Dictionary: LO – LOK


• LOAD
n. 1. 1598 sl. – a large amount of alcohol drunk  
n. 2. 1933 Amer. dial. – a lie; a liar  
n. 3. 1937 sl. – a bout of venereal infection
vb. 1906 Amer. dial. – to deceive, to trick, to mislead  
 
• LOADED
adj. 1. 19C colloq. – pregnant
adj. 2. 1890 sl., orig. & chiefly US – drunk  
adj. 3. 1923 US sl. – in a drugged state  
adj. 4. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – hot-tempered  
 
• LOADED FOR BEAR
adj. 1. 1896 Amer. dial. – fully prepared for a situation; esp. ready and eager for a confrontation; very angry
adj. 2. 1896 Amer. dial. – very drunk  
 
• LOADED TO THE BARREL
adj. 20C US colloq. – drunk  
 
• LOADED TO THE GILLS
adj. 20C US colloq. – drunk
 
• LOADED TO THE GUARDS
adj. 20C US colloq. – drunk
 
• LOADED TO THE GUNNELS
adj. L19 US nautical sl. – drunk  
 
• LOADED TO THE GUNWALES
adj. L19 US nautical sl. – drunk  
 
• LOADED TO THE PLIMSOLL MARK
adj. 20C colloq. – drunk; holding as much as possible  
 
• LOADEN
vb. 1795 Amer. dial. – to load  
 
• LOADENED
adj. 1795 Amer. dial. – loaded
 
• LOADIE
n. 1979 US college sl. – a heavy drinker; a habitual drug abuser  
 
• LOAD OF CLAMS
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – nonsense  
 
• LOAD OF COAL
n. 20C US sl., derogatory – a group of Black people 
 
• A LOAD OF HAY
n. 1922 Amer. dial. – long hair; generally said of men  
 
• A LOAD OF OLD MADAM
n. 1920s sl. – nonsense, rubbish  
 
• A LOAD OF OLD TROT
n. 1940s sl. – a dubious story  
 
• LOAD-ON
n. 1927 US sl. – sufficient liquor to cause intoxication  
 
• LOAD UP
vb. 1883 Amer. dial. – to deceive, to trick, to mislead  
 
• LOADY
adj. 1969 Amer. dial. – feeling a big nauseated  
 
• LOAF
vb. 1838 – to spend one’s time idly  
 
• LOAFER
n. 1. 1830 – someone who spends their time idly  
n. 2. 1877 Amer. dial. – the gray wolf  
n. 3. 20C rare – a cadger
vb. 1837 Amer. dial. – to loiter, to idle, to lounge; to gad about  
 
• LOAFER ABOUT
vb. 1913 Amer. dial. – to loiter, to idle, to lounge; to gad about  
 
• LOAFER AROUND
vb. 1953 Amer. dial. – to loiter, to idle, to lounge; to gad about  
 
• LOAFERER
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a loiterer, a lounger, one who gads about  
 
• LOAFER’S BREAD
n. 1980 Amer. dial. – store-bought bread  
 
• LOAFING
adj. c1838 orig. US – lounging, deliberately idle 
n. c1850 orig. US – aimless lounging; deliberate idling 
 
• LOAFING NUMBER
n. 20C Royal Navy sl. – a nice easy job in depot  
 
• LOAFING STATIONS
n. 20C Royal Navy sl. – shore stations where men await drafting to ships  
 
• LOAF OF BREAD
adj. L19 Brit. rhyming sl. – dead  
n. L19 Brit. rhyming sl. – the head, predominantly in the sense of brains   
 
• LOAMSHIRE DIALECT
n. 20C Brit. authors’ usage  – faulty dialect as used by ignorant writers  
 
• LOAVER
n. Bk1903 sl. – money
 
• LOB
n. 1. E16 – a clumsy fellow; an unwieldy, lumpish oaf  
n. 2. 18C Brit. colloq. – a partial erection of the penis  
n. 3. 1941 Amer. dial. – a lump, a large quantity  
n. 4. M20 US sl. – the penis, esp. the erect penis  
vb. Bk1999 Aust. sl. – to arrive unexpectedly
 
• THE LOB
n. 20C Brit. sl. – a W.C.  
 
• LOB-ALONG
vb. 1856 Eng. dial. – to walk lazily or awkwardly  
 
• LOBBER
vb. 1856 Amer. dial. – of milk: to curdle, to coagulate, to sour and become thick  
 
• LOBBERHEADED
adj. 20C US colloq. – stupid  
 
• LOBBISH
adj. 1567 obs. – characteristic of a ‘lob’ or rustic; clownish, loutish
 
• LOBBUS
n. 20C sl. – an oaf, a stupid person  
 
• LOBBY
n. 1930 Amer. dial. – in logging: the living room, or smoking room at a lumber camp  
 
• LOBBY-GOW
n. 1. 1906 US sl. – an errand-boy, messenger, or hanger-on  
n. 2. E20 US sl. – an opium smoker and addict  
 
• LOBBYHOG
n. 1930 Amer. dial. – in logging: the caretaker of the bunkhouse; a roustabout who does everything from building fires to making beds  
 
• LOBBY LIZARD
n. 1939 US sl. – a person who habitually lounges about a hotel lobby  
 
• LOBBY LOUSE
n. 1939 US sl. – a person who habitually lounges about a hotel lobby
 
• LOBCOCK
n. 1. a1553 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a country bumpkin; a clown, a lout, a boor; a dull, stupid, sluggish person; a clumsy, lubberly fellow; a blundering fool; a blockhead; a term of abuse 
n. 2. 1899 Amer. dial. – a pileated woodpecker  
 
• LOBDOCIOUS
adj. 1914 Amer. dial. – delightful, excellent
 
• LOB IN
vb. Bk1999 Aust. sl. – to arrive unexpectedly
 
• LOBLOLLY
n. 1. 1637 Amer. dial. – a thick gruel, stew, or gravy  
n. 2. 1865 Amer. dial. – ooze, mud, a mud-hole, mire; a slushy mess
n. 3. 1902 Amer. dial. – a soft or gelatinous food; jelly; pudding  
n. 4. 1916 Amer. dial. – food in general, esp. an unappetizing meal  
n. 5. 1970 Amer. dial. – a very fat person  
 
• LOBLOPPERS
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – big or clumsy feet  
 
• LOBO
n. 1. 1852 Amer. dial. – a gray wolf  
n. 2. 1939 Amer. dial. – a solitary person, a loner; an outcast  
n. 3. 1947 African-American college sl. – an ugly girl
n. 4. 1949 US sl. – a thug, a hoodlum
n. 5. 1967 Amer. dial. – a coyote  
 
• LOBO WOLF
n. 1907 Amer. dial. – a solitary person, a loner; an outcast  
 
• LOBS
int. 1. M19 UK juvenile sl. – a warning shout that heralds an approaching master  
int. 2. 1910s UK juvenile sl. – a call for truce during a game  
n. 1. M19 UK tramps’ sl. – talk, conversation  
n. 2. M19 sl. – an under-gamekeeper  
 
• LOBSCOUSE
n. 1895 Amer. dial. – an awkward, hulking fellow  
 
• LOBSTER
n. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – an uncomplimentary term applied to one who is awkward and unsociable
n. 2. 1956 Amer. dial. – a red-headed woodpecker  
 
• LOBSTROPOLOUS
adj. 1891 Eng. dial. – obstreperous, loud, noisy, mischievous  
 
• LOCAL
n. 1934 Brit. sl. – a pub serving the immediate neighbourhood  
 
• LOCAL DICK
n. 1892 Eng. dial. – a local preacher  
 
• LOCAL MINISTER
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a part-time preacher, esp. a Methodist layman licensed to preach in a specified region  
 
• LOCAL PREACHER
n. 1834 Amer. dial. – a part-time preacher, esp. a Methodist layman licensed to preach in a specified region  
 
• LOCAL-YOKEL
n. Bk1999 Aust. sl. – a well-known resident
 
• LOCATE
vb. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – to take up one’s residence
 
• LOCK
vb. 1. 1938 Amer. dial. – to form a close relationship with; to bind in a relationship; to marry  
vb. 2. c1938 Amer. dial. – to cause constipation in the bowels; to become constipated 
 
• LOCK AND BARREL
adj. 1966 Amer. dial. – completely, entirely, wholly  
 
• LOCK AND CABOODLE
adj. 1966 Amer. dial. – completely, entirely, wholly  
 
• LOCK ASSES
vb. 1953 Amer. sl. – to fight, to argue, to brawl  
 
• LOCK ASSHOLES
vb. 1975 Amer. sl. – to fight; to argue
 
• LOCK, BARREL, AND STOCK
adj. 1966 Amer. dial. – completely, entirely, wholly  
 
• LOCKED
adj. 1967 Amer. dial. – constipated  
 
• LOCKED BOWELS
n. 1. 1938 Amer. dial. – constipation; obstruction of the intestines  
n. 2. 1967 Amer. dial. – appendicitis  
 
• LOCKED UP
adj. 1. 1967 Amer. dial. – friendly; married  
adj. 2. 1967 Amer. dial. – constipated
 
• LOCKER
n. 1. 1836 US nautical sl. – a pocket  
n. 2. 1855 US nautical sl. – the belly  
n. 3. 1899 Amer. dial. – a cupboard for the storage of foodstuffs; a pantry  
n. 4. 1961 Amer. dial. – a closet, a wardrobe; a small storage area  
 
• LOCKERED
adj. 1. 1824 Eng. dial. – of hair: matted, entangled
adj. 2. 1824 Eng. dial. – of blood: coagulated
adj. 3. 1824 Eng. dial. – of playing cards: in disorder
adj. 4. B1900 chiefly Sc. obs. – of hair: curled
 
• LOCK-EYE
n. 1895 Amer. dial. – the game of hide and seek  
 
• LOCK HORNS
vb. 1836 Amer. dial. – to come into conflict, to disagree, to fight; to engage in an argument or quarrel with another  
 
• LOCK PICKER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an abortionist  
 
• LOCK, STOCK, AND FIRING PIN
adj. 1948 Amer. dial. – completely, entirely, wholly  
 
• LOCK THE BARN DOOR
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – to fasten one’s trouser fly  
 
• LOCK THE BARN DOOR BEFORE THE HORSE GETS AWAY
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – to fasten one’s trouser fly
 
• LOCO
adj. 1887 Amer. dial. – crazy, insane, mentally deranged, out of one’s mind; obsessed  
n. 1. 1833 Amer. dial. – a locomotive  
n. 2. 1852 Amer. dial., derogatory – one who is out of his mind or obsessed; a crazy or insane person
vb. 1884 Amer. dial. – craze, to derange, to frenzy  
 
• LOCO BLOSSOM
n. 1941 Amer. dial., derogatory – one who is out of his mind or obsessed; a crazy or insane person
 
• LOCOED
adj. 1884 Amer. dial. – crazy, mad, deranged  
 
• LOCOMOTE
vb. 1846 – to move about from place to place; to walk  
 
• LOCO-MOVE
vb. 1792 nonce word obs. – to move about from place to place; to walk
 
• LOCO WEED
n. 1935 sl. – marijuana  
 
• LOCS
n. 1997 US sl. – sunglasses  
 
• LOCUPLETATIVE
adj. 1802-12 – tending to enrich
 
• LOCUS PREACHER
n. 1922 Amer. dial. – a local preacher  
 
• LOCUST
n. 1. 1709 Amer. dial. – a cicada  
n. 2. 1737 Amer. dial. – a grasshopper  
 
• LOCUTORY
adj. 1828 rare – pert. to speech or speaking
n. 1483 – a room or place for conversation; esp. a room in a monastery, or, in later use, a convent, where monks were allowed to converse
 
• LODGE
n. 1814 Amer. dial. – a makeshift bed on the floor  
vb. 1828 Amer. dial. – of wind or rain: to beat down or flatten  
 
• LODGING
n. 1814 Amer. dial. – a makeshift bed on the floor  
 
• LOFT
adj. 1899 Amer. dial. – unwilling  
n. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – the second story of a house; upstairs  
n. 2. 1965 Amer. dial. – the upper balcony in a theatre  
 
• LOG
adj. 1997 US sl. – without money; Low on Green  
n. 1. 1895 US sl. – a dullard  
n. 2. 1950 US sl. – a bar or tavern  
n. 3. 1963 US sl. – a heavy, cumbersome surfboard  
n. 4. 1967 US sl. – the counter surface in a bar  
n. 5. 1973 US sl. – a turd  
n. 6. 1977 US drug culture sl. – a marijuana cigarette  
n. 7. 1991 US sl. – a carton of cigarettes  
n. 8. 1998 UK sl. – phencyclidine  
 
• LOGAMOCHY
n. 1826 Sc. – a long-winded rambling story or discourse; a harangue, rigmarole  
 
• LOGAN
n. 1903 Amer. dial. – a wet, marshy piece of land  
 
• LOGANBERRY
n. 1928 US Army sl. – a prune  
 
• LOG BERRY
n. 1941 Amer. dial. – a prune  
 
• LOG BIRD
n. 1982 US sl. – a logistical supply helicopter, used to bring fresh supplies and provisions to troops in the field  
 
• LOGCOCK
n. 1806 Amer. dial. – a pileated woodpecker  
 
• LOGE
n. L17 UK criminals’ sl. – a watch  
 
• LOGES
n. 17C UK criminals’ sl. – a faked pass or warrant  
 
• LOGEY
n. 20C Irish sl. – a heavy, fat person  
 
• LOG-FLOATER
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a very heavy rain  
 
• LOG-FLOGGER
n. 2003 UK sl. – a male masturbator  
 
• LOGGED
adj. 1. L19 Brit. nautical sl. – of a ship: on her beam-ends  
adj. 2. c1920 Brit. sl. – utterly drunk 
 
• LOGGEREDY-HEADED
adj. 1964 Amer. dial. – stupid, doltish, dull; stubborn  
 
• LOGGERHEAD
n. 1. L16 sl. – a fool; a dullard; a stupid, dull-witted, or mulish person  
n. 2. 1888 US sl. – a Pennsylvanian  
n. 3. 1911 Amer. dial. – a large, heavy head  
n. 4. c1970 Amer. dial. – a woodpecker 
 
• LOGGERHEADED
adj. L16 sl. – dull, stupid, doltish; stubbornly at odds  
 
• LOGGER’S SMALLPOX
n. 20C Can. loggers’ sl. – markings on a man’s face which are caused by a man’s stamping on it with his spiked boots, an activity known as ‘putting the caulks to’ (a man)  
 
• LOGGIN
n. Amer. World War I sl. – a recruit
 
• LOGGING
n. E19 sl., orig. US – the corrupt giving of mutual aid, esp. in professional contexts, as a critic consistently pushing a novelist friend  
 
• LOGGING BERRIES
n. 1979 Amer. lumberjacks’ usage – beans  
 
• LOGGING BERRY
n. 1956 Amer. dial. – a prune  
 
• LOGGISH
adj. 1642 obs. rare – heavy, sluggish
 
• LOGGO
n. M19 Brit. sl. – logs  
 
• LOG GOD
n. 1945 Amer. dial. – a red-headed woodpecker  
 
• LOG GUARD
n. 1951 Amer. dial. – a red-headed woodpecker  
 
• LOG-HEADED
adj. 1889 Amer. dial. – stupid, dull, doltish; stubbornly at odds  
 
• LOGICIAN
n. 20C Brit. sl. – a drunk who accused another of being drunk  
 
• LOGIE
n. 1. 1847 Brit. sl. – sham jewellery  
n. 2. c1870 Brit. sl. – sewage  
 
• LOGIER
n. c1820 cant – a pocket-book 
 
• LOGI-LOGI
n. 1950s W. Indies sl. – a stupid, oafish person  
 
• LOGINESS
n. 1884 Amer. dial. – slowness, lethargy  
 
• LOG-JUICE
n. M19 sl. – a cheap port wine  
 
• LOGODAEDALUS
n. 1611 obs. – one who is cunning in, or clever with, words
 
• LOGODIARRHOEA
n. 1727 obs. – an uncontrolled flow of words
 
• LOGOFASCINATED
adj. 1652 nonce word – fascinated by words
 
• LOG OF EBONY
n. M19 Aust. sl. – a stupid Black person  
 
LOG OF WOOD
n. M19 Aust. sl. – a dull, stupid person
 
LOGOLATRY
n. 1810 – worship of words; unreasonable regard for words or for the literal truth
 
LOGO-LOGO
n. 1950s W. Indies sl. – a stupid, oafish person  
 
• LOGOMANIAC
n. 1870 – a person who is insanely interested in words
 
• LOG-PUSHER
n. 1990s sl. – a male homosexual  
 
• LOG-ROLL
vb. M19 sl. – to engage in the corrupt giving of mutual aid  
 
• LOG-ROLLER
n. 1. E19 sl. – a politician who engages in the corrupt giving of mutual aid  
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. theatrical sl. – a critic who makes favourable reviews, expecting the like in return  
n. 3. 1985 Amer. dial. – a very heavy rain  
 
• LOG-ROLLING
n. E19 sl., orig. US – the corrupt giving of mutual aid, esp. in professional contexts, as a critic consistently pushing a novelist friend  
 
LOG TOWN
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – a small or unimportant town  
 
LOGY
adj. 1. 1848 Amer. dial. – heavy, slow, lethargic, sluggish  
adj. 2. 1899 Amer. dial. – dull, stupid  
adj. 3. 1917 Amer. dial. – top-heavy  
 
LOID
n. 1958 sl. – a celluloid or plastic strip used by thieves to force locks
vb. 1968 sl. – to break open a lock or let oneself in using a ‘loid’
 
LOINER
n. 1950 sl. – an inhabitant of Leeds, West Yorkshire
 
LOITER-LOUCH
vb. 1876 Eng. dial. – to saunter along, to slouch about  
 
• LOITEROUS
adj. 1566 obs. – inclined to loiter; sluggish
 
LOITER-SACK
n. 1594 obs. – a lazy, loitering fellow; an idler
 
LOKES
n. 1997 US sl. – sunglasses  


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Updated: September 7, 2022