Dictionary: LOS – LOV


• LOSARD
n. a1400 obs. – a worthless person; a scoundrel

• LOSE
vb. 1. Bk1913 Amer. dial. – to menstruate
vb. 2. 1913 Amer. dial. – to bleed  
vb. 3. 20C colloq. – to be much superior to; to overcome; to defeat easily
 
• LOSE A EWE FOR A HALF-PENNY-WORTH OF TAR
vb. 1684 Eng. dial. – to be penny wise and pound foolish; to be so saving in little things as to risk things of value  
 
• LOSE A HOG FOR A HALF-PENNY-WORTH OF TAR
vb. 1684 Eng. dial. – to be penny wise and pound foolish; to be so saving in little things as to risk things of value  
 
• LOSE A MEAL
vb. 20C Aust. jocular usage – to vomit  
 
• LOSE AN EYE
vb. 1967 Amer. dial. – of milk: to turn sour  
 
• LOSE BY A NECK
vb. Bk1902 sl. – to lose by next to nothing  
 
• LOSE CASTE
vb. 1816 – to lose social rank, to descend in the social scale  
 
• LOSE IT
vb. L20 motorcyclists’ sl. – to come off one’s motorcycle accidentally
 
• LOSEL
adj. 1601 arch. – good-for-nothing, worthless
n. 1362 arch. – a worthless person, a scoundrel, a cheat; a ragamuffin, a ne’er-do-well  
 
• LOSE LEATHER
vb. 1726 – to suffer abrasion of skin  

• LOSELING
adj. 1624 obs. – rascally, like a scoundrel

• LOSELLED
adj. 1606 obs. – good-for-nothing, worthless

• LOSELLY
adj. 1611 obs. – good-for-nothing, idle, lazy
 
• LOSELRY
n. 1480 arch. – profligacy, debauchery, rascality
 
• LOSENGE
vb. 1422 obs. – to flatter; to compliment unduly; to praise fulsomely

• LOSENGEOUS
adj. 1632 obs. rare – lying, flattering

• LOSENGER
n. 1. 1303 obs. – a false flatterer; a lying rascal, a deceiver
n. 2. 1513 Sc. – a sluggard

• LOSENGERY
n. 1303 obs. – flattery, deceit
 
• LOSE OFF
vb. 1874 Amer. dial. – to drop or come off  
 
• LOSE ONE’S AMATEUR STANDING
vb. 1941 Amer. sl. – to become a prostitute
 
• LOSE ONE’S ‘ARRIS
vb. c1950 sl. – to lose one’s nerve, to chicken out 
 
• LOSE ONE’S ASS
vb. 1788 sl. – to lose all one has, as in gambling; to lose one’s position; to lose everything  
 
• LOSE ONE’S BALLAST
vb. 1889 sl. – to lose one’s good judgement or sense  
 
• LOSE ONE’S BLOCK
vb. 1. 1907 sl., chiefly Aust. & NZ – to lose emotional control; to lose one’s temper; to be or get angry  
vb. 2. 20C Aust. sl. – to fall in love  
 
• LOSE ONE’S BRITCHES
vb. 1965 Amer. dial. – to lose a great deal of money  
 
• LOSE ONE’S CAN
vb. Amer. World War I sl. – to be killed; generally used to refer to men shot through the head
 
• LOSE ONE’S CHERRY
vb. 1918 sl., orig. US – to lose one’s virginity
 
• LOSE ONE’S COOKIES
vb. 1. 1940s US sl. – to lose emotional control  
vb. 2. 1970 Amer. sl. – to vomit  
 
• LOSE ONE’S COOL
vb. c1955 sl. – to lose one’s self-possession; to become nervous, (over-) excited, very angry
 
• LOSE ONE’S DASH
vb. c1880 sl. – to reach one’s limit; to exhaust one’s energies and abilities; to lose one’s opportunity, and suffer accordingly  
 
• LOSE ONE’S DIP
vb. 20C US sl. – to lose one’s composure  
 
• LOSE ONE’S DOG
vb. 1910s US sl. – to lose control of a situation  
 
• LOSE ONE’S DOUGHNUTS
vb. 1940s US college sl. – to vomit  
 
• LOSE ONE’S GENDER
vb. 1940s homosexual sl. – to abandon homosexuality to become a heterosexual  
 
• LOSE ONE’S GOAT
vb. 1910s sl. – to lose one’s courage; to lose one’s ability to fight  
 
• LOSE ONE’S GRIP
vb. L19 sl., orig. US – to lose one’s composure; to lose one’s sanity  
 
• LOSE ONE’S HAIR
vb. 20C sl. – to lose one’s temper
 
• LOSE ONE’S LEGS
vb. c1770 sl. – to become tipsy
 
• LOSE ONE’S LUNCH
vb. 1960s Amer. sl. – to vomit
 
• LOSE ONE’S MARKET
vb. Bk1905 Sc. – to throw away one’s matrimonial chance  
 
• LOSE ONE’S NANA
vb. 1966 sl. – to be or get angry
 
• LOSE ONE’S NANNY
vb. L18 UK sl. – to lose one’s temper (nanny = head)  
 
• LOSE ONE’S OIL
vb. a1548 obs. – to study or labour in vain
 
• LOSE ONE’S PUNCH
vb. 1910s sl. – to reach one’s limit; to exhaust one’s energies and abilities; to lose one’s opportunity, and suffer accordingly  
 
• LOSE ONE’S RAG
vb. B1934 Sc. sl. – to lose one’s temper; to be or get angry
 
• LOSE ONE’S SHIRT
vb. 1892 – to lose all one’s possessions, esp. by gambling or speculation  
 
• LOSE ONE’S SHOES
vb. 1965 Amer. dial. – to vomit profusely  
 
• LOSE ONE’S TAFFY
vb. 1927 Amer. dial. – to fail  
 
• LOSE ONE’S TAW
vb. 1895 Amer. dial. – to lose one’s mind  
 
• LOSE ONE’S VEST
vb. c1890 sl. – to get angry 
 
• LOSE ONE’S VOYAGE
vb. 1680 US – of a pirate: to gamble away one’s share of a privateer’s plunder
 
• LOSE OUT
vb. L19 Aust. sl. – to be swindled or merely fooled
 
• LOSER
n. 1. 1912 US sl. – someone who has been to prison
n. 2. c1920 sl. – a handicap; an obstacle, a disappointment

• LOSERY
n. c1460 obs. – a losing; opportunity or chance of losing
 
• LOSE THE FANG
vb. 1825 Sc. – to miss one’s aim; to fail in an attempt  
 
• LOSE THE HOG FOR A HALFPENNYWORTH OF TAR
vb. 1670 – to lose an object, spoil an enterprise or court failure by trying to save in a small matter of detail  
 
• LOSE THE LAGGIN-GIRD
vb. c1850 Sc. – to have an attack of diarrhoea or dysentery 
 
• LOSE THE MATCH AND POCKET THE STAKE(S)
vb. 19C sl. – of women only: to coit
 
• LOSE THE NUMBER OF ONE’S MESS
vb. 20C sl. – to die; to be killed
 
• LOSE THE RUN OF ONESELF
vb. 20C Anglo-Irish sl. – to lose one’s self-control; to run amok 
 
• LOSE THE SHEEP FOR A HALFPENNYWORTH OF TAR
vb. 1678 – to lose an object, spoil an enterprise or court failure by trying to save in a small matter of detail  
 
• LOSE THE SHIP FOR A HALFPENNYWORTH OF TAR
vb. 1869 – to lose an object, spoil an enterprise or court failure by trying to save in a small matter of detail  
 
• LOSE THE USE OF SHANK’S MARE
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – to lose the use of one’s legs  
 
• LOSE TIME
vb. 1967 Amer. dial. – to waste time; to fool a round  
 
• LOSE YOUR RAG
vb. 1959 UK sl. – to lose your temper  
 
• LOSH
int. a1779 Sc. – an exclamation of astonishment, wonder, or surprise  
n. 1. 1591 obs. – an elk
n. 2. 1884 – a name in Canada and Alaska for the burbot
vb. 1629 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to make the lapping sound caused by a running stream flowing over stones, etc.; to splash in water; of water in a barrel or boat: to roll to and fro  
 
• LOSSAGE
n. 1986 Amer. dial. – waste  
 
• LOSS-LEADER
n. 20C Can. sl. – something displayed prominently, and at cut-price rate, to encourage further buying of other stock
 
• LOSSYME!
int. 1914 Amer. dial. – used to express surprise, annoyance, or dismay  
 
• LOST BREAD
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – French toast  
 
• LOST HEART BEAT
n. Bk1942 Amer. college sl. – an attractive girl  

• LOSTHOPE
n. c1550 obs. – an abandoned person
 
• LOST LADY
n. 20C US colloq. – a prostitute  

• LOSTLING
n. 1872 – a lost person or thing
 
• LOST THE KEY
phr. 20C US sl. – uttered upon smelling a fecal odour or intestinal gas  

• LOTE
vb. 1. a1200 obs. – to lie concealed; to lurk
vb. 2. a1325 obs. – to fail to support or help; to forsake
vb. 3. 1547 obs. – to wash, to cleanse, to purify
 
• LOTEBY
n. 1303 obs. – a companion of love; a lover, a paramour; a bedfellow, a concubine  

• LOTHARIO
n. 1748 – a man who habitually seduces women, or is sexually promiscuous; a libertine, a philanderer

• LOTHEN
adj. c1440 obs. – hairy, shaggy
 
• LOTION
n. 1876 sl. – a drink, rarely of aught but liquor, and esp. of gin
 
• LOT LIZARD
n. 1987 US trucking sl. – a prostitute who works at truck stops  
 
• LOTMAN
n. ? L18 nautical sl. – a pirate
 
• A LOT OF HURRAH
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – nonsense  
 
• LOT ON
vb. 1829 Amer. dial. – to count on, to intend to; to look forward to  

• LOTOPHAGIST
n. 1839 rare – a person who leads a life of idle contentment or luxury

• LOTOPHAGOUS
adj. 1855 – idle, indolent, dreamy
 
• LOT’S WIFE
n. L19 nautical sl. – salt
 
• A LOTTA APPLESAUCE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. –  nonsense  
 
• A LOTTA BULL
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – nonsense
 
• A LOTTA HOOEY
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – nonsense
 
• A LOTTA HORSE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – nonsense

• LOTTEREL
n. a1450 obs. – a term of contempt for a rogue, a scoundrel
 
• LOTTIES
n. L19 sl. – female breasts
 
• LOTTIES AND TOTTIES
n. B1885, chiefly theatrical usage – harlots

• LOTUS-EATER
n. 1847 – a person who leads a life of idle contentment or luxury, untroubled by the working world, or by practical concerns; an idle or indolent person, esp. one who passes time pleasantly doing nothing productive
 
• LOTUSLAND
n. 1980 Amer. sl. –  Los Angeles, California  
 
• LOU
n. L19 sl. – the lavatory  

• LOUCHE
adj. 1819 – dubious, shifty, disreputable
 
• LOUD
adj. 1. 1641 sl., now chiefly US – smelly  
adj. 2. 1847 colloq. – of dress or manners: showy  
 
• LOUDMOUTH
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – boasting  
n. 2. c1944 colloq. – one who speaks loudly, excessively, and either boastfully or bullying or very indiscreetly
 
• LOUD-MOUTHED
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – talkative  
 
• LOUD ONE
n. 1. c1670 colloq. – a big lie
n. 2. World War I army sl. – a misfortune
n. 3. World War I army sl. – a severe wound
 
• LOUD PEDAL
n. c1940 Aust. sl. – the accelerator
 
• LOUDSPEAKER
n. 1934 US sl. – a braggart or loudmouth; an important person or one who regards himself as important  
 
• LOUD-TALK
vb. 1930 Amer. dial. – to bully, impress, or convince someone by using assertive speech or double-talk; to argue in coarse strident tones  

• LOUGHT
adj. a1641 obs. – loath, averse, disinclined, reluctant, unwilling
 
• LOUIE
n. 1. 1916 N. Amer. sl. – a lieutenant
n. 2. 1970s US sl. – a lump of expectorated phlegm  
n. 3. 1970s US sl. – a piece of nasal mucus
 
• LOUIS
n. 1935 sl., orig. US – a harlot’s bully
 
• LOUK
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – an outside cellar door

• LOUKE
n. c1386 obs. – a boon companion

• LOULOU
n. 1894 nickname – a Pomeranian dog
 
• LOUNCE
n. 1. M19 nautical sl. – a drink  
n. 2. 20C Royal Navy colloq. – a ration of food
 
• LOUNCE OUT
vb. 1934 Amer. dial. – to dole out  
 
• LOUNDER
n. 1. 1723 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a heavy blow, a severe stroke, a beating  
n. 2. B1900 Sc. – the act of showing energy at work  
n. 3. B1900 Eng. dial. – a thick slice; a large piece  
vb. 1. 1793 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to beat severely with heavy strokes; to thrash, thump, cuff, cudgel  
vb. 2. 1893 Eng. dial. – to lounge; to walk about idly or awkwardly; to flounder, run, scamper  
vb. 3. B1900 Sc. – to do anything with energy and speed or vehemence  
vb. 4. B1900 Sc. – to scold

• LOUNDERER
n. c1425 obs. – a skulker
 
• LOUNGE LIZARD
n. 1918 sl., derogatory – a man who frequents fashionable parties, bars, etc., in search of a wealthy patroness  

• LOUP-THE-DIKE
adj. 1823 Sc. – giddy, flighty
 
• LOUP THE DYKIE
vb. Bk1900 Sc. – to die  
 
• LOUR;  LOURE
n. Bk1903 sl. – money

• LOURD
adj. 1390 obs. – sluggish, dull, stupid
n. 1579 obs. – a lout, a sluggish, stupid fellow

• LOURDERIE
n. 1555 obs. – stupidity

• LOURDISH
adj. 1600 obs. – sluggish, dull, stupid

• LOURDY
adj. 1721 obs. – sluggish, dull, stupid
 
• LOURING
adj. 1774 US – cloudy; gloomy

• LOURY
adj. 1686 – of the sky: dull, gloomy, threatening
 
• LOUSE
n. 1633 sl. – an unpleasant or despicable person, usually male; one who is thoroughly disliked  
vb. 1966 Amer. dial. – to waste time; to loaf, loiter, or idle about  
 
• LOUSE AROUND
vb. 1. 1917 Amer. dial. – to play the parasite  
vb. 2. c1920 Amer. dial. – to waste time; to loaf, loiter, or idle about 
 
• LOUSE-BAG
n. 20C Brit. sl. – a term of contempt for a disliked male  
 
• LOUSE-CAGE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a bedroom  
 
• LOUSE-LADDER
n. Bk1902 Eng. dial. – the hole or gap made by a dropped stitch having run down in knitting  
 
• LOUSY
adj. 1. c1386 – bad, poor, contemptible
adj. 2. 1933 Amer. dial. – ill, unwell, tired, depressed  
adj. 3. 1944 Amer. dial. – of the weather: unpleasant, threatening  
adj. 4. 1965 Amer. dial. – used as a derogatory intensive  
adv. 1932 Amer. dial. – very, extremely  
 
• LOUSY ANNA
n. 1927 Amer. dial. – Louisiana  
 
• LOUSY AS A BANDICOOT
adj. Bk1999 Aust. sl. – rotten, mean, wretched
 
• LOUSY DRUNK
adj. 1932 Amer. dial. – very drunk  
 
• LOUSY-RICH
adj. 1942 Amer. sl. – very rich, wealthy  
 
• LOUSY WITH MONEY
adj. 1843 Amer. dial. – rich  

• LOVAGE
n. 1489 obs. – praise, honour

• LOVANENTY!
int. 1824 Sc. – an exclamation of surprise
 
• LOVE
n. 1. 16C euphemism – sex, copulation  
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a loved one; a sweetheart
vb. 16C euphemism – to copulate with  
 
• LOVE-APPLES
n. 19C Brit. sl. – the testicles  
 
• LOVE-BEGOTTEN CHILD
n. 19C euphemism – an illegitimate child  
 
• LOVE BITE
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a hickey  
 
• LOVE-BLINK
n. 1508 Sc. – a glance of love  
 
• LOVE BONE
n. 1. c1960 Amer. dial., African-American usage – a wishbone 
n. 2. 1962 US jocular usage – the penis, esp. when erect
 
• LOVE BOX
n. 1. 1865 US jocular usage – the heart
n. 2. 1879 Amer. dial. – an affectionate blow or caress  
n. 3. 1986 US jocular usage – the vagina or vulva
 
• LOVE-BRAT
n. 19C Brit. sl. – an illegitimate child  
 
• LOVE BUBBLES
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a woman’s breasts  
 
• LOVEBUG
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a woman who is very fond of men .
 
• LOVE BUMP
n. 1954 Amer. dial. – a pimple  
 
• LOVE BUMPS
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a woman’s breasts  
 
• LOVE CHILD
n. 1805 – an illegitimate child  
 
• LOVE-CLAP
vb. 1828 Sc. – to embrace fondly  

• LOVE-DRURY
n. 1. c1300 obs. – love; courtship
n. 2. c1400 obs. – a love token or keepsake
 
• LOVEE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a loved one; a sweetheart
 
• LOVE ‘EM AND LEAVE ‘EM
n. 1. L19 sl. – philandering, womanizing  
n. 2. L19 sl. – a philanderer; a womanizer
 
• LOVE ENVELOPE
n. 1970s US homosexual sl. – a condom
 
• LOVE FACTORY
n. 1983 US sl. – a brothel  
 
• LOVEFEST
n. 1995 US sl. – a close, happy relationship  
 
• LOVE FLESH
n. 19C sl. – the vagina

• LOVEFUL
adj. 1. c1225 – full of love
adj. 2. c1225 obs. – lovable; deserving of love
 
• LOVE GLOVE
n. 1. 1980s US sl. – a vagina  
n. 2. 1987 US sl. – a condom  
 
• LOVE GRENADES
n. 2000s sl. – the testicles
 
• LOVE GUN
n. 1970s US sl. – the penis  
 
• LOVE HANDLES
n. 1960s sl. – the excess flesh around a portly stomach that may be seen in a kinder light by those who appreciate the Rubenesque figure
 
• LOVE HEART
n. 1996 UK sl. – a tablet of MDMA, possibly mixed with methaqualone, best known as Quaaludes™  
 
• LOVE-HOLE
n. 1. 1926 Amer. dial. – a gully or ditch across the road
n. 2. 1980s US sl. – the vagina  
 
• LOVE-IN
n. 1. 1967 sl., orig. US – a group gathering to express mutually loving feelings  
n. 2. 1960s sl, orig. US – an orgy  
n. 3. 1960s sl, orig. US – positive, optimistic relations
 
• LOVE IN A PUNT
n. 1973 UK sl. – very weak beer  
 
• LOVE INTEREST
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a loved one; a sweetheart  
 
• LOVE IT!
int. 2001 UK – expressing definite approval  
 
• LOVE-JOY
n. 1876 Eng. dial. – a dearly loved person  
 
• LOVE JUICE
n. 1. 1593 – an aphrodisiac; a juice supposed to have the effect of a love potion
n. 2. 1882 UK sl. – semen; vaginal secretions  

• LOVEKIN
n. 1896 rare – a lover, a sweetheart; an affectionate form of address

• LOVEKINS
n. 1920 – a lover, a sweetheart; an affectionate form of address

• LOVE-LACE
n. 1. c1330 obs. – the snare or tyranny of love
n. 2. 1773 – (as ‘Lovelace’) a seducer; a libertine
 
• LOVE LANE
n. M19 sl. – the vagina  

• LOVE-LAY
n. c1450 chiefly poetic usage – a love song
 
• LOVE LETTER
n. 1. 1940s African-American sl. – a stone or rock thrown at someone  
n. 2. 1940s African-American sl. – a bullet
 
• LOVE-LICK
n. 1953 Amer. dial. – an affectionate blow or caress  
 
• LOVELIES
n. 1970s US drug culture sl. – marijuana laced with phencyclidine  

• LOVELIFY
vb. 1897 – to make lovely; to beautify

• LOVELIHEAD
n. a1637 obs. – loveliness

• LOVELING
n. 1606 – a dear or lovely creature; a darling; a term of endearment; also, a young lover
 
• LOVE LIPS
n. 1990s sl. – the vaginal labia  

• LOVELORN
adj. 1637 – unhappy as a result of unrequited love or the loss of a lover; pining from love
 
• LOVELY
n. 1970s US drug culture sl. – marijuana laced with phencyclidine  
 
• LOVELY BIT OF A BOY
phr. World War II Brit. servicewomen’s usage – said in approval of a man  
 
• LOVELY GRUB!
int. 1939 Brit., orig. services’ usage – very nice indeed!  
 
• LOVELY HIGH
n. 1970s US drug culture sl. – marijuana laced with phencyclidine  

• LOVELY JUBBLY
adj. 1992 Brit. colloq. – excellent, fantastic
int. 1989 Brit. – an exclamation of delight or affirmation; excellent, jolly good
n. 1990 Brit. sl. – money
 
• LOVELY MONEY
n. c1931 Brit. sl. – good money; esp. plenty of money 
 
• LOVE MARK
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a hickey  
 
• LOVE MUSCLE
n. 1958 Amer. jocular usage – the penis

• LOVEND
n. a1000 obs. – a person who loves; a lover; a friend
 
• LOVENESS
n. a1250 obs. rare – love; lovingness
 
• LOVE-NETTLED
adj. 1586 obs. – deeply in love 
 
• LOVE-PAIN
n. 1899 Amer. dial. – toothache 
 
• LOVE-PAT
n. 1951 Amer. dial. – an affectionate blow or caress 
 
• LOVE PIRATE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl.- a philanderer 
 
• LOVE POINTS
n. 1966 Amer. dial.- a woman’s breasts 
 
• LOVER
n. 1. c1225 obs. – a person who praises someone or something; a eulogist
n. 1. a1275 rare – a person who feels fondness or regard towards another; a friend, a well-wisher
n. 2. 1904 US sl. – a man who manages a prostitute or prostitutes; a pimp
 
• LOVER BOY
n. 1. 1925 sl., orig. US – a male lover, esp. a young male lover; an attractive man, a ladykiller
n. 2. 1952 sl., orig. US – a sexual partner
n. 3. 1952 sl., orig. US – a woman-chaser
 
• LOVERED
adj. 1. 1340 rare – loving; friendly
adj. 2. 1609 rare – provided with or having a lover
n. 1. a1000 obs. – the emotion or feeling of love; affection, friendship, good will, kindness
n. 2. 1487 Sc. – sexual desire; lust
 
• LOVERLY
adj. 1. 1568 –  like a lover; characteristic of a lover
adj. 2. 1907 – lovely, delightful, pleasing 
adv. a1513 – in the manner of a lover
 
• LOVER MAN
n. 1. a1905 sl., orig. US – a male lover; an attractive man, a ladykiller
n. 2. 1952 sl., orig. US – a sexual partner
n. 3. 1952 sl., orig. US – a woman-chaser
 
LOVER’S HEAVEN
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – the upper balcony in a theatre 
 
LOVERS’ LAIR
n. c1560 Sc. obs. – the religion or faith of lovers
 
LOVER’S NUTS
n. 1954 US sl. – testicular discomfort attributed to prolonged sexual arousal without ejaculation
 
LOVER’S SPEED
n. 1980s drug culture sl. – MDMA (ecstasy)
 
LOVERTINE
adj. 1603 obs. – addicted to being a lover
 
LOVER UNDER THE LAP
n. 20C Aust. sl. – a lesbian 
 
LOVE RUNGS
n. 1960s sl. – the excess flesh around a portly stomach that may be seen in a kinder light by those who appreciate the Rubenesque figure
 
LOVER WOLF
n. 1976 Amer. dial. – the gray wolf 
 
LOVESHIP
n. c1500 – fondness, liking; loving behaviour; courtship; also, the state of being in love or being a lover 
 
LOVESOME
adj. 1. a1000 – worthy of love; lovable
adj. 2. a1000 rare, chiefly Irish – friendly, affectionate
adj. 3. c1175 – inspiring love on account of beauty; lovely, beautiful
adj. 4. 1575 rare – amorous
n. a1350 obs. – a lovely or beautiful person
 
LOVESOMELY
adv. a1000 rare – lovingly, affectionately; kindly
 
LOVE-SPOKEN
adj. 1880 Sc. – bewitched, under a spell
 
LOVE STUFF
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – love 
 
LOVE-TAP
n. 1889 Amer. dial. – an affectionate blow or caress 
 
LOVE-TOOTH
n. 1580 obs. – an inclination for love 
 
LOVE-UP
n. 1953 sl. – an act of caressing, hugging, etc.; a cuddle or similar display of affection
 
LOVEWARD
adv. 1600 rare – towards love; in the direction of love
 
LOVEWARDS
adv. 1875 rare – towards love; in the direction of love
 
LOVE WEED
n. 1938 Amer. drug culture sl – marijuana 
 
LOVEWENDE
adj. a1000 obs. – lovable, beloved; loving, affectionate; lovely
 
LOVE-WORTH
adj. c1225 obs. – worthy of being loved
n. 1611 obs. rare – worthiness of love
 
LOVEY
adj. 1920 – loving, affectionate; sentimentally romantic; amorous
n. 1. 1684 – a loved one; a sweetheart. a darling
n. 2. 1969 US – an object (as a blanket or soft toy) of which a child is particularly fond and which gives reassurance by its familiarity
 
LOVEY-DOVEY
adj. 1879 – very affectionate or loving, esp. excessively so; overly sentimental
n. 1. 1781 – a loved one; a sweetheart .
n. 2. 1946 rare – love; loving or amorous behaviour
 
LOVING
 adj. a1642 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – of earth, mud, etc.: clinging, adhesive
n. a1000 obs. – praise, acclaim, glorification
 
LOVING AS INKLE-WEAVERS
adj. 1822 Sc. – very friendly or intimate together
 
LOVING CUP
n. 1584 obs. – a love potion; a love drink; a cup containing this
 
LOVINGEST
adj. 20C colloq.- extremely loving and affectionate
 
LOVINGLY
adj. 1493 obs. rare – of a loving disposition
 
LOVING PAPER
n. 1930 Amer. dial. – a marriage certificate, or license 
 
LOVING SPOONFUL
n. 1960 African-American sl. –  intoxicating liquor ‘
 
• LOVENESS
n. a1250 obs. rare – love; lovingness
 
• LOVE-NETTLED
adj. 1586 obs. – deeply in love 
 
• LOVE-PAIN
n. 1899 Amer. dial. – toothache 
 
• LOVE-PAT
n. 1951 Amer. dial. – an affectionate blow or caress 
 
• LOVE PIRATE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl.- a philanderer 
 
• LOVE POINTS
n. 1966 Amer. dial.- a woman’s breasts 
 
• LOVER
n. 1. c1225 obs. – a person who praises someone or something; a eulogist
n. 1. a1275 rare – a person who feels fondness or regard towards another; a friend, a well-wisher
n. 2. 1904 US sl. – a man who manages a prostitute or prostitutes; a pimp
 
• LOVER BOY
n. 1. 1925 sl., orig. US – a male lover, esp. a young male lover; an attractive man, a ladykiller
n. 2. 1952 sl., orig. US – a sexual partner
n. 3. 1952 sl., orig. US – a woman-chaser
 
• LOVERED
adj. 1. 1340 rare – loving; friendly
adj. 2. 1609 rare – provided with or having a lover
n. 1. a1000 obs. – the emotion or feeling of love; affection, friendship, good will, kindness
n. 2. 1487 Sc. – sexual desire; lust
 
• LOVERLY
adj. 1. 1568 –  like a lover; characteristic of a lover
adj. 2. 1907 – lovely, delightful, pleasing 
adv. a1513 – in the manner of a lover
 
• LOVER MAN
n. 1. a1905 sl., orig. US – a male lover; an attractive man, a ladykiller
n. 2. 1952 sl., orig. US – a sexual partner
n. 3. 1952 sl., orig. US – a woman-chaser
 
LOVER’S HEAVEN
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – the upper balcony in a theatre 
 
LOVERS’ LAIR
n. c1560 Sc. obs. – the religion or faith of lovers
 
LOVER’S NUTS
n. 1954 US sl. – testicular discomfort attributed to prolonged sexual arousal without ejaculation
 
LOVER’S SPEED
n. 1980s drug culture sl. – MDMA (ecstasy)
 
LOVERTINE
adj. 1603 obs. – addicted to being a lover
 
LOVER UNDER THE LAP
n. 20C Aust. sl. – a lesbian 
 
LOVE RUNGS
n. 1960s sl. – the excess flesh around a portly stomach that may be seen in a kinder light by those who appreciate the Rubenesque figure
 
LOVER WOLF
n. 1976 Amer. dial. – the gray wolf 
 
LOVESHIP
n. c1500 – fondness, liking; loving behaviour; courtship; also, the state of being in love or being a lover 
 
LOVESOME
adj. 1. a1000 – worthy of love; lovable
adj. 2. a1000 rare, chiefly Irish – friendly, affectionate
adj. 3. c1175 – inspiring love on account of beauty; lovely, beautiful
adj. 4. 1575 rare – amorous
n. a1350 obs. – a lovely or beautiful person
 
LOVESOMELY
adv. a1000 rare – lovingly, affectionately; kindly
 
LOVE-SPOKEN
adj. 1880 Sc. – bewitched, under a spell
 
LOVE STUFF
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – love 
 
LOVE-TAP
n. 1889 Amer. dial. – an affectionate blow or caress 
 
LOVE-TOOTH
n. 1580 obs. – an inclination for love 
 
LOVE-UP
n. 1953 sl. – an act of caressing, hugging, etc.; a cuddle or similar display of affection
 
LOVEWARD
adv. 1600 rare – towards love; in the direction of love
 
LOVEWARDS
adv. 1875 rare – towards love; in the direction of love
 
LOVE WEED
n. 1938 Amer. drug culture sl – marijuana 
 
LOVEWENDE
adj. a1000 obs. – lovable, beloved; loving, affectionate; lovely
 
LOVE-WORTH
adj. c1225 obs. – worthy of being loved
n. 1611 obs. rare – worthiness of love
 
LOVEY
adj. 1920 – loving, affectionate; sentimentally romantic; amorous
n. 1. 1684 – a loved one; a sweetheart. a darling
n. 2. 1969 US – an object (as a blanket or soft toy) of which a child is particularly fond and which gives reassurance by its familiarity
 
LOVEY-DOVEY
adj. 1879 – very affectionate or loving, esp. excessively so; overly sentimental
n. 1. 1781 – a loved one; a sweetheart .
n. 2. 1946 rare – love; loving or amorous behaviour
 
LOVING
 adj. a1642 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – of earth, mud, etc.: clinging, adhesive
n. a1000 obs. – praise, acclaim, glorification
 
LOVING AS INKLE-WEAVERS
adj. 1822 Sc. – very friendly or intimate together
 
LOVING CUP
n. 1584 obs. – a love potion; a love drink; a cup containing this
 
LOVINGEST
adj. 20C colloq.- extremely loving and affectionate
 
LOVINGLY
adj. 1493 obs. rare – of a loving disposition
 
LOVING PAPER
n. 1930 Amer. dial. – a marriage certificate, or license 
 
LOVING SPOONFUL
n. 1960 African-American sl. –  intoxicating liquor 


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Updated: September 15, 2022