Dictionary: FEF – FEZ

• FEFF
n. 1. 1828 Sc. – a bad smell, a stench
n. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a thief
vb. 1. 1898 Eng. dial. – to flatter; to fawn, to play the hypocrite
vb. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to steal

• FEFNICUTE
n. 1864 Eng. dial. – a hypocrite; a mean, sneaking fellow; a parasite, a hanger-on  
vb. 19C Eng. dial. – to fawn, to play the hypocrite; to speak fair to a person, but revile him to others 

• FEFT
vb. 1684 Eng. dial. obs. – to persuade or endeavour to persuade

• FEG
adj. 1721 Eng. dial. obs. – fair, handsome; fine
vb. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to scratch

• FEGARIES
n. 1808 Sc. & Eng. dial. – finery, superfluous adornments, fanciful attire
 
• FEGARY
n. 1. E17 Eng. dial. & colloq., rare – a vagary, a prank; a whim, an eccentricity
n. 2. E18 Eng. dial. & colloq., rare – a gewgaw; a trifle; finery in dress
n. 3. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a wild, excitable temper or humour; a tantrum

• FEGRIM
n. 1766 Sc. obs. – a whim. a vagary; finery
 
• FEGS!
int. L16 Sc. & Eng. dial. – expression of solemn conviction or astonishment
 
• FEGUE
vb. 1668 obs. – to destroy, to bring to ruin, to put an end to

• FEIFFLE
vb. 1845 Sc. – to work in a clumsy or foolish manner
 
• FEIGH
int. 1715 Sc. – an exclamation of disgust or abomination  
vb. c1205 obs. – to cleanse, clean out  
 
• FEIGN
adj. 1766 Eng. dial. – glad, happy, well-pleased  
 
• FEIROCH
n. 1766 Eng. dial. – strength, substance; force, ability, energy  
 
• FEIST
n. 1. 1790 Sc. – a breaking wind without noise
n. 2. 1850 Amer. dial. – a small dog of mixed breed  
n. 3. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – a smell of fustiness or closeness
n. 4. Bk1900 Sc. – exertion with little effect
n. 5. Bk1900 Sc. – a weak person
n. 6. 1949 Amer. dial. – a child that is disrespectful to its elders  
n. 7. 1915 Amer. dial., derogatory – a person or animal that is irascible, touchy, or bad-tempered
vb. 1. Bk1900 Sc. – to make exertion with difficulty and little effect
vb. 2. 1931 Amer. dial. – to strut, to flirt, to move so as to drawn attention to oneself; to behave coquettishly or provocatively  
 
• FEISTER
n. 1958 Amer. dial. – a good-for-nothing  

• FEISTINESS
n. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – fustiness
 
• FEISTY
adj. 1. 1890 Amer. dial. – irascible, argumentative, touchy, angry, low, mean, cross; pert, impertinent, impudent, self-important; frisky, mettlesome  
adj. 2. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – fusty, close; mouldy, injured by damp
adj. 3. 1906 Amer. dial. – acting so as to show off or drawn attention to oneself; putting on airs; flirtatious, saucy, tomboyish, of questionable morals  
adj. 4. 1916 Amer. dial. – worthless  
adj. 5. c1960 Amer. dial. – nosy, inquisitive  
adj. 6. 1969 Amer. dial. – eager to get married  
n. 1. 1939 Amer. dial. – a small dog of mixed breed, a cur  
n. 2. 1954 Amer. dial. – one who moves about hurriedly  
 
• FEISTY BRITCHES
n. 1906 Amer. dial. – a touchy or quarrelsome person  

• FELCH
n. 1827 Eng. dial. – a tame animal
 
• FELICIFY
vb. 1683 obs. rare – to make happy
 
• FELICIOUS
adj. 1. c1485 obs. – happy, joyous
adj. 2. 1599 obs. – fortunate, prosperous
 
• FELICITIES
n. 1909 Amer. dial. – entrails  
 
• FELLA;  FELLAH
n. 1864 sl. – a male person, a fellow
 
• FELL-AWAY
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a person who goes to church very seldom or not at all  
 
• FELLER
n. 1. 1825 sl. – a male person, a fellow
n. 2. 1833 Amer. dial. – a woman’s sweetheart, a beau  
n. 3. 1939 Amer. dial. – a child  
 
• FELLING OF OAKS
n. 17C colloq. – seasickness  
 
• FELL-LURKING
adj. 18C – lurking to do mischief  
 
• FELLOW
n. 1. 1833 Amer. dial. – a woman’s sweetheart, a beau  
n. 2. 1842 Amer. dial. – a Black man  
n. 3. 1939 Amer. dial. – a child  
n. 4. 1941 Amer. dial., African-American usage – a White man
 
• A FELLOW AND A WENCH
n. 1952 Amer. dial. – a pair of mismatched socks or stocking; that is, a companion and a noncompanion  
 
• FELLOWLY
adj. 1928 Amer. dial. – sociable, companionable  
 
• FELLOWSHIP
vb. 1861 Amer. dial. – to associate with, to be on familiar terms with  
 
• FELLOW TRAVELER
n. World War II Amer. sl. – a person working secretly for a foreign government; a treacherous person  
 
• FELON
n. 1840 Amer. dial. – a severe inflammation or swelling, usually in a finger or toe and often involving a bone  
 
• FELONY
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a hard, painful swelling, often on a finger, that seems to come from deep under the skin  
 
• FEM
n. 1. c1690 sl. – the hand 
n. 2. 1871 US sl. – a young woman
n. 3. 1969 Amer. dial. – a homosexual man  
n. 4. 1969 Amer. dial. – an effeminate man  
 
• FEMALE UNIT
n. 1980s US college sl. – a young woman  
 
• FEMALIST
n. 1613 obs. rare – one devoted to the female sex; a courter of women; a gallant
 
• FEMARINES
n. World War II Amer. sl. – the women’s reserve of the Marine Corps  
 
• FEME
n. L17 sl. – a hand  
 
• FEMICIDE
n. 1. 1801 – the killing of a woman
n. 2. 1828 – one who kills a woman
 
• FEMINARY
adj. 1630 obs. – womanish  
 
• FEMINATE
adj. a1533 obs. rare – resembling a woman, effeminate; female, feminine
 
• FEMINILE
adj. 1650 obs. – peculiar to a woman; feminine
 
• FEMME
n. 1. 1871 US sl. – a young woman
n. 2. 1957 sl. – a lesbian who adopts a passive, feminine role
 
• FEMME FOLLOWER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a philanderer  
 
• FEMME LOOKER
n. Bk1942 Amer. college sl. – an attractive girl  
 
• FEMMY
adj. 1967 Amer. dial. – of a man: too particular or fussy; womanish  
 
• FENCE
n. 1. a1700 sl. – a dealer in stolen goods
n. 2. 1914 Amer. dial. – a field, a pasture; a fenced-in area  
vb. 1610 sl. – to handle or sell stolen goods
 
• FENCE BREAKER
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a severe rainstorm  
 
• FENCE-CORNER BREED
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – a horse that was not intentionally bred; a dog of mixed breed  
 
• FENCE-CORNER KID
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – an illegitimate child  
 
• FENCE CRAWLER
n. 1936 Amer. dial. – a cow or other animal that cannot be held in a fence  
 
• FENCE-LIFTER
n. 1933 Amer. dial. – a very heavy rain  
 
• FENCE LIZARD
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – an immoral woman  
 
• FENCE MOUSE
n. 1857 Amer. dial. – a chipmunk  
 
• FENCE POST
n. 1. 1943 Amer. dial. – a household match
n. 2. 1950 Amer. dial. – a toothpick  
 
• FENCE-POST HOLE
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a nonexistent item used as the basis for a practical joke  
 
• FENCE RAIL
n. c1960 Amer. dial. – a very thin, lanky person 
 
• FENEAGUE
vb. 1854 Eng. dial. – to fail of a promise, to play truant, to shirk work  
 
• FENERATE
vb. 1623 obs. – to put money to usury; to lend money at interest
 
• FEN-NIGHTINGALE
n. a1825 Eng. dial. – a frog 
 
• FENSIES!
int. 1977 Amer. dial. – used to demand a pause, exemption, or truce during a fight or game  
 
• FENUGIE
n. 1991 US sl. – during the Vietnam War: a soldier freshly arrived in Vietnam  

• FENZIE
vb. 1773 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to feign, to pretend

• FENZIED
adj. 1827 Sc. – feigned, pretended
 
• FERD
n. 1660 Sc. obs. – a violent onset, a stir, a bustle
 
• FERDARVA
adj. 1939 Amer. dial. – spoiled  
 
• FERDINAND
n. 1950 Amer. euphemism – a bull  
 
• FERDUTZT
adj. 1. 1967 Amer. dial. – bewildered, nonplussed, confused, mixed up  
adj. 2. 1985 Amer. dial. – spoiled, botched, bungled  
 
• FERDY
adj. 1. c1340 obs. rare – fearful, timid, afraid, terrified 
adj. 2. 1742 Sc. – strong, able-bodied, active, hale, hearty  
n. 19C Sc. – a person who wears well in constitution  
 
• FERHEX
vb. 1935 Amer. dial. – to bewitch, to put a curse on  
 
• FERHEXED
adj. 1967 Amer. dial. – having bad luck  
 
• FERHEXT
adj. 1939 Amer. dial. – bewitched; full of the ‘devil’  
 
• FERHOODLE
vb. 1. 1935 Amer. dial. – to confuse, to perplex  
vb. 2. 1969 Amer. dial. – to jumble; to botch  
 
• FERHOONSE
vb. 1950 Amer. dial. – to botch; to mix up, to disarrange  
 
• FERINE
adj. 1. 1640 – of humans, their actions and attributes: barbarous, savage, fierce
adj. 2. 1666 rare – of a disease: malignant
adj. 3. 1677 – of the nature of a wild animal, wild, untamed
n. 1. 1538 Sc. obs. rare – meal
n. 2. 19C – a wild beast  
 
• FERITY 
n. c1534 – the quality of being wild or savage; brutishness; wildness; fierceness; ferocity; barbarous or savage cruelty; of plants: wildness, uncultivated condition
 
• FERK
vb. 17C sl. – to copulate  
 
• FERKISH
n. 1824 Sc. – a confused, untidy, ravelled heap or bundle, e.g. of rope, clothes, etc.; odds and ends, miscellaneous articles

• FERKISHIN

n. 1856 Sc. – a large amount; a crowd, a seething mob  
 
• FERLE
n. 1721 Sc. – the fourth part of a thin circular cake, generally made of oatmeal; a segment of cake; a cake  
 
• FERLICUE
n. 1975 Amer. dial. – a shenanigan, a prank  
 
• FERMOOSE
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – to leave in a hurry, to vamoose  
 
• FERNANDEZ TALKING
phr. 20C W. Indies sl. – used of one who is drunk and talking nonsensically or aggressively  
 
• FERNET
n. a1300 obs. – a band, company, train of attendants 
 
• FERNHOPPER
n. 1955 Amer. foresters’ usage – a forester  
 
• FERNIG
vb. 1854 Eng. dial. – to fail of a promise, to play truant, to shirk work  
 
• FERNINSTER
n. 1935 Amer. dial. – one who habitually dissents  
 
• FERNITICKLES
n. 1483 obs. exc. Sc. – freckles  
 
• FERNLING
adv. 1936 Amer. dial. – extremely  
 
• FERNOMETER
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – thermometer
 
• FEROCIENT
adj. 1654 obs. – ferocious, fierce, savage
 
• FERRECK
vb. 1967 Amer. dial. – to die  
 
• FERRET
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a keen and sly individual
vb. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally
 
• FERRICADOUZER
n. 1930 Amer. dial. – a sound beating  
 
• FERRICKED
adj. 1939 Amer. dial. – quite crazy, deranged  
 
• FERRIDIDDLE
n. 1893 Amer. dial. – a red squirrel; a chipmunk  
 
• FERRO
n. 1913 Amer. dial. – a cicada  
 
• FERRY
n. 1691 Eng. dial. – a litter of pigs, a ‘farrow’  
 
• FERRY WHEEL
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a Ferris wheel  
 
• FERSCHIMMELT
adj. 1968 Amer. dial. – confused, mixed up  
 
• FERSCHNAPP ONESELF
vb. 1970 Amer. dial. – to let the cat out of the bag, to reveal a secret  
 
• FERSTEH
vb. 1950 Amer. dial. – to understand  
 
• FERTILIZER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – nonsense  
 
• FESART
n. Bk1900 Sc. – a puny man of feminine appearance; a shameless person  
 
• FESHOUS
adj. 1725 Eng. dial. – troublesome, annoying, vexatious; difficult to please, particular; unfortunate, shameful  
 
• FESS
n. 1930 Amer. dial. – a male teacher, a professor  
vb. 1. 1834 Amer. dial. – among students: to fail in recitation; to admit that one it not prepared to recite  
vb. 2. 1953 Amer. dial. – to acknowledge, to profess  
 
• FESSED UP
adj. 1955 Amer. dial. – angry, excited  
 
• FESSES
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – the buttocks  
 
• FESSITUDE
n. 1656 obs. rare – weariness, tiredness, fatigue
 
• FESSOR
n. 1908 Amer. dial. – a male teacher, a professor  
 
• FEST
n. 1. 1910 Amer. dial. – an informal meeting or celebration; a festival; usually used in combinations, as talkfest  
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a conversation; discussion  
 
• FESTIVOUS
adj. 1654 – festive, jovial, merry, gay, mirthful
 
• FETCH
n. 1. 1930 Amer. dial. – a spirit that foretells early death, a ‘token’  
n. 2. 1944 Amer. dial. – an illegitimate or abandoned child  
 
• FETCH
vb. 1865 sl. – to strike a blow against someone  
 
• FETCH A CIRCUMBENDIBUS
vb. 1831 – to make a detour
 
• FETCH A LACE OF ANYTHING
vb. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – to go for and bring back any article  
 
• FETCH A SHINGLE OFF THE HOUSE
vb. 1953 Amer. dial. – to take unfair advantage
 
• FETCH AT THE THROPPLE
vb. Bk1905 Sc. obs. – to gasp
 
• FETCHED
adj. 1854 Amer. dial. – confounded, damned; used for emphasis  
 
• FETCHER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something beautiful or attractive  
 
• FETCHING-UP
n. 1854 Amer. dial. – upbringing, rearing, esp. ‘proper’ upbringing  
 
• FETCH-TAKED
adj. 1953 Amer. dial. – blasted, damned  
 
• FETCH THE FARM
vb. 1. L19 sl. – to have oneself admitted to the prison infirmary  
vb. 2. Bk1901 sl. – to be ordered prison infirmary diet and treatment  
 
• FETCH-UP
n. 1. 1866 Amer. dial. – a sudden stop; the halt which results from such a stop  
n. 2. 1975 Amer. dial. – upbringing, rearing, esp. ‘proper’ upbringing  
vb. 1838 Amer. dial. – (as ‘fetch up’) to come or be brought to a sudden stop; to end up in some place or situation  
 
• FETCHY
adj. 1908 Amer. dial. – charming, attractive  
 
• FETTIGLICH
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a doughnut  
 
• FETTLE
n. 1932 Amer. dial. – a fetter  
 
• FETUS 
n. 20C teen & high school sl. – a real loser  
 
• FEUSTERING
n. 1939 Amer. dial. – wasting time  
 
• FEVER
n. 1885 sl. – enthusiastic or excited interest  
 
• THE FEVER
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – the nervous excitement felt by an inexperienced hunter at the sight of game  
 
• FEVER AND LURK
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – the ‘disease’ of laziness; an imaginary disease  
 
• FEVER DELUXE
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – an imaginary disease  
 
• FEW
adv. 1942 Amer. dial. – very well, excellently  
n. 1851 Amer. dial. – an expert; someone to be reckoned with  
 
• A FEW PICKLES SHORT OF BARREL
adj. 1941 sl. – stupid; crazy, eccentric  
 
• A FEW SANDWICHES SHORT OF A PICNIC
adj. 20C sl. – stupid; crazy, eccentric  
 
• FEWTRILS
n. c1750 Eng. dial. – little unimportant things, trifles 
 
• FEW WAYS
n. 1933 Amer. dial. – a short distance  
 
• FEXATIALLY
adv. 1931 Amer. dial. – completely, thoroughly
 
• FEXATIOUSLY
adv. 1931 Amer. dial. – completely, thoroughly  
 
• FEY
n. 1. a1400 obs. – the liver
n. 2. L19 US sl., usually derogatory – a White person
vb. Bk1900 Eng. dial. – to scratch, as a dog does


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