Dictionary: FLO – FN

• FLOATER
n. 1. 1890 US sl. – a dead body found floating in water
n. 2. 19C Brit. sl. – the penis
n. 3. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a vagrant  
n. 4. 1933 Brit. sl. – a book, newspaper, etc. passed surreptitiously from prison cell to prison cell
n. 5. World War II Amer. sl. – a woman who follows the fleet  
 
• FLOATING
adj. 1. 20C US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol
adj. 2. M20 US sl. – drug intoxicated
 
• FLOATING ACADEMY
n. Bk1891 sl. – a prison  
 
• FLOATING COFFIN
n. World War II Amer. sl. – an unsafe ship
 
• FLOATING ELEPHANT
n. World War II Amer. sl. – a military balloon  
 
• FLOATING HELL
n. Bk1891 sl. – a prison
 
• FLOATING PALACE
n. World War II Amer. sl. – a large and comfortable ship  
 
• FLOBBER
adj. 19C Eng. dial. – loose, flabby  
n. 1. 19C Eng. dial. – anything loose and flabby; e.g. the flesh under a cow’s neck 
n. 2. 19C Eng. dial. – stupid talk 
n. 3. 19C Eng. dial. – snow which melts in falling before touching the ground
vb. 1377 obs. rare – to dirty, soil
 
• FLOBBERCHOPS
int. 1892 Eng. dial. – an expletive  
n. 19C Eng. dial. – a term of abuse  
 
• FLOCCINAUCICAL
adj. 1826 – inconsiderable, inconsequential, trifling
 
• FLOCCINAUCITY
n. 1829 – a matter of little consequence; something worthless
 
• FLOCK-PATED
adj. ?1640 obs. – silly, stupid, foolish; giddy; having a head or brains like wool 
 
• FLOG
vb. 1. 1919 Brit. sl., orig. services’ usage – to sell  
vb. 2. 20C Aust. sl. – to masturbate  
 
• FLOG A DEAD HORSE
vb. 1872 – to expend effort ineffectually or futilely  
 
• FLOGGING
n. 17C cant – a whipping to arouse sexual feelings; flagellation
 
• FLOG ONE’S DONKEY
vb. 19C Brit. sl. – to masturbate
 
• FLOG ONE’S MEAT
vb. 19C Brit. sl. – to masturbate
 
• FLOG ONE’S SAUSAGE
vb. 19C Brit. sl. – to masturbate
 
• FLOG THE BISHOP
vb. 19C Brit. sl. – to masturbate
 
• FLOG THE DAISY
vb. 1956 US sl. – to masturbate  
 
• FLOMMAX
n. 19C Brit. – a slattern
 
• FLONG ONE’S DONG
vb. M20 US sl. – to masturbate  
 
• FLOODS
n. 20C US sl. – menstruation  
 
• FLOOEY
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; confused; muddled  
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – nonsense
 
• FLOORED
adj. 1. 19C sl. – intoxicated with alcohol; dead drunk, as if the drinker had been knocked out
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; perplexed; baffled  
 
• FLOOR FUCK
vb. E20 Aust. sl. – to copulate on the floor
 
• FLOOSEY;  FLOOSIE;  FLOOSY;  FLOOZIE
n. 1. E20 sl. – a girl, a young woman, a woman
n. 2. E20 sl. – a prostitute
n. 3. E20 sl. – a wanton or promiscuous woman, a sexually loose woman
 
• FLOOSTER
n. 1892 Ireland – a flatterer, one given to praising
vb. 1890 Ireland – to flatter, coax, wheedle; to fondle, to make much of
 
• FLOOZY
adj. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – sporty, attractive, stylish
n. 1902 sl., derogatory – a promiscuous woman
 
• FLOP
n. 1. 1909 sl. – a fat or flabby person
n. 2. 1910 US sl. – a cheap lodging-house; a place to sleep; a bed
vb. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to lie down
 
• FLOP A WOMAN
vb. 19C Brit. sl. – to place a woman, literally or figuratively, in a position to perform sexual intercourse
 
• FLOP-HOUSE
n. 1909 sl., orig. US – a cheap lodging-house, esp. for vagrants
 
• FLOP IN
vb. 19C Brit. sl. – to penetrate the vagina
 
• FLOP IN THE HAY
n. E20 US sl. – a rapid act of sexual intercourse
vb. E20 US sl. – to go to bed with a person for sexual activity
 
• FLOPPER-STOPPER
n. 20C Aust. sl. – a brassiere
 
• FLOPPY DISK
n. 20C teen & high school sl. – one who studies too much  
 
• FLOP ROOM
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a bedroom  
 
• FLORULOUS
adj. B1900 obs. – full of flowers, flowery; blossoming
 
• FLOSCLE
n. 1599 obs. – a flower
 
• FLOSCULENT
adj. 1646 obs. – of speech or a speaker: flowery
 
• FLOSSIE
n. 1. E20 sl. – a girl, a young woman, a woman
n. 2. E20 sl. – a prostitute
n. 3. E20 sl. – a wanton or promiscuous woman, a sexually loose woman
 
• FLOSSY
adj. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – gay, attractive
adj. 2. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – pert, impudent
adj. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate  
 
• FLOUR
n. Bk1903 sl. – money
 
• FLOURISH
vb. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally
 
• FLOWER
n. 1. 19C Brit. sl. – the female genitals
n. 2. 20C US sl. – a homosexual male
 
• FLOWER-FANCIER
n. 19C Brit. sl. – a whoremonger; a keeper of whores
 
• FLOWER OF CHIVALRY
n. 19C Brit. sl. – the female genitals
 
• FLOWER OF THE WINDS
n. 1867 – the mariner’s compass on maps and charts
 
• FLOWERS
n. 15C sl. – menstruation
 
• FLOWERS AND FROLICS
n. 1940s rhyming sl. for ‘ballocks’ – the testicles
 
• FLOWERY (DELL)
n. 1925 Brit. rhyming sl. – a prison cell
 
• FLUBDUB
n. 1. 1888 Amer. dial. – bombastic or inept language; nonsense, balderdash  
n. 2. 1893 Amer. dial. – a snob, a pretender  
n. 3. 1915 Amer. dial. – a bit of finery, ornamentation  
n. 4. 1979 Amer. dial. – a fussy person; a fuddy-duddy  
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – to blunder
 
FLUBDUBBERY
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – nonsense  
 
FLUCKADRIFT
n. 1866 Sc. obs. – haste, hurry, speed
 
FLUCTISONOUS
adj. B1900 – sounding or roaring with waves  
 
• FLUCTIVAGOUS
adj. B1900 – floating or tossed on the waves 
 
• FLUENT-TEARED
adj. 1899 Eng. dial. – easily moved to tears  
 
• FLUFF
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. college sl. – a giddy girl  
n. 2. 20C US homosexual usage – a lesbian with female traits
n. 3. E20 US sl. – a young woman
vb. 20C Aust. sl. – to release intestinal gas
 
• FLUFFY
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; confused; muddled  
 
• FLUG-FISTED
adj. 19C N. Ireland – left-handed  
 
• FLUKE
n. 1. US Civil War usage  – a fiasco; a failure
n. 2. US Civil War usage – a fortunate turn of events that is the result of accident rather than skill
n. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something worthless  
 
• FLUMADIDDLE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – nonsense  
 
• FLUMADIDDY
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – nonsense
 
• FLUMDIDDLE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – nonsense
 
• FLUMINOUS
adj. 1656 obs. – pertaining to rivers; abounding in rivers  
 
• FLUMMADIDDLE
n. 1. 1848 Amer. – silly or delusive nonsense; something trivial or ridiculous; balderdash  
n. 2. 1857 Amer. dial. – a dish composed of stale bread, pork fat, molasses, water, cinnamon, allspice, and cloves, eaten by the fishermen in Cape Cod  
n. 3. 1882 Amer. dial. – a bauble, a bit of finery  
n. 4. 1897 Amer. dial. – a doodad, a thing  
 
• FLUMMER
n. 1873 Eng. dial. – a state of agitation, excitement, or confusion
vb. 1. 1533 obs. – to repeat indistinctly, to mumble  
vb. 2. 1764 obs. – to deceive by flattery, to humbug
 
• FLUMMIXED
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; perplexed; baffled  
 
• FLUMMOX
n. 1. 19C US sl. – a failure
n. 2. 19C US sl. – a stupid person
n. 3. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – in colleges: a poor recitation
vb. 1. 1837 sl. – to fool, to confuse, to overcome by trickery; to bewilder  
vb. 2. M19 sl. – to back out, to back out of a promise; to disappoint; to opt out of a round of betting
vb. 3. M19 US sl. – to blunder; to fail; to die
vb. 4. M19 sl. – to move in a clumsy manner
vb. 5. M19 US sl. – to titivate one’s hair
 
• FLUMMOX BY THE LIP
vb. L19 sl. – to talk down
 
• FLUMMOXED
adj. 1. M19 sl. – confused, let down, outwitted
adj. 2. M19 sl. – drunk
adj. 3. M19 sl. – ruined
adj. 4. M19 UK criminals’ sl. – imprisoned for 1 month
adj. 5. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; perplexed; baffled  
adj. 6. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – dead
 
• FLUMMOXED UP
adj. M19 sl. – confused, let down, outwitted
 
• FLUMMUT
n. M19 sl. – a 1 month prison sentence
 
• FLUMMUX
n. 1. 19C US sl. – a failure
n. 2. 19C US sl. – a stupid person
n. 3. M19 sl. – a 1 month prison sentence  
vb. 1. 19C sl. – to fool, to confuse, to overcome by trickery
vb. 2. M19 sl. – to back out, to back out of a promise; to disappoint; to opt out of a round of betting
vb. 3. M19 sl. – to move in a clumsy manner
vb. 4. M19 US sl. – to blunder; to fail; to die  
 
• FLUMMUXED
adj. 1. M19 UK criminals’ sl. – imprisoned for 1 month
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; perplexed; baffled  
adj. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – dead
 
• FLUMMYDIDDLE
n. 1903 Amer. dial. – foolishness, nonsense  
 
• FLUMP
n. 1. L18 sl. – a sudden heavy fall
n. 2. 1990s US teen sl. – the act of sitting down in a casual manner
vb. 1. M19 sl. – to collapse or fall heavily
vb. 2. M19 sl. – to move determinedly
 
• FLUNK
n. 1. M19 sl. – a failure
n. 2. M19 US students’ sl. – a student who has failed
n. 3. M19 US students’ sl. – a total failure in academic work; a grade F
n. 4. L19 US sl. – an idler, a loafer
n. 5. 1920s US criminals’ sl. – the strongbox within a safe
vb. 1. 1837 sl., orig. US students’ usage – to fail an examination; to give a fail mark
vb. 2. E19 US sl. – to give in; to back down or renege in a cowardly manner
vb. 3. M19 US sl. – in gambling: to fold one’s cards
vb. 4. M19 US students’ sl. – to be dismissed or dismiss on the grounds of academic failure
vb. 5. L19 sl., orig. US – to do a skimpy, inadequate job
vb. 6. L19 sl. – to embarrass someone by an indiscreet remark  
vb. 7. L19 US sl. – to fail; to blunder; to make a mistake
 
• FLUNKED OUT
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – dead  
 
• FLUNKEE
n. 1. 19C US students’ sl. – one who fails an examination
n. 2. 1920s sl. – one who is expelled, due to failing examinations  
n. 3. 1960s African-American sl. – an undistinguished person
n. 4. 20C sl. – a menial, a stooge
 
• FLUNKER
n. L19 US students’ sl. – one who regularly fails their examinations or recitations
 
• FLUNKEY
n. 1. 19C US students’ sl. – one who fails an examination  
n. 2. 1920s sl. – one who is expelled, due to failing examinations
n. 3. 1960s African-American sl. – an undistinguished person
n. 4. 20C sl. – a menial, a stooge  
 
• FLUNK OUT
n. 1920 sl., orig. & chiefly US – expulsion from a college, etc. for failing an examination  
vb. 1. E19 sl., orig. US students’ usage – to fail an examination; to give a fail mark
vb. 2. 1920 sl., orig. & chiefly US – to be dismissed from college, etc. after failing an examination  
 
• FLUNKY
adj. L19 US sl. – ignorant, second-rate
n. 1. 19C US students’ sl. – one who fails an examination
n. 2. Bk1913-17 Amer. college sl. – one who fails
n. 3. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – in mining and logging camps: a waiter or assistant cook
n. 4. 1920s sl. – one who is expelled, due to failing examinations
n. 5. 1960s African-American sl. – an undistinguished person
n. 6. 1990s sl. – a condom
n. 7. 20C sl. – a menial, a stooge
 
• FLURGLE
vb. M20 US sl. – to copulate
 
• FLURRY
n. 2000s Aust. sl. – a promiscuous woman  
 
• FLURRY ONE’S MILK
vb. E19 sl. – to be worried, perturbed, annoyed
 
• FLURT
n. 1. E18 sl. – an act of copulation
n. 2. 19C Eng. dial. – an insignificant person; a fool
 
• FLUSH
adj. 1. 1603 sl. – rich  
adj. 2. 19C Brit. sl. – intoxicated with alcohol
 
• FLUSHED
adj. E18 Brit. & US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol; reddened with alcohol
 
• FLUSTER
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to intoxicate; to make dead drunk
 
• FLUSTERATE
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to intoxicate; to make dead drunk  
 
• FLUSTERATED
adj. 1. 19C Brit. & US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; confused; disconcerted
 
• FLUSTERATED UP
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; confused; disconcerted  
 
• FLUSTER-BLUSTER
n. 1708 obs. nonce word – a ‘blustering’ wind; a blusterer  
 
• FLUSTICATE
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to intoxicate; to make dead drunk
 
• FLUSTICATED
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; confused; disconcerted  
 
• FLUSTRATED
adj. 1. 19C Brit. & US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; confused; disconcerted  
 
• FLUSTRATED UP
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; confused; disconcerted  
 
• FLUSTRATION
n. c1740 sl. – confusion; bustle; excitement; flurry
 
• FLUTE
n. 1. 18C sl. – the male member
n. 2. c1840 sl. – a pistol
n. 3. 20C US sl. – a homosexual male  
 
• FLUTER
n. E20 US sl. – a male homosexual receiver in fellatio
 
• FLUTTER
n. 1. 1857 colloq. – a short visit or trip , esp. a joyous, informal one
n. 2. c1870 colloq. – a gamble
n. 3. c1870 colloq. – a venture, a spree
n. 4. c1870 sl. – the spinning of a coin
vb. 1. c1870 sl. – to gamble
vb. 2. c1870 sl. – to spin a coin
vb. 3. c1880 sl. – to indulge in pleasure  
vb. 4. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally
 
• FLUTTER A SKIRT
vb. M19 sl. – to be a (street-walking) harlot
 
• FLUTTERBUDGET
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a fussy or fretful person  
 
• FLUTTER ONE’S KIDNEYS
vb. c1860 sl. – to agitate, to greatly annoy
 
• FLUTTER-PATE
n. 1894 – a flighty or light-headed person
 
• FLUTTER THE DOVECOTES
vb. 1840 – to disturb the equanimity of a society; to cause a stir or excitement in a conservative community
 
• FLUTTER THE RIBBINS
vb. Bk1903 sl. – to drive (ribbins = reins)
 
• FLUTTER THE RIBBONS
vb. c1860 colloq. – to drive horses
 
• FLUX
vb. L18 sl. – to cozen, to cheat, to outwit
 
• FLUXES
n. 20C – diarrhoea, esp. bloody diarrhoea; dysentery
 
• FLUZIE
n. 1. E20 sl. – a girl, a young woman, a woman
n. 2. E20 sl. – a prostitute
n. 3. E20 sl. – a wanton or promiscuous woman, a sexually loose woman
 
• FLUZY
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a girl
 
• FLUZZ DYKE
n. M20 US homosexual sl. – a passive lesbian; a feminine male homosexual
 
• FLY
adj. 1. c1810 sl. – artful, knowing, shrewdly aware; sharp; smart
adj. 2. c1834 sl. – dexterous
adj. 3. c1880 sl. – of women: wanton
adj. 4. 19C sl., chiefly Sc. –  furtive or sneaky
adj. 5. 20C teen & high school sl. – fine; good  
n. 1. B1857 sl. – a policeman
n. 2. c1860 sl. – a trick, a ‘dodge’
n. 3. c1870 sl. – the act of spinning a coin
n. 4. 19C boxing sl. – a blow, a punch
n. 5. L19 Brit. sl. – a wanton woman; a prostitute
vb. 1. M20 US drug culture sl. – to experience a ‘high’ from narcotics
vb. 2. M20 US drug culture sl. – to take narcotics habitually
 
• FLY A KITE
vb. 1. B1880 sl. – to raise money
vb. 2. 20C Aust. sl. – to tell a tall story  
 
• FLY ALL TO GOSH
vb. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to give way to emotion or rage
 
• FLY A TILE
vb. c1820 sl. – to knock off a man’s hat
 
• FLY AROUND
vb. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – to stir about; to be active
 
• FLY-AWAY
adj. 1775 – frivolous or flighty; giddy
n. 1. 1887 sl. – a tricycle
n. 2. 20C – a person who is frivolous or flighty
 
• FLY BALL
n. 1. 20C US sl. – a homosexual male
n. 2. 20C US sl. – an oddball; an eccentric person
 
• FLY-BLOW
n. 1875 colloq. – a bastard
vb. 20C Aust. sl. – to separate someone from his money
 
• FLY-BLOWN
adj. 1. 1850s Aust. sl. – penniless  
adj. 2. c1880 sl. – exhausted
adj. 3. c1885 sl. – devirginated  
adj. 4. c1885 sl. – suspected of venereal disease
adj. 5. c1875 sl. – tipsy
adj. 6. 20C – contaminated; tainted
 
• FLY-BOG
n. c1930 Aust. sl. – jam
 
• FLY-BOY
n. 1. 1937 US sl. – a member of an air force, esp. a pilot  
n. 220C teen & high school sl. – an attractive young man  
 
• FLY BULL
n. 1. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – a homosexual
n. 2. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – an eccentric, unusual, unreliable person
 
• FLY-BY-NIGHT
adj. 1. 20C colloq. – brief; impermanent
adj. 2. 20C colloq. – unreliable or untrustworthy, esp. in finance
adj. 3. 20C rhyming sl. for ‘tight’ – tipsy, drunk
n. 1. 18C colloq. – a term of contempt for a woman
n. 2. L18 sl. – a witch  
n. 3. 1823 colloq. – a defaulting debtor
n. 4. c1860 sl. – a harlot; a prostitute
n. 5. 19C sl. – the female pudend
 
• FLY-BY-NIGHTER
n. 1. 20C – a person who goes out at night to places of entertainment .
n. 2. 20C – an untrustworthy person, esp. one who departs secretly or by night to avoid paying debts
 
• FLY-CAGE
n. 19C sl. – the female pudend
 
• FLY-CATCHER
n. 1. c1820 colloq. – an open-mouthed,  ignorant person
n. 2. 19C sl. – the female pudend
n. 3. 1915 military sl. esp. airmen’s usage – a fast aeroplane, officially a ‘fleet-fighter’
 
• FLY-CHASER
n. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – in baseball: an outfielder
 
• FLYCHICK
n. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – an attractive, hip girl
 
• FLY CHINESE
vb. 1941 Amer. aviation jocular usage – to fly an airplane without being able to maintain horizontal stability
 
• FLY COP
n. 1. 1889 sl., orig. US  – a detective
n. 2. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – a homosexual
n. 3. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – an eccentric, unusual, unreliable person
 
• FLY DICK
n. 1. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – a homosexual  
n. 2. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – an eccentric, unusual, unreliable person
 
• FLY-DISPENSER SOUP
n. c1860 sl. – oxtail soup
 
• FLY-DUSTERS
n. c1880 sl. – fists
 
• FLYER
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent  
n. 2. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – a chance, a gamble  
n. 3. 20C colloq. – a long flying leap; a bound .
n. 4. 20C chiefly US – a speculative business transaction .
vb. L18 Brit. sl. – to coit rapidly and briefly with a woman
 
• FLY-FLAPPED
adj. c1785 sl. – whipped in the stocks or at the cart’s tail
 
• FLY-FLAPPER
n. c1840 sl. – a heavy bludgeon
 
• FLY-FLAT
n. 1. 1864 Brit. sl. – someone taken in by confidence tricksters; a gullible person who thinks himself clever
n. 2. c1885 turf sl. – a would-be expert  
n. 3. c1910 Aust. sl. – a smart alec, a know-it-all
 
• FLY-GIRL
n. 20C teen & high school sl. – an attractive  young woman  
 
• FLY GUY
n. 1. WW II Armed Forces usage – a US Air Force pilot; any member of the Air Force; now derogatory, implying snobbishness, youth, and cautiousness
n. 2. World War II, usually used ironically – an aviator, esp. a glamorous, heroic, or daring aviator
n. 3. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – any airplane pilot  
 
• FLY HIGH
vb. c1860 sl. – to get or to be drunk  
 
• FLY HOUCHY
n. 20C teen & high school sl. – an attractive female  
 
• FLYING
n. M20 US drug culture sl. – a state of drug intoxication
 
• FLYING ADDER
n. Bk1888 – the dragonfly  
 
• FLYING AX-HANDLES
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – diarrhoea
 
• FLYING BAKER
vb. 20C sl. – to be experiencing the menses
 
• FLYING BEDSTEAD
n. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – an early, lumbering, but comparatively stable and steady airplane
 
• FLYING BLOWTORCH
n. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – a jet fighter airplane
 
• FLYING COFFIN
n. World War II US Air Force & paratrooper usage – a glider or airplane
 
• FLYING EDSEL
n. 1972 US sl. – the US Air Force F-111 aircraft
 
• FLYING FISH
n. Amer. World War I sl. – an airplane
 
• FLYING-FUCK
n. 20C sl. – an imaginary act of coition accomplished in the air, as in an airplane or at the end of a great leap made by the male
 
• FLYING HANDICAP
n. 20C Aust. sl. – diarrhoea
 
• FLYING HIGH
adj. 1960s Amer. sl. – drunk, fully intoxicated
 
• FLYING LIGHT
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – hungry  
 
• FLYING MARE
n. 1754 – a wrestling throw in which a wrestler seizes his opponent’s arm or head and turns to throw him over his shoulder
 
• FLYING PASTY
n. E19 Brit. sl. – human dung wrapped in paper and thrown about as an act of vandalism
 
• FLYING SAUCER
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a metal or plastic coasting sled in the shape of a shallow, circular bowl  
 
• FLYING SAUCERS
n. M20 US drug culture sl. – morning glory seeds as a source of hallucinogenic alkaloid
 
• FLYING THE ENSIGN
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – drunk  
 
• FLY IN THE OINTMENT
n. 1828 colloq. – a slight flaw that detracts from value, completeness, or enjoyment
 
• FLY JERKS
n. 1942 Aust. sl. – small pieces of cork suspended from the brim of a tramp’s hat to ward off flies
 
• FLY LIGHT
vb. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – to miss a meal; to be hungry
 
• FLY LIKE A BRICK-BUILT SHITHOUSE
vb. 1950s airmen’s sl. – of an aircraft: to fly awkwardly; to be difficult to pilot
 
• FLY LOW
vb. 1. c1835 colloq. – to be modest and retiring
vb. 2. c1870 sl. – to hide from justice
 
• FLY MAN;  FLYMAN
n. 1. 1816 sl. – a cunning man
n. 2. c1919 Glasgow cant – a professional criminal
n. 3. 20C cant – an expert thief
n. 4. 20C – in the theatre: a stagehand who operates the scenery, curtains, etc. in the flies
 
• FLY MEMBER
n. 1909 sl. – a very shrewd, sharp person
 
• FLY MUG
n. 1. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – a homosexual  
n. 2. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – an eccentric, unusual, unreliable person
 
• FLY MY KITE
n. 1857 rhyming sl. – a light
 
• FLY OFF AT A TANGENT
vb. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – to fly into a passion
 
• FLY OFF THE DEEP END
vb. 1931 sl. – to lose one’s temper
 
• FLY OFF THE HANDLE
vb. 1. 1825 orig. US – to lose one’s temper; to be or get angry
vb. 2. Bk1905 Amer. sl. – to become excited; to fly into a passion
 
• FLY ON THE COACH-WHEEL
n. 1785 – a person of little consequence who considers himself of great importance
 
• FLY ON THE WALL
n. 1949 – a person who watches others, while not being noticed himself or herself
 
• FLY OUT
vb. 17C sl. – to grow angry; to scold
 
• FLY OVER THE HILLS
n. 1979 schoolchildren’s sl. – a fly-button undone and showing
 
• FLY PADDLE
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a fly-swatter  
 
FLYPE
vb. 19C Sc. – to peel or strip off something, esp. skin
 
FLYPITCH
n. 20C colloq. – an area for unlicensed stalls at markets
 
FLY RIGHT
vb. Bk1974 Amer. sl. – to be honest and useful; to do the ethical or socially proper thing; to live or act according to ethical standards
 
• ֳFLY-RINK
n. 1875 sl. – a bald head  
 
FLY-SLICER
n. 19C sl. – a cavalryman
 
FLYSPECK
n. 1855 – a small spot or speck
 
THE FLY SPECK
n. 20C Aust. sl. – Tasmania
 
FLY-SWISHER STEW
n. c1910 Aust. sl. – oxtail stew
 
FLY THE COOP
vb. c1910 Amer. colloq. – to run off, to leave or depart abruptly or secretly; to escape
 
FLY THE FLAG
vb. 1. c1840 sl. – of harlots: to walk the streets
vb. 2. c1850 sl. – to have the monthly flux; to experience the menses
vb. 3. c1860 tailors’ sl. – to post a notice that workmen are needed
 
FLY THE KITE
vb. 1890s society sl. – to seek publicity
 
FLY THE MAGS
vb. B1812 sl. – to gamble
 
FLY THE PIGEONS
vb. B1923 cant – to steal coal as one carts it
 
FLY TIME
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – spring  
 
FLY-TIPPER
n. 1985 – a person who deliberately dumps rubbish in an unauthorized place
 
FLY-TIPPING
n. 1968 – the deliberate dumping of rubbish in an unauthorized place
 
FLY-TRAP
n. 1. c1790 sl. – the mouth
n. 2. 19C sl. – the female pudend
 
FLY-UP-THE-CREEK
n. 1937 Amer. dial. – a resident of Florida  
 
FLY UP WITH JACKSON’S HENS
vb. c1570 colloq. then dial. – to become bankrupt
 
THE FLY-WALK
n. 20C sl. – the ridge on a loaf of bread
 
FLY WITH ONE’S ASS
vb. 1977 Amer. sl. – of an aviator: to fly by relying on luck and one’s own experience, rather than on charts or instruments


Back to INDEX F

Back to DICTIONARY


Updated: September 7, 2022