Dictionary: INE – ING


• INEAR
n. 1790 Eng. dial. – a kidney  
 
• INEBRIATE
adj. 1497 – drunk  
n. L18 – an intoxicated person, esp. an habitual drunkard
vb. LME – to make drunk, to intoxicate
 
• INEBRIATED
adj. 1615 – drunk
 
• INEBRIATION
n. E16 – intoxication
 
• INEBRIETY
n. L18 – habitual drunkenness
 
• INEBRIOUS
adj. M19 rare – inebriated, habitually drunken
 
• INEDITA
n. E20 – unpublished writings
 
• INEFFABLE
n. M19 sl. – a supreme dandy  
 
• THE INEFFABLE
n. 19C sl. – the vagina  
 
• INEFFABLES
n. 1850 humorous euphemism – trousers
 
• IN EFFECT MODE
adj. 1980s African-American teen sl. – in a relaxed, stress-free state of mind  
 
• INEFFICACIOUS
adj. M17 – ineffective
 
• INEGALITARIAN
adj. M20 – marked by inequality
n. M20 – a person who denies or opposes equality between people
 
• INELUCTABLE
adj. E17 – unable to be resisted or avoided; inescapable
 
• INELUDIBLE
adj. L17 – unavoidable; inescapable
 
• INENUBILABLE
adj. E20 rare – inexplicable
 
• INEQUALITARIAN
adj. L19 – marked by inequality
n. L19 – a person who denies or opposed equality between people
 
• INERGETICAL
adj. L17 obs. rare – without energy; sluggish, inactive
 
• INERRANT
adj. M19 – that does not err; unerring
 
• INERUDITE
adj. E19 – unlearned; uninstructed
 
• INEXECRABLE
adj. L16 obs. rare – most execrable or abhorred
 
• INEXORABLE
adj. M16 – unable to be moved or be persuaded to entreaty or request (esp. for mercy); rigidly severe, immovable, relentless
 
• INEXPLEBLE
adj. M16 obs. – unable to be filled or satisfied; insatiable
 
• INEXPLICABLES
n. 1836 sl. – trousers  
 
• INEXPRESSIBLES
n. 1790 sl. – trousers
 
• I-NEY!
int. 1950s W. Indies Rasta usage – a greeting
 
• INFALL
n. 1721 Sc. obs. – an invasion, attack, onslaught  
 
• INFAMATION
n. 1888 Eng. dial. – inflammation  
 
• INFAMATORY
adj. 1. 1612 obs. – defamatory; having the property of defaming
adj. 2. 1880 rare – bringing infamy  
 
• INFANG
vb. 1793 Sc. obs. – to cheat, to gull, to ‘take in’
 
• INFANTRY
n. 1623 sl. – children
 
• INFARE
n. 1. 1701 Sc. obs. – the coming of a bride to her new home and the feast given by the bridegroom to celebrate this; hence, the day succeeding the wedding  
n. 2. 1794 Amer. dial. – a reception or celebration for a newly married couple, esp. one given at the home of the groom’s parents on the day following the wedding  
n. 3. 1827 Sc. obs. – entry into a new situation in life
n. 4. 1893 Amer. dial. – any kind of party or celebration
 
• INFARE DAYS
n. 1926 Amer. dial. – a honeymoon  
 
• IN FATHERLAND
adj. 1683 obs. – at home; opposite to ‘abroad’  
 
• IN FEATHER
adj. L18 US sl. – in one’s best clothes  
 
• INFENCEABLE
adj. 1707 Sc. obs. – unable to be defended or guarded, unprotected
 
• INFERIOR HALF
n. L19 sl. – one’s wife or partner; generally in jocular use  
 
• INFERNAL
adj. 1602 colloq. – detestable; fit only for Hell
adv. 17C – detestably, confoundedly 
 
• INFERNALLY
adv. 17C – detestably, confoundedly
 
• INFESTED
adj. 1967 Amer. dial. – infected  
 
• INFESTIOUS
adj. 1597 obs. – hostile, troublesome, inimical
 
• INFESTUOUS
adj. 1899 Sc. – extraordinary  
 
• INFICIATE
vb. 1611 obs. rare – to deny, to disavow
 
• INFICIATORY
adj. 1611 obs. rare – pertaining to denial, denying
 
• INFICIENT
adj. 1609 – ineffective, of no effect (obs.)
 
• INFIDOUS
adj. 1656 – faithless, unfaithful; not to be trusted (obs.)
 
IN FIFTH GEAR
adj. 1960s – drunk, fully intoxicated (Amer. sl.)
 
IN FINE FIG
adj. Bk1942 – in order; in good condition (Amer. sl.)
 
IN FINE TWIG
adj. 19C – in high spirits or good order (sl.)
adv. 19C – splendidly, stylishly (sl.)
 
• IN FINE WHACK
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – in order; in good condition  
 
• INFIRM
adj. 1. 1890 Eng. dial. – silly, foolish  
adj. 2. Bk2009 sl. – drunk  
 
• INFIRMARY
n. 1931-33 Amer. dial. – a poorhouse or a farm where poor people are maintained at public expense  
 
• INFIT
n. 1. Bk1902 Sc. – an introduction  
n. 2. Bk1902 Sc. – influence
 
• IN FITS
adj. 1856 sl. – laughing
 
• IN FLAGGERS
adv. 1920s Aust. sl. – in flagrante delicto, in the very act of wrongdoing, esp. in an act of sexual misconduct  
 
• IN FLAGRANTE
adv. E17 sl. – (caught) in the act, generally of sexual intercourse  
 
• INFLAMINATED
adj. Bk2009 sl. – drunk  
 
• IN FLEW ENDWAYS
n. 1942 Amer. dial., jocular usage – influenza
 
• INFLUENCED
adj. Bk2009 sl. – drunk  
 
• INFLUENZA SPARROW
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – the goldfinch  
 
• INFO
n. 1. 1913 sl. – information  
n. 2. c1925 UK criminals’ sl. – advice 
 
• INFOBAHN
n. Bk2002 Aust. sl. – the information superhighway, the Internet  
 
• IN FOR
adj. 1. M17 sl. – in trouble, facing punishment  
adj. 2. 18C sl. – drunk  
adj. 3. M19 sl. – willing, committed to, eager  
adj. 4. 1910s sl. – pregnant  
 
• INFOR
n. 20C UK prison sl. – information, esp. information carried by informers to prison officials  
 
• IN FOR IT
adj. 1. M17 sl. – in trouble, about to be reprimanded or punished  
adj. 2. 18C sl. – drunk  
adj. 3. M19 sl. – willing, committed to, eager  
adj. 4. 1910s sl. – pregnant  
 
• IN FORM
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – in order; in good condition  
 
• INFORMATION
n. 1888 Eng. dial. – inflammation  
 
• INFORMATION FENCE
n. 1940 US criminals’ sl. – a criminal who sells information to crooks  
 
• IN FOR ONE’S CHOP
phr. 1920s Aust. & NZ sl. – out for oneself, for one’s own profit or advantage

• IN FOR PATTER
phr. M19 sl. – facing trial  
 
• IN FOR THE PLATE
phr. Bk1896 sl. – venereally infected
 
• INFOXICATED
adj. 1962 Amer. dial., jocular usage – drunk, intoxicated
 
• INFRENDIATE
 vb. 1623 obs. rare – to gnash the teeth, usually in anger  
 
• IN FRONT
adj. 1950s sl., orig. US – open, honest  
 
• IN FULL BLOOM
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – of a fire: burning strong  
 
• IN FULL CAREER
adv. 1626 – at full speed  
 
• IN FULL DIG
phr. M19 sl. – earning one’s full pay
 
• IN FULL EFFECT
adj. 1990s sl., orig. African-American – present, going on, happening
 
• IN FULL FEATHER
adj. 1. L18 US sl. – in one’s best clothes 
adj. 2. 1855 Amer. dial. – in good condition, in fine fettle, in high spirits  
adj. 3. E19 sl. – rich  
 
• IN FULL FIG
adj. M19 sl. – dressed up  
 
• IN FULL HABITUDE
adv. a1661 obs. rare –  to the full extent; wholly, entirely 
 
• IN FULL LAY
adj. 1885 – laying eggs  
 
• IN FULL PAINT
adj. 1900s Aust. sl. – dressed up  
 
• IN FULL SAIL
adj. 1892 Eng. dial. – at the height of prosperity  
 
• INFUSE
vb. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – to inform  
 
• ING
n. 1. 1703 Eng. dial. – mould raised by moles; mole-hills  
n. 2. 1788 Eng. dial. – a meadow, pasture, esp. low-lying land by the side of a stream or river, etc.  
 
• INGAIN
n. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – profit in buying and selling  
 
• INGAN
n. 1728 Sc. – an onion  
 
• INGANG
n. 1. 1825 Sc. – lack, deficiency  
n. 2. 1852 Sc. – loss of weight or measure due to shrinkage, etc.  
n. 3. 1911 Sc. – a beginning  
n. 4. 1911 Sc. – an entrance, entry
 
• INGANGERS
n. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – people assembling or coming in  
 
• INGANGING
n. 1824 Sc. & Eng. dial. – the act of entering, the entrance, entry
 
• INGANGS
n. 1824 Sc. – the intestines, entrails  
 
• INGAN JOHNNIE
n. 19C Sc. – an itinerant onion-seller  
 
• INGATE
adv. 1898 Sc. – within, inside, indoors, inwardly  
n. 1. 1837 Sc. & Eng. dial. – an entrance, ingress; a way in; the act of entering
n. 2. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – an inroad, an attack  
 
• INGATE AND OUTGATE
adv. 1898 Sc. – within and without, completely  
 
• INGATE OR OUTGATE
adv. 1882 Eng. dial. – willy-nilly, by any means whatever  
 
• ING-BING
n. 1920s US sl. – a fit, an emotional outburst  
 
• INGEAR
n. 1835 Sc. – household belongings, furniture, etc.  
 
• INGENURIOUS
adj. 1875 Eng. dial. – ingenious  
 
• INGERN
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – an onion
 
• INGETTING
n. 1721 Sc. obs. – the act of gathering in or receiving
 
• INGIDDIED
adj. 1628 obs. rare – made giddy or unsteady  
 
• INGINE
n. 1. 1660 Sc. obs. – ingenuity, quickness of intellect; ability; knowledge, invention
n. 2. 1824 Sc. obs. – an ingenious person, a genius; a person of ability  
 
• INGLE
n. 1. L16 sl. – a catamite
n. 2. 1601 sl. – an intimate, a dear friend
n. 3. 1737 Sc. & Eng. dial. – fire, flame; a fire in a room; the furnace of a kiln
n. 4. 1736 Sc. – an open fireplace or hearth; the fireside, a chimney corner  
n. 5. 1808 Sc. obs. – an open-air fire kindled for amusement, a bonfire
n. 6. 1814 Sc. – fuel for a fire, a burning coal, peat, etc.  
vb. 1. 1598 sl. – to practice sodomy
vb. 2. 1599 Eng. dial. – to fondle, to cherish, to caress  
 
• INGLE-BRED
adj. 1788 Sc. – home-bred  
 
• INGLE-DOG
n. 1889 Eng. dial. – an earthworm  
 
• INGLE-GLEED
n. Bk1902 Sc. – the flames or blaze of a fire; firelight; a blazing fireside  
 
• INGLE-LIGHTED
adj. 1818 Sc. – lighted by the fire  
 
• INGLE-LOWE
n. 1798 Sc. – the flames or blaze of a fire; firelight; a blazing fireside  
 
• INGLENOOK
n. 19C sl. – the female pudendum
 
• INGLER
n. 1. 1598 sl. – a sodomist
n. 2. 1809 sl. – an habitually dishonest horse-dealer  
n. 3. 1825 thieves’ sl. – a horse thief who toured country fairs looking for victims
 
• INGLIN
n. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – fuel  
 
• INGLISHER
n. 1823 Sc. – an Englishman  
 
• INGLUNSHIRE
n. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – England  
 
• INGLUVIOUS
adj. 1569 obs. – greedy, gluttonous
 
• INGO
vb. Bk1902 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to go in  
 
• INGOGO
n. 1970s S. Afr. sl. – a cheap prostitute  
 
• IN GOOD
adj. 1989 Aust. sl. – in favour  
 
• IN GOOD ADDLE
phr. Bk1898 Eng. dial. – earning good wages
 
• IN GOOD BREAD
adj. 1763 – in a good living or position  
 
• IN GOOD CASE
adj. 1. 1560 – well off  
adj. 2. 1640-1 arch. – in good condition  
 
• IN GOOD FASHION
adv. 1965 Amer. dial. – thoroughly  
 
• IN GOOD FEATHER
adj. 1852 – in good condition of health, spirits, etc.  
 
• IN GOOD FORM
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – in order; in good condition  
 
• IN GOOD NICK
adj. 20C sl. – of a person or thing: in good condition  
 
• IN GOOD ORDER
adj. 1929 Amer. dial. – said of one putting on much weight  
 
• IN GOOD POINT
adv. 1958 Amer. dial. – in good condition  
 
• IN GOOD RIG
adj. 1939 Amer. dial. – in good condition  
 
• IN GOOD SADDENS
adv. Bk1904 Eng. dial. – in earnest  
 
• IN GOOD SADNESS
adv. 1544 obs. – in earnest, not joking
 
• IN GOOD SHAPE
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – in order; in good condition  
 
• IN GOOD TIME!
int. 1610 obs. – an expression of ironical acquiescence, incredulity, amazement, or the like; to be sure! indeed! very well!
 
• IN GOOD TRIM
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – in order; in good condition  
 
• IN GOOD TWIG
adj. 19C sl. – in high spirits or good order
adv. 19C sl. – splendidly, stylishly  
 
• INGORDIGIOUS
adj. 1637 obs. rare – greedy, avaricious
 
• INGOTED
adj. M19 sl. – very rich  
 
• INGOTHILL!
int. 1825 Sc. obs. – God willing!
 
• INGOTTED
adj. 1864 sl. – rich  
 
• INGRAM
adj. Bk1902 Sc. – ignorant  
 
• INGRATEFUL
adj. 1694 Amer. dial., obs. – ungrateful
 
• INGRATSOW
adj. Bk1902 Sc. – ungrateful  
 
• INGRATUS
n. a1700 UK sl. – an ungrateful servant 
 
• IN GREASE
adj. 1929 US sl. – in trouble  
 
• IN GREAT FEATHER
adj. 1873 – in good condition of health, spirits, etc.  
 
• IN GREAT SHAPE
adj. L19 sl. – in excellent condition, either physically or emotionally  
 
• IN GREAT SNUFF
adj. L17 sl. – elated, very happy  
 
• IN GREAT SPOUT
adj. L18 sl. – in high spirits  
 
• IN GREAT SUDDEN
adv. a1674 obs. – very suddenly
 
• INGROTEN
vb. c1440 obs. rare  – to cram with food or drink, to glut, to devour
 
• INGROWTH
n. 1. 1826 Sc. – increase  
n. 2. a1838 Sc. – an abscess, tumour, or the like 
 
• INGRUSH
vb. 1850 Sc. – to ingratiate  
 
• INGRYDOORIE
n. 1904 Sc. – a burning stick waved about in the dark by children as a plaything  
 
• INGUN
n. 1904 Sc. – an onion  
 
• IN GUTS GULLY
adj. 20C W. Indies sl. – in serious difficulties  


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