person, esp. as used in small ads  
n. 11. 1941 Aust. sl. – an erection  
n. 12. 1985 Bermuda euphemism for ‘fuck’ – an act of sexual intercourse  
 
• FATAL
adj. 1. c1374 obs. – allotted or decreed by fate or destiny; destined, fated 
adj. 2. 1503 obs. – prophetic
adj. 3. 1509 obs. – condemned by fate, doomed
adj. 4. 1590 obs. – foreboding or indicating mischief; ominous
adj. 5. 1927 Amer. dial. – completely, out-and-out; used as an intensifier
 
• FAT ALBERT
n. 1994 US sl. – an exceptionally large aircraft, esp. a Boeing 737, a Lockheed C-5A Galaxy, or a Lockheed C-130 Hercules  
 
• FAT ALE
n. M19 sl. – strong beer  
 
• FATALIZE
vb. 1876 – to render subject to fate or inevitable necessity  
 
• FATAL PILL
n. 1. World War II Amer. sl. – a cannonball
n. 2. World War II Amer. sl. – a bullet
 
• FATALS
n. 1560 obs. – fatal persons or things  
 
• FAT AND FINE
adj. 1968 Amer. dial. – in good health and spirits  
 
• FAT AND FUNKY
adj. 1967 Amer. dial. – in good health and spirits  
 
• FAT AND RAGGED
adj. 1893 Amer. dial. – in good health and spirits
 
• FAT AND SASSY
adj. 1. 1928 Amer. dial. – in good health and spirits  
adj. 2. 1968 Amer. – securely entrenched, and therefore arrogant  
 
• FAT AND SAUCY
adj. 1843 Amer. dial. – in good health and spirits  
 
• FAT AND WIDE
n. 1992 UK rhyming sl. – a bride  
 
• FAT ARM
n. 1960s drug culture sl. – a serious narcotics addiction  
 
• FAT AROUND THE HEART
adj. 1935 Amer. dial. – afraid, scared  
adv. 1935 Amer. dial. – cowardly
 
• FAT-ARSE
adj. 18C sl. – fat, large-buttocked; also, of objects: large
n. 1930s sl. – a very fat person  
 
• FAT-ARSED
adj. 1. 18C sl. – fat, large-buttocked; also, of objects: large  
adj. 2. 19C sl. – said of anyone who is lazy or unpleasant  
adj. 3. 1937 UK sl. – wealthy  
 
• FATARY
n. 1652 obs. rare  – one who foretells fates  
 
• FAT AS A BUGGY WHIP
adj. 1967 Amer. dial. – thin; small  
 
• FAT AS A HEN’S FOREHEAD
adj. 1939 Amer. dial. – thin; small; meagre  
 
• FAT AS A HOG IN BUTCHERING TIME
adj. 1929 Amer. dial. – very fat; said of one putting on much weight 
 
• FAT AS A MATCH
adj. Bk1899 Amer. dial. – thin; small  
 
• FAT AS A MAWK
adj. 1889 Eng. dial. – very fat  
 
• FAT AS A NIGGER IN CANE TIME
adj. Bk1892 W. Indian sl., offensive – contentedly fat
 
• FAT AS GOD’S POCKET
adj. 1931 Amer. dial. – pregnant  
 
• FAT-ASS
adj. 1. 1950s US sl. – fat  
adj. 2. 1950s US sl. – comfortably off, well-to-do, wealthy  
adj. 3. 1970s sl. – large  
adj. 4. 2000s sl. – money-grabbing, superficial, fake  
n. 1931 US sl. – a fat person  
vb. 1960s US sl. – (as ‘fat ass’) to loaf, to idle  
 
• FAT-ASSED
adj. 1. 19C sl. – with very large or fat buttocks  
adj. 2. 19C sl. – said of anyone who is lazy or unpleasant
adj. 3. 1950s US sl. – comfortably off, well-to-do  
adj. 4. 1970s sl. – large
 
• FAT-ASSING
adj. 1950s US sl. – fat  
 
• FAT AS SIR ROGER
adj. L19 sl. – extremely fat  
 
• FATATION
n. 1652 obs. rare – the exercise of inevitable and irresistible influence; inevitability
 
• FATBACK
adj. 1934 US sl. – lacking sophistication, rustic  
 
• FAT BAGS
n. 1998 UK sl. – crack cocaine  
 
• FAT BASTARD
n. 1988 UK sl. – an overweight person  
 
• FAT-BRAIN
n. L16 sl. – a fool, an idiot; often used affectionately as well as derogatorily  
 
• FAT-BRAINED
adj. L18 sl. – foolish, stupid  
 
• FAT BRAINS
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – stupidity  
 
• FAT CAN
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – the buttocks  
 
• FAT-CAT
adj. 1950s sl., orig. US – prosperous, successful; the implication being that such prosperity has been gained by corruption
n. 1928 sl., orig. & chiefly US, derogatory – (as ‘fat cat’) someone who is privileged because of their wealth, and often specifically to one who backs a political party or campaign; latterly in Britain also applied to business executives who are unjustifiably highly remunerated; any successful, wealthy, influential person

• FATCH
vb. 1874 Eng. dial. – to excite, to trouble
 
• FATCHA
n. 20C sl. – the human face  
 
• FAT CHANCE
int. M19 sl. – no chance at all  
n. M19 sl. – no chance at all

• FATCHED
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – troubled in mind, perplexed; hurried in business
 
• FAT-CHEWING
n. 1957 Amer. dial. – a gabfest; a spirited conversation; gossip
 
• FAT-CITY
adj. 1960s sl. – excellent, splendid
n. 1. 1960s sl. – (as ‘fat city’) success, wealth, often from criminal activities  
n. 2. 1970s US sl. – (as ‘fat city’) the process of gaining weight or the state of being fat  
 
• FAT COCK
n. 1. 19C Brit. sl. – female genitals with very large labia minora  
n. 2. M19 sl. – a fat old man  
 
• FAT CULL
n. 1848 Amer. dial. – a rich fellow  

• FAT DABS
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a fat, awkward person or child
 
• FATE
n. 1. 1700 poetic usage – an instrument of death or destruction
n. 2. 1856 Amer. dial. – a person whom one is fated to marry  
vb. 1. c1400 obs. – to ruin irrevocably
vb. 2. 1788 obs. – to destine to death
 
• FAT ENOUGH TO KILL
adj. 1929 Amer. dial. – very fat; usually said of hogs, but occasionally said of people  
 
• FATER
n. 16C UK criminals’ sl. – a cheat or impostor; a fraudulent fortune-teller  
 
• FAT-FACE
n. 1741 – a term of abuse  
 
• FAT-FANCIER
n. 19C sl. – a man who prefers plump women  
 
• FAT FARM
n. 1960s sl., orig. US – a slimming clinic  
 
• FAT-FED
adj. 1607 – of a man: full-fleshed  
 
• THE FAT FLITS FROM A MAN’S BEARD
phr. 1562 obs. – he lets go the advantage he has gained
 
• FAT FRIEND
n. World War II Amer. sl. – a balloon  
 
• FATGUT
n. L16 sl. – a term of abuse for a person who has a fat stomach  
 
• FAT-GUTS
n. 1596 – one having a big belly; used as a term of abuse  
 
• FATHEAD
n. 1. c1250 obs. rare – fatness
n. 2. 1842 – (as ‘fat-head’) one having a fat head; a stupid dolt; a senseless fellow; an oaf; one whose brain is composed of fat and is therefore useless  
n. 3. 1910s sl. – (as ‘fat head’) a hangover  
n. 4. 1910s sl. – (as ‘fat head’) a headache
 
• FAT-HEADED
adj. c1510 – dull, stupid 
 
• FATHER
n. 1. 1599 – the relative or friend who ‘gives away’ a bride  
n. 2. M19 sl. – a receiver of stolen goods
n. 3. M19 sl. – the owner of a common lodging house
n. 4. 1939 Amer. dial. euphemism – a male animal kept for breeding purposes  
n. 5. 1941 Amer. dial. – one’s husband  
n. 6. 1960s US drug culture sl. – a large-scale drug dealer  
vb. 1. 1577 obs. – to carry out a law
vb. 2. 1591 obs. – to represent oneself as the owner of
vb. 3. 1966 Amer. dial. – to admit paternity or responsibility  
 
• FATHER ABRAHAM
n. 19C sl. – the penis  
 
• FATHER-AGE
n. 1. 1596 obs. – the time of life when one is a father; hence, a mature age; adulthood of man
n. 2. 1633 obs. – an age earlier than the present, a period gone by; time long past  
 
• FATHER-AND-SON
adj. 1943 Amer. dial. – of a business enterprise: small
 
• FATHER-BETTER
adj. 1645 Sc. – surpassing one’s father in any respect
 
• FATHER-CONFESSOR
n. 19C Brit. sl. – the penis  
 
• FATHER DIVINE
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a person who uses a divining rod to find water

• FATHER-FOLK
n. 1790 Eng. dial. – the relations, family of one’s father
 
• FATHER-FUCKER
n. M20 US homosexual sl. – a pederast; a contemptuous term of address  
 
• FATHER-FUCKING
adj. 1960s US homosexual sl. – a general intensifier  
 
• FATHERHOOD
n. c1460 obs. – authority of or as of a father; paternal authority, headship
 
• FATHER-IN-LAW
n. 1552 – a stepfather; now regarded as a misuse  
 
• FATHER IN THE LAW
n. 1552 obs. – a father-in-law  
 
• FATHERKIN
n. c1440 obs. – descent by the father’s side
 
• FATHERLESS
adj. 1611 obs. – of a book, etc.: without a known author; anonymous
 
• FATHERLING
n. 1625 – a little father; used as an affectionate mode of address  
 
• FATHER-LONG-LEGS
n. 1796 – a daddy-long-legs; a long-legged spider; the crane-fly  
 
• FATHER LOVES YOU BEST
phr. 1950 Amer. dial. – used to warn a woman that her slip is showing  
 
• FATHERLY
adj. a1000 obs. – pert. to ancestors; ancestral; also, venerable

• FATHER MATHEW’S CHICKENS
n. 1853 Sc. – grouse
 
• FATHER-OF-ALL
n. 19C sl. – the penis  
 
• THE FATHER OF LIES
n. 1825 – the Devil  
 
• THE FATHER OF LIGHTS
n. 1362 – God  
 
• FATHER O’FLYNN
n. 1960s rhyming sl. – the chin  
 
• FATHER OF MERCY!
int. 1900 Sc. – an exclamation of surprise, sorrow, etc.  
 
• FATHER-QUELLER
n. c1440 obs. – a parricide; one who kills a father
 
• FATHER-SISTER
n. 1808 Sc. obs. – an aunt on the father’s side
 
• FATHER SOMETHING ON SOMEONE
vb. 20C sl. – to put the blame for something on someone else; to ‘pass the buck’  
 
• FATHER-STUFF
n. 20C sl. – the male seed in a figurative sense; semen  
 
• FATHER TIME
n. 1. 1920s US college sl. – an older man, but possibly still attractive n. 2. 1940s US prison sl. – the warden  
 
• FATHER WAR
adj. 1535 Sc. obs. – worse than one’s father, degenerate
 
• FATHER-WAUR
adj. Bk1901 Sc. – worse than one’s father  
 
• FATHOLT
n. 1543 Sc. obs. rare – ? staves for casks
 
• FATHOM
n. 1. a800 – the length covered by the outstretched arms, including the hands to the tip of the longest finger; hence, a definite measure of 6 feet 
n. 2. c1000 obs. – the length of the forearm
n. 3. a1000 obs. – grasp, power 
n. 4. 1602 obs. rare – the object of embrace
n. 5. 1604 obs. – breadth of comprehension; grasp of intellect; ability
n. 6. 1607 obs. – a stretching of the arms in a straight line to their full extent
n. 7. 1692-1708 obs. – three feet in length
vb. 1. c1300 – to encircle with extended arms  
vb. 2. c1440 obs. – to clasp or embrace a person
vb. 3. 1625 – to get to the bottom of; to thoroughly understand  
 
• FATHOMABLE
adj. 1633 – comprehensible, intelligible  
 
• FATHOM ABOUT
vb. a1300 obs. rare – to try what the arms will take in; to grope about
 
• FATHOM-DEEP
adj. 1835 – excessively deep  
 
• FATHOMING
n. c1440 – the act of encircling with the arms 
 
• FATHOM INTO
vb. 1607 obs. – to enquire into
 
• FATHOMLESS
adj. 1. 1606 obs. – that cannot be clasped with the arms
adj. 2. 1645 – that cannot be fully understood; incomprehensible  
 
• FATHOMLESSLY
adv. 1822 – very deeply  
 
• FATHOM-PROOF
adj. 1792 nonce word – unfathomable  
 
• FATHOMS
n. a1000 obs. – the embracing arms
 
• FATHOMS UNDER
adj. 1968 Amer. dial. – deep asleep  
 
• FATHOM TOGETHER
vb. a1300 obs. – to embrace mutually
 
• FATICANE
n. 1652 obs. rare – a singer of fate; a prophet
 
• FATIDIC
adj. 1671 rare – concerned with predicting fates; prophetic  
 
• FATIDICAL
adj. 1607 – concerned with predicting fates; prophetic  
 
• FATIDICATE
vb. 1867 rare – to declare or predict fates
 
• FATIDICENCY
n. a1693 obs. rare – a method of foretelling fate; divination 
 
• FATIDICIAL
adj. 1641 – gifted with the power of prophecy  
 
• FATIFEROUS
adj. 1656 – fate-bringing; deadly, mortal, destructive  
 
• FATIFU
adj. 1845 Sc. – affectionate  
 
• FATIGABLE
adj. 1. 1608 – capable of being fatigued; easily tired  
adj. 2. 1656 obs. – wearying, tiring
 
• FATIGATE
adj. 1471 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – wearied, tired, fatigued, exhausted with labour  
vb. 1535 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to fatigue, exhaust, weary, tire  
 
• FATIGATED
adj. 1552 obs. – fatigued, exhausted, weary
 
• FATIGATION
n. 1. 1504 obs. – the state of being fatigued, weariness
n. 2. a1529 obs. – the act of fatiguing
 
• FATI-GOO
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – fatigue  
 
• FATIGUABLE
adj. 1. 1608 – capable of being fatigued; easily tired  
adj. 2. 1656 obs. – wearying, tiring
 
• FATIGUE
n. 1794 Sc. obs. – wear and tear; hard usage
 
• FATILOQUENCY
n. a1693 obs. rare – declaring fate; divination 
 
• FATILOQUENT
adj. 1656 – declaring fate, prophetic, soothsaying
 
• FATILOQUIST
n. 1652 obs. rare – one who declares or foretells fates; a fortune-teller
 
• FATILOQUY
n. 1623 obs. – soothsaying, declaring fate
 
• THE FAT IS IN THE FIRE
phr. 1644 – in early use expressing that a design has irremediably failed; later used when some injudicious act has been committed that is sure to provoke a violent explosion of anger  
 
• FAT JACK OF THE BONE-HOUSE
n. M19 sl. – a very fat man  
 
• FAT JAY
n. 20C US drug culture sl. – a fat joint; a fat marijuana cigarette  

• FAT-JOWLED
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – fat-faced
 
• FAT KNACKER
n. 1990s UK juvenile sl. – an unattractive, promiscuous woman  
 
• FAT KNOT
n. 1970s African-American sl. – a substantial roll of dollar bills  
 
• FATLING
adj. 1847 rare – small and fat
 
• FAT LIP
n. 1. 1940s sl. – a bruise; the result of a blow 
n. 2. 1940s sl. – unpleasant talk
 
• FAT LOT
n. M19 sl. – not very much, if anything at all  
 
• FATLY
adv. 1. 1515 obs. – plentifully, abundantly  
adv. 2. 1611 obs. – in a fatty or greasy manner
adv. 3. 1866 – like a fat person; clumsily  
adv. 4. 1866 – to a great extent; largely; extensively  
 
• FATMAN
n. 1. L19 Aust. & NZ sl. – the business elite; the wealthiest members of the community  
n. 2. 1970 Amer. dial. – (as ‘fat man’) a hobgoblin used to threaten children and make them behave  
 
• FAT MEAT
n. 1940s African-American sl. – the truth  
 
• FAT-MONGER
n. 19C sl. – a man who prefers plump women  
 
• FATMOUTH
adj. 1960s sl., orig. African-American – boastful, noisy, verbose  
n. 1926 US sl., chiefly African-American usage – a braggart, a boaster, a loquacious talker; the quality of being one  
vb. 1968 sl., orig. African-American – to argue, to answer back, to be cheeky, to talk glibly, persuasively, or excessively, to boast  
 
• FAT-MOUTHED
adj. 1960s sl., orig. African-American – boastful, noisy, verbose  
 
• FATNESS
n. 1. c1000 obs. – a greasy or oily substance, fat
n. 2. c1000 obs. – the richest or best part of anything
n. 3. 1382 obs. – of a tree: oiliness; juiciness
n. 4. 19C sl. – wealth  
 
• FAT-ONE
n. 1. 19C Brit. sl. – an extremely loud and bad-smelling breaking of wind  
n. 2. 1950s US sl. – (as ‘fat one’) a $100 bill  
n. 3. 1950s US sl. – (as ‘fat one’) a large cigar
n. 4. 1990s drug culture sl. – (as ‘fat one’) a marijuana cigarette
 
• FAT ON TOP
adj. 1. 1970s US homosexual sl. – drunk
adj. 2. 1970s US homosexual sl. – intellectual  
 
• FATPOKES
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a very fat person  
 
• FAT, RAGGED, AND SASSY
adj. 1857 Amer. dial. – in good health and spirits  
 
• FATS
n. 1. 1910s sl., orig. African-American – a  jazz musician  
n. 2. 1930s US sl. – a nickname for anyone seen as overweight  
 
• FAT-SAGG
adj. 1604 obs. – hanging down with fat
 
• FAT’S A-RUNNING
phr. L19 UK criminals’ sl. – used to indicate that a loaded van is passing along the street and may be robbed, to the greatest extent, by opportunists  
 
• FAT SCRAPS AND GLORIOUS BITS
n. 17C UK criminals’ sl. – a sound beating  

• FAT-SHAG
n. 1886 Eng. dial. – bacon
 
• FAT SHOW
int. 1948 NZ sl. – no show or chance at all  
n. 1930s NZ sl. – no chance at all  
 
• FATSO
n. 1933 sl. – a fat person; often used as a derisive nickname
 
• FATS OR FEMS
n. 1970s homosexual sl. – fat or effeminate homosexuals, as described in gay advertisements  

• FAT-SORROW
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – sorrow alleviated by riches
 
• FAT SQUIRE
n. 17C sl. – a rich fool  
 
• FATSTICK
n. 1942 Amer. dial. – a candle  
 
• FAT-TAILED
adj. 1950s US sl. – overweight  
 
• FAT TALK
n. 1970 Amer. dial., chiefly African-American – meaningless, nonsensical talk
 
• FAT TAPE
n. 1990s African-American teen sl. – an exceptionally good mix tape 
 
• FATTEN FOOD
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – a snack  
 
• FATTEN FROGS FOR SNAKES
vb. 1950s sl. – to prepare a victim (including oneself) for exploitation by a criminal or trickster  
 
• FATTENING HOG POST CARD
n. 1954 Amer. dial. – a jumbo-sized post card  
 
• FATTER
n. 1528 obs. – fattening food
 
• FATTERALS
n. 1786 Sc. obs. – ribbon ends, loose pieces of trimming; anything loose and trailing; rarely in singular

• FATTERS
n. 1858 Eng. dial., obs. – tatters, rags

• FATTERT
adj. 1854 Eng. dial. – embarrassed, unhandy in doing a job
 
• FATTER THAN A SETTLED MINISTER
adj. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – very fat; in good condition
 
• FATTIE
n. 1960s drug culture sl. – a particularly large marijuana cigarette  

• FATTIGUED
adj. 1893 Eng. dial. – annoyed
 
• FATTINESS
n. 1601 obs. – grease  
 
• FATTING
adj. 1602 – growing or being made fat  
n. 1594 obs. – the process of growing or becoming fat  
 
• FATTISH
adj. 1589 obs. – somewhat greasy or unctuous

• FATTLE
vb. 1856 Eng. dial. – to trifle about business; to dangle after a woman
 
• FAT-TO-MY-CHRIST!
int. 1955 Amer. dial. – an exclamation  
 
• FAT-TO-MY-JASSUM!
int. 1955 Amer. dial. – an exclamation
 
• FATTOON
n. 1950s W. Indies sl. – a very fat person  
 
• FATTRALS
n. 1786 Sc. obs. – ribbon ends, loose pieces of trimming; anything loose and trailing; rarely in singular
 
• FATTRELS
n. 1786 Sc. – ribbon-ends, etc.  
 
• FATTY
adj. 1. 1552 obs. – of animals, their limbs: full of fat, plump, well-fed
adj. 2. 1601 obs. – of a leaf: full of sap, juicy
n. 1. 1797 sl., derogatory – a fat person; often used as a derisive nickname 
n. 2. 1960s drug culture sl. – a particularly large marijuana cigarette 
 
• FATTY ARBUCKLE
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a very fat person  
 
• FATTY ARBUNCLE
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a very fat person
 
• FATTY-BREAD
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a very fat person  
 
• FATTY BUM-BUM
n. 1950s W. Indies & Trinidad – a fat person, esp. a woman with large buttocks  
 
• FATTY CAKE
n. 20C sl. – a young woman with a plump, well-rounded figure  

• FATTY-HEAD
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a stupid person

• FATTY-LEFT
adj. 1893 Eng. dial. – well-off, left well provided for
 
• FATTYMA
n. M19 sl. – a fat man or woman
 
• FATTYMUS
n. M19 sl. – a fat man or woman  
 
• FATUANT
adj. 1641 obs. rare – behaving foolishly; foolish, silly
 
• FATUATE
adj. 1601 obs. – infatuated
vb. 1656 arch. – to become silly, to act foolishly, to play the fool  
 
• FATUATED
adj. 1848 – besotted, infatuated  
 
• FATUISM
n. 1884 – idiocy, mental imbecility, dementia  
 
• FATUITOUS
adj. a1734 – besotted, infatuated 
 
• FATUITY
n. 1. 1621-51 rare – idiocy, mental imbecility, dementia
n. 2. 1648 – folly, silliness, stupidity; infatuation  
 
• FAT-UN
n. 19C Brit. sl. – an extremely loud and bad-smelling breaking of wind  
 
• FATUOSITY
n. 1681 obs. rare – folly, silliness, stupidity; infatuation
 
• FATUOUS
adj. 1. 1608 obs. – tasteless, insipid, vapid
adj. 2. 1633 – foolish, vacantly silly, stupid, besotted, infatuated  
adj. 3. 1773 rare – that is in a state of dementia or imbecility; idiotic
 
• FATUOUSLY
adv. 1876 – in a besotted or infatuated manner  
 
• FATUOUSNESS
n. 1874 – besotted foolishness, stupidity, infatuation; imbecility  
 
• FAT UP
vb. 1892 Amer. dial. – to increase a stake at cards  
 
• FAT-WITTED
adj. 1596 – of slow wit, dull, thick-headed, stupid  
 
• FATYMA
n. M19 sl. – a fat man or woman
 
• FATYMUS
n. M19 sl. – a fat man or woman


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