Dictionary: LOO – LOR


• LOO
n. 1. L19 sl. – the lavatory  
n. 2. 1952 Amer. dial. – a hullabaloo; a clamorous noise or disturbance; an uproar  
n. 31960s US sl. – a police or fire lieutenant  
vb. E19 US sl. – to cheat; to defraud  
 
• LOOB
n. M14 Eng. dial. – a fool, a dullard  
 
• LOOBILY
adj. 1655 – awkward, clumsy, lubberly

• LOOBISH
adj. 1648 obs. – awkward, clumsy, lubberly
 
• LOOBY
adj. 1679 – clumsy, awkward, doltish, stupid  
n. 1377 – a fool; a soft-head; a dull, clumsy person; an awkward, heavy person; a lazy, hulking fellow; an awkward, stupid, clownish person

• LOOBY-LIKE
adj. 1582 – like a looby, clumsy, awkward, stupid
 
• LOOCHA
n. 19C Anglo-Indian – a blackguard libertine; a lewd loafer  
 
• LOOCHER
n. Bk1892 Anglo-Indian sl. – a low and especially lascivious blackguard  
 
• LOOCIVEE
n. 1791 Amer. dial. – a lynx
 
• LOODER
n. 1. 1714 Irish – a long, stout, rough stick
n. 2. 1825 Irish – a heavy blow or stroke
vb. 1850 Sc. & Irish – to give a severe beating; to thrash
 
• LOOEY
n. 1. 1916 N. Amer. sl. – a lieutenant
n. 2. 1970s US sl. – a lump of expectorated phlegm  
n. 3. 1970s US sl. – a piece of nasal mucus

• LOOF
n. a1300 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – the palm of the hand
 
• LOOF-FAKER
n. M19 sl. – a chimney sweep  
 
• LOOGAN
n. 1. 1929 US sl. – a foolish person  
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a gullible person; a dupe  
 
• LOOGIE
n. 1967 Amer. colloq. – an expectorated bit of phlegm  
 
• LOOGIN
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a gullible person; a dupe  
 
• LOOIE
n. 1. 1916 N. Amer. sl. – a lieutenant
n. 2. 1970s US sl. – a lump of expectorated phlegm  
n. 3. 1970s US sl. – a piece of nasal mucus
 
• LOOK
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a small amount; a bit  
 
• LOOK A LITTLE OUT
vb. 1928 Amer. dial. – to be on guard; to be careful  
 
• LOOK ALIVE
vb. 1858 colloq. – to make haste
 
• LOOK AS BLACK AS A WET FRIDAY
vb. 1892 Eng. dial. – to look very angry
 
• LOOK AS IF YOU HAD BEEN PULLED THROUGH A KNOTHOLE (BACKWARDS)
adj. 20C Amer. sl. – dishevelled
 
• LOOK AS SMILING AS A BASKET OF CHIPS
adj. 1834 Amer. dial. – showing great happiness
 
• LOOK AT
vb. 1967 Amer. dial. – to speak to someone on a telephone  
 
• LOOK BABIES
vb. 20C – to gaze into another’s eyes
 
• LOOK DOWN ONE’S NOSE
vb. 1. 1914 Amer. dial. – to look embarrassed or unhappy; to look chagrined, baffled, sorrowful, discouraged, or ashamed; to submit to someone  
vb. 2. 1921 sl. – to regard or treat with contempt  
 
• LOOKER
n. 1. 1909 sl., orig. US – a sexually attractive woman
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something beautiful or attractive  
 
• LOOKERINO
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. college sl. – an attractive girl  
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something beautiful or attractive
 
• LOOKERS
n. 1. Bk1913 Amer. dial. – eyes
n. 2. c1935 Amer. dial. – eyeglasses 
 
• LOOK FOR A NEEDLE IN A BOTTLE OF HAY
vb. 1742 – to attempt an extremely difficult, impossible, or foolish task  
 
• LOOK FOR A NEEDLE IN A HAYSTACK
vb. 1855 – to attempt an extremely difficult, impossible, or foolish task  
 
• LOOK FOR A NEEDLE IN A MEADOW
vb. c1530 – to attempt an extremely difficult, impossible, or foolish task 

• LOOKIE-LIKIE
n. 1990 chiefly Brit., colloq. – a person who imitates or closely resembles another in appearance; a lookalike
 
• LOOKINGEST
adj. 1932 Amer. dial. – most extraordinary in appearance  
 
• LOOKING-GLASS
n. 1. Bk1896 sl. – a chamber-pot  
n. 2. 1966 Amer. rhyming sl. for ‘ass’ – the buttocks  
 
• LOOKING GLASS TIME
n. 1960s Amer. sl. – self-assessment  

• LOOKIST
n. 1990 – a person who discriminates on the grounds of appearance
 
• LOOK LIKE A CHAP’S PLAYHOUSE
vb. 1965 Amer. dial. – to be untidy  
 
• LOOK LIKE A DEAD DUCK IN A THUNDERSTORM
vb. 20C Aust. sl. – to be unattractive, untidy, etc.  
 
• LOOK LIKE A MORAY MAN MELTING BRASS
vb. Bk2002 Sc. – to look silly  
 
• LOOK LIKE A TEE-HEE’S NEST WITH A HA-HA’S EGG IN IT
vb. 1970 Amer. dial. – to be laughable  
 
• LOOK LIKE A THROTTLED ISAAC
vb. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – to look as if one couldn’t move  
 
• LOOK LIKE DEATH ON A MOPSTICK
vb. B1900 Eng. dial. – to look very miserable
 
• LOOK LIKE HAMMERED HELL
vb. 1970 Amer. dial. – to look unhealthy, or as if one hasn’t been well for some time  
 
• LOOK LIKE ONE WAS SENT FOR AND COULDN’T COME
vb. 1843 Amer. dial. – to look indisposed, out of sorts, or exhausted  
 
• LOOK LIKE THE LAST OF PEA-TIME
vb. 1923 Amer. dial. – to look utterly worn out  
 
• LOOK LIKE THE OLD SCRATCH
vb. 1915 Amer. dial. – to look dishevelled and dirty  
 
• LOOK OVER
vb. 1887 Amer. dial. – to disregard, to forgive, to overlook  
 
• LOOK-SEE
n. 1. 1876 colloq. – a look, a glance; an inspection or examination; a survey
n. 2. 1898 – appearance, aspect
n. 3. 1925 military sl., rare – a telescope or periscope
vb. 1862 colloq. – to investigate, to examine; to determine, to ascertain  
 
• LOOKS LIKE A HAYSTACK
phr. 1. 1968 Amer. dial. – said of a person who dresses carelessly  
phr. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. – said of an untidy house
 
• LOOKS LIKE A WET WEEK-END
phr. 1930s Aust. sl. – used by girls menstruating at the weekend; then by males (mostly teens) to a girls carrying a parcel that, judging by its size, may well contain a box or carton of sanitary pads  
 
• LOOK SNAPPY
int. 1926 UK sl. – quickly!  
vb. 1926 UK sl. – to be quick  
 
• LOOK SPARE
vb. Amer. World War I sl  – to have nothing to do; to be at leisure
 
• LOOKSTICK
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a telescope  
 
• LOOK THROUGH GREEN GLASSES
vb. B1900 – to be jealous of one; to be envious of another’s success
 
• LOOK TO ONE’S LAURELS
vb. 1882 – to beware of losing one’s pre-eminence; to be careful not to lose one’s superior position to a rival  

• LOOKUP
n. 1. 1813 obs. – a having a good deal of respect for a person
n. 2. 1852 colloq. – (as ‘look-up’) a visit, a social call
n. 3. 1948 colloq. – (as ‘look-up’) a looking something up in a dictionary, book, etc.
 
• LOOK VERY MANK
vb. Bk1905 Sc. – to seem at a loss  
 
• LOOK YARK
vb. 1887 Eng. dial. – to look sharp, to make haste  

• LOOKY-LOO • LOOKY-LOU
n. 1. 1977 colloq. – a person who views something for sale with no intention of making a purchase
n. 2. 1978 colloq. – a person who stops to look at something out of curiosity, esp. when such attention is unwelcome
 
• LOOLOO
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate  
n. 1. 1896 Amer. dial. – in poker: a special hand or game usually employed to deceive an inexperienced player  
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent  
 
• LOON
n. 1. c1450 chiefly Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – a worthless person; a rogue, a scamp; a sluggard, an idler
n. 2. c1560 chiefly Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – a strumpet, a concubine
n. 3. 1535 arch. – a man of low birth or condition
n. 4. c1560 chiefly Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – a boy, a lad, a youth
n. 5. a1586 chiefly Sc. & Eng. dial. – a fellow, a man
n. 6. 1619 chiefly Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – a boor, a lout, a clown; an untaught, ill-bred person
n. 7. 1885 sl. – a crazy or eccentric person; a simpleton  
vb. 1. 1960s Brit. criminals’ sl. – to fool about like a lunatic  
vb. 2. 1966 sl. – to pass time in pleasurable activities  
 
• LOON ABOUT
vb. 1979 Brit. sl. – to fool about like a lunatic  

• LOONERY
n. a1513 obs. – the disposition and habits of a rascal; lechery, villany
 
• LOONEY
adj. 1872 sl. – crazy, eccentric  
n. 1884 sl. – a mad or insane person  
 
• LOONEY TUNE
n. 1967 US sl. – a crazy person  
 
• LOONEY TUNES
adj. 1971 US sl. – insane  
 
• LOON PANTS
n. 1971 sl. – casual trousers widely flared from the knees to the ankles  
 
• LOONS
n. 1. 1969 Amer. dial. – a great amount  
n. 2. 1971 sl. – casual trousers widely flared from the knees to the ankles  
 
• LOON SHIT
n. 1. 1974 Brit. sl. – the mud or muck on the bottom of a pond  
n. 2. 1987 Can. sl. – boggy land
 
• LOONSLATE
n. Bk1903 sl. – 1 shilling and 1 1/2 penny
 
• LOONSLATT
n. Bk1903 sl. – 1 shilling and 1 1/2 penny
 
• LOON TROUSERS
n. 1971 sl. – casual trousers widely flared from the knees to the ankles  
 
• LOONY
adj. 1. 1841 US sl. – extremely erratic; mildly crazy, demented, foolish, silly  
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – foolish; silly; witless  
n. 1. 1682 sl. – a fool; a soft-head
n. 2. 1883 US sl. – a madman  
n. 3. 2002 Can. – a $1 coin  
 
• LOONY AS A JAYBIRD
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – insane, eccentric  
 
• LOONY BIN
n. 1919 UK sl. – a hospital or other institution for the treatment of psychiatric problems and other mental illness  

• LOONY BIRD
n. 1964 US sl. – a person who is at least eccentric, at most mentally unstable or irrational  
 
• LOONY-DOCTOR
n. 1925 sl. – a psychiatrist  
 
• LOONY FARM
n. 1977 US sl. – an insane asylum  
 
• LOONY HOUSE
n. 1977 US sl. – a hospital for the insane  
 
• LOONY PEN
n. 1984 US sl. – a hospital for the insane  
 
• LOONY TUNE
n. 1967 US sl. – a crazy person  
 
• LOOP
n. 1. 1940s Aust. sl. – a fool  
n. 2. 1990s sl. – a pornographic film  
n. 3. 2000s African-American sl. – sex involving several men and a single woman  
vb. 1. 1920s US sl. – to go on a drinking spree  
vb. 2. 1980s sl. – to be a golf caddie  
 
• LOOPED
adj. 1. 1934 Amer. sl. – drunk, fully intoxicated
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; confused; muddled  
adj. 3. 1960s US sl. – demented, crazy  
adj. 4. 1960s US sl. – infatuated with something or someone
 
• LOOPED UP
adj. 1. 1930s US sl. – drunk  
adj. 2. 1960s US sl. – demented, crazy  
adj. 3. 1960s US sl. – infatuated with something or someone
 
• LOOPER
n. 1. 1910s sl. – a punch, a blow  
n. 2. 1980s sl. – a crazy, disturbed person  
n. 3. 1980s sl. – a caddie
 
• LOOPHOLE
n. 1. 1664 – an outlet or means of escape; often applied to an omission in a statute, etc., which gives opportunity for evading its intention
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a lawyer  

• LOOPINESS
n. 1939 colloq. – craziness, insanity
 
• LOOP-LEGGED
adj. 1944 Amer. dial. – thoroughly inebriated  
 
• LOOP-LEGGED DRUNK
adj. 1966 Amer. dial. – thoroughly inebriated  
 
• LOOPY
adj. 1925 sl. – crazy, eccentric  
 
• LOOSE
adj. L15 – wanton, lewd, sexually loose and legally unattached  
 
• LOOSE AS A GOOSE IN SCOPEBERRY TIME
adj. 1969 Amer. dial. – having diarrhoea  
 
• LOOSE-BODIED
adj. L17 sl. – of women: wanton  
 
• LOOSE-BODIED GOWN
n. E17 sl. – a prostitute; a harlot  

• LOOSE CANNON
n. 1946 – an unpredictable or uncontrollable person or thing, esp. considered liable to cause unintentional or indiscriminate damage
 
• LOOSE-CLACKED
adj. 1661 obs. – loquacious, chattering  
 
• LOOSE-COAT GAME
n. M17 Urquhart usage – copulation  
 
• LOOSE-ENDED
adj. 1. L17 sl. – of women: wanton  
adj. 2. 19C colloq. – having diarrhoea  
 
• LOOSE FISH
n. E19 Brit. sl. – a prostitute  
 
• LOOSE GRAVY
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – unthickened gravy  
 
• LOOSE IN THE HAFT
adj. 1. c1325 obs. – unstable, unreliable
adj. 2. E18 US sl. –  intoxicated with alcohol  
adj. 3. 19C Brit. sl. – wanton  
adj. 4. 19C Brit. sl. – having diarrhoea  
 
• LOOSE IN THE HEFT
adj. 1895 Eng. dial. – dissolute, dishonest, untrustworthy  
 
• LOOSE IN THE HILT
adj. 1. E18 US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol  
adj. 2. 19C Brit. sl. – wanton  
adj. 3. 19C Brit. sl. – having diarrhoea  
 
• LOOSE IN THE RUMP
adj. 19C Brit. sl. – of women: wanton  
 
• LOOSE-KIRTLE
n. 1855 arch. – a woman of loose or bad character; a wanton woman; a prostitute (kirtle = woman’s gown)  
 
• LOOSE-LEGGED
adj. L16 sl. – wanton; sexually promiscuous  
 
• LOOSE-LOVE CENTER
n. 20C US sl. – a brothel  
 
• LOOSE-LOVE LADY
n. E20 US sl. – a prostitute  
 
• LOOSERVEE
n. 1791 Amer. dial. – a lynx
 
• LOOSE-TAILED
adj. 1598 obs. – of bad character; wanton; unchaste; wanting in self-restraint
 
• LOOSE-TWISTED
adj. 1. B1900 Eng. dial. – lewd, wanton  
adj. 2. B1900 Eng. dial. – slovenly in dress, work, or gait
 
• LOOSE WOMAN
n. 20C US colloq. – a sexually indiscreet female  

• LOOSIE
n. 1948 US colloq. – a cigarette sold individually
 
• LOOT
n. 1. 1759 US – a lieutenant  
n. 2. 1943 sl. – money  
 
• LOOTCHA
n. 19C Anglo-Indian – a blackguard libertine; a lewd loafer  
 
• LOP
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a couch or sofa on which one can stretch out to rest 
vb. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to lean, as if drunk
vb. 2. 1939 Amer. dial. – to strike with the fist  
vb. 3. 1969 Amer. dial. – to walk heavily, making a lot of noise  
 
• LOP ABOUT
vb. 1882 Amer. dial. – to move slowly or aimlessly; to loll; to idle  
 
• LOP AROUND
vb. 1965 Amer. dial. – to move slowly or aimlessly; to loll; to idle  
 
• LOP DOWN
vb. 1822 Amer. dial. – to flop down; to lie down and rest; to sit down  
 
• LOPE
n. 1. a1400 obs. – a leaping
n. 2. 1809 – a long bounding stride
n. 3. 1969 Amer. dial. – a cantaloupe  
vb. 1. 1483 obs. exc. Eng. & Amer. dial. – to leap, to jump, to spring
vb. 2. 1575 Eng. dial. – to run, to run away
vb. 3. Bk1902 Amer. dial. – to assail  
vb. 4. Bk1902 Amer. dial. – to importune
vb. 5. Bk1902 Amer. dial. – to mount

• LOPEHOLT
n. 1616 obs. – a place of refuge

• LOPEMAN
n. a1625 obs. – a runner
 
• LOPER
n. 1. 1483 obs. – a leaper, a dancer
n. 2. 1895 Amer. dial. – a worthless, intrusive fellow  

• LOPE-WAY
n. c1736 – a private footpath
 
• LOP-JAWED
adj. 1966 Amer. dial. – having a protruding lower jaw  
 
• LOP-LOLLARD
n. 19C Eng. dial. – a lazy fellow  
 
• LOPLOLLY
adj. 1. 1895 Amer. dial. – of gait or dress: careless, slouching adj. 2. 1981 Amer. dial. – askew, crooked, catty-cornered  
n. 19C Eng. dial. – a lazy fellow  
 
• LOP ONTO
vb. 1934 Amer. dial. – to grab, to get hold of, to latch on to  

• LOPPAGE
n. 1683 obs. – the loppings from trees
 
• LOPPER
n. 1. 1835 – half-melted snow
n. 2. 1880 – a curdled or coagulated state, as of milk or blood
vb. 1. a1300 – of milk: to curdle, to coagulate, to sour and become thick  
vb. 2. 1893 Sc. – of water: to lap, to splash gently, to ripple
 
• LOPPER-JAWED
adj. 1916 Amer. dial. – askew, crooked  

• LOPPET
vb. 1864 Eng. dial. – to move or run with a heavy gait; generally used of animal, as a rabbit or hare; rarely used of a person

• LOPPINESS
n. 1908 rare – a being choppy: said of water, the sea, etc.

• LOPPING
adj. 1. 1685 – of the ears: hanging down
adj. 2. 1887 – of the sea: rising and falling in short waves
n. 1868 – of the ears: a hanging loosely
 
• LOPPUS
n. 1. 20C sl. – an oaf, a stupid person  
n. 2. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a large, clumsy person or animal

• LOPPY
adj. 1. 1483 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – infested with ‘lops’ or fleas
adj. 2. 1855 – hanging loosely; limp
adj. 3. 1883 – of the sea: choppy
n. 1898 Aust. sl. – a handyman on rural stations
 
• LOP ROUND
vb. 1851 Amer. dial. – to move slowly or aimlessly; to loll; to idle  
 
• LOPSY LOWS
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – an imaginary disease  
 
• LOPSY-WISE
adv. 1900 Amer. dial. – askew, in a lopsided manner  

• LOP-WEB
n. c1400 obs. – a spider’s web; a cobweb

• LOPYN
n. c1430 obs. – a morsel or lump of food

• LOQUEL
n. 1694 obs. – speech

• LOQUENCE
n. 1677 rare – talk, speech, speaking

• LOQUENCY
n. 1623 rare – talking, speech, speaking

• LOQUENT
adj. 1593 rare – that speaks, speaking
 
• LOR!
int. 1835 Brit. – an exclamation of surprise or astonishment

• LOR-A-GOR!
 int. 1823 Amer. dial. – an exclamation  
 
• LORD-A-MASSEY!
int. 1851 Amer. dial. – used to express surprise, dismay, etc.

• LORD-A-MASSY!
int. 1917 Amer. dial. – used to express surprise, dismay, etc.

• LORD-A-MIGHTIES
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a red-headed woodpecker  
 
• LORD-A-MUSSY!
int. 1872 Amer. dial. – used to express surprise, dismay, etc.

• LORD BLESS US!
int. 1906 Amer. dial. – an exclamation  
 
• LORD CHESTERFIELD
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a citified person  
 
• LORD COCK
n. 1951 Amer. dial. – a red-headed woodpecker  
 
• LORD-GOD
n. 1909 Amer. dial. – a red-headed woodpecker  
 
• LORD-GOD ALMIGHTY
n. 1951 Amer. dial. – a red-headed woodpecker  
 
• LORD-GOD PECKERWOOD
n. 1947 Amer. dial. – a red-headed woodpecker  
 
• LORD GUARD
n. 1955 Amer. dial. – a red-headed woodpecker  
 
• LORD HARRY
n. M17 sl. – the devil  
 
LORD HAVE MERCY!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – used to express surprise, dismay, etc.

LORDING
adj. 1548 – powerful, dominating, having presiding authority or influence; also, behaving in an arrogant, disdainful, or dissipated manner
n. 1. a1000 obs. – a lord; a man of high rank or office; a gentleman
n. 2. 1567 arch., contemptuous usage – a lord; a minor or inferior lord; a young lord

LORDKIN
n. 1855 hist. – a young lord; a minor lord

THE LORD-KNOWS-WHAT
n. 19C Brit. euphemism – the female genitals  

LORDLET
n. 1642 contemptuous usage – a lord; a minor or inferior lord; a young lord

LORDLING
n. c1300 – a young, minor, or inferior lord
 
LORD LOVE A DUCK!
int. 20C colloq. – a mock oath and an exclamation  
 
LORDLUMMY!
int. L19 – an exclamation of surprise, shock, disbelief  
 
LORD-MAYOR
n. 1877 sl., obs. – a large crowbar, used by housebreakers

LORD MAYOR’S COAL
n. 1840 obs. – a slate
 
LORD MUCK
n. 1937 sl. – a pompous, self-opinionated condescending man  
 
LORD OF THE HEAVIES
n. Bk1942 Amer. boxing sl. – a heavyweight boxing champion  
 
LORD-OF-THE-MANOR
n. Bk1903 sl. – sixpence

LORDOLATRY
n. 1846 obs. – worship of a lord
 
LORD REX
n. 1970s NZ prison sl. – sexual intercourse  

LORDSAKE!
int. 1815 colloq., orig. Sc. – an exclamation of surprise, exasperation, etc.
 
LORD SAKES ALIVE!
int. M19 colloq. – an oath and an exclamation  
 
LORDS AND PEERS
n. 2000s rhyming sl. – the ears  
 
LORD SAVE US!
int. 1789 Sc. – an exclamation of surprise, fear, etc.  
 
LORD’S BREAD-WAGON
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – thunder
 
LORD’S FERTILIZER
n. 1985 Amer. dial. – spring snow  
 
LORD’S SUPPER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bread and water  
 
LORD SUTCH
n. 1. 1960s rhyming sl. – the clutch  
n. 2. 1960s rhyming sl. – the crotch  

• LORDSWIKE
n. a1000 obs. – a person who betrays his or her lord; a traitor
 
LORD-TO-GOD
n. 1942 Amer. dial. – a red-headed woodpecker  
 
LORD WIGG
n. 1960s rhyming sl. – a pig  
 
LORDY!
int. 1853 Amer. dial. – used as an expression of surprise, dismay, annoyance, etc.  
 
LORDY-GOD
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a red-headed woodpecker  
 
LORDY-MASSY!
int. 1917 Amer. dial. – used to express surprise, dismay, etc.

LORDY ME!
int. 19C colloq. – a mild oath or exclamation  
 
LORDY MERCY!
int. 1962 Amer. dial. – used to express surprise, dismay, etc.

LORDY MUSSY!
int. 1909 Amer. dial. – used to express surprise, dismay, etc.

• LORED
adj. a1839 rare – learned; stored with knowledge

LOREL
adj. 1590 obs. – good-for-nothing
n. 1362 obs. – a worthless person; a dissolute person; a low, disreputable fellow; a rogue, a scoundrel

LORENDRIVER
n. 1649 obs. – a smuggler

LORER
n. c1400 obs. – a worthless person; a rogue, a blackguard
 
LORESMAN
n. 1377 obs. – a teacher, instructor

LORESPELL
n. c1000 obs. – a sermon, an instructive discourse
 
LORETTA YOUNG
n. 1990s rhyming sl. – the tongue  
 
LORETTE
n. 1865 euphemism – a prostitute; a courtesan of a class which at one time had its headquarters in the vicinity of the Church of Notre  Dame de Lorette in Paris
 
LORG
n. E20 US sl. – a stupid person; an oaf  
 
LORGAMIGHTY!
int. 20C US colloq. – Lord God Almighty!  

• LORING
n. 1596 obs. – teaching, instruction
 
LORK A SARSAY!
int. 1899 Eng. dial. – Lord have mercy!  
 
LORKUS!
int. 1887 Eng. dial. – an exclamation of surprise  
 
LOR LUMME!
int. L19 – an exclamation of surprise, shock, disbelief  

LORN
adj. 1. a1400 obs. – lost, perished, ruined; doomed to destruction
adj. 2. c1475 obs. – abandoned, left alone; bereft of; lonely, desolate, wretched
 
LORNA DOONE
n. 20C rhyming sl. – a spoon  
 
LORRY UP
vb. 1940s Irish sl. – to beat, to thrash  
 
LORS!
int. 1860 – a mild oath or exclamation; Lord!  

LORTHEW
n. c1160 obs. – a teacher, an instructor


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Updated: September 15, 2022