Dictionary: FEB – FEE

• FEBBYWERRY
n. 1922 Amer. dial. – February  

• FEBRICITANT
adj. 1599 rare – affected with fever, feverish
n. 1541 obs. – one who is affected with fever

• FEBRICITATE
vb. 1656 obs. – to be ill of a fever

• FEBRICITATION
n. 1584 obs. rare – the state of being in a fever, feverishness

• FEBRICITY
n. 1873 – the state of having a fever or being feverish  

• FEBRICOSE
adj. 1879 – feverish  

• FEBRICULOSE
adj. 1727 – having a slight fever  

• FEBRICULOSITY
n. 1727 rare – feverishness

• FEBRICULOUS
adj. 1656 obs. rare – slightly feverish

• FEBRIENT
adj. 1651 obs. rare – feverish, sickening of a fever

• FEBRIFIC
adj. 1749 – feverish  

• FEBRILE
adj. 1666 – pert. to fever, feverish  

• FEBRILITY
n. 1873 – feverishness

• FEBRILOUS
adj. 1651 obs. rare – pert. to fever; feverish

• FEBRIS
n. 1483 obs. – a fever

• FEC
n. c1000 obs. – a definite interval in space or time; a limited distance, fixed period

• FECAL FREAK
n. 1971 US sl. – a person who derives sexual pleasure from eating the faeces of others  

• FECALITY
n. 1653 obs. – faecal matter  

• FECHIE-LEGHIE
adj. Bk1900 Sc. – inactive; insipid

• FECK
adj. 1. 1810 Sc. – strong, vigorous
adj. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – worthless
int. 1724 Eng. dial. – an exclamation or mild expletive  
n. 1. c1470 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – amount, quantity  
n. 2. c1500 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. obs. – the purport, drift, tenor, or substance of a statement, intention, etc.
n. 3. 1535 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – efficacy, efficiency, value; hence, vigour, energy  
n. 4. Bk1900 Sc. – familiar intercourse
n. 5. Bk1900 Sc. – esteem, affection
vb. 1809 sl. – to steal  

• FECKET
n. 1810 Sc. – a waistcoat, an underjacket; a shirt

• FECKFOW
adj. Bk1900 Sc. – wealthy, possessing substance

• FECKFUL
adj. 1596 – efficient, vigorous, powerful  

• FECKFULLY
adv. 1723 – efficiently, vigorously, powerfully  

• FECKLE
vb. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to entangle

• FECKLES
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – freckles

• FECKLESS
adj. 1. 1599 orig. Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – of things: ineffective, feeble, futile, valueless, worthless  
adj. 2. a1774 orig. Sc. – lacking resourcefulness, incapable, incompetent, shiftless  
adj. 3. 1869 – destitute of vigour, energy, or capacity; weak, helpless, useless

• FECKLESSLY
adv. 1862 – feebly, ineffectually; wretchedly

• FECKLESSNESS
n. 1. 1637 – lack of vigour or energy, feebleness  
n. 2. 1893 – lack of resourcefulness  

• FECKLINS
adv. 1853 Sc. – for the most part, chiefly, mostly
int. 1845 Eng. dial. – an exclamation or mild expletive

• FECKLY
adv. 1. c1680 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. obs. – effectually, indeed
adv. 2. a1774 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – for the most part, mostly; almost 

• FECKS!
int. L16 Sc. & Eng. dial. – expression solemn conviction or astonishment

• FECKT
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – competent, capable, sane

• FECT
vb. 1541 obs. rare – to infect

• FECTUALLY
adv. c1485 obs. – effectually

• FECULENCE
n. 1. a1648 – feculent matter; dregs, lees, dross, scum; also, filth 
n. 2. 1733 – faeces  
n. 3. 1860 – foulness, filth  
n. 4. 1860 – moral foulness  

• FECULENCY
n. 1651 obs. – foulness, filth

• FECULENT
adj. 1. 1471 – of the nature of faeces or dregs; abounding with sediment or impurities; laden or polluted with filth; foul, fetid
adj. 2. 1590 obs. – covered with faeces; filthy  

• FECUND
adj. c1420 – capable of producing offspring or vegetable growth abundantly; prolific, fertile 

• FECUNDATE
vb. a1631 – to render fruitful or productive 

• FECUNDATION
n. 1541 – fertilization; impregnation  

• FECUNDATORY
adj. 1839 – impregnating  

• FECUNDIFY
vb. 1730 obs. rare – to render fruitful or productive

• FECUNDIOUS
adj. 1630 obs. – productive, fruitful

• FECUNDITY
n. 1. c1420 – of the earth: the quality of producing abundantly; fertility 
n. 2. 1447 – of female animals: the faculty of reproduction; the capacity for bringing forth young; productiveness  
n. 3. 1555 – productiveness in general, the faculty or power of being fruitful, fertility  

• FECUNDIZE
vb. 1828 – to render fruitful or productive  

• FECUNDNESS
n. 1727 – the ability to produce an abundance of offspring or new growth; fertility  

• FECUNDOUS
adj. 1737 obs. – productive, fruitful

• FED
adj. c1250 obs. – at variance, hostile
n. 1. a1300 obs. – an enemy; the fiend, the devil
n. 2. 1916 US sl. – an FBI agent

• FEDARIE
n. 1603 obs. – a confederate, an accomplice  

• FED AT A TROUGH
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – lacking manners, uncouth, boorish  

• FED-BED
n. 1827 Eng. dial. obs. – a feather-bed

• FEDDLE
n. a1400-50 obs. – one who is made much of; a pet, a favourite, a darling  
vb. 1611 obs. rare – to make much of; to pamper, to cherish  

• FEDE
adj. c1250 obs. – at variance, hostile
n. a1300 obs. – an enemy; the fiend, the devil

• FEDERAL
adj. 1660 obs. – pert. to a covenant, compact, or treaty

• FEDERAL BUILDING
n. 1949 Amer. dial. – an outdoor toilet  

• FEDERATIVE
adj. 1690 obs. – pert. to the formation of covenant, league, or alliance  

• FEDERATORY
adj. 1692 obs. rare – pert. to the formation of covenant, league, or alliance  

• FEDERED
adj. 1382 obs. rare – allied or leagued together

• FEDIFRACTION
n. 1650 obs. rare – breach of covenant

• FEDIFRAGOUS
adj. 1600 obs. – breaking a pledge or agreement, faithless, perfidious

• FEDILL
n. a1400-50 obs. – one who is made much of; a pet, a favourite

• FEDITIES
n. 1539 obs. – foul or disgusting practices

• FEDITY
n. 1542 obs. – foulness, filthiness, nastiness, vileness, loathsomeness, whether moral or physical 

• FEDMILL
n. 1897 Sc. – a clumsy woman

• FEDMIT
adj. 1825 Sc. – gluttonous
n. 1825 Sc. – a glutton

• FED TO THE NECK WITH
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bored  

• FED UP
adj. 1. 1914 sl. – depressed  
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bored  

• FED UP TO THE BALLS
adj. 1965 US sl. – completely fed up  

• FEE
n. 1. c870 obs. – money
n. 2. c888 obs. – movable property in general; goods, possessions, wealth
n. 3. c900 obs. – livestock, cattle, whether large or small
n. 4. c1340 obs. – a warrior’s share of spoil; a dog’s share of the game
n. 5. c1369 obs. – a tribute or offering to a superior
n. 6. c1386 obs. – a perquisite allowed to an officer or servant
n. 7. c1400 obs. – a prize, a reward
n. 8. a1400 obs. – the liver
n. 9. 1549 obs. – a bribe
n. 10. a1592 obs. – a gift in acknowledgement of favour
vb. 1. 1375 obs. – to bribe
vb. 2. 1701 Amer. dial. – to hire, to employ  
vb. 3. 1925 Amer. dial. – to give a gratuity to; to tip  

• FEEB
n. 1. 1911 US sl. – an ineffectual or incompetent person  
n. 2. E20 US sl. – a stupid or mentally disabled person

• FEEBEE
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – a small or cheap playing marble  

• FEEBILITY
n. 1413 obs. rare – feebleness

• FEEBLE
adj. 1. c1250 obs. – in moral sense: mean, base, contemptible
adj. 2. c1275 obs. – of inferior quality, poor, mean; often said of clothing, food, dwelling, etc.
adj. 3. 1297 obs. – of a period, event, etc.: miserable, ill-starred, unhappy
adj. 4. c1314 obs. – wanting in resources; ill-supplied,
adj. 5. 1494 obs. – limited in quantity or amount, insufficient, scanty
n. 1. c1325 obs. – weakness, feebleness
n. 2. 1340 obs. – a feeble person; a weak, frail, or ineffectual person
n. 3. 1678 – a moral weakness, a foible  
vb. 1. a1225 obs. – to become or grow feeble  
vb. 2. a1340 obs. exc. arch. – to make feeble; to enfeeble, to weaken 

• FEEBLE MAN
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – the third or ring finger  

• FEEBLER
 n. 1586 obs. rare – one who or that which makes feeble or weak

• FEEBLESS
adj. 1297 obs. exc. arch. – feebleness, infirmity; infirm health  

• FEEBLING
n. L19 – a feeble person; a weakling

• FEEBLISH
adj. 1674 – somewhat feeble  
vb. 1375 obs. – to render feeble, weak, or infirm, to enfeeble

• FEEBLISHING
n. 1580 obs. – a weakening, decline in health  

• FEEBLISHMENT
n. 1548 obs. – enfeeblement

• FEEBLOSE
adj. 1882 rare – rather feeble; weakly  

• FEEBLY
adv. c1290 obs. – in a sorry manner or plight; inefficiently, insufficiently, niggardly, poorly, scantily

• FEE CHASER
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a lawyer  

• FEED
n. 1. 1808 – a meal; a sumptuous meal; a feast; a full meal  
n. 2. 1818 Amer. dial. – food or drink for human consumption
n. 3. 1846 Amer. dial. – a period of active eating  
vb. 1. c1320 obs. – to nurture, to bring up
vb. 2. 1790 Eng. dial. – to grow fat or stout; to put on flesh
vb. 3. 1933 Brit. sl. – to bore  

• FEED BAG
n. 1. 1929 Amer. dial. – a meal  
n. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. – a place where one can get a meal  

• FEED BOX
n. 1942 Amer. sl. – the stomach  

• FEEDER
n. 1. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a person who grows fat
n. 2. 1967 Amer. dial .- one who eats, usually prodigious amounts
n. 3. 1969 Amer. dial. – a man who cared for the horses and stables in a logging camp
n. 4. 1969 Amer. dial. – kindling wood

• FEED FULL AND HIGH
vb. 1697 – to supply with rich and abundant food  

• FEEDING
adj. 1940 Brit. sl. – boring, dull, tedious  
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a meal, esp. an abundant or elaborate one  

• FEEDING FRENZY
n. 1972 – an episode of frantic competition or rivalry for something, esp. among journalists covering a story, personality, etc.

• FEEDING LOT
n. 1940 Amer. dial. – a barnyard  

• FEEDING-STORM
n. 1819 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a continuous snow-storm

• FEEDING-TIME
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – warm, showery weather

• FEED-JOINT
n. 1909 Amer. dial. – a place where one can get a meal  

• FEEDLE
n. 1882 Sc. – a field

• FEED LEAD
vb. 1917 Amer. dial. – to shoot someone  

• FEEDLOT
n. 1959 Amer. dial. – a barnyard  

• FEED OFF HIS RANGE
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to meddle in the affairs of another  

• A FEED OF OATS
n. 19C chiefly rural usage – a whipping  

• FEED ONE’S FACE
vb. 1894 Amer. sl. – to eat greedily  

• FEEDS LIKE A HOTEL
phr. World War II Amer. sl. – said of a ship with a sumptuous bill of fare  

FEED-STATION
n. 1910 Amer. dial. – a place where one can get a meal  

• FEED THE FISH
vb. 1928 Amer. dial. – to be seasick, and vomit in consequence  

• FEED THE FISHES
vb. 1. 1928 Amer. dial. – to be seasick, and vomit in consequence  
vb. 2. 20c sl. – to be drowned

• FEED THE GOLDFISH
vb. 1942 Amer. dial. – to vomit  

• FEED WITH MONEY
vb. 1567 obs. – to bribe  

• FEE-FAW-FUM
n. 1. L17 rare – a bloodthirsty person
n. 2. E19 rare – nonsense, such as might terrify children

• FEE GRABBER
n. 1. 1967 Amer. dial. – a lawyer  
n. 2. 1967 Amer. dial. – a policeman; a deputy sheriff; a constable  

• FEE-HOUSE
n. 1. c1000 obs. – a treasury
n. 2. 1483 obs. – a cattle-shed

• FEEK
vb. 1. 1878 Eng. dial. – to be uneasy or anxious  
vb. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to fetch

• FEEKI-FEEKI 
n. 1967 Amer. military sl. – sexual intercourse
vb. 1948 Amer. military sl. – to have sexual intercourse

• FEEL A DRAFT
vb. 1957 Amer. dial. – to sense hostility or discrimination  

• FEEL AS THOUGH DEATHSTRUCK
vb. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to feel anxious, apprehensive, or greatly distressed

• FEEL FINE
vb. 1965 Amer. dial. – to be slightly drunk  

• FEEL FLAT
vb. 1838 Amer. sl. – to be low-spirited, out of sorts

• FEEL FOR
vb. 1907 Amer. dial. – to want, to like  

• FEEL-GOOD
adj. 20C colloq., orig. US – causing s feeling of happiness and well-being
n. 20C colloq., orig. US – a feeling of happiness and well-being
vb. 1927 Amer. dial. – (as ‘feel good’) to be slightly drunk  

• FEEL HAIRY
vb. M19 sl. – to feel sexually inclined  

• FEELIMAGEERIES
n. 1894 Sc. – knick-knacks; gewgaws; odds and ends; useless trifles

• FEELING A BIT OFF
adj. 20C Aust. sl. – unwell, off-colour 

• FEELING FINE
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – drunk  

• FEELING FUNNY
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – somewhat ill; indisposed  

• FEELING GOOD
adj. 1942 Amer. sl. – drunk  

• FEELING-HEARTED
adj. 1888 Sc. & Eng. dial. – tender-hearted, kind-hearted

• FEELING LIKE THE WRATH OF GOD
phr. c1950 sl. – feeling very ill, esp. if from a bad hangover 

• FEELING THAT YOU FEEL WHEN YOU FEEL YOU HAVE A FEELING YOU NEVER FELT BEFORE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – love  

• FEEL IN ONE’S BONES
vb. 1857 Amer. dial. – to have a sense of certainty based on instinct rather than evidence  

• FEEL LIKE A BOILED OWL
vb. 1857 Amer. dial. – to be nervously exhausted, as from loss of sleep; to be physically uncomfortable; to be hungover

• FEEL LIKE A MILLION BUCKS
vb. 1937 Amer. sl. – to feel wonderful  

• FEEL LIKE A STEWED MONKEY
vb. 1892 Amer. dial. – to be physically uncomfortable or nervously exhausted; to be hungover  

• FEEL LIKE A STEWED OWL
vb. 1892 Amer. dial. – to be physically uncomfortable or nervously exhausted; to be hungover

• FEEL LIKE A STEWED WITCH
vb. 1909 Amer. dial. – to be physically uncomfortable or nervously exhausted; to be hungover  

• FEEL LIKE GOING
vb. 1954 Amer. dial. – to feel in good health and spirits  

• FEEL LIKE GOING TO HEAVEN IN A STRING
vb. Bk1904 sl. – to feel blindly and confusedly happy

• FEEL LIKE THE LAST ROSE OF SUMMER
vb. 1966 Amer. dial. – to have a general feeling of discomfort or illness  
• FEEL MEAN
vb. M19 sl. – to feel ashamed of one’s unpleasant conduct

• FEEL MONSTROUS SKITTISH
vb. 1884 Amer. dial. – to be very timid  

• FEEL NO PAIN
vb. 1947 sl. – to be drunk to the point of insensibility  

• FEEL OF
vb. 1817 Amer. dial. – to touch, to handle  

• FEEL ONE’S KEEP
vb. 1966 Amer. dial. – to be in good health and spirits; to feel confident, ambitious  

• FEEL ONE’S KEEPING
vb. 1927 Amer. dial. – to be in good health and spirits; to feel confident, ambitious  

• FEEL ONE’S KEEPINGS
vb. 1966 Amer. dial. – to feel ambitious and eager to work  

• FEEL ONE’S KEEPS
vb. 1966 Amer. dial. – to feel depressed or in a gloomy mood  

• FEEL ONE’S OATS
vb. 1. 1831 Amer. sl., orig. of horses – to be high-spirited
vb. 2. 19C Amer. sl. – to be aware of or call attention to one’s own power or strength

• FEEL OUT
vb. ME – to test or discover by cautious trial

• FEEL SOMEONE’S COLLAR
vb. 1950 Brit. sl. – to arrest

• FEELTH
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – feeling, sensation

• FEEL THE BREEZE?
phr. 1950 Amer. dial. – used to warn a man that his pants are torn or that his fly is open  

• FEEL THE DRAFT?
phr. 1950 Amer. dial. – used to warn a man that his pants are torn or that his fly is open  

• FEEL THE DRAUGHT
vb. 20C colloq. – feel the adverse effects of changed, esp. financial, conditions 

• FEEL THE PINCH
vb. 1861 colloq. – feel the adverse effects of changed, esp. financial, conditions; to feel the effects of having insufficient money

• FEELTHY
adj. 1933 sl. – obscene; pornographic; erotic

• FEEL TO
vb. 1837 Amer. dial. – to want, to desire; to want to, to feel inclined to do something  

• FEEL UP
vb. 1930 colloq. – to fondle a person without their consent, for one’s own sexual stimulation

• FEEL WALLOW
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to have a distaste for one’s food  

• FEEL WALLOW-LIKE
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to have a distaste for one’s food  

• FEEL WEE-WAWY
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to be nauseated  

• FEEL WEE-WOWY
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to be nauseated

• FEELY
adj. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – sensitive

• FEEN
adj. 1818 Eng. dial. – desirous, eager  

• FEENEEKIN
n. Bk1900 Sc. – a person of small stature, and of a tart, finical disposition

• FEERDY; FEIRDY; FERDY
adj. 1742 Sc. – strong, able-bodied, in good condition, hale, hearty
n. Bk1900 Sc. – a person who wears well in constitution

• FEERED
adj. 1933 Amer. dial. – afraid  

• FEERIE
adj. 1. 1810 Sc. – clever, active, nimble
adj. 2. 1825 Sc. – looking weakly; in a bad state of health

• FEERILIE
adv. 1825 Sc. – cleverly, actively, nimbly

• FEEROCH
n. 1742 Sc. – strength, substance; force, ability, energy  

• FEEROCHRIE
n. Bk1900 Sc. – ability, activity, agility  

• FEERY
n. 1715 Sc. – tumult, noise, bustle, confusion; rage, passion

• FEERY-FARRY
n. 1535 Sc. obs. – a bustle, a tumult; a state of excitement, disorder, confusion

• FEES
n. c1400 obs. exc. Sc. – wages 

• FEEST
adj. 1. 1859 Amer. dial. – disgusted with; sated by; made nauseated by; nauseated  
adj. 2. 1901 Amer. dial. – untidy, unkempt; filthy  

• FEEST OF
adj. 1859 Amer. dial. – disgusted with; sated by; made nauseated by; nauseated  

• FEETH
adj. 1889 Eng. dial. – hesitating, reluctant

• FEETING
n. 1663 Amer. dial. – footprints, tracks  

• FEETNING
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – footprints, tracks  

• FEEZE
n. 1647 Amer. dial. – a state of excitement or anxiety; a fit of fretfulness; a state of alarm  
vb. 1. 1806 Sc. – to screw, to twist, to turn
vb. 2. 1851 Amer. dial. – to vex, to trouble, to faze  
vb. 3. 1886 Amer. dial. – to worry, to fret  

• FEEZE ABOUT
vb. 1794 Sc. – to shuffle or potter about

• FEEZED
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; confused; disconcerted

• FEEZE UP
vb. 1. 1825 Sc. – to flatter
vb. 2. 1825 Sc. – to work up into a passion


Back to INDEX F

Back to DICTIONARY