Dictionary: LEAP – LEAZ


• LEAP
n. 1. c1000 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a large basket 
n. 2. 1486 obs. – an alleged name for a company of leopards
n. 3. 1775 US – the act of copulation
n. 4. 1796 – the sudden fall of a river to a lower level  
vb. 1. a1100 obs. – to run, to go hastily or with violence; to rush
vb. 2. 1477 obs. – to burst, to crack
vb. 3. 16C sl. – to possess carnally
vb. 4. 1658-9 obs. – to evade, to neglect
vb. 5. 1869 colloq. – of frost: to ‘give’ or thaw suddenly  
vb. 6. 1900 Sc. – of the face: to become a deeper colour; to flush with blushing or with a skin eruption
 
• LEAP AFOOT
vb. 1481 obs. – to spring to the ground from horseback; to dismount
 
• LEAP AND YOU WILL RECEIVE
phr. 1970s African-American sl. – a ritual challenge to a fight  
 
• LEA-PARK
n. 1895 Eng. dial. – a pasture
 
• LEAP AT A CRUST
vb. M17 sl. – to be starving  
 
• LEAP AT A DAISY
vb. M16 sl. – to be hanged  
 
• LEAP-CHRISTIAN
n. 1647 – “Leap-Christians are not so much to be liked, that all on the sudden, of notorious profane become extremely precise and scrupulous”  
 
• LEAPER
n. 1. a1000 obs. – a runner; a dancer
n. 2. 1604 obs. – an irregular soldier
n. 3. 1954 US sl. – a person who threatens to or actually does jump to their death  
n. 4. 1961 US drug culture sl. – any central nervous system stimulant, esp. amphetamine  
n. 5. 1973 US drug culture sl. – a cocaine user after sustained cocaine use  
 
• LEAPERESS
n. 1382 obs. rare – a female dancer
 
• LEAPERS
n. 1967 US drug culture sl. – wads of cotton soaked in Benzedrine™ (amphetamine sulphate, a central nervous system stimulant) extracted from an inhaler  
 
• LEAPFROG
n. 1851 Amer. dial. – a bullfrog or similar frog  
 
• LEAP FROM THE LEAFLESS TREE
vb. E19 sl. – to be hanged  
 
• LEAPFUL
n. c1000 obs. – a basketful 
 
• LEAPING
adj. 1. E20 US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol  
adj. 2. 1925 US drug culture sl. – drug-intoxicated  
 
• LEAPING-BLOCK
n. 1851 Eng. dial. – a stone set up to assist riders to mount their horses
 
• LEAPING EGG CRATE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a fast car  
 
• LEAPING HEAP
n. 2002 UK Royal Air Force sl. – a Harrier aircraft  
 
• LEAPING HOUSE
n. 1596 obs. – a brothel
 
• LEAPING LENA
n. 1. 1940 Aust. sl. – a train that ran from Darwin to Birdum  
n. 2. 1971 US sl. – a light truck  
 
• LEAPING-ON-STONE
n. 1721 Sc. – a stone set up to assist riders to mount their horses
 
• LEAPING OYSTERS
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – nonsense  
 
• LEAPING-STOCK
n. 1877 Eng. dial. – a stone set up to assist riders to mount their horses
 
• LEAPING-STONES
n. 1874 Eng. dial. – stepping-stones
 
• LEAPING TIME
n. 1611 – the time of activity, youth  
 
• LEAP-LAND
adj. 1614 obs. – vagabond
 
• LEAP-LONG-MARE
n. 1894 Eng. dial. – the game of leapfrog
 
• LEAP-MONTH
n. 1566 obs. – February of leap year
 
• LEAP OUT OF ONESELF
vb. 1611 obs. – to be delighted or eager
 
• LEAP OUT OF ONE’S SKIN
vb. 1629 – to be delighted or eager  
 
• LEAP OUT OF ONE’S SKIN FOR JOY
vb. 1584 – to be extremely delighted, excited, or surprised  
 
• LEAP OUT OF THE PAN INTO THE FIRE
vb. 1596 – to escape from one evil only to fall into a greater one  
 
• LEAP OVER THE HEDGE BEFORE YOU COME AT THE STILE
vb. ?1599 – to be in a violent hurry
 
• LEAPS
n. 1922 US sl. – anxiety, nervousness  
 
• LEAP-SKIP
adj. a1649 nonce word obs. – applied to the knight’s move in chess
 
• LEAP-STAFF
n. c1626 obs. – a leaping pole
 
• LEAP-THE-BULLOCK
n. Bk1902 N. Ireland – the game of leapfrog
 
• LEAP-THE-LONG-MARE
n. 1894 Eng. dial. – the game of leapfrog
 
• LEAP THE PALE
vb. Bk1909 – to go beyond bounds, to indulge in extravagance or licence  
 
• LEAP-UP-AND-KISS-ME
n. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – the pansy, Viola tricolor
 
• LEAR
adj. 1. 1796 Eng. dial. – empty, void, unladen
adj. 2. 1852 Eng. dial. – hungry; faint and exhausted with hunger
adj. 3. 1876 Eng. dial. – thin, meagre, spare in person
adj. 4. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – frightened
n. 1. c1390 obs. – a thickening for sauces, soups, etc.; a thickened sauce
n. 2. a1400-50 obs. exc. Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – instruction, learning; in early use, a piece of instruction, a lesson  
n. 3. 1889 Eng. dial. – a sinking, exhausted condition due to hunger; hunger
n. 4. Bk1902 Sc. – a habit; a custom
vb. 1. 1721 Sc. – to teach, to instruct
vb. 2. 1721 Sc. – to learn, to acquire knowledge, to ascertain
vb. 3. 1737 Sc. obs. – to accustom, to habituate
vb. 4 1784 Eng. dial. – to employ
 
• LEAR-FATHER
n. 1. 1533 obs. – a master in learning
n. 2. 1855 Eng. dial. – a person whose conduct has influenced others  
 
• LEAR-HEADED
adj. 1868 Eng. dial. – empty-headed
 
• LEA-RIGS
n. 19C Sc. – the female genitals  
 
• LEARINESS
n. 1. 1888 Eng. dial. – hunger, faintness and exhaustion due to hunger
n. 2. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – emptiness
 
• LEARLESS
adj. 1815 Sc. – without learning, ignorant
 
• LEARN
vb. 14C – to teach, to instruct  
 
• LEARN A FROM IZZARD
vb. 1914 Amer. dial. – to learn the most rudimentary thing  
 
• LEARNEDISH
adj. a1680 obs. – learned-like
 
• LEARNED WOMAN
n. 1878 Eng. dial. – a fortune-teller
 
• LEARNER
n. 1. c900 obs. – a scholar, a man of learning
n. 2. 1382 obs. – a teacher
 
• LEARNESS
n. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – emptiness
 
• LEARNING
n. 1. 1362 obs. – a lesson, instruction
n. 2. c1380 obs. – teaching, schooling
n. 3. c1386 obs. – information or direction
n. 4. 1570 obs. – a branch of learning, a science
n. 5. 1602 obs. – an acquirement
n. 6. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – correction, discipline
 
• LEARNING-SHOVER
n. 1869 Cockneys’ sl. – a schoolteacher  
 
• LEARNLESS
adj. 1593 obs. – devoid of learning
 
• LEARN ONE ANOTHER ROAD TO THE PEAS
phr. 1892 Eng. dial. – not to allow one to do something again; said in correcting one for doing wrong
 
• LEARN ONE’S GRANNY TO LAP ASHES
vb. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – to teach one’s grandmother to suck eggs; said to those who presume to offer advice to others who are more experienced; to instruct an expert
 
• LEARN ONE’S RECKONINGS AGAIN
vb. 1899 Eng. dial. – to change one’s ways  
 
• LEARS
n. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – departments of learning
 
• LEAR UP
vb. 1828 Sc. – to brighten up
 
• LEARY
adj. 1. 1641 Eng. dial. – thin, slender
adj. 2. 1718 sl. – cunning, astute, knowing, artful; wide-awake; alert; cautious, wary  
adj. 3. 1750 Eng. dial. – hungry, faint and exhausted from hunger
adj. 4. c1850 sl. – of personal appearance: somewhat wild 
adj. 5. 1873 Eng. dial. – abusive
adj. 6. 1898 Aust. sl. – dressed flashily or vulgarly; ostentatious, showy  
adj. 7. L19 US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol  
adj. 8. Bk1902 Eng. & Amer. dial. – dazed, bewildered; foolish, half-witted  
adv. 20C Aust. sl. – showily, ostentatiously  
 
• LEARY-HANDED
adj. 1892 Eng. dial. – empty-handed
 
• LEARY’S
n. 2003 UK sl. – LSD  
 
• LEASE
adj. a900 obs. – untrue, false, lying
n. 1. c888 obs. – an untruth, falsehood, lying
n. 2. a1000 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – pasture; pasturage; meadow-land 
vb. 1. c1000 obs exc. Eng. dial. – to glean 
vb. 2. c1000 obs. – to tell lies; to slander, to calumniate
vb. 3. 1882 Sc. rare – to release, to let go, to unloose
 
• LEASE LOUSE
n. 1953 US sl. – a dealer in oil field leases  
 
• LEASE-MONGER
n. 1549 obs. – one who traffics in leases
 
• LEASE-PIECE
n. M19 US nonce word – a prostitute  
 
• LEASER
n. c950 obs. rare  – a liar 
 
• LEASH
n. 1. c1374 obs. – a snare, a noose
n. 2. 1748 Sc. – a whip, a lash, the stroke of a whip
n. 3. 1977 US sl. – a line attached at one end to a surfer and at the other to the surfboard  
vb. 1. 1503 obs. – to beat or lash with a leash; to whip
vb. 2. 1827 Sc. – to tie together; to couple
vb. 3. 1827 Sc. – to marry
vb. 4. 1950 Sc. – of rain: to fall in torrents; to lash down
 
• LEA-SHAFT
n. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – a scythe handle
 
• LEASH AWAY
vb. 1801 Sc. – to walk or move quickly
 
• LEASHED
adj. 1880 Sc. – married
 
• LEASH-LAW
n. 1721 obs. – a law to be observed in hunting or coursing
 
• LEASH OFF
vb. Bk1902 Sc. – to repeat from memory, to speak much by way of news
 
• LEASING
adj. 1873 – lying  
n. 1. c950 obs. exc. Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – lying, falsehood 
n. 2. c1000 obs. exc. Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – a lie, a falsehood 
 
• LEASING-MAKER
n. 1388 – a liar  
 
• LEASING-MONGER
n. c1380 obs. – a liar
 
• LEASOW
n. c950 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – pasture; pasturage; meadow-land 
vb. c950 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to pasture, to graze 
 
• LEAST
adj. 1887 Amer. dial. – youngest  
 
• LEASTER
adj. 1953 Amer. dial. – smaller in physical size  
 
• LEASTEST
adj. 1795 Amer. dial. – smallest  
 
• LEASTNESS
n. 1674 obs. rare – minimal size
 
• LEASTY
adj. 1790 Eng. dial. – of the weather: dull, wet, rainy
 
• LEAT
n. 1. 1796 Eng. dial. – an artificial channel for water; a water-course, esp. one leading to a mill; a gutter
n. 2. 1825 Eng. dial. obs. – a leak
vb. 1. 1825 Eng. dial. obs. – to leak
vb. 2. 1851 Eng. dial. – to pour
vb. 3. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – to thaw
 
• LEATH
adj. 1867 Eng. dial. – soft, supple, pliable
n. c1175 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – cessation, intermission, rest 
vb. 1. c1200 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to mitigate, to soften, to relax 
vb. 2. 1205 obs. – to cease, to abate
 
• LEATHER
adj. 20C US sl. – pert. to any sadistic, virile male  
n. 1. 1303 – skin  
n. 2. E16 sl. – the female genitals; specifically the vagina  
n. 3. 1827 Sc. & Eng. dial. – the udder of a cow
n. 4. 1861 Sc. – a heavy blow
n. 5. 1868 – in cricket and football: the ball  
n. 6. World War I Amer. sl. – meat
n. 7. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – the pendent part of a dog’s ear  
n. 8. M20 US sl. – a homosexual male, esp. one who is cruel and sexually sadistic 
vb. 1. a1625 – orig. to hit someone with a leather strap; hence, to beat or thrash someone 
vb. 2. 1691 – Sc. & Eng. dial. – to overcome, to beat in competition; to surpass
vb. 3. 1800 Sc. – to hurry, to hasten, to walk briskly; to get a move on
vb. 4. 1866 Sc. – to scold, to rail at, to criticize severely
vb. 5. Bk1893 Sc. – to labour, to plod at anything; to impress upon
vb. 6. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – to puzzle, to nonplus
vb. 7. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – to fall suddenly to the ground with a slap
 
• LEATHER AND PRUNELLA
phr. 1734 – an expression for something to which one is utterly indifferent  
 
• LEATHER-ASS
n. 1970 Amer. sl. – a tough, stubborn or aggressive person  
 
• LEATHER-ASSED
adj. 1977 Amer. sl. – tough, stubborn, aggressive  
 
• LEATHER AWAY
vb. 1869 – to work hard  
 
• LEATHER-BIRD
n. 1869 Eng. dial. – a bat
 
• LEATHER-BRAINED
adj. 20C US colloq. – stupid  
 
• LEATHER BRITCHES FOR A CAT
phr. 1965 Amer. dial. – said to a child when he asks “What are you making?”

• LEATHER BUMPER
n. World War I Amer. sl. – a cavalryman
 
• LEATHER-COAT
n. 1597 – a name for russet apples, from the roughness of their skin  
 
• LEATHER-CRACKERS
n. 1843 Ireland – breeches
 
• LEATHER-DICK
n. Bk1902 Eng. dial. obs. – leather apron
 
• LEATHER-DRESSER
n. 19C Brit. sl. – a lecher; a man who copulates frequently  
 
• LEATHER-EARS
n. 1903 Amer. dial. – a stupid person; a fool; one slow of comprehension  
 
• LEATHERER
n. 1. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – anything large
n. 2. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – a person of great strength or stature
 
• LEATHER-HEAD
n. 1. a1700 – a fool, a blockhead, a dolt, an oaf, a stupid person; a person slow of comprehension  
n. 2. 1847 Aust. – the friar-bird  
n. 3. L19 US sl. – a policeman; a watchman  
n. 4. B1900 Can. sl. – a swindler  
 
• LEATHER-HEADED
adj. a1668 – stupid, foolish, slow-witted 
 
• LEATHER-HEADEDNESS
n. 1879 Amer. dial. – stupidity; foolishness  
 
• LEATHER-HOUSE
n. 1851 Eng. dial. – an asylum for the destitute
 
• LEATHERING
adj. 1865 Eng. dial. – lithe, muscular, active
n. 1. 1791 colloq. – a flogging, a beating  
n. 2. Bk1902 Sc. – a scolding
 
• LEATHERJACK
n. 1911 Amer. dial. – a daddy longlegs  
 
• LEATHER-JACKET
n. 1. 1861 Eng. dial. – an apple with a thick rind
n. 2. 1905 Amer. dial. – a daddy longlegs  
 
• LEATHER JUMP
n. 1894 Eng. dial. – a leather apron
 
• LEATHER-LANE
adj. 1810 cant – paltry
n. 18C sl. – the female genitals  
 
• LEATHER-LAPS
n. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – a forgetful person
 
• LEATHER-LUNG
n. 1975 Amer. jocular usage – a person who shouts  
 
• LEATHER-LUNGS
n. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – a garrulous person; a loud, vociferous talker
 
• LEATHERLY
adj. 1573 obs. – leather-like, tough
 
• LEATHER MEDAL
n. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – a derisive term for the reward of stupidity, slowness, or badness
 
• LEATHER-MOUSE
n. 1869 Eng. dial. – a bat
 
• LEATHERN
adj. c1000 – made of leather, consisting of leather 
 
• LEATHERN-BIRD
n. 1873 Eng. dial. – a bat
 
• LEATHERNECK
n. 1. 1890 naval sl. – a soldier  
n. 2. 1890 Brit. nautical sl. – a sailor’s name for a soldier, from the leather stock he used to wear
n. 3. 1898 Aust. sl. – an unskilled farm-labourer, esp. on a sheep station  
n. 4. 1914 US sl. – a marine  
n. 5. 1919 Amer. dial. – a stupid person; a fool; a blockhead; an uncouth person  
n. 6. 1966 Amer. dial. – a real roughened cowboy of many trail accomplishments  
 
• LEATHER-NECTARINES
n. World War II Amer. sl. – the women’s reserve of the Marine Corps  
 
• LEATHERN-MOUSE
n. 1825 Eng. dial. – a bat
 
• LEATHER ON
vb. 1893 – to work hard  
 
• LEATHER-PLATE
n. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – a race for inferior horses
 
• LEATHER-PLATER
n. 1843 Eng. dial. – an inferior horse; a poor hack
 
• LEATHER-POUNDER
n. 1936 Amer. dial. – a cowboy  
 
• LEATHER PUSHER
n. Bk1942 Amer. boxing sl. – an easy-hitting boxer  
 
• LEATHER QUEEN
n. M20 US homosexual usage – an aggressive and possibly sadistic male homosexual who wears leather clothing  
 
• LEATHERS
n. 1. 1837 colloq. – one who wears leather breeches or leggings  
n. 2. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – a thrashing, chastisement
 
• LEATHERSKIN
n. 1834 Amer. sl., usually offensive – an American Indian
 
• LEATHER-SKINNED
adj. 1898 Amer. sl., usually offensive – said of an American Indian  
 
• LEATHER-STRAP
n. 1887 US nautical sl. – molasses  
 
• LEATHER-STRETCHER
n. 18C sl. – the penis  
 
• LEATHER-TWANG
n. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – a leather shoelace
 
• LEATHERTY-PATCH
n. 1882 Eng. dial. – a clumsy, noisy dancer
 
• LEATHER-WING
n. 1851 – a bat  
 
• LEATHER-WORKER
n. 1901 US sl. – a pickpocket or purse-snatcher  
 
• LEATHERY ICE
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – ice that will bend when you step on it, but not break  
 
• LEATHSOME
adj. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – of a subservient or submissive nature
 
• LEATHWAKE
adj. c1000 obs. exc. N. Eng. dial. – having the joints flexible; hence, generally, pliant, soft 
 
• LEATS
n. 1725 Sc. – manners; demeanour; habits, customs  
 
• LEAVE
n. 1. c1785 Sc. – dismissal from a job, discharge, notice to leave
n. 2. 1969 Amer. dial. – a layover  
vb. 1. c1000 obs. – to remain; to remain behind; to continue or stay in one place
vb. 2. a1225 now rare or obs. – to abandon, to forsake a habit, practice, etc.
vb. 3. a1300 obs. – to neglect or omit to perform some action, duty, etc.
vb. 4. 1590 obs. rare – to raise an army
vb. 5. 1951 Sc. rare – to give leave to, to permit, to allow
 
• LEAVE BEHIND
vb. a1300 obs. – to neglect, to leave undone
 
• LEAVE BETWEEN TWO DAYS
vb. 1916 Amer. dial. – to leave a community in bad repute; to leave unexpectedly, with the implication of disgrace; literally, at night  
 
• LEAVE CHEYENNE
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to depart hurriedly 
 
• LEAVE DOWN
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to discontinue, to let drop
 
• LEAVE IN THE AIR
vb. 1948 UK sl. –  to abandon someone without support
 
• LEAVE IN THE LASH
vb. 1573 obs. – to leave in the lurch
 
• LEAVELANG
adj. 1796 Eng. dial. – oblong
 
• LEAVELESS
adv. c1250 obs. – without permission
 
• LEAVE-LOOKER
n. Bk1902 Eng. dial. obs. – an inspector of weights and measures; a public officer who collected the dues for primage
 
• LEAVEN
vb. 1907 Amer. dial. – to allow, to let  
 
• LEAVE-NIMING
n. 1340 obs. – the taking leave of a person; saying farewell
 
• LEAVE OFF
vb. 1973 Amer. dial. – to depart  
 
• LEAVE ONE COLD
vb. World War I Amer. sl. – to annoy; to bore
 
• LEAVE OUT
vb. 1. 1917 Amer. dial. – to depart; to go; to leave  
vb. 2. 1935 Amer. dial. – of school: to let out, to be dismissed  
 
• LEAVE-OVER
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a layover  
 
• LEAVE-OVERS
n. 1986 Amer. dial. – leftovers  
 
• LEAVE SOME MANNERS IN THE DISH
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to leave a small portion of any dish of food  
 
• LEAVE THE ROOM
vb. 20C US euphemism – to retire to the W.C.; to depart to the restroom  
 
• LEAVE THIS WORLD
vb. 20C euphemism – to die  
 
• LEAVE TO THE LONG SANDS
vb. 1671 Sc. obs. – to leave in the lurch, to place in a difficulty
 
• LEAVE UP
vb. 1430-40 obs. – to abandon, to give up, to resign
 
• LEAVINGS
n. 1. a1340 obs. – what is left; remainder, residue, remains
n. 2. 1813 Sc. & Eng. dial. – scraps of food
 
• LEAVING OUT
n. 1683 obs. – what has been left out; omitted matter
 
• LEAVING-SHOP
n. 1. 1878 sl. – an unlicensed pawnshop  
n. 2. M19 Brit. sl. – the female genitals; a place where one’s ‘spendings’ are left
 
• LEA-WATER
n. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – clear water


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