Dictionary: JUJ – JZ


• JU-JU
n. 1. 1894 – (as ‘juju’) an object of any kind superstitiously venerated by West African native peoples, and used as a charm, amulet, or means of protection; also, the supernatural or magical power attributed to such objects
n. 1940 sl. – a marijuana cigarette  
 
• JUKE
n. 1. 1935 sl., orig. US – a brothel
n. 2. 1935 sl., orig. US – an establishment providing food and drink and music for dancing
vb. 1933 sl., orig. US – to dance, esp. at a juke-joint or to the music of a juke-box
 
• JUKE-HOUSE
n. 1. 1935 sl., orig. US – a brothel
n. 2. 1935 sl., orig. US – an establishment providing food and drink and music for dancing
 
• JUKE-JOINT
n. 1. 1935 sl., orig. US – a brothel  
n. 2. 1935 sl., orig. US – an establishment providing food and drink and music for dancing
 
• JULEP
n. a1640 – something to cool or assuage the heat of passion, etc.
 
• JULLY
vb. 1862 Eng. dial. – to make jealous  
 
• JUMART
n. 1690 – a hybrid animal, erroneously believed to be the offspring of a bull and a mare or she-ass, or of a horse or ass and a cow
 
• JUMBIE
n. 1764 chiefly Caribbean usage – the ghost or spirit of a dead person, esp. a malevolent one
 
• JUMBIE BIRD
n. 1827 Guyana, Trinidad, & Tobago – a bird of ill omen, esp. an owl
 
JUMBLE
n. 1. 1674 colloq. – a ride in a carriage, with reference to the shaking experienced
n. 2. 1957 African-American sl. – a White person
vb. 1. 1530 obs. – to make a confused or rumbling noise; to play discordantly or noisily on an instrument, to strum
vb. 2. 1582 obs. – to have carnal intercourse
vb. 3. 1668 – to confuse, to bewilder, to muddle; to put into mental confusion
vb. 4. 1748 – to travel with shaking or jolting
 
• JUMBLE-GUT-LANE
n. 1690 sl. obs. – any very bad or rough road  
 
JUMBLER
n. 1618 rare – a strumpet
 
• JUMBLE-SHOP
n. 1893 – a shop where very miscellaneous goods are sold
 
• JUMBLE UP
vb. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally
 
• JUMBLONEY
n. 1984 Amer. dial. – an inept, stupid or inexperienced person; a guy or fellow  
 
• JUMBLY
adj. 1. 1864 – confused, chaotic, in a jumble
adj. 2. a1800 Sc. – turbid, ‘drumly’
 
• JUMBO
n. 1. 1823 – a big clumsy person, animal, or thing
n. 2. 1882 – a trade name of a shade of grey, like that of an elephant
n. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a nickname for a fat person  
n. 4. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – Texas
 
• JUMBOBURGER
n. 1959 US – a large hamburger
 
• JUMBO STATE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – Texas  
 
• JUMBUCK
n. 1824 Aust. sl., orig. Aust. pidgin – a sheep  
 
• JUMELLE
adj. c1475 obs. – twinned or paired; made or shaped in couples or pairs, double
 
• JUMELLES
n. 1865 – a pair of opera-glasses
 
• JUMENT
n. 1382 obs. – a beast of burden; also, a beast in general
 
• JUMENTARIOUS
adj. 1656 obs. rare – pert. to juments (beasts of burden)
 
• JUMENTOUS
adj. 1846 – of urine: strong-smelling, high-coloured, and turbid, resembling that of a horse
 
• JUMM
vb. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally
 
• JUMMIX
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a jumble, mix; disorder  
 
• JUMP
adj. 1581 obs. – coinciding, exactly agreeing; exact, precise
adv. 1539 obs. – with exact coincidence or agreement; exactly, precisely
n. 1. 1598 obs. – the decisive moment of plunging into action of doubtful issue; dangerous critical moment, critical point, crisis
n. 2. 1600 obs. – venture, hazard, risk
n. 3. Bk1892 Aust. sl. – a window
n. 4. 1923 sl., orig. US – a journey, a trip
n. 5. 1934 sl. – an act of sexual intercourse  
n. 6. 1937 orig. US – jazz music with a strong beat; a jazz tune with a strong rhythm
n. 7. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a hasty or unceremonious departure
vb. 1. 1589 obs. – to agree upon a marriage, a match
vb. 2. 1859 sl. – to rob or take unlawful possession of any empty house
vb. 3. 1870 – to cook in a frying pan, shaking up from time to time
vb. 4. Bk1892 Aust. sl. – to cheat, to steal
vb. 5. Bk1892 Aust. sl. – to copulate  
vb. 6. World War I Amer. sl. – to admonish
vb. 7. c1938 sl., orig. US – to be full of liveliness and excitement 
 
• JUMP AWRY
vb. 1762 – to disagree
 
• JUMP DOWN SOMEONE’S THROAT
vb. 1879 sl. – to reprimand  
 
• JUMP AT
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to guess  
 
• JUMPED-UP
adj. 1835 Brit. sl. – self-important, conceited  
 
• JUMPER
n. 1. 1900 Brit. sl. – a ticket-inspector on a bus, tram, etc.  
n. 2. 1903 US sl. – a fraudulently plural voter
n. 3. Bk1903 sl. – tenpence
n. 4. a1904 US – one who quits a job
n. 5. 1906 Irish English – a convert from Roman Catholicism to Protestantism
vb. c1374 obs. – to introduce discordantly or incongruously; to jumble together
 
• JUMPERY
n. 1882 humorous usage – a dance
 
• JUMPING BLUE BLAZES!
int. 1939 Amer. dial. – an expletive  
 
• JUMPING JEEHU!
int. 1859 Amer. dial. – an exclamation  
 
• JUMPING JEEPERS!
int. 1950 Amer. dial. – a mild oath  
 
• JUMPING JEHOSAPHAT!
int. 1950 Amer. dial. – an exclamation or mild oath  
 
• JUMPING JEHOSHAPHAT!
int. 1950 Amer. dial. – an exclamation or mild oath
 
• JUMPING JOCKEY
n. 1947 – a jockey who rides in steeplechases
 
• JUMPING-OFF PLACE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a small town  
 
• JUMPIN’ JEWSHARPS!
int. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – an exclamation, usually of surprise
 
• JUMP IN QUILL
vb. 1687 obs. – to act simultaneously or in harmony  
 
• JUMP IN WITH YOUR HAT IN YOUR HAND
vb. 1960s Amer. sl. – to enter a deal too quickly
 
• JUMP JOCKEY
n. 1970 – in horse racing: a jockey who rides in steeplechases
 
• JUMPLY
adv. a1586 obs. – coincidently, accordantly; exactly, precisely
 
• JUMP-MASTER
n. 1942 – a man in charge of parachutists
 
• JUMPNESS
n. 1611 obs. – evenness, fitness
 
• JUMP OFF
n. 1. 1873 US colloq. – a precipitous descent; a place which a person must jump
n. 2. 1918 US sl. – the start of a military operation or campaign
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to begin, to commence  
 
• JUMP ON
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to humiliate  
 
• JUMP ON THE BANDWAGON
vb. 1940 – to join or give support to a party or movement that seems to be assured of success
 
• JUMP OVER THE BROOM
vb. 1784 colloq. – to enter into a common-law or irregular marriage, esp. by means of a ceremony involving leaping or stepping over a broomstick; later, to get married, spec. to leap or step over a broomstick as part of an official civil or religious marriage ceremony
 
• JUMP OVER THE BROOMSTICK
vb. 1810 colloq. – to enter into a common-law or irregular marriage, esp. by means of a ceremony involving leaping or stepping over a broomstick; later, to get married, spec. to leap or step over a broomstick as part of an official civil or religious marriage ceremony
 
• JUMPS
n. 1879 sl. – delirium tremens
 
• JUMP-SACK
n. 1942 sl. – a parachute
 
• JUMP SALTY
vb. 1938 US sl. – to be or get angry  
 
• JUMP THE BUCK
vb. 1965 Amer. dial. – to shift or avoid responsibility or commitment  
 
• JUMP THE BUCKEYE LOG
vb. 1952 Amer. dial. – to die  
 
• JUMP THE SHARK
vb. 1998 sl. – to begin a period of inexorable decline in quality or popularity, esp. as marked by a particular event
 
• JUMP THROUGH ONE’S ASS
vb. 1969 Amer. sl. – to go wild with fear or confusion; to panic  
 
• JUMP THROUGH ONE’S ASSHOLE
vb. 1972 Amer. sl. – to throw a tantrum
 
• JUMP TO ATTENTION
vb. 1984 UK sl. – to achieve an erection
 
• JUMP TO THE EYES
vb. 1926 – to be noticed; to be obvious or prominent
 
• JUMP-UP
n. 1948 Caribbean usage – a party or celebration characterized by lively dancing
vb. 1952 Caribbean usage – (as ‘jump up) to dance in a lively manner
 
• JUMP UP MY ASS
phr. 1973 Amer. sl. – used as a derisive retort  
 
• JUMP UPON
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to humiliate  
 
• JUMP UP SOMEONE’S ASS
vb. 1977 Amer. sl. – to attack someone  
 
• JUMPY
adj. 1879 sl. – agitated, restless  
 
• JUNCARY
n. 1613 obs. rare – land overgrown with rushes
 
• JUNCIFORM
adj. 1855 – of the form of a rush; long and slender like a rush
 
• JUNCOUS
adj. 1755 rare – full of bulrushes
 
• JUNCT
adj. 1475 obs. – joined, joint
 
• JUNCTIVE
adj. 1898 poetic usage, rare – having the quality of joining
 
• JUNCTLY
adv. 1488 obs. – jointly, conjunctly, closely; in a conjoined way
 
• JUNCTURE
n. a1500 obs. – a joint of the body
 
• JUNDIE
n. 1. 1737 Sc. – a blow; a push with the elbow  
n. 2. B1900 Sc. – anything that is larger than is strictly necessary  
vb. 1. 1785 Sc. – to jostle with the elbow; to struggle, to contend and push in a crowd  
vb. 2. B1900 Sc. – to move or rock from side to side
 
• JUNDY
n. 1. 1737 Sc. – a push with the elbow; a jostle
n. 2. 1894 Sc. – ordinary or steady course; jog-trot
vb. 1786 Sc. – to push with the elbow or shoulder; to jostle
 
• JUNE
vb. 1. 1869 Amer. dial. – to move in a lively fashion, to hurry; to be restless or aimless; to wander around
vb. 2. 1903 Amer. dial., rare – to drive briskly
 
• JUNESSE
n. c1430 obs. – youth
 
• JUNGIBLE
adj. 1656 rare – that may be joined
 
• JUNGLE
n. 1914 sl., orig. US – a camp for vagrants, tramps, or the like
vb. 1922 – to prepare a meal at a hoboes’ camp’ to form such a camp; to join forces with another person
 
• THE JUNGLE
n. a1901 Stock Exchange sl. – the West African share market
 
• JUNGLE-BASHING
n. 1954 sl. – movement through a jungle, esp. by soldiers
 
• JUNGLE BUNNY
n. 1966 sl., derogatory or offensive – a person of colour
 
• JUNGLE JUICE
n. 1. 1942 sl., orig. Aust. – any form of strong, home-distilled liquor, often made of jungle-grown fruits and plants, herbs, etc. by soldiers with no ‘regular’ drinks 
n. 2. 1950s sl., chiefly UK juvenile usage – tea  
n. 3. 1970s US sl. – men’s aftershave that supposedly enhances virility and sexual appeal  
n. 4. 1990s US students’ sl. – semen or vaginal secretions  
 
• JUNGLE JULIETS
n. World War II Amer. sl. – the women’s reserve of the Marine Corps  
 
• JUNGLE MEAT
n. 1960s homosexual usage – a Black man or his penis  
 
• JUNGLE MOUTH
n. 1970s US students’ sl. – bad breath  
 
• JUNGLE ROT
n. 1944 sl. – a tropical skin disease
 
• JUNGLERY
n. 1864 – a complication like that of a jungle
 
• JUNGLES
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – open country; woods  
 
• JUNGLE SEX
n. 1990s sl. – an intense, rough and speedy bout of sexual intercourse  
 
• JUNGLI
adj. 1920 – inhabiting a jungle
n. 1927 – an inhabitant of the jungle
 
• JUNIOR
adj. 1606 obs. – youthful, juvenile; belonging to youth or earlier life
 
• JUNIOR MISS
n. 1927 orig. US – a young teenaged girl
 
• JUNIOR SERVICE
n. 1915 – the Army
 
• JUNIPER
n. 1857 sl. – gin
 
• JUNIPERATE
vb. 1605 obs. – to impregnate or flavour with juniper
 
• JUNIPERINE
n. c1430 obs. rare – a juniper tree
 
• JUNIPER LECTURE
n. 1706 colloq., obs. – a severe pungent ‘lecture’ or reprimand
 
• JUNK
adj. 1908 orig. US – inferior, worthless, of poor quality
n. 1. a1425 obs. – a rush or reed
n. 2. 1726 – a piece or lump of something; a chunk, a hunk
n. 3. 1904 chiefly US, orig. criminals’ sl. – jewellery made from inexpensive materials or artificial gemstones
n. 4. 1906 orig. & chiefly US – worthless or absurd ideas, talk, writing, etc.; nonsense
n. 5. 1911 US criminals’ sl., rare – jewellery
n. 6. 1921 sl., orig. US – a narcotic drug; often specifically heroin  
n. 7. 1941 baseball usage – pitches that rely on unpredictable movement rather than speed, such as breaking balls and knuckleballs
n. 8. 1983 sl., orig. & chiefly US – the male genitals
vb. 1.1776 chiefly Amer. dial., rare – to cut or divide into pieces or chunks
vb. 2. 1911 – to treat as junk or rubbish; to scrap, to throw away; to discard, to abandon, to get rid of
 
• JUNK ARTIST
n. 1. 1954 – in baseball: a pitcher who specializes in throwing off-speed pitches such as breaking balls and knuckleballs
n. 2. 1959 – a person who creates art using found and discarded objects and materials
 
• JUNKER
n. 1. 1922 US sl. – a drug addict  
n. 2. 1930 US sl. – a supplier of drugs  
 
• JUNK FARM
n. 20C US sl. – a federal rehabilitation institution  
 
• JUNKET
n. 1886 sl., orig. US – a trip, ostensibly taken for business or other serious purposes and paid for by an employer, government, etc., which is characterized by the self-indulgent pursuit of pleasure  
 
• JUNKETACEOUS
adj. 1760 nonce word – fond of gaiety or junketing
 
• JUNKIE
n. 1923 sl., orig. US  – a drug addict  
 
• JUNK IN THE TRUNK
n. 1992 sl., orig. & chiefly US – curvaceousness of the buttocks, esp. regarded as an attractive feature of a woman
 
• JUNK MAT
n. 1794 obs. – a mat made from old cable or rope material
 
• JUNKO
n. 1970s US sl. –  a drug addict  
 
• JUNK TANK
n. 1960s US police sl. – a cell reserved for drug abusers and alcoholics  
 
• JUNK TREE
n. 1957 US – a tree that is not commercially valuable
 
• JUNKY
adj. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – insignificant; trivial; worthless  
adj. 2. 1960s US sl. – nonsensical, absurd  
 
• JUNKYARD DOG
n. 1980s US sl. – a politician who is adept at investigating corruption  
 
JUNTA
n. 1970s sl. – a playboy, a womanizer  
 
• JUNTISH
adj. B1900 Eng. dial. – surly  
 
• JUNTOUS
adj. 1875 Eng. dial. – apt to take offense; ill-tempered, sullen, captious, surly, morose  
n. B1900 Eng. dial. – a fit of sulks, a sulky state  
 
JUPITER!
int. 17C – an exclamation  
 
JUPITER PLUVIUS
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – rain  
 
JURK
n. 19C sl. – a seal, a license  
 
JURY LEG
n. M18 sl. – a wooden leg 
 
JUST
adv. L19 sl. – absolutely, definitely, very  
 
JUST AS CHEAP
phr. 1950s W. Indies Rasta usage – just as well  
 
JUST FELL OFF THE CABBAGE TRUCK
adj. 1986 Amer. sl. – utterly naive or unsophisticated
 
JUST FOR LAUGHS
phr. c1950 colloq. – as a joke; for the fun of it 
 
JUST GOOD
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – mediocre  
 
JUST IN ONE’S REASON
adj. 1901 Sc. – greatly excited; almost out of one’s senses  
 
JUST MEET
adv. 1703 Eng. dial. – exactly, quite  
 
JUST NEEN
adv. 1865 Eng. dial. – almost, nearly  
 
JUST ONE OF THOSE THINGS
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – love  
 
JUST THE JOB
n. 1943 sl. – something which is wanted or needed  
 
JUST THEN
adv. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – immediately; shortly  
 
JUST THE TATY
phr. 1843 Eng. dial. – just the thing, exact, fit, suitable  
 
JUST TOO KILLING
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – resplendently beautiful; gorgeous  
 
JUST YOUR HARVEST
phr. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – just what suits you, just what you like  
 
• JUTTLE
vb. 1. 1813 Sc. – to drink habitually, to tipple  
vb. 2. 1824 Sc. – to shake liquids; to spill over by shaking  
 
• JUVATE
vb. 1708 obs. rare – to help, to aid
 
JUVENTUTE
n. 1541 obs. rare – youth; the age of youthful vigour or early manhood
 
JUVEY;  JUVIE
n. 1. 1941 US sl. – a juvenile delinquent
n. 2. 1941 US sl. – an older child
n. 3. 1967 sl. – a detention centre for juvenile delinquents
 
• JUZZLED
adj. B1900 Eng. dial. – rotted away  
 
JYBE
n. M16 UK criminals’ sl. – a written paper, esp. a counterfeit pass or license, carried by many of the mendicant villains  
 
JYP
n. 1910 UK sl. – pain, actual or figurative  
 
JYRENE
n. 1894 Amer. sl., orig. Navy usage – a member of the US Marine Corps; a marine  


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Updated: September 22, 2022