Dictionary: JO – JOH


• JOB
n. 1. 1722 sl. – a robbery; a criminal undertaking  
n. 2. Bk1903 sl. – £1
n. 3. Bk1942 Amer. turf sl. – a racehorse  
vb. 1. L17 colloq. obs. – to rebuke in a long and tedious harangue  
vb. 2. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally
vb. 3. 1903 sl., orig. US – to incriminate someone

• JOBARD
n. a1400 obs. – a stupid fellow; a fool

• JOBATION
n. 1687 colloq. – a rebuke, a reproof, especially one of a lengthy and tedious character; a prolonged scolding, a lecture; also, a long discussion

• JOBBERNOWL
adj. 1828 colloq. – stupid, dunderheaded
n. 1. 1599 colloq. – a ludicrous term for the head, implying stupidity
n. 2. 1592 colloq. – a stupid, thick-headed person; a blockhead, a fool, a dunce, a dolt

• JOBE
n. Bk1903 sl. – £1
vb. L17 colloq. obs. – to rebuke in a long and tedious harangue

• JOBLIJOCK
n. 1. Bk1868 Eng. dial. – anything tending to interfere with domestic comfort or peace, as a scolding wife, a smoking chimney, etc.;  domestic trouble 
n. 2. Bk1868 Eng. dial. – a turkey-cock

• JOBS FOR THE BOYS
n. 1950 sl., derogatory – appointments given preferentially to one’s own associates or supporters

• JOB SHARK
n. 1938 Amer. dial. – an employment agent; esp. in logging  

• JOCANT
adj. c1440 obs. – mirthful, merry, gay, jocund  

• JOCATORY
adj. 1576 obs. – characterized by joking; jocular, jesting, merry

• JOCK
n. 1. M16 Sc. – a countryman; a rustic; a clown
n. 2. a1790 sl. – the genitals of a man, or (formerly) a woman
n. 3. L18 sl. – a Scottish or (formerly) northern English sailor; a Scottish soldier; a Scotsman; a form of address to a Scotsman  
n. 4. L18 colloq. – a jockey; a rider in horse races
n. 5. 1879 Eng. dial. & sl. – food
n. 6. 1952 Amer. sl. – a jock-strap  
n. 7. 1960s colloq. – a disc jockey  
n. 8. 1960s Amer. sl. – an athlete
n. 9. M20 N. Amer. colloq. – a pilot or astronaut
n. 10. M20 N. Amer. colloq. – an enthusiast for or a participant in any specified activity, as a computer ‘jock’
vb. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally

• JOCKALEGS
n. 1790 Eng. dial. – a pocketknife; a large clasp knife  

• JOCKAM
n. M16 cant – the penis  
vb. 18C Brit. sl. – to coit a woman  

• JOCKER
n. 1. 1893 N. Amer. sl. – a tramp who is accompanied by a youth who begs for him and may act as his catamite
n. 2. 1935 N. Amer. sl. – an active male homosexual

• JOCKETTE
n. M20 rare – a female jockey

• JOCKEY
n. 1. L16 – a lad; an underling
n. 2. M17 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a horse dealer
n. 3. M17 obs. – a person who drives or rides a horse  
n. 4. L17 rare – a fraudulent bargainer; a cheat
n. 5. L17 Sc. obs. exc. hist. – a strolling minstrel or beggar
n. 6. L17 cant – the penis  

• JOCKEY BOX
n. 20C US – a glove compartment 

• JOCKIE
n. L17 cant – the penis  

• JOCK-ITCH
n. M20 US colloq. – an itching of the male genitals or of the groin  

• JOCKO
n. L18 – a chimpanzee or other ape

• JOCK PACKER
n. Bk1942 Amer. turf sl. – a racehorse  

• JOCKUM
n. M16 cant – the penis  
vb. 18C Brit. sl. – to coit a woman  

• JOCKUM-GAGE
n. 17C cant – a chamber pot  

• JOCKY
n. L17 cant – the penis 

• JOCOCIOUS
adj. 1790 Eng. dial. – jocose, mirthful; humorous, fond of joking  

• JOCOSERIOUS
adj. M17 – half jocular, half serious; blending jokes and serious matters

• JOCULAR
n. LME obs. – a professional jester or minstrel  

• JOCULATOR
n. LME obs. exc. hist. – a professional jester or minstrel  

• JOCULATORY
adj. 1623 obs. – having the character of a jester; uttered in jest; jocular, droll, humorous, sportive, merry, jesting

• JOCUM
n. M16 cant – the penis  
vb. 18C Brit. sl. – to coit a woman  

• JOD
n. 1. 1596 – the least particle or quantity; the least amount; a very little or small part; an iota
n. 2. 1790 Eng. dial. – the letter “J”  
vb. a1400 obs. – to strike, to knock

• JO-DANDY
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – something that is excellent

• JODS
n. M20 colloq. – jodhpurs  

• JOE
n. 1. L18 – a book of jokes; a joke, esp. a stale joke
n. 2. 1846 sl. – a male person; a fellow, a chap, an average man
n. 3. M19 Aust. & NZ – a taunt to or warning of the approach of a policeman
n. 4. M19 – an American
n. 5. Bk1903 sl. – fourpence
n. 6. 1947 Amer. sl. – coffee
n. 7. 1963 Can. sl. – a French-Canadian  
n. 8. 1963 Amer. Indian student sl. – a Navaho student  
n. 9. 20C US sl. – a W.C.; a urinal  
vb. 1. M19 Aust. & NZ  – to taunt, (esp. a policeman) with a cry of ‘joe’
vb. 2. 20C US sl. – to urinate or defecate  

• JOE BLAKE
n. 1905 Aust. rhyming sl. – a snake  

• JOE BLAKES
n. 20C Aust. rhyming sl. for ‘shakes’ – delirium tremens  

• JOE BLOGGS
n. 1969 Brit. sl. – a hypothetical average man

• JOE BLOW
n. c1941 US sl. – a hypothetical average man 

• JOE BUCK
n. E20 Aust. rhyming sl. for ‘fuck’ – an act of copulation  
vb. E20 Aust. rhyming sl. for ‘fuck’ – to coit a woman  

• JOE COTTON
n. 1910s US sl. – the point of 8 in craps dice 

• JOE DAKI
n. 1990s rhyming sl. for ‘Paki’, derogatory – a British Asian

• JOE DANDY
n. L19 sl. – an excellent person or thing  

• JOE DARTER
n. 1900s US sl. – an outstanding example of its kind  

• JOE DOAKES
n. 1943 US sl. – a hypothetical average man  

• JOE-DOCK TO GO ON A GUM-FUDGEON
phr. 1965 Amer. dial. – said to a child when he asks “What are you making?”

• JOE DOKES
n. 1943 US sl. – a hypothetical average man

• JOE ERK
n. World Wars rhyming sl. for ‘jerk’ and ‘berk’ – a fool; an oaf; a jerk; a wretched man  

• JOE GARDINERS
n. 1950s Aust. sl. – boots  

• JOE HUNT
n. 20C Brit. rhyming sl. for ‘cunt’ – a fool; an oaf; a jerk; a wretched man  

• JOE MILLER
n. L18 – a book of jokes; a joke, esp. a stale joke

• JOE PUBLIC
n. 1942 sl., orig. US theatrical usage, often mildly derogatory – a typical male member of the general public

• THE JOES
n. 1910 Aust. sl. – depression; the blues  

• JOE SOAP
n. 1966 sl. – a hypothetical average man; a slow-witted or ordinary person

• JOE WITH COW AND SAND
n. E19 sl. – a cup of coffee with milk and sugar  

• JOEY
n. 1. E19 Aust. & NZ – any young animal or child
n. 2. M19 sl. obs. – a fourpenny piece
n. 3. L19 colloq. – a clown  
n. 4. 1936 obs. exc. hist. – a former twelve-sided British coin of nickel-brass worth three old pence

• JO-FIRED
adj. M18 euphemism – hell-fired, damned

• JOG
vb. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally

• JOG-JOG
adv. L18 – with a jogging motion or pace

• JOG-TROTTY
adv. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – slowly  

• JOGUE
n. Bk1903 sl. – shilling

• JOHN
n. 1. LME obs., derogatory – a priest
n. 2. LME colloq. – a man, esp. a male servant; a form of address to a man
n. 3. M17 sl. – a policeman
n. 4. Bk1903 sl. – money
n. 5. World War I Amer. sl. – a greenhorn; a newcomer to the army
n. 6. 1928 sl., orig. US – the client of a prostitute
n. 7. 1932 sl. chiefly US – a lavatory
n. 8. 1934 sl. – the penis
n. 9. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a philanderer

• JOHN-A-DREAMS
n. 1603 – a dreamy or idle fellow

• JOHN-A-NOKES
n. c1475 obs. – an anonymous party, usually the plaintiff, in a legal action; an ordinary person  

• JOHN-A-STILES
n. 1530 – an anonymous party, usually the defendant, in a legal action

• JOHN A’THINGS’ SHOP
n. 1893 Sc. – the general shop of a village or small town  

• JOHN BARLEYCORN
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – whisky  

• JOHN BATES
n. 1920s US criminals’ sl. – a potential victim, a confidence man’s dupe  

• JOHN BULL
n. 1. L18 – an individual Englishman exemplifying the supposedly typical national character
n. 2. L18 – the English nation personified; the English collectively

• JOHN-BULLISH
adj. L18 – typically English

• JOHN CITIZEN
n. 1918 – an ordinary man, esp. as a member of the community

• JOHN D
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a very rich person

• JOHNDARM
n. M17 sl. – a policeman  

• JOHN DAVIS
n. Bk1903 sl. – money

• JOHN DOE
n. 1. 1593 chiefly US – an ordinary or typical citizen
n. 2. 20C US colloq. – a signature
n. 3. 20C US – an anonymous party, usually the plaintiff, in a legal action

• JOHN DRUM’S ENTERTAINMENT
n. L16 sl. – a rough reception, esp. the throwing out of an unwelcome guest  

• JOHN HANCOCK
n. 1885 US colloq. – a signature

• JOHN HENRY
n. 1910 Amer. colloq. – a person’s signature

• JOHN HOP
n. 1905 Aust. & NZ rhyming sl. for ‘cop’ – a police officer

• JOHN JILLETS
n. 1844 Sc. – a term of contempt for a man  

• JOHN KETCH
n. M17 sl., orig. UK criminals’ – a hangman

• JOHN LAW
n. 1907 US sl. – personification of the police  

• JOHNNIE
n. a1852 sl. – a police officer

• JOHNNIE BATES
n. 1920s US criminals’ sl. – a potential victim, a confidence man’s dupe  

• JOHNNIE NEWCOME
n. 1823 sl. – a new arrival; a fresh face; a freshman at college; a new baby, etc.  

• JOHNNY
n. 1. L17 colloq. – a fellow, a chap; frequently used as a derogatory form of address to a man regarded as inferior, esp. a soldier of a colonized country in the army of the colonizing power
n. 2. a1852 sl. – a policeman
n. 3. M19 US sl. – a Southerner, esp. a fighter for the Confederacy
n. 4. M19 – a gentoo penguin
n. 5. World War I Amer. sl. – a Turk; the Turkish army
n. 6. 1932 colloq., chiefly US – a lavatory; a bathroom
n. 7. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a philanderer  
n. 8. 1965 sl. – a condom
n. 9. 20C sl. – a short, collarless gown that is fastened in back ad is worn by hospital patients, persons being examined in a doctor’s office, etc.  

• JOHNNY-COME-LATELY
n. 1. 1839 nautical usage – an inexperienced youngster; a novice
n. 2. c1910 NZ sl. – a nickname for a farm hand recently arrived from England 
n. 3. 20C Aust. sl. – any newcomer  

• JOHNNY COTTON
adj. 20C rhyming sl. – rotten  

• JOHNNY CRAPAUD
n. 1. 1805 colloq. arch. – a Frenchman; a French Canadian 
n. 2. 1805 colloq. arch. – the French nation personified

• JOHNNY CRAPEAU
n. 1. 1805 colloq. arch. – a Frenchman; a French Canadian
n. 2. 1805 colloq. arch. – the French nation personified

• JOHNNY CRAPO
n. 19C sl. – a Frenchman  

• JOHNNY CRAPOSE
n. 1. c1815 nautical sl. – a British seaman wearing a moustache 
n. 2. 19C sl. – a Frenchman  

• JOHNNY CRAPPO
n. 19C sl. – a Frenchman

• JOHNNY DARBIES
n. c1860 sl. – handcuffs 

• JOHNNY FOREIGNER
n. 1990 Brit. sl., usually derogatory – a personification of a foreign person, usually with ironic reference to British xenophobia

• JOHNNY GALLACHER
n. 1935 tramps’ cant – a uniformed policeman  

• JOHNNY GALLAGHER
n. 1935 tramps’ cant – a uniformed policeman

• JOHNNY GILES
n. 1950s UK & Aust. rhyming sl. for ‘piles’ – haemorrhoids  

• JOHNNY GURK
n. c1915 army sl. – a Gurkha soldier 

• JOHNNY GURKHA
n. c1915 army sl. – a Gurkha soldier 

• JOHNNY HEAD-IN-AIR
n. 1851 colloq. – a dreamy fellow 

• JOHNNY HEAD-IN-THE-AIR
n. 1851 colloq. – a dreamy fellow

• JOHNNY HOUSE
n. 1937 Amer. dial. – a toilet; a bathroom

• JOHNNY JUMP UP
adv. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – immediately; shortly  

• JOHNNY LAW
n. 1960s Amer. sl. – the police

• JOHNNY NEWCOME
n. 1. 1800 – orig. Caribbean usage – a newcomer of any kind
n. 2. 1815 rare – an inexperienced youngster; a novice
n. 3. 1840 obs. – a newborn baby

• JOHNNY O’BRIEN
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a slow freight train  

• JOHNNY RAW
n. 1803 colloq. rare – an inexperienced youngster; a novice 

JOHNNY RAY
adj. 1980s rhyming sl. for ‘gay’ – homosexual

JOHNNY REB
n. 1. 1860 Amer. – a native or inhabitant of the southern US, esp. of one of the former Confederate states; a southerner  
n. 2. 1860 sl. – in US Hist., a Confederate soldier during the American Civil War  

JOHNNY RED
n. M19 US sl. – a Southerner, esp. a fighter for the Confederacy

JOHNNY ROCKS
n. 1920s Irish sl. – syphilis  

JOHNNY ROWSERS
n. 1920s rhyming sl. – trousers

JOHNNY RUSSELL
n. 20C Aust. rhyming sl. – bustle, hustle

JOHNNY RUTTER
n. 1930s rhyming sl. – butter

JOHNNY SAP
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a gullible person; a dupe  

JOHNNY TAPP
vb. 1980s Aust. prison rhyming sl. for ‘crap’ – to defecate

JOHNNY TINPLATE
n. 1910s US sl. – a rural sheriff  

JOHNNY WALKER
n. 1. 20C rhyming sl. for ‘talker’ – a garrulous person  
n. 2. 20C rhyming sl. for ‘talker’ – an informer  

JOHNNY WARDER
n. 1. L19 Aust. sl. – a drunken layabout  
n. 2. 1910s Aust. sl. – anyone who drinks alone; a drink that is taken by oneself  

JOHNNY WET-BREAD
n. 20C Irish sl. – a teasing rather than aggressive term of mockery  

JOHNNY WHOP-STRAW
n. 19C colloq. – a clodhopper; a rustic  

JOHN O’BRIEN
n. 1. 1914 Amer. hobo sl. – a boxcar; a freight train  
n. 2. 1910s US sl. – an empty safe  
n. 3. 1920s US sl. – a hand-car  

JOHN Q. PUBLIC
n. 1922 N. Amer. colloq. – a member of the general public 

JOHN ROSCOE
n. 1938 US sl. – a gun, esp. a pistol or revolver

JOHNSON
n. M19 sl. – the penis

JOHN TAMSON’S NEWS
n. 1900 Eng. dial. – stale or unimportant news

JOHN THOMAS
n. 1879 sl. – the penis  


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