Dictionary: FAU – FAZ

• FAUBOURG
n. 1470 – a portion of a town or city, lying outside the gates; a suburb  
 
• FAUCET
n. 1. a1400 obs. exc. Eng. & Amer. dial. – a tap for drawing liquor from a barrel, etc. 
n. 2. c1430 obs. – a peg or spigot to stop the vent-hole in a cask or in a tap; a vent-peg
n. 3. 1614 obs. – a term of contempt for a tapster
n. 4. M18 US sl. – a penis  
 
• FAUCETIN
n. Urquhart usage – the penis
 
• FAUCETT
n. 19C Brit. sl. – the female genitals  
 
• FAUCH
vb. 1. 1790 Sc. obs. – to beat
vb. 2. 1866 Sc. – to work with speed; to toil, esp. with little result  
vb. 3. 1916 Sc. – to scrounge  
vb. 4. 1923 Sc. – to scratch, to claw, to rub; to scrub hard  
 
• FAUCHENTULIE
n. 1825 Sc. obs. – an argument or quarrel
vb. 1825 Sc. obs. – to argue, to contend
 
• FAUCHIE
adj. 1. 1911 Sc. – of persons: sickly-looking, pasty-faced, pale  
adj. 2. 1911 Sc. – pale yellowish grey, of a faded colour
adj. 3. 1950 Sc. – itchy  
adj. 4. 1950 Sc. – of liquids: pale, colourless  
 
• FAUCHINLESS; FAUCONLESS
adj. 1866 Sc. – weak, without strength or energy  
 
• FAUCHLE
n. 1. 1866 Sc. – a slow, inept worker; a bungler; a small, weak person unable to do his own turn and yet trying to do it  
n. 2. 1952 Sc. – a muddle, a state of confusion  
vb. 1. 1824 Sc. – to work lazily or listlessly, to work with difficulty, to work in a helpless, bungling fashion
vb. 2. 1866 Sc. – to walk with difficulty, or from lack of strength; to trudge, to plod; to move the feet awkwardly or heavily  
 
• FAUCHT
n. 1721 Sc. – a fight, a struggle, trouble, exertion  
 
• FAUD
n. 1641 Eng. dial. – a bundle  

• FAUF
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a flea
 
• FAUGH
adj. 1824 Sc. obs. – pale, faint of colour; faded, yellowed
int. 1542 – an exclamation of abhorrence or disgust  
 
• FAUGHT
n. 1721 Sc. obs. – a fight, a struggle, trouble, exertion
 
• FAUGHTER
n. 1535 obs. – one who commits a fault; a culprit, delinquent, offender

• FAUKIMS
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – the fire

• FAUL
n. Bk1900 Sc. – a circle; a halo round the moon
 
• FAULD
n. 1. 1824 Sc. – a ring or halo around the moon, as a presage of stormy weather  
n. 2. 1908 Sc. – a strand of rope  
vb. 1776 Sc. – to shut, to close a door, clasp knife, the eyes, the fist, etc.  
 
• FAULDINGS
n. 1832 Sc. obs. – the nether garments; ‘that part of dress with involves the posteriors”
 
• FAULKENER
n. 1. L17 UK criminals’ sl. – one who lures an innocent player into a crooked gambling game  
n. 2. L17 sl. – a juggler, a tumbler  
 
• FAULKNER
n. L17 UK criminals’ sl. – one who lures an innocent player into a crooked gambling game  
 
• FAULT
n. 1. a1300 obs. – deficiency, lack, scarcity, want of; want of food or necessaries
n. 2. c1325 obs. – default, failing, neglect
n. 3. 1514 obs. – an unsound or damaged place; a flaw, a crack
vb. 1. c1375 obs. – to be wanting or absent
vb. 2. 1377 obs. – to stand in need of; to lack, to want; to be deficient in
vb. 3. a1400 obs. – to come short of a standard; to make default, to fail
vb. 4. c1400 arch. – to commit a fault; to do or go wrong; hence, to sin  
vb. 5. 1504 obs. – to be deficient in; to be lacking in  
vb. 6. 1522 obs. – to fail or omit to do something; to miss one’s aim
vb. 7. 1530 obs. – to make a mistake, to be in error, to blunder
vb. 8. 1936 Amer. dial. – of a hunting dog: to lose the scent or trail
 
• FAULTED
adj. 1608 – having faults of character, faulty  
 
• FAULTER
n. 1. 1535 obs. – one who commits a fault; a culprit, delinquent, offender  
n. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial., obs. – an unpaired pheasant or partridge
vb. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to perceive or discover a blemish or fault
 
• FAULTFUL
adj. 1591 – faulty, culpable  
 
• FAULTIES
n. 1990s African-American teen sl. – a mobile telephone that is being used illegally  
 
• FAULTIVE
adj. 1496 obs. – faulty  
 
• A FAULTLESS CUBE
n. 1853 – a truly good man; an almost perfect man
 
• FAULTLESSLY
adv. 1610 obs. – blamelessly
 
• FAULTLESSNESS
n. 1580 obs. – freedom from blame; blamelessness
 
• FAULTRESS
n. 1580 obs. – a female offender
 
• FAULTSOME
adj. 1891 rare – full of faults, faulty

• FAULT-SURE
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – conscious of one’s faults or shortcomings
 
• FAULTURE
n. 1. 1820 rare – decayed remnants
n. 2. 1828 rare – a failing
 
• FAULTWORTHY
adj. 1586 obs. rare – deserving of blame, blameworthy, culpable, reprehensible
 
• FAULTY
adj. 1. a1300 obs. – that has committed a fault, error, or offense; guilty of wrong-doing 
adj. 2. 1873 Eng. dial. – given to finding fault, grumbling, scolding
 
• FAUN
vb. 1821 Sc. obs. – to caress, to fondle
 
• FAUNCE
vb. 1858 Amer. dial. – to rush, to make a sudden violent attack  
 
• FAUNCH
n. 1982 Amer. dial. – a rage  
vb. 1. 1911 Amer. dial. – to rant, to rave, to rage; to make an outcry against  
vb. 2. 1970 Amer. dial. – to fret, to worry; to show irritation or impatience; to complain, to sulk  
 
• FAUNCHED
adj. 1980 Amer. dial. – angry  
 
• FAUNCHING
adj. 1930 Amer. dial. – raving angry  
 
• FAUNCHY
adj. 1970 Amer. dial. – fretting, worried; complaining  
 
• FAUNET
n. M20 US sl. – an attractive, post-adolescent male viewed as a potential sexual partner by a homosexual male  
 
• FAUNIC
adj. 1674 obs. – wild, woodish, rude
 
• FAUNT
n. a1300 obs. – an infant, a child, a young person
 
• FAUNTEKIN
n. 1377 obs. – a little child, an infant  
 
• FAUNTELET
n. 1393 obs. – a little child, an infant
 
• FAUNTELTE
n. 1377 obs. – childishness
 
• FAUNTLEROY
vb. E19 US sl. – to act as a forger  
 
• FAUP
n. 1. 1866 Sc. obs. – a pod of peas or beans, full or shelled
n. 2. 1866 Sc. – a disagreeable person  
vb. 1866 Sc. obs. – to shell peas

• FAUSOME
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – winsome, showing affection
 
• FAUSONRY
n. 1647 obs. – fraud, in the legal sense; falsification of deeds or measures, coining false money, etc.
 
• FAUST
adj. 1692 rare – lucky, happy
n. 1. 1850 Amer. dial. – a small dog of mixed breed  
n. 2. 1930s African-American sl. – a blind date  
n. 3. 1930s African-American sl. – an ugly person of either sex

• FAUSTEEN
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – trembling
 
• FAUSTITUDE
n. 1721 obs. – good luck, happiness  
 
• FAUSTITY
 n. 1656 obs. – good luck, happiness, good fortune
 
• FAUSTY
adj. 1890 Amer. dial. – irascible, angry, low, mean, cross; pert, impertinent, impudent, self-important; frisky, mettlesome  
 
• FAUTERER
n. a1662 – an adherent, a partisan, a supporter, an abettor, an encourager 
 
• FAUTEUIL
n. 1744 – an armchair  
 
• FAUTIVE
adj. 1667 obs. rare – tending to favour, favourable  
 
• FAUTOR
n. 1. c1330 – an adherent, a partisan, a supporter, an abettor, an encourager 
n. 2. 1460 obs. – a protector, a patron
 
• FAUTORSHIP
n. partisanship …1863
 
• FAUTRESS
n. 1. 1596 obs. – an adherent, a partisan, a supporter, an abettor, an encourager
n. 2. 1596 obs. – a protector, a patron
 
• FAUTRIX
n. 1582 obs. – a protector, a patron  

• FAUVEL
n. 1873 Eng. dial. – a light bay horse
 
• FAUX
n. 1980s US college sl. – a mistake  
vb. 1980s US college sl. – to make a mistake
 
• FAUXBOURG
n. 1470 – a portion of a town or city, lying outside the gates; a suburb  
 
• FAUXBURGH
n. 1470 – a portion of a town or city, lying outside the gates; a suburb
 
• FAUXONRY
n. 1647 obs. – fraud, in the legal sense; falsification of deeds or measures, coining false money, etc.
 
• FAUX-PRUDE
n. 1676 obs. – a man who simulates prudishness
 
• FAV
adj. 1930s sl., orig. US – favourite  
n. 1930s sl., orig. US – a favourite
 
• FAVE
adj. 1938 sl., orig. US – favourite  
n. 1938 sl., orig. US – a favourite
 
• FAVEL
adj. c1489 obs. – of a horse: pale reddish-yellow
n. 1362 obs. – a personification of cunning or duplicity
 
• FAVE RAVE
n. 1967 sl., orig. US – a favourite piece of music, film, musician, etc. 
 
• FAVEREL
n. 1597 – an onion  
 
• FAVILLOUS
adj. 1650 – consisting of or resembling ashes  
 
• FAVONIAN
n. 1656 – pert. to the west wind;  hence, favourable, gentle, propitious  
 
• FAVONIOUS
adj. 1692 obs. – pert. to the west wind
 
• FAVONIUS
n. 1549 poetic or mythical – the west wind, Zephyr  
 
• THE FAVOR
n. 19C sl. – copulation thought of as a gift granted by the female to the male  
 
• FAVORANCE
n. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – resemblance of features
n. 2. 1933 Amer. dial. – a liking, preference  
 
• FAVORITE
n. 1895 Amer. dial. – a friend  
 
• FAVOROUS
adj. 1. c1485 obs. – full of favour, obliging, kind
adj. 2. 1560 obs. – adapted to win favour, pleasing; pleasant
 
• FAVOUR
n. 1. c1300 obs. exc. arch. – that which conciliates affection or goodwill; attractiveness, comeliness, beauty; an attraction, charm 
n. 2. 1387 obs. – the object of favour; a favourite
n. 3. c1400 obs. – aid, support, furtherance
n. 4. c1450 obs. exc. arch or Eng. dial. – appearance, aspect, look 
n. 5. c1460 obs. – lenity, mildness, mitigation of punishment; an instance of this, a lenient act
n. 6. 1525 arch. – the face, countenance  
n. 7. 1596 obs. – a feature
n. 8. 1634 obs. – an indulgence, privilege
n. 9. 1692 obs. rare – the act of favouring; patronage of an object
n. 10. 19C Eng. dial. – family likeness  
vb. 1. 1362 obs. – to indulge oneself, or a feeling
vb. 2. 1740 Eng. dial. – to smell
 
• FAVOURABLE
adj. 1. c1384 obs. – showing undue favour, partial
adj. 2. 1398 obs. – winning favour; hence, pleasing, agreeable, beautiful, comely  
adj. 3. 1502 obs. exc. arch. – of a superior: gracious; kindly, obliging  
adj. 4. 1666 obs. – admissible, allowable
 
• FAVOURABLENESS
n. 1545 obs. – kindliness, leniency
 
• FAVOURABLY
adv. 1430-50 obs. – with undue favour or partiality
 
• FAVOUR-CURRIER
n. 1855 obs. – a servile flatterer
 
• FAVOURER
n. 1625 obs. – a patron
 
• FAVOURESS
n. 1616 obs. rare – a female supporter or encourager
 
• FAVOURISH
vb. 1490 obs. rare – to bring into favour with; to favour  
 
• FAVOURISHED
adj. 1556 obs. – favoured
 
• FAVOURITE
n. 1. 1585-7 obs. – one who countenances, encourages, or supports; a well-wisher, friend, or follower
n. 2. 1690 – a curl or lock of hair hanging loose upon the temple: worn in the 17th and 18th centuries  
 
• FAVOURITE VICE
n. L19 sl. – one’s preferred drink  
 
• FAVOURITIZE
vb. 1861 rare – to practice favouritism
 
• FAVOURIZE
vb. 1585 obs. – to support, to encourage; to favour, to treat with partiality
 
• FAVOURLESS
adj. 1. 1509 obs. – not showing favour, unpromising, unfavourable  
adj. 2. 1594 obs. – that has no attractiveness or beauty, unattractive
 
• FAVOUR-RIBBON
n. 1762 obs. – a ribbon worn as a love token
 
• FAVOURSOME
adj. 1599 obs. rare – that is an object of favour; acceptable, pleasant
 
• FAW
adj. 1. a700 obs. – coloured, stained, streaked; particoloured, variegated
adj. 2. c1000 obs. – of objects that reflect light: bright, glancing, gleaming, twinkling
n. 1. 1756 – a gypsy, a beggar, a vagrant; an itinerant tinker 
n. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a slovenly woman; a term of abuse
vb. Bk1900 Eng. dial. obs. – to take
 
• FAWD
n. 1641 Eng. dial. – a bundle  
 
• FAW-GANG
n. 1777 – a gang of gypsies, rogues, or beggars  
 
• FAWL
n. 1932 Sc. – a whale  

• FAW-LIKE
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – gypsy-like, untidy, slatternly
 
• FAWN
n. 1. 1481 obs. – a young animal, a cub
n. 2. 1590 obs. – an act of fawning; a servile cringe, a wheedling courtesy
n. 3. 1635 obs. rare – one who fawns, cringes, or flatters; a toady
vb. a1300 obs. – to wag the tail
 
• FAWNERY
n. 1661 obs. – the bearing or tricks of a fawner; flattery, sycophancy
 
• FAWNEY
n. 1. 1781 sl. – one who practices the fraud involving bogus jewellery  
n. 2. L18 sl. – a finger-ring  
 
• FAWNEY-BOUNCING
n. 1851 sl. – selling a ring to a victim; the justification for the sale is a supposed wager, which the seller can win only by selling the ring  
 • FAWNEY-DROPPER
n. M19 UK criminals’ sl. – one who practices the ‘fawney-rig’  
 
• FAWNEY-DROPPING
n. 1796 sl. – a common fraud: a fellow drops a brass ring, double gilt, which he picks up before the party meant to be cheated, and to whom he disposed of it for less than its supposed, and ten times more than its real, value  
 
• FAWNEYED
adj. 1812 sl. – wearing a ring or rings  
 
• FAWNEY-FAM’D
adj. 1812 sl. – having one or more rings on the finger  
 
• FAWNEY-MAN
n. L18 sl. – a seller of bogus jewellery  
 
• FAWNEY RIG
n. 1796 sl. – a common fraud: “a fellow drops a brass ring, double gilt, which he picks up before the party meant to be cheated, and to whom he disposed of it for less than its supposed, and ten times more than its real, value  

• FAWN-FRECKLES
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – freckles
 
• FAWNGUEST
n. 1. 1592 obs. – a fawning parasite, a sycophant, a toady 
n. 2. 1602 obs. – one who robs or swindles another under the guise of friendship

• FAWNICATE
vb. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to fondle affectionately

• FAWNICATING
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – affectionate, caressing, fondling
 
• FAWN ON
vb. a1300 obs. – to pat the head of a dog

• FAWN-PECKLES
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – freckles

• FAWNSOME
adj. 1851 Eng. dial. – kind, caressing, loving; gently aggressive in manner or desire
 
• FAWNY
n. L18 sl. – a ring  

• FAWS
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a fox

• FAWSONT
adj. 1786 Sc. obs. – honest, seemly
 
• FAX
int. 1724 Eng. dial. – an exclamation or mild expletive  
n. 1. c900 obs. – the hair of the head
n. 2. 1513 obs. – the face; used derisively
 
• FAXED
adj. 891 obs. – having hair, hairy
 
• FAXED STAR
n. a1259 obs. – a comet, from the resemblance of its tail to hair
 
• FAY
adj. L19 sl., orig. African-American – White; pert. to White culture  
n. 1. c1290 obs. or arch. – allegiance  
n. 2. c1300 obs. or arch. – fidelity  
n. 3. a1300 obs. or arch. – promise, assurance  
n. 4. a1300 obs. or arch. – religious belief, faith
n. 5. c1374 obs. or arch. – credit, authority
n. 6. 1393 – a fairy or elf  
n. 7. 1885 Eng. dial. – luck, success
n. 8. L19 US sl., usually derogatory – a White person 
n. 9. E20 African-American usage, derogatory – a Black person who acts like a Caucasian
vb. 1. a1000 obs. – to fit, adapt, or join; to put together, add, compose; to fix or fasten in position
vb. 2. c1205 – to clean, to cleanse, to polish; to clear away filth, etc.  
vb. 3. c1300 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to do, to go on favourably, to succeed  
vb. 4. c1300 obs. – to suit; to match with
vb. 5. 1847 Amer. dial. – to fit, to fit in, to agree; to fill in (a gap)
vb. 6. 1866 US  – of a coat: to fit  
vb. 7. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to discharge blood
vb. 8. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to injure, to mutilate
 
• FAYER
n. 1611 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – one who cleanses  
 
• FAYFUL
adj. a1400 obs. – faithful
 
• FAYFULLY
adv. a1400 obs. – in a faithful manner, loyally, reliably
 
• FAY-LAND
n. 1870 – fairyland  
 
• FAYLLARD
adj. c1310 obs. rare – that fails or offends; offending, delinquent 
 
• FAYMISH
adj. 1827 Eng. dial. – excellent, splendid; used as an emphatic expression of approval  
 
• FAYNIGHTS!
int. 1870 UK schoolchildren’s usage – used to call a playground truce  
 
• FAYTER
n. 16C UK criminals’ sl. – a cheat or impostor; a fraudulent fortune-teller  

• FAYTOR
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a vagabond, a gypsy, a fortune-teller
 
• FAZARD
n. 1721 Sc. – a puny, effeminate man; a weakling, a coward; an impudent fellow  
 
• FAZART
adj. 1508 obs. – cowardly, dastardly
n. 1597 Sc. obs. – a coward, a dastard
 
• FAZE
n. 1. c1885 Amer. dial. – a state of worry 
n. 2. 1894 Amer. dial. – an injury  
vb. 1. 1830 US sl. – to surprise, to disconcert
vb. 2. 1894 Amer. dial. – to injure  
 
• FAZED
adj. 1597 Sc. obs. – bewildered; confused; disconcerted  

• FAZLE
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a tangle
vb. 1874 Eng. dial. – to tangle, to twist

• FAZLEMENT
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a tangle
 
• FAZOOL
n. 1979 US sl. – one dollar  
 
• FAZZLED
adj. 1914 Amer. dial. – tired


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