Dictionary: HOL – HON


• HOLD
vb. 1935 US sl. – to be in possession of drugs for sale  

• HOLD A CANDLE TO ANOTHER
vb. 1550 – to assist him by holding the candle while he works; hence, to help in a subordinate position  

• HOLD A CANDLE TO THE DEVIL
vb. 1599 obs. – to serve or assist an evil person; to be active in evil courses  

• HOLD ACES
vb. 1894 Amer. sl. – to effectively control a situation  

• HOLD A GOOD WIND
vb. M19 nautical colloq. – of a ship: to have good weatherly qualities  

• HOLD ALL THE ACES
vb. 1823 – to have control of a situation, to have the advantage

• HOLD A LOOKING-GLASS TO A MOLE
vb. B1900 – to act foolishly and to no purpose

• HOLD AN ACE FULL
vb. 1894 Amer. sl. – to effectively control a situation  

• HOLD A SPEAR
vb. 1950 Aust. theatrical sl. – to take a very minor non-speaking part  

• HOLD BY THE TOE
vb. 1623 obs. – to have a secure hold of

• HOLD CLOSE TO THE WILLOWS
vb. 1913 Amer. dial. – to act cautiously and conservatively; to be conventional, conservative, or modest  

• HOLD EVERY ACE
vb. 1894 Amer. sl. – to effectively control a situation  

• HOLD HARD!
int. c1760 – wait a moment! stop!  

• HOLDING
adj. 1940s US sl. – wealthy

• HOLD IN HALS
vb. c1560 obs. – to flatter, to beguile, to delude with false professions

• HOLD IN HAND
vb. c1860 colloq. – to amuse; to interest  

• HOLD IN LEASH
vb. 1842 – to have control over, to keep in bondage  

• HOLD IT
int. c1910 colloq. – wait! stay in precisely that position  
vb. 20C sl. – to feel angry or resentful; to sulk or not speak  

• HOLD ITS LEVEL WITH
vb. 1596 obs. – to be on an equality with

• HOLD-OFF
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – delay; postponement  

• HOLD ON!
int. c1800 – wait a moment! stop!

• HOLD ON BY SOMEONE’S MONKEY-TAIL
vb. 1887 nautical sl. – to take someone’s word for a story

• HOLD ONE IN TAMTARY
vb. 1710 Sc. – to keep one in suspense; to tease or exasperate by delay; to vex or disquiet one  

• HOLD ONE’S CORNER
vb. M19 colloq. – to hold one’s own against others  

• HOLD ONE’S GULSH
vb. c1840 Eng. dial. – to keep quiet, to refrain from talking  

• HOLD ONE’S HORSES
vb. 1842 US sl. – to check one’s impulsiveness; to be calm  

• HOLD ONE WAG
vb. c1540 obs. – to keep at bay, to defy

• HOLD ON TO THE SLACK
vb. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to be idle, with a suggestion of waiting for and desiring employment

• HOLD ONTO YOUR HAT
vb. 1970s US sl. – to get ready for trouble; to take precautions

• HOLDOUT
n. 1. 1894 US gambling sl. – a playing card sneakily kept from the deck by the dealer
n. 2. 1940s US sl. – a person who refuses to agree to something
(verbs as ‘hold out’)
vb. 1. 1593 – to endure, to persist
vb. 2. 1907 US sl. – to refuse to do something until one gets certain conditions

• HOLDOVER
n. Bk1942 Amer. college sl. – a student who takes a course a second time  

• HOLD SOMEONE’S COAT
vb. 1940s US sl. – to stand back and let other’s fight

• HOLD SOMEONE’S FEET TO THE FIRE
vb. 1980s US sl. – to subject someone to strong and painful persuasion; to use maximum pressure

• HOLD TACK WITH
vb. 1412-20 obs. – to hold one’s own with; to keep up with; to be even with or equal to; to match

• HOLD TAG
vb. 1567 obs. – to keep a person engaged in conversation

• HOLD THE BABY
vb. 1878 – to bear an unwelcome responsibility

• HOLD THE BAG
vb. 1760 Amer. sl. – to be left in the lurch

• HOLD THE HANK IN ONE’S OWN HAND
vb. 1882 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to be master of the situation; to hold one’s own  

• HOLD THE PHONE
vb. 1930s US sl. – to wait a minute; to delay

• HOLD THE SACK
vb. 1904 Amer. dial. – to bear alone the consequences that should be shared by others; to possess what remains after others have taken whatever is of value; to be in a predicament  

• HOLD-UP
n. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. sl. – a sale at an exorbitant price  
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – delay; postponement  

• HOLD UP OIL
vb. 1387 obs. – to use flattering speech, to flatter

• HOLD UP THE BACKDROP
vb. 1929 Amer. theatrical sl. – to play a nonspeaking role, esp. as part of a group of bystanders  

• HOLD WITH THE HARE AND HUNT WITH THE HOUNDS
vb. 1555 – to try to remain on good terms with both sides in a quarrel, etc.

• HOLD WITH THE HARE AND RUN WITH THE HOUNDS
vb. 1555 – to try to keep in with both sides; to play a double part

• HOLD YOUR ASS!
int. 1961 Amer. sl. – be patient!  

• HOLD YOUR DANDER DOWN!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – said to a person to make him be patient  

• HOLD YOUR HORSES!
int. 1842 US sl. – wait!  

• HOLD YOUR HOT POTATO!
int. M19 sl. – be quiet! shut up!  

• HOLD YOUR JAW
phr. 1892 sl. – hold your tongue

• HOLD YOUR KEDGE
vb. 1887 Eng. dial. – to keep quiet  

• HOLD YOUR LONG TONGUE!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – be quiet! be patient!  

• HOLD YOUR WATER!
int. Bk1975 US sl. – be patient!

• HOLD YOUR YAP!
int. 1871 Amer. dial. – be quiet!  

• HOLE
n. 1. 1340 sl. – female genitals
n. 2. 1607 sl. – the anus  
n. 3. 1607 sl. – the mouth
n. 4. 1616 sl. – an unpleasant or nasty place  
n. 5. 1935 Brit. sl. – a shilling  
vb. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally

• THE HOLE
n. 1. 1535 prison sl. – solitary confinement or a cell used for it
n. 2. 1950s US criminals’ sl. – a subway

• HOLE CARD
n. 1908 US sl. – a card dealt face down in stud poker

• HOLE-CREEPER
n. 1462 – a sneaking thief

• HOLED
adj. L19 sl. – of a man: enjoying sexual intercourse  

• HOLE IN MY SHOE
n. 1960s sl. – in bingo: the number 82

• HOLE IN ONE
int. 1970s sl. – absolutely correct!  
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent  

• THE HOLE IN THE DOUGHNUT
n. 1990s US sl. – what is lacking; an obstacle of omission

• HOLE IN THE GROUND
n. 20C rhyming sl. – £1 sterling  

• HOLE IN THE ROAD
n. M19 US sl. – a small, insignificant, remote place  

• HOLE IN THE WALL
adj. M19 sl., orig. US – second-class, inferior  
n. 1. M17 sl. – a brothel  
n. 2. 1822 US sl. – a small, insignificant, remote place  
n. 3. M19 sl. – an illicit liquor store or bar  
n. 4. M19 sl. – a small shop
n. 5. L19 sl. – a tiny, cramped apartment  
n. 6. 1910s US sl. – a bar  
n. 7. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a rendezvous or hiding place for criminals and outlaws in the rugged mountain ravines near Jackson, Wyoming
n. 8. 1920s sl. – a restaurant  
n. 9. 1980s sl. – an automatic teller machine installed in the external wall of a bank, etc.  

• HOLE OUT
vb. 1867 golfing usage – to finish a hole by putting the ball in the cup

• HOLE UP
vb. 1875 sl. – to conceal; to hide; to take refuge

• HOLIDAY
n. 1. 1935 US Navy sl. – a small area missed while painting
n. 2. 1935 US Navy sl. – a forgotten or neglected task

• HOLLANDS ACRE
n. 1645 US – 2.1 acres

• HOLLER
vb. 1. 1699 sl. chiefly US – to shout  
vb. 2. 1904 US sl. – to complain
vb. 3. 1940s US sl. – to inform

• HOLLER CALF-ROPE
vb. 1859 US sl. – to plead for mercy or admit defeat; to say uncle; to give in, to surrender; to capitulate, esp. in children’s games

• HOLLER NEW YORK
vb. 1976 Amer. dial. – to vomit  

• HOLLER NEW YORKE
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – to vomit  

• HOLLER UNCLE
vb. 1918 US sl. – to admit defeat, to beg for mercy

• HOLLOW-HEADED
adj. B1900 Eng. dial. – foolish, silly  

• HOLLOW-POT
n. B1900 Eng. dial. – a loud-talking woman

• HOLLYWOOD CORPORAL
n. World War II US Army – an acting corporal

• HOLLYWOOD STOP
n. 1970s US sl. – of a motorist: running a stop sign  

• HOLOUR
n. c1230 obs. – a fornicator, a whoremonger, an adulterer; a debauchee, rake, ribald, scoundrel 

• HOLS
n. 1905 sl. – holidays  

• HOLY BALLS!
int. 1943 US sl. – an exclamation of shock, surprise, etc.  

• HOLY CATS!
int. 1900 US sl. – an exclamation of surprise, wonder, dismay, admiration, etc.

• HOLY CHRISTMAS!
int. 20C – an exclamation and oath

• HOLY COW!
int. 1924 – an exclamation of surprise or astonishment  

• HOLY CROW!
int. 1965 US – used to express astonishment  

• HOLY FATHER!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – an exclamation  

• THE HOLY FATHER
n. c1400 – the Pope  

• HOLY FRIGHT
n. 1. Bk1913 Amer. dial. – a large amount
n. 2. Bk1913 Amer. dial. – something astonishing

• HOLY GEE!
int. 1895 US sl. – an exclamation of surprise, wonder, dismay, admiration, etc.

• HOLY HATS!
int. 1924 Amer. dial. – an exclamation of surprise  

• HOLY HELL
n. 1940s US sl. – a vehement rebuke; severe punishment

• HOLY JEEBERS!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – a mild oath  

• HOLY JEHOSAPHAT!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – an exclamation or mild oath  

• HOLY JESWAX!
int. 1895 Amer. dial. – a mild oath  

• HOLY JOE
n. 1. 1874 sl., orig. nautical usage – a priest or clergyman
n. 2. 1889 sl. – an enthusiastically religious person  

• HOLY JUMPING JEHOSOPHAT!
int. 1924 Amer. dial. – an exclamation or mild oath  

• HOLY KAMOLY!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – an exclamation of surprise or astonishment  

• HOLY MAC!
int. 1931 Amer. sl. – used to express surprise, etc.

• HOLY MACKEREL!
int. 1931 Amer. sl. – used to express surprise, annoyance, or the like  

• HOLY MACKINAW!
int. 1907 Amer. dial. – an exclamation or mild oath  

• HOLY MESS
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – disorder  
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something unattractive
n. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an unattractive person

• HOLY MOLEY!
int. 1949 Amer. sl. – an exclamation of surprise  

• HOLY MOLLY!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – an exclamation of surprise or astonishment  

• HOLY MOLY!
int. 1949 – an exclamation of surprise or astonishment  

• HOLY MOSES!
int. 1855 – an exclamation of surprise or astonishment  

• HOLY NED!
int. 1967 Amer. dial. – an exclamation  

• HOLY OF HOLIES
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a bedroom  

• HOLY OLD MACKINAW!
int. 1938 Amer. dial. – an exclamation or mild oath  

• HOLY SCHMUTZ!
int. 1990s US sl. – an exclamation of surprise, wonder, dismay, admiration, etc.

• HOLY SHIT!
int. 1982 orig. US – an exclamation of surprise or astonishment  

• HOLY SMOKE!
int. 1892 – an exclamation of surprise or astonishment  

 HOLY SNAKES!
adj. 1927 Amer. dial. – an exclamation, usually of surprise or indignation

• HOLY SOX!
int. 1909 US sl. – an exclamation of surprise, wonder, dismay, admiration, etc.

• HOLY TAMOLY!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – an exclamation of surprise or astonishment  

• HOLY TERROR
n. 1883 sl. – a troublesome child  

• HOLY WARS!
int. 1900s sl. – a general exclamation  

• HOLY WATER
n. 1. 20C sl. – water that has been laced with whisky  
n. 2. 20C rhyming sl. – a daughter  

• HOLY-WATER SPRINKLER
n. 19C sl. – a spiked club  

• HOLY-WATER STICK
n. 19C sl. – a spiked club

• HOLY WEEK
n. 1. 1960s US sl. – the time of menstruation  
n. 2. 1970s homosexual sl. – any time one abstains from sex, as when one has VD  

• HOLY WILLIE
n. 1. L19 sl. – a sanctimonious, hypocritically pious person  
n. 2. 1916 sl. – an enthusiastically religious person   

• HOM
n. 1990s sl. – a term of abuse (homosexual)  

• HOMBRE
n. 1. M19 sl. – a man  
n. 2. L19 sl. – a term of address  
n. 3. 1990s sl., orig. US students’ sl. – a male friend

• HOMBRECITOS
n. 1970s drug culture sl. – psilocybin, an hallucinogen  

• HOME
n. 1. L19 US criminals’ sl. – St. Paul, Minnesota  
n. 2. 1940s sl., orig. African-American – a friend; often used in direct address
n. 3. 1970s US students’ sl. – a person from the same hometown  

• HOME AND HOSED
adj.20C Aust. sl. – completed a task

• HOME BASE
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – the starting line in marble games  

• HOMEBIRD
n. 1. 1950s orig. US – one who prefers their home to venturing anywhere more exciting or challenging  
n. 2. M19 sl. – a henpecked husband  

• HOME BISCUIT
n. 1980s US college sl. – a friend  

• HOME BLASTER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a philanderer  

• HOMEBOY
n. 1. L19 sl. – a good friend  
n. 2. L19 sl. – a naive person, newly arrived in the city from the countryside
n. 3. L19 sl. – a neighbourhood person
n. 4. L19 sl. – someone who stays mainly at home
n. 5. 1910s S. Afr. & US sl. – someone who has come to the city from the same rural or provincial area as oneself  
n. 6. 1950s Irish sl. – an ex-inmate of a religious institution  
n. 7. 1970s African-American sl. – a young Black or Hispanic member of a street gang  
n. 8. 1980s African-American sl. – a fellow Black person  

• HOME BREAKER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a philanderer  

• HOME-BUDDY
n. L19 sl. – someone who stays mainly at home  

• HOMECHICKEN
n. 1980s US college sl. – a male or female homosexual  

• HOMECHOP
n. 1980s US college sl. – a friend, usually of the opposite sex

• HOME COOKING
n. 1930s African-American sl. – anything outstanding, wonderful or first-rate  

• HOMEE-PALONE
n. 1966 UK sl. – a homosexual man  

• HOME FREE
adj. 1960s Amer. sl. – having completed a task

• HOMEGIRL
n. 1967 sl., orig. & chiefly African-American – a friend

• HOME GUARD
n. 1900s US circus & tramps’ sl. – a resident of a place; a native

• HOMELY AS A BASKET OF CHIPS
adj. 1827 Amer. dial. – plain

• HOME ON THE PIG’S BACK
adj. L19 Ireland, Aust. & NZ sl. – very contented, happily or successfully placed, having arrived at a successful conclusion  

• HOME PLATE
n. 1. 1950s US Air Force sl. – the landing field, aircraft carrier, etc. where an aircraft is based
n. 2. 1960s Amer. sl. – where you live

• HOMER
n. 1. 1942 Aust. & NZ sl. – a wound sufficiently serious to warrant repatriation
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent  
n. 3. 1980s US sports sl. – an official who favours the home team

• HOME RUN
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent

• HOMESELF
adj. 1650 obs. rare – carried on with oneself; private

• HOMESKILLET
n. 1990s US sl. – a good friend

• HOMESLICE
n. 1. 1980s US teen sl. – a good friend; one’s best friend
n. 2. 1990s African-American sl. – a Black person

• HOMEWORK
n. 1945 sl. – a person considered as an object of sexual desire or availability, generally a woman

• HOME WRECKER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a philanderer  

• HOMEY
n. 1927 NZ sl. – a British immigrant, esp. one newly arrived

• HOMICIDIOUS
adj. 1632 rare – pert. to homicide; tending to or resulting in homicide; man-slaying; murderous

• HOMIE
n. 1. 1927 NZ sl. – a British immigrant, esp. one newly arrived
n. 2. 1940s US sl. – a male homosexual
n. 3. 1970s African-American sl. – a close friend, or a fellow townsperson

• HOMINEITY
n. 1660 obs. – the essential quality of mankind; that which constitutes man

• HOMMOCKS
n. 1. 1809 Eng. dial. – large, awkward feet or legs  
n. 2. B1900 Eng. dial. – an awkward, clumsy person; a tall, slatternly or romping girl  

• HOMMOCKY
adj. 1. B1900 Eng. dial. – awkward, clumsy
adj. 2. B1900 Eng. dial. – rough, uneven
adj. 3. B1900 Amer. – filled with hommocks (a small elevation or island in the ‘everglades’ or lands covered with fresh water swamp 

• HOMO
n. 1929 sl., mainly derogatory – a homosexual

• HOMODOX
adj. 1656 obs. – of the same opinion

• HOMODOXIAN
adj. 1716 obs. – of the same opinion
n. 1716 obs. – a person of the same opinion

• HOMOROCK
adj. 1990s US sl. – featuring rock music played by homosexuals

• HOMUNCULE
n. 1656 – a little or diminutive man; a dwarf

• HON
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a loved one; a sweetheart  

• HONCHO
n. 1945 sl. – a leader, esp. an assertive leader; a chief
vb. 1945 sl. – to organize, supervise, or be the leader of

• HONDO
adj. 1980s US students’ sl. – excellent; desirable

• HONE
vb. 1710 Amer. dial. – to yearn, to long for

• HONEROUS
adj. c1400 obs. – burdensome; oppressive; troublesome  

• HONEST AS THE SKIN THAT IS BETWEEN ONE’S BROWS
adj. a1643 obs. – very honest  

• HONEST COD
n. M17 sl. – a good friend  

• HONEST INJUN
phr. 1876 sl., orig. US – used as an assertion that what one has said, one believes to be true  

• HONEST JOHN
n. 1. 1930 colloq. – a man so trusting and innocent that he may be easily cheated or deceived
n. 2. 1930 colloq. – an honest, sincere man

• HONEY
n. 1. c1350 colloq. – a person for whom one feels loves or deep affection; sweetheart, darling; a term of endearment
n. 2. 1888 sl., orig. US – an excellent person or thing  
n. 3. Bk1903 sl. – money
n. 4. Bk1942 Amer. college sl. – an attractive girl  
n. 5. 20C colloq. – something of high quality, degree of excellence, etc.
vb. 20C colloq. – to talk flatteringly or endearingly to (often followed by ‘up’)

• HONEY-BABY
n. 1904 sl. – a term of endearment

• HONEY BARGE
n. 1950s US Navy sl. – a garbage scow

• HONEY BUCKET
n. 1931 Can. sl. – a chamber pot or other container for excrement

• HONEY BUN
n. 1895 colloq. – a person for whom one feels loves or deep affection; sweetheart, darling; a term of endearment

• HONEY BUNCH
n. 1900 colloq. – a person for whom one feels loves or deep affection; sweetheart, darling; a term of endearment

• HONEY BUNCH PLUMMINS
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a term of endearment for children

• HONEY-BUNNY
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a loved one; a sweetheart  

• HONEY-DROP
n. ?a1800 – a mole on the skin

• HONEY-FUCK
vb. 1950s US sl. – to do the sex act in a romantic, idyllic way

• HONEY-FUGGLE
vb. 1. 1829 Amer. dial. – to dupe, deceive, cheat, swindle; to act in an underhand manner in order to deceive  
vb. 2. 1856 Amer. dial. – to cajole, wheedle, flatter  
vb. 3. 1888 Amer. dial. – to lure, to entice  
vb. 4. 1969 Amer. dial. – to show affection in public  

• HONEY LOVE
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a child

• HONEY MAN
n. 1940s US sl. – a kept man; a pimp

• HONEYMOON BURGER
n. 1980s US lunch counter usage – a sandwich made with only bread and lettuce

• HONEY-OIL
vb. 1900 Sc. – to flatter; to ‘butter up’  

• HONEY-PEOPLE
n. 1598 obs. – honey bees

• HONEY-POT
n. 1709 sl. – female genitals

• HONEY-SPOT
n. 1547 obs. exc. Sc. – a mole on the skin

HONEY UP
vb. 20C colloq. – to talk flatteringly or endearingly to

HONEY WAGON
n. 1. 1915 US sl. – a manure wagon or manure spreader
n. 2. World War II US Army sl. – a garbage truck

HONISH
vb. 1. a1300 obs. – to bring to disgrace or ruin; to dishonour, insult; to destroy, put an end to 
vb. 2. 1878 Eng. dial. – to starve a person for want of food  
Etymology
from Anglo-Norman huniss-, Anglo-Norman and Old French honiss-, extended stem of Anglo-Norman hunir, Anglo-Norman and Old French honir (French honnir) (to shame, to humiliate, to ruin, to damage)

HONK
vb. 1. 1960s US sl. – to make a sexual,. esp. a homosexual, advance by handling or pressing a man’s genitals
vb. 2. 1990s US sl. – to vomit

HONKED
adj. 1959 UK sl., orig. military usage – drunk  

• HONKED OFF
adj. 1958 US sl. – angry  

• HONKER
n. 1. 1835 Amer. – a goose  
n. 2. 1942 US sl. – the nose  
n. 3. 1968 US sl. – in drag racing: a fast stock car  
n. 4. 1968 US sl. – the penis
n. 5. 1981 US sl. – expectorated sputum  
n. 6. 1991 US sl. – a large and powerful wave  

• HONKERS
adj. 1957 Brit. sl. – drunk  
n. 1984 UK military sl. – Hong Kong  

• HONKEY
n. 1945 African-American sl., disparaging and offensive – a White person

• HONKEY-DOOLEY
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate  

• HONK-HONK
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – an automobile  

• HONKIE;  HONKY
n. 1945 African-American sl., disparaging and offensive – a White person

• HONKING
adj. 1. 1985 Sc. – very smelly; of inferior quality  
adj. 2. 1995 US sl. – very large  

• HONK OFF
vb. 1980s US sl. – to anger; to annoy

• HONKY-DORI
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate  

• HONKY-TONK
n. 1. 1894 US sl. – a cheap, usually disreputable, saloon and gambling place
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a small town  
n. 3. Bk1997 US sl. – a cheap, small-town theatre
n. 4. Bk1997 US sl. – a brothel

• HONORIFICABILITUDINITY
n. 1656 obs. rare – honourableness  

• HONORIFICENT
adj. 1681 obs. – doing or conferring honour; importing honour or respect 

• HONOUROUS
adj. c1475 obs. – honourable

• HONOUR’S BED
n. 1834 – the grave of a soldier who has died on the field of battle  

• HONTOUS
adj. c1477 obs. – full of shame; ashamed; shameful

• HONYOCK
n. 1. 1875 US sl. – a rustic person; a farmer
n. 2. 1911 US sl. – an immigrant from central or southeastern Europe

• HON-YOCKER
n. 1875 US sl. – a rustic person; a farmer


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Updated: September 7, 2022