Dictionary: FRI – FRZ

• FRIAND
adj. 1599 obs. – dainty; delicious to the palate; fond of delicate food
n. 1598 obs. – a person of dainty taste in food; an epicure
 
• FRIAR
n. 1956 UK rhyming sl. for ‘fuck’ – sexual intercourse  
vb. 1956 UK rhyming sl. for ‘fuck’ – to have sexual intercourse
 
• FRIAR TUCK
int. 20C rhyming sl. for ‘fuck’- an exclamation
n. 1956 UK rhyming sl. for ‘fuck’ – sexual intercourse
vb. 1956 UK rhyming sl. for ‘fuck’ – to have sexual intercourse
 
• FRIAR TUCKED
adj. 1996 euphemism for ‘fucked’ – bothered, concerned; thwarted 
 
• FRIAR’S 
n. 1956 UK rhyming sl. for ‘fuck’ – sexual intercourse
vb. 1956 UK rhyming sl. for ‘fuck’ – to have sexual intercourse
 
• FRIBBLE
adj. 1798 – trifling, frivolous, ridiculous, silly
n. 1. 1664 – a trifling, frivolous fellow; one not occupied in serious employment, a trifler; a silly oaf
n. 2. 17C Brit. sl. – a homosexual male, possibly a transvestite
n. 3. M17 sl. – a sexually inadequate male
n. 4. 1785 sl. – a contemptible fop  
n. 5. 1831 – a trifling thing, a frivolous notion or characteristic
n. 6. 1881 – frivolity, nonsense
vb. 1. a1627 obs. – to falter, to stammer
vb. 2. 1640 – in early use, to act aimlessly or feebly, to busy oneself to no purpose; to fuss about; later, contemptuously  (except dialect), to behave frivolously, to trifle
vb. 3. M17 sl. – to behave in a sexually inadequate manner
vb. 4. 1709 obs. – to falter, to totter in walking
vb. 5. 1756 Sc. – to frizzle or frizz a wig  
 
• FRIBBLING
adj. 18C – trifling
 
• FRIBBLISH
adj. 1768 – trifling
 
• FRICATRICE
n. 1605 – a lewd woman; a harlot
 
• FRICATRIX
n. 1. 19C Brit. sl. – a woman who masturbates herself
n. 2. 20C sl. – a woman known to copulate frequently or well  
 
• FRICK AND FRACK
n. 1980s African-American sl. – the testicles
 
• FRICKINCHATEN
n. 2000s African-American sl. – a talking seductively to a woman
 
• FRICKING
adj. 1930s euphemism for ‘fucking’ – a general intensifier
 
• FRICKLE
n. 1681 obs. – a basket for fruit that holds about a bushel
vb. 1. 19C Eng. dial. – to potter about at little jobs, such as an old man can do
vb. 2. 19C Eng. dial. – to fidget, to worry about a thing 
 
• FRICKO
n. 1951 Can. sl. – a chicken stew
 
• FRICTION
n. 1953 Trinidad and Tobago – a match
 
• FRIDAY AFTERNOON CAR
n. 1979 UK sl. – a car that is constantly going wrong  
 
• FRIDAY CAR
n. 1979 UK sl. – a car that is constantly going wrong  
 
• FRIDAY-FACE
n. 1592 obs. – a grave, dismal, or gloomy expression of the countenance; a gloomy, dejected-looking or miserable-looking man or woman 
 
• FRIDAY-FACED
adj. c1600 obs. – sad-looking, melancholy, gloomy, sour-featured, miserable, gloomy  
 
• FRIDGE
n. 1. 1926 US colloq. – a refrigerator
n. 2. 1996 US sl. – a person who is sexually unresponsive, gen. a woman  
 
• FRIED
adj. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – starched, as a shirt
adj. 2. 1923 US sl. – drunk, or drug-intoxicated  
adj. 3. 1980 US sl. – mentally exhausted
adj. 4. 1981 US sl. – in computing: not working because of a complete hardware failure
adj. 5. 1989 US sl. – sunburnt
 
• FRIED, DRIED, AND SWEPT ASIDE
phr. 1997 US sl. – said of bleached hair that suggests straw
 
• FRIED, DYED, COMBED TO THE SIDE
phr. 1980 US sl. – used as a description of a Black person’s hair that has been chemically straightened
 
• FRIED, DYED, SWOOPED TO THE SIDE
phr. 1980 US sl. – used as a description of a Black person’s hair that has been chemically straightened
 
• FRIED EGG
n. 1908 US sl. – the insignia of the US Military Academy
 
• FRIED EGGS
n. 1997 UK sl. – small female breasts
 
• FRIED SHIRT
n. 1853 Amer. dial. – a man’s starched dress shirt  
 
• FRIED TO THE GILLS
adj. M20 US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol
 
• FRIEND
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a loved one; a sweetheart  
n. 2. 1988 US sl. – in poker: any card that improves a hand  
vb. 1. 1971 Trinidad and Tobago – to have sex; to take part in a romantic relationship
vb. 2. 1993 Can. sl. – to engage in sexual foreplay
 
• FRIENDIES
n. M19 sl. – a friend  
 
• FRIEND IN NEED
n. 19C sl. – a louse; generally in plural  
 
• FRIENDLY
adj. 1987 US sl. – used as a euphemism for ‘passive’ in sadomasochistic sex
 
• FRIENDLY CITY
n. 1951 S. Afr. – Port Elizabeth, South Africa  
 
• FRIEND OF DOROTHY
n. 1988 Aust. sl. – a homosexual
 
• FRIEND OF PEDRO
n. 1999 UK sl. – someone in possession of cocaine
 
• FRIENDS
vb. 1965 Barbados usage – to court
 
• FRIES
n. 1994 US sl. – pieces of crack cocaine
 
• FRIG
n. c1888 sl. – act of sexual intercourse
vb. 1. 1598 mainly euphemistic – to have sex; to copulate  
vb. 2. 1680 sl. – to masturbate
vb. 3. 18C Brit. sl. – to dawdle, to waste time
vb. 4. 2003 UK sl. – to digitally stimulate/explore the vagina as a part of sexual foreplay  
 
• FRIGABOB
n. 19C Eng. dial. – anything dancing up and down, jerking from side to side, or moving about rapidly
vb. 19C Eng. dial. – to dance or jerk up and down, to move about rapidly
 
• FRIG ABOUT
vb. 1933 UK sl. – to potter about; to waste time doing little or nothing   
 
• FRIGGING
adj. 1. 18C Brit. – of a person or task: time-wasting; demanding too much time, pottering about  
adj. 2. M20 US sl. – an intensifier; damned; ‘fucking’
n. 1. 16C – masturbation  
n. 2. 18C – pottering about  
n. 3. 20C US – copulation  
 
• FRIGGLE
vb. 19C Brit. sl. – to masturbate  
 
• FRIGGLE-FRAGGLES
n. 19C Sc. – toys, trifles, gewgaws; useless, vain ornaments of dress  
 
• FRIGG-UP
n. 20C Aust. & US euphemism for ‘fuck-up’ – a mess, a muddle  
 
• FRIGHT
n. 1. 1751 sl. – one who is an object of ridicule  
n. 2. 1832 sl. – an ugly or unattractive person or thing  
 
• FRIGHTENER
n. 1962 sl. – a member of a criminal gang employed to intimidate the gang’s potential victims  
 
• FRIGHTEN THE DAYLIGHTS OUT OF
vb. 1951 sl. – to frighten; to terrify   
 
• FRIGHTEN THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS OUT OF
vb. 1951 sl. – to frighten; to terrify
 
• FRIGHTEN THE PANTS OFF
vb. 1967 UK sl. – to frighten or scare someone, esp. severely or when horror is presented as entertainment) thrillingly  
 
• FRIGHTFULNESS
n. 1914 colloq. – anything, esp. behaviour, that is objectionable  
 
• FRIGIDIOUS
adj. 1630 obs. rare – intensely cold, frigid
 
• FRIG IT!
int. M20 US sl. – ‘fuck it!”  
 
• FRIGITATE
vb. 1635 obs. rare – to freeze, to cool
 
• FRIGO
n. 1918 Brit. military sl. – frozen or chilled meat  
 
• FRIG ONESELF
vb. 16C – to masturbate oneself  
 
• FRIGOT
n. 1683 obs. rare – a person of frigid temperament
 
• FRIGSTER
n. 19C Brit. – a male who masturbates himself
 
• FRIGSTRESS
n. 19C Brit. – a female who masturbates herself
 
• FRIG-UP
n. 20C Aust. & US euphemism for ‘fuck-up’ – a mess, a muddle  
 
• FRILL
n. 1. 19C colloq. – swagger, conceit, affectation
n. 2. c1933 sl. – a girl, a woman  
 
• FRILL-DE-DILLS
n. 1883 Eng. dial. – frills, embroidery; laces, trimmings, ornaments on a dress  
 
• FRILLED LIZARD
n. c1942 Aust sl. – a man with a whisker-framed face  
 
• FRILLERY
n. c1888 colloq. – women’s underclothing  
 
• FRILLIES
n. c1870 colloq. – women’s underclothing  
 
• FRIM-FRAM
n. 1847 Sc. – a trifle, a whim, a fancy, an invention  
 
• FRIMICATE
vb. 1. 19C Eng. dial. – to give oneself airs; to be affected
vb. 2. 19C Eng. dial. – to be fretful or uneasy at trifles
 
• FRIMPLE-FRAMPLE
adv. 19C Sc. – in a confused, tangled manner; promiscuously  
 
• FRIP
n. 1847 Sc. – an oaf  
 
• FRIPPET
n. 1908 sl., derogatory – a frivolous or showy young woman
 
• FRISGIG
n. 19C Eng. dial. – a silly, giddy young woman  
 
• FRISK
vb. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally
 
• FRISKING
adj. 20C US sl. – petting or groping  
 
• FRISKY
adj. 20C – playful, amorous  
n. 1986 US sl. – cocaine
 
• FRISKY POWDER
n. 1955 US sl. – cocaine  
 
• FRIT
n. 1. 1986 Quebec usage – a French fried potato
n. 2. M20 US sl. – a homosexual male  
 
• FRITCHETY
adj. 19C Eng. dial. – fretful, peevish, fidgety  
 
• FRITO
n. 1967 US sl. – a woman who is sexually expert

• FRITTER
vb. 1780 – to break or tear into pieces or fragments

• FRITTERS
n. 1755 – minute pieces, fragments, shreds; articles of trifling sizes, trifles
 
• FRITTERWARE
n. 1991 US sl. – computer software that is seductive to users, consumes time, and adds little to functionality  

• FRITTLE
adj. 1579 obs. – ? fickle
 
• FRITZ
adj. 1919 colloq., mainly derogatory – German
n. 1887 colloq., mainly derogatory – a German; a German soldier

• FRITZIE
n. 1915 colloq. – a German, esp. a German soldier

• FRIVOL
adj. 1. 1488 chiefly Sc., obs. – fickle, unreliable
adj. 2. 1492 chiefly Sc., obs. – frivolous, paltry, flimsy, absurd
n. 1. c1450 chiefly Sc., obs. – a frivolous thing, a trifle
n. 2. 1903 colloq. – a frivolous person
vb. 1866 – to behave frivolously; to trifle

• FRIVOLISM
n. 1. 1778 – a frivolous occupation
n. 2. 1882 – frivolity

• FRIVOLIST
n. 1884 – a person given to frivolity; a frivolous person

• FRIVOLIZE
vb. 1821 – to make frivolous
 
• FRIVOLOUS FRAIL
n. Bk1942 Amer. college sl. – a giddy girl  

• FRIXORY
n. 1657 obs. – a frying pan
 
• FRIZGIG
n. 19C Eng. dial. – a silly, giddy young woman  

• FRIZILATION
n. 1567 obs. – a frizzling of the hair

• FRIZZ
n. 1668 – curled or frizzed hair
vb. 1. 1660 – to curl or crisp the hair
vb. 2. 1834 – to make a sputtering noise in frying
vb. 3. 1891 Eng. dial. – to scorch or dry up

• FRIZZLE
n. 1613 – frizzled hair; a short crisp curl
vb. 1. 1565-73 – to curl hair in small crisp curls
vb. 2. 1839 – to make a sputtering noise in frying
 
• FRO
n. 1970 sl. – a hairdo, sometimes worn by American Blacks, where the hair appears to be a large fluffy ball
 
• FROB
n. 1983 US computer sl. – an unnamed or unspecified thing  
 
• FROBLY-MOBLY
adj. 1691 Eng. dial. obs. – indifferently well
 
• FROBNITZ
n. 1983 US computer sl. – an unnamed or unspecified thing  
 
• FROG
n. 1. 1778 sl., derogatory – a French person
n. 2. 19C Brit. – a policeman  
n. 3. 1952 Aust. sl. – a condom
n. 4. 1955 sl., derogatory – the French language
n. 5. 20C US – an adolescent male whose voice is changing  

• THE FROG AND TOAD
n. 1859 rhyming sl. – the road
 
• FROG-EATER
n. M19 sl., derogatory – a nickname for a Frenchman
 
• FROGGEE
n. 1872 sl., derogatory – a French person
 
• FROGGIE
n. 1952 Aust. sl. – a condom
 
• FROGGY
adj. 1872 sl., derogatory – French
n. 1853 sl., derogatory – a Frenchman or Frenchwoman

• FROGGY-LAND
n. 1895 colloq. – France
 
• FROGLAND
n. 1. 1830 obs, derogatory – the Netherlands 
n. 2. 19C jocular usage, derogatory – France
 
• FROGLANDER
n. 1673 Brit., obs., derogatory – a Dutchman
 
• FROGLET
n. 1824 – a young or small frog, esp. one that was recently a tadpole
 
• FROGLING
n. a1590 – a tiny young frog; a tadpole
 
• FROG POND
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – the ocean  
 
• FROG’S EYES
n. 20C colloq. – tapioca  
 
• FROGSH
n. 20C Aust. military usage – nonsense
 
• FROGSKIN
n. 1. 1902 US sl. – a banknote; usually specifically a dollar bill  
n. 2. 1907 Aust. sl. – a pound note  
n. 3. E20 Aust. – a condom  
 
• FROG’S PARADISE
n. Amer. World War I sl. – Paris  
 
• FROG-SPAWN
n. 1959 Brit. sl. – applied disparagingly by children to tapioca or sago pudding  
 
• FROG STRANGLER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a heavy rain  
 
• FROGTOWN
n. Amer. World War I sl. – Paris  

• FROIDEUR
n. 1645 – coldness of manner; indifference, disdain, reserve
 
• FROKIN
n. 1603 obs. – a Dutch girl or woman
 
• FROLIC
vb. 1. 19C colloq. – to play sexually  
vb. 2. 20C US euphemism – to be in heat; to be sexually aroused  
 
• FROM ARSEHOLE TO BREAKFAST TIME 
phr. L19 sl. – all the way; all the time
 
• FROM ASSHOLE TO APPETITE
adv. 1899 Amer. sl. – from end to end; thoroughly, totally
 
• FROM ASS TO APPETITE
adv. 1952 Amer. sl. – completely
 
• FROM A TO IZZARD
adv. 1839 Amer. dial. – from beginning to end; thoroughly, in every detail  
 
• FROM BACKBONE TO BREAKFAST TIME THROUGH AND THROUGH
adv. 1907 US sl. – thoroughly, totally
 
• FROM CAN TO CAN’T
adv. 1968 US sl. – without stint; all day long  
 
• FROM CELLAR TO GARRET
adv. 1828 – throughout the house  
 
• FROM DEAKE’S ISLAND
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – lacking manners, uncouth, boorish  
 
• FROM END TO ONE
adv. Bk1900 N. Ireland – through and through, from one end to another  
 
• FROM GARRET TO KITCHEN
adv. 1712 – throughout the house  
 
• FROM HEAD TO FOOT
adv. a1300 – completely, thoroughly  
 
• FROM HELL TO BREAKFAST
adv. 1. 1928 Amer. dial. – completely, utterly, thoroughly, decisively, violently  
adv. 2. 1939 Amer. dial. – for a considerable distance or time  
adv. 3. 1942 Amer. dial. – helter-skelter, in all directions, everywhere  
 
• FROM HELL TO BUSH
adv. 1928 Amer. dial. – completely, utterly, thoroughly, decisively, violently  
 
• FROM HELL TO HARLEM
adv. 1. 1939 Amer. dial. – for a considerable distance or time  
adv. 2. 1966 Amer. dial. – helter-skelter, in all directions, everywhere  
 
• FROM IN FRONT
adv. 1950s Amer. sl. – from the beginning
 
• FROM JERICHO TO JUNE
n. 1837 sl. – a long distance
 
• FROM MARS
adj. 1980 Amer. sl. – remarkably eccentric; also, very confused  
 
• FROM MOUNT SHASTA
adj. 1930s US drug culture sl. – addicted to narcotics  
 
• FROM PODUNK
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – lacking manners, uncouth, boorish  

• FROMSHAPEN
adj. 1581 obs. – deformed, misshapen
 
• FROM SUN TO SUN
adv. a1400 obs. – from sunrise to sunset, all day
 
• FROM SWAMPOODLE
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – lacking manners, uncouth, boorish  
 
• FROM TAW
adv. 1935 Amer. dial. – from the beginning; of the truest sort
 
• FROM THE BACKWOODS
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – lacking manners, uncouth, boorish  
 
• FROM THE CROWN TO THE TOES
adv. 1297 – all over  
 
• FROM THE EGG TO THE APPLES
phr. 1837 – from first to last; from the beginning to the end
 
• FROM THE OTHER SIDE OF THE MOUNTAIN
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – lacking manners, uncouth, boorish  
 
• FROM THE STICKS
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – lacking manners, uncouth, boorish  
 
• FROM THE TENDER NAIL
phr. 1603 – from early youth  
 
• FROM THE THREAD TO THE NEEDLE
adv. 1882 Eng. dial. – from beginning to end, the whole, every particular; entirely  
 
• FROM THE WRONG SIDE OF THE TRACKS
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – lacking manners, uncouth, boorish  

• FROMWARD
adj. 1. c888 obs. – departing, about to depart
adj. 2. c1275 obs. – froward
adv. 1. c1225 obs. – in a different or diverse way, contrarily
adv. 2. c1400 obs. – of time: onward from a given date
 
• FROM WAY BACK
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate  
 
• FROM WHO LAID THE CHUNK
adj. 1896 Amer. dial. – of the most thoroughgoing or experienced sort; through and through
adv. 1893 Amer. dial. – very thoroughly, vigorously, or well; to an extreme degree  
 
• FROM WHO LAID THE RAIL
adj. 1889 Amer. dial. – of the most thoroughgoing or experienced sort; through and through  
adv. 1881 Amer. dial. – very thoroughly, vigorously, or well; to an extreme degree
 
• FROM WIG TO WALL
phr. E17 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. rare – from wall to wall; backwards and forwards

• FRONCLE
n. 1543 obs. – a boil or furuncle

• FRONDENT
adj. 1677 – full of leaves or fronds

• FRONDESCE
vb. a1816 – to put forth leaves

• FRONDEUR
n. 1847 – a malcontent; a political rebel

• FRONDOSITY
n. 1656 obs. – leafiness

• FRONDOSOUS
adj. 1623 obs. – full of leaves
 
• FRONT
n. M17 – effrontery, impudence
vb. L16 arch. – to face boldly, to confront, to oppose
 
• FRONT-DOOR MAT
n. 19C Brit. sl. – the female pubic hair  
 
• FRONT-GARDEN
n. 19C Brit. sl. – the female genitals  
 
• FRONTIN’
adj. 20C teen & high school sl. – lying  
 
• FRONTMAN
n. 1960 – the leader of most prominent member of a group of musicians
 
• FRONT NAME
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – the Christian name
 
• FRONT-PAGE
adj. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – important
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate  
 
• FRONT-PARLOR
n. 19C Brit. sl. – the female genitals  
 
• FRONT RAILS
n. 19C sl. – the teeth  
 
• FRONT ROOM
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a sedan  
 
• FRONT RUNNER
n. 1914 orig. US – a leading contestant; the contestant most likely to succeed
 
• FRONTS
n. 1994 US sl. – ornamental dental work
 
• FRONT-SUSPENSION
n. E20 Aust. – a brassiere  
 
• FRONT TRAIL
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – the future  

• FRONTURE
n. 1417 obs. – frontier; the part of a country that fronts or faces another country
 
• FRONT-WHEEL SKID
n. E20 Brit. rhyming sl. for ‘Yid’, derogatory – a Jewish man or woman
 
• FRONT-WINDOW
n. 19C Brit. sl. – the female genitals  
 
• THE FROOD DUDE
n. 20C teen & high school sl. – Sigmund Freud  
 
• FROPPISH
adj. 1659 obs. – froward, fretful, peevish
 
• FRORE
adj. c1250 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – intensely cold, frosty, frozen

• FRORY
adj. 1. 1567 – frozen, frosty; extremely cold 
adj. 2. 1600 obs. – covered with foam or froth

• FROSH
n. 1. c1000 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a frog
n. 2. 1915 Amer. sl. – a college freshman or a member of a freshman sports team

• FROSK
n. c1000 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a frog

• FROSLING
n. a1529 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – anything injured by frost, as an animal, fruit, etc.
 
• FROST
n. 1914 colloq. – a deceptive, dishonest, or fraudulent person or thing
vb. Bk1913 Amer. dial. – to surprise
 
• FROST-BRAINED
adj. 1592 obs. – stupid, foolish, dull
 
• FROST CAKE
vb. 1902 US sl.- to make a difference, to matter  

• FROSTIFICATION
n. 1831 humorous usage, obs. – an instance of hair turning grey or hoary

• FROSTIFIED
adj. 1840 chiefly Eng. dial. – very cold

• FROSTIFY
vb. 1833 obs. – to make cold or frosty
 
• FROSTY
adj. Shakespeare usage – cold; sexually unresponsive, frigid n. 1. M20 African-American usage – a Caucasian  
n. 2. M20 African-American usage – a Black person who prefers to act like a Caucasian  
 
• FROSTY NAIL
n. 1783 Sc. – a dram, drink, probably originally one taken on a cold day

• FROT
vb. 1. c1225 obs. – to stroke or caress an animal
vb. 2. c1320 obs. – to rub, to chafe; to polish a precious stone

• FROTH-BLOWER
n. 1905 jocular usage – a beer-drinker

• FROTHER
n. 1960 – an excitable person, esp. one readily provoked to outrage in defense of a principle

• FROTHERY
n. 1851 – empty display, triviality

• FROTHY
adj. 1593 – trifling, vain, empty, unsubstantial

• FROUD
n. a1200 obs. – a frog or toad

• FROUGH
adj. c1275 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – liable to break or give way; frail, brittle

• FROUGHY
adj. 1579 – musty, stale, sour, not sweet

• FROUNCE
n. 1. 1390 obs. – a wrinkle
n. 2. c1374 obs. – a fold, a crease; a pleat
vb. 1. 1390 obs. – to gather in folds or wrinkles, to wrinkle; to purse the lips or brows
vb. 2. a1529 – to curl or frizz the hair, a wig, etc.

• FROUSSHURE
n. 1477 obs. – a bruise, a contusion

• FROUST • FROWST
n. 1907 – the close and musty air of a room, etc., which is over-warm or overcrowded and without sufficient ventilation
vb. 1884 – to take pleasure in staying in a warm, close, stuffy atmosphere

• FROVER
n. a1000 obs. – comfort, a means of comforting
vb. c900 obs. – to comfort, to console

• FROW
adj. c1275 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – liable to break or give way; frail, brittle
adv. c1325 obs. – hastily
n. 1. 1390 – a Dutchwoman
n. 2. 1587 – a woman, a lady; chiefly said of Dutch or German women
n. 3. 1781 Eng. dial. – an idle, dirty woman

• FROWISH
adj. 1608 obs. – stale-smelling, fetid

• FROWSTINESS
n. 1923 – mustiness, stuffiness

• FROWSTY
adj. 1865 – fusty, musty, having an unpleasant smell
 
• FROWY
adj. 1579 – partly decomposed and ill-smelling; musty, stale, not sweet

• FROWZE
vb. 1611 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to curl, to frizz, to ruffle, to rumple

• FROWZLED
adj. 1808 – rumpled, tousled, dishevelled

• FROWZLY
adj. 1872 – rumpled, tousled, dishevelled

• FROWZY
adj. 1. 1681 – ill-smelling, fusty, musty; having an unpleasant smell from being dirty, unwashed, etc.
adj. 2. 1710 – having a dirty, untidy, soiled, neglected appearance, as unkempt hair, etc.; dingy, rusty, slatternly, unkempt
 
• FROZE HIS MOUTH
phr. E18 US sl. – became intoxicated with alcohol  
 
• FROZEN
adj. E18 US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol

• FRUB
vb. 1611 obs. – to polish or furbish

• FRUCTIVOROUS
adj. 1688 – eating fruit

• FRUGIVORE
n. 1863 – a person who tends to eat a lot of fruit

• FRUGIVOROUS
adj. 1713 – eating fruit

• FRUIBLY
adv. c1450 obs. – enjoyingly; in a state of enjoyment  
 
• FRUISH
vb. c1450 obs. – to enjoy
 
• FRUIT
n. 1. 1894 sl., orig. US – a gullible person; a dupe  
n. 2. 1959 US sl. – a crazy or eccentric person  
n. 3. E20, orig. US usage, derogatory – any male homosexual
n. 4. E20 US sl. – a woman of easy morals  
n. 5. E20 US colloq. – any strange person  
n. 6. M20 US sl. – an effeminate male; a passive homosexual male  

• FRUITARIAN
n. 1893 rare – a person who lives on fruit
 
• FRUITCAKE
n. 1. 1945 sl., orig. US – a crazy or eccentric person  
n. 2. 1952 colloq., derogatory – a homosexual male, esp. one considered to be effeminate
n. 3. M20 US sl. – a jerk; an oaf
 
• FRUITER
n. E20 US sl. – a homosexual male  
 
FRUITESTER
n. c1386 obs. rare – a female seller of fruit
 
FRUIT-FLY
n. 1. M20 US sl. – a homosexual male  
n. 2. M20 US sl. – a heterosexual woman who associates with homosexual males for sex or for security
 
FRUITFUL VINE
n. E19 Brit. – the female genitals; the womb  
 
FRUITING
adj. M20 African-American usage – living a sexually promiscuous life  
 
FRUIT JACKET
n. 1930s US sl. – a reputation as homosexual  
 
FRUIT-PICKER
n. M20 US homosexual usage – a male who has occasional homosexual experiences  
 
FRUIT-PLATE
n. 20C US sl. – a homosexual male  
 
FRUIT SALAD
n. 1. 1917 – a mixture of many different things; a medley
n. 2. 1943 sl. – a (copious or ostentatious) display of medals, or other decorations  
 
FRUIT-STAND
n. M20 US sl. – a homosexual bar; a gathering place for homosexual males  

FRUITURE
n. a1657 obs. – fruition
 
FRUITY
adj. 1. 1900 colloq. – highly interesting, attractive, or suggestive
adj. 2. 1929 US sl. – crazy, eccentric  
adj. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate  

FRUMBERDLING
n. c1000 obs. – a youth

FRUME
n. a1000 obs. – beginning

FRUMIOUS
adj. 1871 (Lewis Carroll word) – furious, fuming

FRUMKENNED
adj. c893 obs. – firstborn

FRUMMAGEMED
adj. 1699 cant, obs. – choked, strangled, hanged

FRUMP
n. 1. 1553 obs. – a mocking speech or action; a flout, a jeer
n. 2. 1593 obs. – a derisive deception, a hoax
n. 3. 1817 – a cross, old-fashioned, dowdily-dressed woman
n. 4. 1886 – a dowdy dress
n. 5. 20C colloq. – any ugly or unpleasant male or female
vb. 1. 1566 obs. – to scoff, to mock
vb. 2. 1577 obs. – to mock, flout, to jeer; to taunt, to insult, to snub
vb. 3. 1693 obs. – to sulk, to be in a bad temper
vb. 4. 1862 – to put in a bad humour, to vex

FRUMPER
n. 1589 obs. – a person who mocks, flouts, or jests

FRUMPERY
n. 1. 1582 obs. – abuse, mockery
n. 2. 1653 obs. – a flout, a mock, a sneer

FRUMPING
adj. 1587 – mocking, scoffing, jeering

FRUMPISH
adj. 1. 1647 – disposed to mock or flout; jesting, sneering; also, cross, ill-tempered
adj. 2. 1847 – old-fashioned or dowdy; outmoded, shabby, drab

FRUMPLE
n. c1440 obs. – a wrinkle
vb. 1398 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to wrinkle, to crumple

FRUMP OFF
vb. a1625 obs. – to put off with jeering answers

FRUMPS
n. 1671 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – sulks, ill-humour

FRUMPY
adj. 1746 – cross, ill-tempered, irritable, churlish; also, dowdy

FRUMRESE
n. c1275 obs. – a first attack, onslaught

FRUMTH
n. c950 obs. – beginning

FRUNTY
adj. 1. 19C Sc. – having the appearance of health, healthy  
adj. 2. 19C Sc. – free in manner; spirited, implying the idea of forwardness; keen, eager; passionate 

FRUSH
n. 1. c1400 obs. exc. Sc. – a rush, charge, onset, collision
n. 2. 1582 obs. exc. Sc. – fragments, splinters
adj. 1. 1802 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – liable to break, brittle, fragile
adj. 2. a1807 Sc. obs. – frank, forward
adj. 3. 1848 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – soft, not firm in substance
vb. 1. a1300 obs. – to strike violently so as to crush, bruise, or smash
vb. 2. c1430 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to rub harshly, to scratch
vb. 3. c1430 obs. – to carve a chicken
vb. 4. 1489 obs. – to break, to snap; to break or become broken under pressure; to become crushed

FRUSHY
adj. 1610 obs. – liable to break, brittle, fragile

FRUST
n. 1765 obs. – a fragment

FRUSTER
adj. 1488 Sc. obs. – ineffectual, meaningless, vain
n. 1488 Sc. obs. – frustration, disappointment
vb. a1513 obs. – to render useless; to frustrate; to destroy, to ruin, to lay waste

FRUSTILLATION
n. 1653 obs. – a breaking into small pieces

FRUSTRABLE
adj. 1673 obs. – capable of being frustrated or made ineffectual

FRUSTRANEOUS
adj. a1643 obs. – vain, useless, ineffectual, unprofitable
 
FRUSTRATORY
adj. 1. 1490 obs. – resulting in disappointment; disappointing
adj. 2. 1529 obs. – tending to frustrate, balk, defeat, or make void  

FRUSTULENT
adj. 1656 – full of small pieces

FRUTICAL
adj. 1597 obs. – shrubby, have the nature of a shrub

FRUTICEOUS
adj. a1682 obs. – shrubby, bushy

FRUZ
vb. 1702 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to spread out hair in a frizzy mass; to ruffle, to rumple
 
FRY
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewilderment; perplexity  
vb. 1. 1928 US sl. – to execute or be executed in the electric chair
vb. 2. 1968 African-American sl. – to straighten curly hair  
 
FRY A FAGGOT
vb. 1621 obs. – to be burnt alive
 
FRY SOMEONE’S BACON
vb. 1986 Amer. sl. – to ruin  
 
FRY-UP
n. 1967 sl. – a quickly made dish or meal prepared by frying, often of cold cooked food


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Updated: September 15, 2022